* Posts by LDS

1833 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

'Just follow the damn Constitution!' FBI, DoJ skewered over demands for crypto backdoors

LDS
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TSA locks, anyone?

Since when to travel to USA you are forced to ensure your luggage carries a standard backdoor - of course just to be used by TSA personnel for security reasons - your luggage can be easily opened by anyone, and if you really store anything valuable in it, you're really very naïve or an idiot. I would like to know how many terrorists have been arrested or deterred by TSA locks, and how many goods were even more easily stolen because of them. And often, by TSA personnel itself.

Is FBI going to ask a backdoor in every safe and door, because inside it or behind it there could be an evidence, or a crime is being committed?

Sure, just like technology can help investigations - think DNA - it could also make them more difficult, especially if law enforcement agencies chase the 'easy way' and don't get prepared for the difficult one.

Or they believe they could also enforce US backdoors in foreign devices? Or once the backdoor exists, refuse to give the key to some countries were it takes very little to be declared an enemy of the state and searched? What if some mobe, even of foreign citizens, is inspected in countries where, for example, homosexuality, or even carrying some books is a crime?

I may understand FBI fears of being unable to gather evidence. But tha is a risk that always existed in a democracy. Better they stop asking for a dangerous, unlawful easy way, and invest in training to better investigation techniques.

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ZuckerBorg assimilates Microsoft boffins into potentially world-threatening FART

LDS
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Thought Zuckerberg should have been happy...

... of having made so much money just on Natural Stupidity.

But probably now he needs machines to herd his sheep and extract even more money.

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Ubuntu to shutter year-old clock unlock bug

LDS
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Re: Insider risk not appreicated by interviewee

Especially since a remote attacker can find other ways to get his code run as an unprivileged user on a target machine, and then all he needs is exactly a privilege escalation vuln. Many attacks are carefully built using several holes at once, moving sideway, etc. not just looking for a single, high risk one on the target machine.

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SHA-1 crypto hash retirement fraught with problems

LDS
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Joke

Re: As always, Firefox

Yes, we all know that Firefox SHA-1 is far more secure than Windows one...

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REVEALED: The 19 firms whose complaints form EU's antitrust case against Google

LDS
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Re: A question

It wasn't web browsing - it was "web" rendering. Actually, the IE rendering engine is used in several part of the Windows GUI. Thereby, could an OS have its default HTML rendering engine and HTTP protocol support or not? Could a web browser use that engine or not?

But the real problem was not really IE preinstalled - although giving it away for free killed many competitors, but, again, free email services and web mails didn't kill many competitors as well?

It was how MS was using it to twist the standards to drive them to its own direction and advantage (not different from what Google is doing now, see HTTP/2). Just like it attempted to twist Java - and lost there too.

Same for APIs, Office was then able to modify the OS and add new features that could kept hidden for a while, giving MS an unfair advantage (but in iOS there are several APIs only Apple apps can call, but that's OK, it's "for security"...). But believe me, WordPerfect developers had far bigger issues in Windows programming than "hidden" APIs. For example, it looked they never tested on NT4 (I was using it...).

In fact believe the biggest outcome of the EU rule was not the "browser choice" - it was the publishing of "all" interoperability specs. Just, because it's something that matters moslty to developers only, it never made the headlines.

OS/2 was another very bad managed project - did IBM really believed it could rely on its ability to run Win 3.1 applications for ever?? It bought Lotus, and instead of delivering SmartSuite for OS/2 quickly, spent time in releasing the Windows 3.1 version first, riddled with bugs. Given how slow IBM moved, and how big was an OS/2 service pack (and not everybody had Internet then, it came in a pack of several floppies you had to order explicitly - yes, I used OS/2 3.0 from 1994 to 1997, I'm not a MS fan...), it was far too easy to break it with a minimal change. But OS/2 should have relied on its own software. not Win3.x one.

With Google the issue is not if paid for ads are displayed more explicitly - it's if knowingly removed/blacklisted links of competiting services (or put them far below from they would have appeared without manipulation), if it ripped other site contents (what, if it happened to your very own one?). It's like net neutrality: do you agree that telcos could give precedence to traffic for which someone is ready to pay more, at expenses of yours? Or the kind of services telcos provide (and all of them are private business) should not allow for it?

I would just image what would happen if MS decided to blacklist Chrome on Windows systems...

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LDS
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Re: @LDS - A question

False. A lot of PC don't (and didn't) come with Windows pre-installed - only the low-end consumer ones. And nobody forced to use it, you had to actively use Windows. Windows was there because people wanted Windows.

*Nobody* ever forced them to use Windows. There was AppleOS/OSX, there was OS/2, there was Solaris, *BSD, *nix. People consciounsly decided to buy - and wanted - a Windows PC. Stop pretending people didn't want to use Windows, it was just the 1.46% of them that didnt't want Windows just because of hating MS (just to get a pirated copy "just in case....").

Nobody ever forced you to click the IE icon - you can ignore it as much as you liked. Yo had to actively click the IE icon. MS never forbade you to install another browser. And today a lot of pre-installed PC comes with Google pre-configured as the search engine, with Google bar or Chrome installed.

Moreover, even if you don't use Google services actively, still you can be used by them. Google Analytics tracks people data without their active consent (unless you use special software to block it). Mail transiting through GMail accounts are still analyzed, etc. etc.

But that again, that matters little.

It's when *in any way* you achieve a dominant position that puts you in the place to abuse it and cripple competition (and you do), that antitrust laws come into effect. It doesn't really matter how you achieve it, it's how you use it. Again, learn why antitrust laws exist, and how they are designed and why. But it looks Google is very good at brainwash people, the word "free" helps a lot, it looks..

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LDS
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Re: A question

For the same reason MS could not deploy and prominently place and display its browser and media player in its own OS product.

Why other complained and forced MS to offer competition products offering them in a neutral way?

You should really learn how antitrust rules are designed and work.

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Cash register maker used same password – 166816 – non-stop since 1990

LDS
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Re: That caption for the second image

Isn't it from a South Park episode?

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Fukushima nuke plant owner told to upgrade from Windows XP

LDS
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Re: Here's hoping

No thanks, we don't need another distro, "Linuxzilla"... due to the radiations while installing...

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GoDaddy buys 200,000 domains for $28.1m – that's $140 a piece

LDS
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Limiting the number of domains an entity can own - 200,000 aren't a bit too many? Forcing to release those you don't use and are just parked? For example in many airports airlines can't keep forever slots they don't use just to avoid competitors get and really use them. There is no an unlimited number of useful domains, so some rules about their proper use should apply. See also the RSA2015 speech about how cybercrooks exploit the easy availability of domains.

If somebody would like to act, he or she could, but because advertising agencies and the like are often very useful to politicians as well when time comes to mass-spam the "electors", it's better to have a friendly approach to them....

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Google guru: Android doesn't have malware, it has Potentially Harmful Applications™ instead

LDS
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"around the word malware that internally we don't use that word"

"Because nobody understands if we are talking about our own Google software, or someone else..."

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It's official: David Brents are the weakest link in phishing attacks

LDS
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Oh well, the current Vodafone CEO PC was compromised years ago when it was working as a CEO for a different company through a phishing email sent as coming from the company IT tech support...

But I too believe it is true a lot of this skew depends on who and how open emails - most executive mails are filtered by an assistant, and probably they read more mail on mobile devices today than on theirs PCs.

But years ago, while working for another company, the Kournikova virus spread thanks two people: an executive, and a developer...

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Yay, we're all European (Irish) now on Twitter (except Americans)

LDS
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Re: It's not quite as easy as they pretend..

"Now, stepping back a bit - Twitter? Wasn't all that data public anyway?"

The problem may be "forensic evidence". Only the entity storing the content and being able to tie it, beyond any reasonable doubt, to someone, can deliver that kind of evidence.

What has been shown on someone else monitor may not stand as an evidence, it may be have been tampered with...

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LDS
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Re: You're damned either way

" read somewhere that international treaties are only binding on the Federal govt & not on individual states."

AFAIK individual states in the US can't act towards (or against) foreign states, foreign affairs are a Federal matter. That's why I believe that judge is trying to pretend those data are under US jurisdiction - his (or her?) jurisdiction, so he/she can bypass the federal government, the FBI, treaties, etc. etc.

Here in Italy too, if a judge needs data from a foreign country, the request needs to go through the Ministry of Justice, which can approve and submit it, or deny it. That's because there could be also "political" or "diplomatic" reasons to deny it.

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LDS
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Re: You're damned either way @solidsquid

MS didn't disclosed the data. Let's see how it ends... the judge who is trying to ignore jurisdiction and MLATs is walking on a very thin and dangerous line...

Meanwhile, it's interesting that a Nevada court ruled that FBI can't gather evidence in a private house without a warrant just pretending to be ISP technician. But probably it's just because Las Vegas bosses (even if foreigners, like in this case) can pay better lawyers than most Europeans...

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LDS
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Re: Lee D

If US spooks collaborate with Irish spooks, and they have a warrant, it's another story. If they don't have a warrant, but it's an intelligence agencies cooperative operation for some reason, it's still another story (but spooks may end in trouble, ask those who operated a "rendition" in Milan).

Nobody is saying the Irish-stored data will be completely safe, just it means they're not under the whimsical decision of some US judge with little knowledge of international laws and bilateral agreement, and like ancient Romans, divide the world in "Americans" and "Barbarians" to whom the Empire laws don't apply.

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LDS
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Re: @LDS

"since they would still have to make data available to its US parent for the system as a whole to work "

Not true at all.

"The data centre might be in the EU, but it still has to play nice with those that aren't."

So what? The fact that an EU data centre is connected to an US one doesn't mean US has jurisdiction over the EU stored data. Or do you mean my ISP has legal access to data stored on my PCs?

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LDS
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Re: You're damned either way

For children abuser, they can act *only* against their own citizens - because you can persecute your own citizens for crimes committed abroad - you have jurisdiction over your citizens.

They can't jail a foreigner in the US for the same reason - no jurisdiction.

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LDS
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Re: You're damned either way

Latest news: French troops are regaining control of Disneyland Paris, renaming it Parc Astérix II. The Queen of Hearts card troops were unable to stop the Légion étrangère. Prisoners have been sent to the Montecarlo Casino.

Mickey Mouse and Minni Mouse have been guillotined. Scrooge McDuck fled to Switzerland, while Donald Duck has been captured and convicted... as Foie gras...

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LDS
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Re: You're damned either way

If US starts to convict people for something outside their jurisdiction, I see bad times for US tourism... North Korea could become a better destinaton.

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LDS
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Just record the conversation and then sue the company for damages...

Also, because if you act you are legally responsible for breaking the laws, ask for a signed request of handing off the data, so you can show you're not responsible for it. 99% ot the times, the senior guy backs off.

Something alike happened to a colleague of mine when he was working for an Italian telco. The then Head of Security asked to access data protected by the privacy laws. My colleague asked for a formal request, which never came. Instead, another guy was asked, who complied. When the affair became a scandal, people were arrested, included the guy who accessed the data illegally, and he spent a couple of years in jail.

Sometimes, clearing your desk may not be the worst option you have....

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LDS
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Sorry, but that's just the opionion of an Australian lawyer - not the outcome of an EU court ruling.

Moreover, US should be aware if this is pushed too far, it could start to work the other way round... with US companies having subsidiaries outside the US being forved to disclose US data to non US entities... if I were a US judge I would be very careful to not open a Pandora box, but some US judge look to still live in some Western boomtown and fans of Charles Lynch rules...

Corporations like Twitter knows very well their business outside US could be severly hit if any US judge believe US jurisdiction extends wherever a US company has an office. They won't side with the US gov for a simple reason - foreign money are still money...

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Ex-Windows designer: Ballmer was dogmatic, Sinofsky's bonkers, and WinPho needs to change

LDS
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Re: So blameMicrsoft because it doesn't innovate...

Most people will struggle at first with any different device. Give Linux to a Windows user (and even OSX), and he or she will struggle with it in the beginning. Why smartphones took so many years to become mainstream? Because I see most people used to plain dumb phone struggle in the beginning with little computers where the "phone" feature was just one among others.

Even multitouch, so natural now, wasn't at all in the beginning. Did you ever see people trying to use a mouse the first time thirty years ago when they were becoming widespread? Did you see people using the first TV remote controls? Sure, we should still use punched cards and rotary dial televions because people were struggling in the beginning...

You're saying basically there should be no innovation because people should never change habits. Apple should have never introduced a GUI, people worked so well on character based terminals... using a GUI was difficult, in the beginning.

The real problem with Metro is it is a very good Microsoft innovation. So most people felt the urgent need to spit all over it because "hey, it's MS, we can't really praise it! Let's stick with Program Manager icon collections, they look like candies, mmmmmmh, candies!".

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LDS
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Re: @LDS - So blameMicrsoft because it doesn't innovate...

No, I really hate anybody people who need to use their phone as a digital photo holder. And little tiles are far from "nonsensical" as soon as you learn how to use it instead staring at your cat.

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LDS
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So blameMicrsoft because it doesn't innovate...

... and blame it when it innovates as well? The only mistake was to force Metro on the desktop. On a mobile UI it's the best UI designed till now. Coherent, and lets you choose what level (and how much space) you like to give to a given type of information.

The other are still stuck in a Windows 3.1 Program Manager interface - and later PalmOS start screen - mostly useless but to collect colorful icons. Also, I can't really understand those who can't live without a photo background - no, thank you, I don't want to be exposed to your ugly children, spouse/fiancé or any kind of pets.

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Drones to bring DEBT FROM ABOVE in Switzerland

LDS
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Re: I guess money-mules will start to use them to deliver...

Maybe, but Swiss bank vaults usually don't store drugs ;-)

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LDS
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I guess money-mules will start to use them to deliver...

... money on the other side of the boundary from Italy and other countries. Gold and other metals are probably too heavy now, but diamonds and other precious stones could be another payload.

Sure, it could be a risky transfer, but moving illegal money and other goods across the boundary is an old tradition, maybe it will get a new boost from new technology.

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WORLD+DOG line up to SLAM Google after anti-trust case unveiled

LDS
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Re: I don't trust Google or even use their Search these days ...

"but Google achieved it's position by simply doing things better, by being more innovative."

That can be said of most monopolies - including the MS one :-P -, very few achieve it using mafia killers and street gangs against competitors, or just selling vastly overpriced average products but using very good PR to make them "status symbol" goods.

But what is funny, is that for antitrust laws it doesn't matter how did you achieved that position (it could be still the matter of other laws, it it was achieve through illegal means). It's how you use that position that matters.

If you actively use that position to destroy any kind of competition, it's not legal.

The example is MS was fined for simply giving its browser away for free preinstalled in the OS. It didn't in any way blocked the installation of other browser, or their workings. But of course most people would have simply used the already installed browser, giving MS a huge competitive advantage.

Or how it limited interoperability keeping hidden implementation details of its protocols and document formats - that, partially, was also being forced to disclose intellectual property - but when you become so big and dominant, you may be forced to disclose them as well.

It didn't count how MS reached its dominant position - it was how it used it.

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LDS
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Re: What's the evidence of abuse?

Oh yes, the "mysterious" Microsoft tax... and it says what kind of buyer you are. Only low-end consumer PCs come with a preinstalled bundled OEM license you may have issue to get the money back. Business PC always come with the option of a bundled license or not, because most business have volume licensing and don't buy OEM licenses. No MS "tax". Or you can get an assembled PC and it never comes with a "forced" OEM license (for the matter, it may even be illegal to get one if you assemble the PC yourself...). And sure, all those using pirated Windows licenses have been forced to get them, a strange form of "MS tax", one that MS was actually paying itself.

There's always been alternatives to Microsoft, Windows and Office (Apple, OS/2, Lotus, Wordperfect, then Linux, OpenOffice), why you never used it?

IIS is as proprietary as Apache - it does run static HTML, CGI, PHP, Python, whatever you like. Sure, it also run some MS technologies, why not? You can also run Apache on Windows, if you like. Silverlight? Isn't Flash proprietary as well? And when Microsoft has ever hindered the development and installation of a competitive product?

And the Google tax? I may not use Google, but every damned site that use Google Analytics sends my data to Google without my consent (unless I use a blocker, how many do?). Every time I mail someone and directly or indirectly it ends in gmail my mail gets analyzed by Google. Site using Google as their internal search engine, again, sends data to Google - isn't this a "Google tax" you have to pay too, and even worse, often without even knowing?

But oh yes, MS is evil because it actually asked you money of its products, and most people hate to pay for software. Google just asks everybody's data thereby it's OK, it can do whatever it likes and crush competition even worse than MS ever did - also controlling contents - what people see, then do and think - not what technology people use - but you "don't get it".

And, sorry, behind most open source products countering the "MS" monopoly, there's no Google. Google supporters are pure hypocrites.

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LDS
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Re: I must be missing something

Just, the biggest SEO company is actually Google...

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Google has tested its speedy QUIC internet protocol on YOU – and the early results are in

LDS
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No, it's just someone at Google has just discovered "stateful connections"...

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LDS
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Re: Hubris

Have you ever read the amount of criticism about SPDY and its offspring? Now Google is in the position and with the weight to enforce its own protocols.

Another stupid Google protocol is WebSocket, basically TCP over HTTP, just for the need of Google to bypass firewalls to be able to access and gather more and more data.

The very difference is that protocols like the TCP/IP suite were designed to be application agnostic and serve any kind of application present and future. Google is designing protocols around its browser needs. Very, very different approaches and drivers.

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Who runs this world? Sony Pictures CEO jokes about getting UK culture minister fired

LDS
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Maybe Sony executivr should have been a little morem careful..

... about their own company, before planning broader...

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WHAT did GOOGLE do SO WRONG to get a slapping from the EU?

LDS
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"Microsoft abused things because EVEN IF you chose to use OS/2 or Lotus or whatever - you STILL had to give Microsoft money".

Where did you dream that? Patents? So, don't use Android.

What was wrong for a MS product to have a default MS browser - which you could easily change? Don't Google drives you to its own services as well?

Frankly, the fact that people like you has a unnatural hate for MS, while Google is holy, makes all this a bit scary...

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LDS
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Re: Microsoft was different

Sorry, people used MS stuff because they *wanted* to - they bought them, they *pirated* them by the sacksful, even when they had no real reason to use them - why get something illegally if you don't like it?

Some MS products was barely OK, other were excellent, while competitors like Lotus and WordPerfect actually committed suicide believing DOS would have still been used widely in the XXI century, or that Notes would have made the company rich. IBM believed with OS/2 on its PS/2 machine using the Microchannel bus it would have regained control of the PC market.

Microsoft took advantage of the position it found itself - people meaning "Microsoft" when they said "PC". Nobody was forced with a gun to buy a Windows PC - just very few choose Apple or OS/2 - I bought OS/2 in 1994 to avoid Windows, how many of you did? I bought SmartSuite 95 to avoid MS Office, how many of you - now MS haters and complainers - did? Of you all got your copy of 95 and Office, maybe without paying for it?

Google is doing exactly what MS did, just you don't complain because it's so "smart" to give away some lame free products - and most people are ready to give away their first born as soon as they see the word "free". And of course, Google is useful to find also a lot of other "freeeeee...." software and contents, MS one included. Of course, just because "you have to". Hypocrites are Google best allies.

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LDS
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She tried to find a clever answer on Google, but wasn't able to find one...

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Re: US officials haven't accepted anything

Don't you believe that the EU ruling that forced MS to publish its own protocols gave a big boost to Linux, and thereby to Android too, especially when all of them as to talk to some Microsoft system like Exchange or the like? Or Office document compatibility? Would have had Samba and other projects lagged far behind if those ruling were never enforced?

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LDS
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"How can Google be said to control billions of desktops when the people involved can all switch search engines tomorrow if they wanted to."

That was true for Microsoft Windows, Internet Explorer and Media Player as well. There were alternatives, and MS never forbid anyone to install a different browser or player - or even an office suite, there were Lotus SmartSuite and WordPerfect one, plus StarOffice which would have become OpenOffice later. You could use OS/2, if you didn't like Windows, or even some of the first releases of Linux, Solaris, and other Unixes.

The real problem was that most people had real little choice anyway, because MS effectively abused its monopoly and killed competition ensuring it was too expensive and with uncertain revenues trying to compete with it because it could give away the browser and the media player for free, while retaining a competitive advantage in applications because it did control the APIs.

Exactly what Google did now.

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SQL Server 2005 end of life is coming, run to the hills...

LDS
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Did eventually Postgres support LOBs in a decent way? It is usually a real showstopper for any database relying on them for unstructured data (and needing them fully inder transaction control). I also found hard to believe that a properly coded database application running on MS SQL 2005 will break on 2012/2014. You also need to understand what will break moving to a different engine and needs to be rewritten or even re-implemented in a different way.

Also beware when migrating from MS SQL Server to Postgres, Postgres follows very much the Oracle model, and that it means it works in some different ways from SQL Server - you may find some nasty surprises if you're not fully aware of the differences.

GPU acceleration is OK if your DB workload is CPU bound, it will help very little if it's I/O bound or memory bound.

Also, switching to Postgres from the developer viewpoint means 1) spend time to learn how the new db really works, its quirks, and its language for triggers/sp, ecc. 2) learn to use the new tools (and SQL Server has some great tools available) 3) Less integration with your development environment (probably VS) 4) Less integration with your .NET frameworks (if you're using them)

DB and system administrators needs to re-learn deployment, administration, testing, tuning, and backup techniques.

Licensese costs may not be the biggest ones... and you have always the choice of licensing per core or per CAL depending on how large is your SMB and how many users access the datatase. If you're using SQL Enterprise, you're hardly an SMB...

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Rand Paul puts Hillary Clinton's hard drive on sale

LDS
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Re: Email servers - @Peter Gathercole

"Most users at that time would probably be using their modem-attached microcomputers as termials to either their work place"

It is called "the cloud" today...

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LDS
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Where are the backup on floppies?

Single disk... where are the backup on floppies?

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It's 2015 and a RICH TEXT FILE or a HTTP request can own your Windows machine

LDS
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Please, indicate me someone who can design and write secure code and doesn't need to release patches...

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LDS
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Service packs today are delivered only to augment features or other deep changes. Everything else comes with patches - that's why WSUS is handy. There's also slipstreaming....

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Life after Nokia: Microsoft Lumia 640 budget WinPho blower

LDS
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Re: GUI madness

Yes, but haters kept on whining about the tile interface so MS will try to ruin it just to follow the mob... and will lose customers instead of gaining more.

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Unpatched 18-year-old Windows man-in-the-middle diddle revived

LDS
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Re: Who's fault is it?

Using "smb:" instead of "file:" won't change anything, simply the malicious redirector would use the former instead of the latter. SMB, just like NFS, was designed to access files on shared resources, using the file interface - while with NFS usually you mount the share somewhere, in Windows you can "mount" to a letter (there are more sophisticated ways, anyway), or simply access it with the UNC syntax - which is what makes the trick work. The issue is that once SMB is requested to access a server, it could naively present user credentials in attempt to get access - if this works depends on how the Windows system is configured, which authentication is used, and which type of password hashes it is allowed to use. And especially, unless the rogue server is in your LAN, if SMB "out" is allowed by the firewall on an unsecure network. It may be a risk on standalone machine, because AFAIK int the default Windows FW SMB out is enabled with the only scope limitation "local subnet" - but in some environments (i.e. free wi-fi), the local subnet may span several machines outside your control...

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Russian censor warns against meme 'misuse'

LDS
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Whne you're in charge of something called "Roskomnadzor"...

... you can'r really cultivate any humor. I believe it was the name of an assault tank with rotating blades to kill people around...

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NSA: 'Back doors are a bad idea, give us a FRONT door key'

LDS
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Re: Actually, they are admitting their incompetence.

Because sometimes you can read between the lines...

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Actually, they are admitting their incompetence.

If I were in charge of overseeing NSA & C. I would be very, very worried, because they are basically admitting their intel abilities are now wholly unable to find anythning but using a dragnet approach. It's pretty clear that their spies, under cover agents, agents, investigators, analysts, etc. are people without any clue and just hope to find an "enemy" by pure chance gathering any data they can and hoping for the best.

Moreover, if they start to rely and sleep happily being able to access US made devices, they will find themsevelve wholly unprepared when an opponent with the proper skill and technology will implement its own protection, and the US will have lost any skill to counter those threats - well, it's no new that the US always entered any conflict unprepared and with outdated, wrong, and often ill-designed devices and weapons. Complacency is always your worst enemy.

I would be very, very worried NSA & C. are stubbornly chasing the easiest way, it means its commanders are unable to front the new threats and are desperately seeking for some fingers to hide behind. Probably the only reasonable action would be to fire them all, and find someone who's really got a clue about the new environment...

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Struggling through the Crystal Maze in our hunt for a spare CAT5

LDS
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I may agree, but when its use was mandatory and every check in/check out took ages (and could fail in the middle) was no fun. Also, those in charge then was terrified by "concurrent" changes, so forced the pessimistic locked model - you could not work on anything someone was also working on until he or she checked it in... and of course it would have been your fault if you didn't meet deadlines!

But in some other ways it was an interesting testing rig for some bad coded DB applications that used large amount of bandwidths because of poor coding and classic "select * from <table>" even if they needed a single field of a single row...

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LDS
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Re: WiFi

No, especially WiFI needs to be really secured properly if you want to use it without opening your network do dogs+pigs... most instead of doing that simply ban WiFi.

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