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* Posts by LDS

1380 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

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Forget the $2499 5K iMac – today we reveal Apple's most expensive computer to date

LDS
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Re: Now that's just going too far

IIRC Commodore PET line was available around the same time of the Apple II - don't know how much they were sold for, but I guess they were too far cheaper than a PDP.

Kit to build your PC were available too - after all the Apple I was something alike a pre-built one. Better quality than competitors? Probably. Better ideas on how to evolve the product? Yes. But hardly the cheapest and more affordable ones.

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LDS
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Re: Now that's just going too far

Besides number, it's the product design. Model T was not among first cars, but was designed to be cheap enough to be affordable by a large number of customers. Apple products were never designed to be cheap, like ZX80/81 or some Commodore models were.

I'm sorry for Ford, but Apple looks like more a sport car maker than Ford itself...

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LDS
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Re: Now that's just going too far

Sorry, but the diffusion of Internet predates Linux and not by a small time. Linux and Apache made possible the $9.99 hosted site, but commercial services don't depend much on the "cheapness" of the OS.

Without "cheap" PCs (BTW, Apple ones never were cheap, what lead to mass adoption was the Sinclairs, Commodores, etc, then the IBM PCs), the whole open source development would have had no momentum, because it would have been limited to universities and maybe some large companies. And there would be no Internet without clients... most of which didn't run Linux (and still today, just Android clients are in a sensible number). So maybe you also have to say thank you to MS for not licensing DOS first and then Windows to a single hardware supplier - which in turn allowed the IBM "clones" market and cheaper and cheaper PCs.

"Broadband" depends on a lot of expensive hardware to run - an mostly running proprietary OSes like Cisco IOS - and really it doesn't depend on a large number of cheap servers. Also, its billing don't run on cheap LAMP server, probably it runs still on some expensive mainframe...

Sure, open source software helped Google to increase its revenues even more if it had to buy Windows or Unix licenses, or develop its own OS, but it would have offered the same services anyway, and still made a lot of money.

Android is not cheap because it is Linux, it is cheap because Google spends the money to develop it and put in your hands a Google terminal to access your data .- and you still pay for the hardware!. And as with any device, the hardware costs are fare larger than the software ones.

Is Linux important in the IT history. Sure. DId it create the Internet and the interconnected world of ttoday? No, it didn't - it is just a player among others.

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Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes

LDS
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Re: Allegedly

Windows 95 was of course version 4.0.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Microsoft_Windows_versions or http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms724832(v=vs.85).aspx.

"Year" names looksnow reserved to the server versions only.Why they did jumped 9 maybe one day will be explained fully, but there are many numbers that may be avoided in product names, it happens with 13, it happens with 14 - for example Canon in its G line jumped from 12 to 15 because 13 in "unlucky" in many western cultures, while 14 is not good in some oriental ones. Office AFAIK skipped the internal 13 version number.

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LDS
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BTW, for some discussions on Ext4:

http://www.linux-magazine.com/Online/News/Linus-Torvalds-Upset-over-Ext3-and-Ext4

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LDS
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1) So if you know it's tech previw why you complain about being instrumented? Did you ever worked on software development? Early releases are always heavily instrumented to identify issues. Or are you the kind that debug with printf() only?

2) It looks you don't understand the differences between commercial software and non commercial one. You may not like one model, but there's no law forbidding making money from selling software. And I guess you just bash Windows for being commercial, not other commercial OSes, right?

3) http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sharedsource/default.aspx - it would have been easy to find it

4) See 1....

5) Sure, only MS is wrong if it asks you an account, right? Did you complain about Apple, Google, etc in this way too? Also you missed 10 lifts this for domain accounts.

7) "Extensive research" will tell you everything and its contrary. But feel free to tell some developers (i.e. Mozilla ones..) who bumped into Ext4 issue how great Ext4 is...

8) If your "factual arguments" are like "is a total piece of shit" there's little to discuss. It's clear you have no clue about how Windows is designed, works, and is implemented (insecure? LOL!), and nothing can change your prejudices.

9) Again, extensive research on the Internet will tell you everything and its contrary. You are free to believe what you like

And you're free to read what you like. Just it's difficult to understand why you feel so compelled to comment like a troll, insult people, use a coarse language - it looks you're not pointing out real technical problems at all, it looks you need to reassure your self esteem that way. Windows users don't spend their time insulting Linux ones on their forums, probably has a lot better to do and don't feel any need to feel "superior" at all costs. Probably they don't need to compensate something...

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LDS
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Re: No no children

pirthous attacked first like a troll without reasons.

The store can already be dsabled through a group policy in Windows 8:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2826659

You can't really make valid points if your knowledge of Windows is shallow and outdated, and you just feel the need to bash it.

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LDS
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1) This a technical preview, not a production one

2) Windows Store cannot be removed but can be disabled (group policies) it if you like. Can you remove iOS store? or install software on a Chromebook outside Google control? It wasn't MS to start with stores...

3) Those in the MS source code access program can access Windows source for inspection. You just need to qualify...

4) Again, it's a technical preview for testing - noone would use it for sensitive data. If you look for a free Windows, look elsewhere.

5) Google, Apple, etc. had deliberately made difficult to operate without an account. MS is just following the trend. You need a RedHat account too, think....

6) Skype 7 for Windows is available as a preview too.

7) ZFS is a nice FS for storage servers, but it requires large amounts of memory to run. It's no the FS you would use on a client. EXT4 came with its shares of problems too (fsync(), anyone?). And your knowledge of NTFS looks very outdated - not that you know much about the others too but the acronyms.

8) Windows registry is a nice facility as long as you use it as it should be used. It's not a kitchen sink dump for application written by developers without a clue about developing good applications. It's not so easy to corrupt the registry. Stop being afraid of binary files, it's so '70s... and if you like I can find plenty of blogs telling you why Linux sucks as well.

9) Sure, blog.zorinaq.com is an authoritative source.

10) Do you believe that in any organization with more than 100 employee there's not at least one not happy?

Really, if you dislike Windows so much stop reading articles about it and feel compelled to write why you dislike it so much. Partecipate in some system v against systemd discussion, you will be happier...

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NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code

LDS
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That's why telcos and vendors should not be able to handle the update process (or remove functionalities), and it should come from the software vendor itself.

Think if HP, Dell, Lenovo, etc. could control what software updates and features you can install on your PCs... of course they would try to stop updating older machine and force you to but new ones - Apple, which controls both the HW and SW side, does something alike when new OS releases no longer support older but still valid models.

Google anyway is not interested in spending money in efforts to keep your OS updated... after all your phone is just a Google terminal to access your data. Only if Android market starts to shrink seriously under security issues Google will change something, otherwise it has no real interest.

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Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST

LDS
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Re: Too late to the party...again.

Being late is not an issue. Apple was late in the smartphone market but with the perceived right product it doesn't mean you can't conquer a large slice of any market even entering late. Google and Chrome are another example. Swatch was able to conquer its slice of the watch market - and entered it in 1983 only.

It all depends on creating a product that is good - or at least actually looks like - and people start to want for some reason.

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There are some specic wrist devices - like subs dive computers, or cardio training devices - or the like, because you need them at hand and there are not many places where you could wear them - although future practical HUD devices could make them less useful. How much a generic "smartwatch" is useful is yet to see. Especially if they have short battery life, are not waterproof, and require a smartphone to be tethered to. The above devices are self-contained.

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LDS
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Someone remembers Timex/Microsoft watches?

Microsoft did already "smartwatches" when it teamed AFAIK with Timex to transfer PDA-like data to watches. IIRC it used the screen to transmit data to a light sensor on the watch before USB and Bluetooth were available.

After all, nothing really new under the Sun. And still, there's little you can cramp into a wristwatch more useful than two hands showing time...

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iPad AIR 2 and iPad MINI 3, 5K iMac: World feels different today – and it IS

LDS
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Re: 2GB GPU to drive a 5k display?

It could be 3D rendering...

Anyway a Nikon D810 frame is 7360 x 4912, while an Hasselblad H5D-50c is 8272 x 6200 - monitor of such resolution can be useful for high-megapixel cameras, and the driving video card will be in the upper range even if their power will not be much used for 2D editing (but that memory could be used for GPU computations as well).

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LDS
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Re: Retina iMac

You. Others can. It's not a monitor for the casual user browsing and watching a movie. Imaging professional can find it very useful.

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LDS
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Re: Retina iMac

Dell monitor also rotates and you can use it portrait, it you wish so. Also, today a professional monitor is more than just the pixel count. What are both monitor color space coverage? Hardware calibration capabilities? Etc. etc.

Anyway, these are just the first wave of 4K/5K monitors, expect more coming. Anyway professional prefer a computer *outside* the monitor, for several reasons (components changing temperature can impact color rendition as well).

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Apple's new iPADS have begun the WAR that will OVERTURN the NETWORK WORLD

LDS
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Only unlicked devices should ever be allowed....

The mistake was to allow for locked devices since the beginning. No devices should have ever been tied to a service providers. Nobody ever thought about radios ot TVs being able to receive only selected channels (althought it was left happen with satellite decoders), music player able to play music only from one suppliers, washing machine that could use only one brand of detergent, and so on. It was left to happen with phones. It took an high court ruling in the USA to assert you can unlock your phone after the contract expires. The market doesn't need much regulation - just needs to forbid any kind of proprietary regulations coming from the interested companies. Devices should be free and unllocked, and interoperable among networks through standards. And nothing more.

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Done with Microsoft and Adobe patches? Good, here's Oracle's load

LDS
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Re: Its that Tuesday time of the month again.

MS could deliver binary patches but they wouldn't be cumulative, and would take much longer to install. It could be far simpler and safer to deploy the fixed files and those using them if any private interface changed. Office is a large chunk of software, it's not a surprise an update may be large as well. WSUS is available exactly to download once and easily distribute across a a LAN (and also to slave WSUS)

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It's 2014 and you can still own a Windows box using a Word file or font

LDS
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Re: Why would you PARSE FONTS in the kernel?

Why would you a shell for DHCP or SSH aithentication?

Anyway the reason is the video drivers are on the kernel too.

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LDS
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Re: Where's the daft name and funky logo?

Did you miss 'Sandworm'? Hate sometimes blinds....

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Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'

LDS
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Re: Complexity to the point of no return

And it wouldn't be usable from any language unable to call DLL functions and use pointers. Do you know why COM was designed that way?

Anyway a COM server is just an executable or DLL - just with special support for COM interfaces and instantiation.

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LDS
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Because you know if someone discovered and used heartbleed before? It doesn't leave any trace on your server unlike something that needs to be run locally.

Bash bug has been there for how long? Twenty years? Are you sure it was never exploited? Securoty researchers will tell you, crooks don't.

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LDS
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Re: Complexity to the point of no return

Exactly. The issue are some developers who believes they need a shell - and program more - just to execute some command line utilities from an application, when often there's really no need for it - you can run them without a shell and just redirect I/O.

But using system() or its equivalents is a quick and lazy way to perform that, so why not use it? It's their level of abstraction that is weak - they really don't understand what a shell is and a command line program is.

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LDS
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Not that it is difficult - just prepare the proper document for the target victim and you're pretty sure it will be opened and the user will click exactly where you like.

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LDS
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Because this diminish the graviy of those vulnerabilities? And still shouldn't open source code have been reviewed by thousand of eyes to spot those vuilnerabilities earlier? Shouldn't have open source code "more secure" because of that? Of course this is closed source, thereby no one peer reviewed it, right?

Or after all the only real way to have secure code is to design it well, code it better and test it properly - open source or not?

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LDS
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Re: Complexity to the point of no return

Do you know that OLE is COM, and COM is "Component" Object Model? In this case Excel is exactly a "component" handled through COM interfaces and hosted in the application - in a language and application agnostic way. What is a "component", after all? Something you can embed and drive from another application? What is better, a standard, common API, or a dedicated private one?

Sure, MS could have made office application interop available only to its own applications through private dedicated APIs callable from VC++ only, and all of you would have cried about the "customer lock-in", "hidden private APIs", "unfair competition", "lack of interoperability", etc. etc.

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NASTY SSL 3.0 vuln to be revealed soon – sources (Update: It's POODLE)

LDS
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Re: Thank $deity for proprietary software

If it's a flaw in SSL 3.0 design all standard implementations will be affected - proprietary or not.

If it is a bug in a given implementation of SSL (like the Heartbleed bug), then only the buggy libraries will be affected - proprietary or not.

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Internet Explorer stars in monster October Patch Tuesday

LDS
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Re: Mmm... Swiss Cheese

One major issue for any browser is they are "open" platforms to be programmed, and needs to support today a lot of very different ways of using them. Versatility doesn't usually go hand in hand with "minimizing the attack surface" - which usualy can be made shutting down features and reducing access to unknown sources.

To make a browser safe, tou need to build sounder code with more robust libraries and compilers. Look at how the October release of Chrome closed 159 security issues, 113 of which were related to bad memory usage...

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LDS
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Maybe you should give a look to:

http://googlechromereleases.blogspot.it/2014/10/stable-channel-update.html

"This update includes 159 security fixes"

https://www.mozilla.org/security/known-vulnerabilities/firefox.html

The only difference is that MS Tuesday Updates are much more publicized...

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LDS
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Yes, as the bash soap opera showed very well...

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LDS
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Just because they're not used by the OS itself... the IE HTML rendering engine is used in many OS interfaces. There are in fact patches of IE that don't require a reboot - depends on what file they update.

Moreover Linux fans still are deceived by the fact it doens't ask for a reboot, but the file aren't actually updated until applications using them are closed and restarted. What is better - a false sense of ssecurity, or a message reminding you you need to reboot?

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Microsoft confirms Surface NOT DEAD YET, next-gen version coming

LDS
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"weasel words - no body knows, they can't even guarantee it."

LOL! It was announced a few week ago and it's a technical preview. What could I write? I have no crystall ball and don't work for MS, but I guess an upgade will be available.

Anyway any Surface Pro is an Intel PC - you can install whatever you like on it. If it wasn't a device I use for my daily work I would like to try the Win 10 TP on it....

The web a platform?? The web is just a transport layer. Whatever you use still runs inside an operating system. And still, any web application is a pain in the ass to use for any moderately complex task.

Windows is much more stable than anything else around. What OS was supported for thirteen years? What OS supports applications written many years ago without any need to recompile them, if you are able and could with all dependencies still working?

What MS thinks is the next technology is usually an issue for developers, not users. You can still run VB6 or Silverlight applications even if they are not what you should use to develop today... but it is true on Linux there are no changes, everything is still as if it was the 1970 still....

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LDS
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Re: admit it... you're either never tried it, or you're just a hater

C'mon how much local store? 16GB? It's less than the CF in my camera.

Updates? A Surface can update automatically, so where's the problem? A Chromebook never gets updates? AV? It's funny how many people think they are safe just because they don't use Windows. Bash bugs and compromised Macs of these days never sound an alarm bell?

Fight with your computer? Unless you're the kind who likes to install all the crap it can find on it, especially from dodgy site, the days you have to fight with a Windows one are gone many years ago. And most Windows software is very well written and easy to use - without any compromise and a full native GUI.

Licenses? Oh well, we're back to people who are afraid to pay for software.... and prefer "free" one paid with all their data. If you're fine with sending everything to Google it's up to you, I prefer software which doesn't, even if I have to pay for it. After all, why paying for the hw is good, while paying for sw is not?

Chromebooks don't tie you to a *single* company called Google that controls everything you can run on your device? Again, people like you just look from a single perspective. MS "lock-in" is bad, Google lock-in is good.... At least on Windows I can run any software I like.

When on the road, carrying around three devices is something I hate. Having a 4" phone and a good 10" tablet which works very well as a laptop too with a keyboard, is all I need.

If a Chromebooks works well for you, good. There are people who need fairly more powerful portable devices able to run the same software they run on their desktop - because they need to perform real work everywhere they are.

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LDS
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Re: admit it... you're either never tried it, or you're just a hater

Sure, three devices are better than one... I by far prefer a cheaper smaller phone and a powerful tablet (which can also replace a notebook), than having to use three separate device. And I by far prefer an OS which let me work with the applications I need fully locally (and store data locally) and not only what Google feeds me in exchange for all my data.

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LDS
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It's "missing something" but you can't say what. And it won't stop working when Win10 is released (and could be probably upgraded to).

So funny... some people complaining because XP was EOLed after thirteen years, other complaining because Win10 will be released next year. Also it's Windows - it looks to me a stable and proven platform despite Win 8 UI issues which mostly disappear on a tablet.

It looks you're the perfect Apple user - one who feels compelled to upgrade its device every year and pay €950 euro for a phone, just to feel he has the "latest and greatest".

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LDS
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I still prefer the smaller 2 to the 3 for the way I use it. Of course the improvement in the 3 are nice, especially the stand. I'm not sure how much a 7" or 8" with limited RAM/disk Windows tablet may be useful, although one with an x86 chip WiFi and USB like the Toshiba encore port could be a good remote control for my camera - and cheaper than most dedicated ones.

If Microsoft stops the Surface, I'm not surely going to replace it with an iOS or Android device, it would look a large step back in versatility and power. And it would be funny if meanwhile Apple releases an OSX capable tablet...

What Microsoft shoudn't do is change pen technology with each model. I got a Wacom Bamboo Stylus Carbon and I love it (and it doesn't need a battery nor bluetooth), but it wouldn't work with the 3. If it really wants to start OneNote quickly, add a customizable button to the Surface itself.

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No one wants iOS 8 because it's for NERDS - dev

LDS
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Re: iOS ME ?

It looks strangely like a Windowsuesque way of getting a device health again...

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Was Nokia's Elop history's worst CEO?

LDS
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Re: Too slow

From some perspective, Microsoft understood better what a smartphone is than Apple and Google. For example the "candy icons collection" iOS and Android use as home screens are utterly useless and that design dates back to the Palm devices of many years ago.

At least MS understood the home screen needs to convey useful informations (since WinCE) to the user - and give fust access to them, and just not be a Fisher Price interface with a lot of colorful candies to collect for the joy of the average fanboy luser - which of course is happy to own a phone and show it to others, not to use it really.

Just, MS wasn't able to design a true usable UI for its devices until WP8, trying to backport too much the Windows desktop design (just to go the other way round with W8...)

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Windows 10 feedback: 'Microsoft, please do a deal with Google to use its browser'

LDS
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Re: Chrome,,,,YUK!

It's funny how many mindless users don't understand Chrome is the best spyware ever written, one that users actually install themselves. It was also turned into a spyhardware called "Chromebooks".

It's a perfect example of social enginnering. Give people something for "free" and they will blindly forget whatever you steal them in exchange. After all, weren't people accepting to give away their first born for free wifi access?

Add the powerful Google advertising machine and Google drones ready to swear Chrome is the best piece of software ever written, and you get the perfect spyware.

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LDS
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Re: Better config in general

Do Chrome or OSX let you choose what browser, etc. use on install?

This is business - you want people use your products, not someone else. And still Windows let you install much more competitors' software than most other platforms.

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So long Lotus 1-2-3: IBM ceases support after over 30 years of code

LDS
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Re: I fondly remember...

It was an ill fated choice because it was strongly tied to the US keyboard layout. In other countries it was very uncomfortable. MS had already started with 'world domination' ideas, and was looking for UIs that could work in different languages without becoming clumsy or requiring big changes.

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LDS
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Re: Back in a time where...

That happened only *after* Microsoft decided that an integrated suite with the same UI, and able to easily exchange data between applications, was a great idea.

What Lotus, Wordperfect & C. couldn't do was to adapt the OS to these needs. Microsoft introduced DDE first and then OLE exactly to make Office application integrate easily, first only data (DDE), than the whole application (OLE) - it wasn't made at the file level, but at the application level with a standard API, and it was also open to third party applications...

When Borland teamed with Wordperfect to deliver something alike, it wasn't able to reach the same kind of integration - while Lotus took too long to integrate Ami Pro and the presentation software into its product line - wasting resources in DOS releases.

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LDS
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Re: Many Notes users still spit

Notes/Domino is one of the few apps that makes you really long for a Outlook + Exchange system...

Years ago I worked for a company that was a full IBM shop (yes, we also had a Token Ring network), it was a reseller of IBM products and also had a software development division. We had Notes, but I do not know why, IT one day decided to give a try to Outlook and Exchange. My software development group was chosen as the pilot installation (probably because we were the only ones happy to get new software to play with... and nobody cared if our mail system didn't work for a while).

Well, Outlook was very well received (its UI was years ahead of Notes with its strange Egyptian UI...) - and after a while most of the company wanted "that mail application the software development group uses!". It took more time to get rid of Token Ring and switch to Ethernet, though...

I also shared the office for a while with some Notes developers.... well, most of them hoped to ditch it soon and start to develop applications with better tools on real RDBMS...

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LDS
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Re: "Prior to the personal computer, spreadsheets were the purview of mainframe systems"

Actuially, one of the limits of 1-2-3 was its very limited graphics and printing capabilities - you needed add-ons (which costed money) to get decent graphics and prints - in a time when you couldn't easily publish a file or image on a website everybody could easily access - nor easily bring a floppy disk to a meeting... (no laptops, no projectors.... I still remember devices to "print" on real slide film to show them on a screen using a slide projector...)

That was a ground which both Borland with Quattro and Microsoft with Excel attacked easily - both products offered much better integrated graphic and printing capabilities.

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LDS
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Re: @Zippy's Sausage Factory

IBM missed wholly the point that OS/2 needed software to take off. Nobody buys a desktop OS if there is no good user friendly productivity software available (look at Linux, same mistake - ironically, StarOffice . now Open/LibreOffice - was one of the few software available for OS/2). It didn't understand what made the PC take off - and it wasn't the DOS prompt or EDLIN.

Lotus could have filled that gap, but it didn't, even after it was bought by IBM.

Sure, OS/2 could run Win 3.x applications, but 95 and NT4 were coming, and it was clear everybody would have moved to the newer 32 bit applications which couldn't run on OS/2 - and nobody would have developed expensive software for an OS with a small user base. Moreover, the best Win 3.x office applications available were already the Microsoft one - it wasn't smart to make people used to MS software...

it was up to IBM to sustain the investment to bring the most useful software to OS/2, but they decided to avoid it, and rely on third parties who were hesitant and delivered little and late.

They didn't see the Outlook/Exchange combo coming also... anyway Notes alone would have never been a good reason to adopt OS/2 on the desktop as well.

OS/2 also lacked good development tools, Visual Basic and Delphi started then to offer "simple" good tools to deliver GUI apps without the difficult of C/C++ and API programming, but none was available for OS/2 - VisualAge was an ugly monster - but that's another story.

Had OS/2 a good office suite to offer, maybe history could have been somewhat different. But Lotus wasted all its efforts in the SmartSuite for Win 3.1 first, and later for 95, without being able to gain any ground in Microsoft battlefield (also, its software was buggy and with the unfriendly Notes UI), while never delivering an OS/2 SmartSuite in time.

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I spent endless hours with Lotus support trying to make WordPro work - it crashed too often. Also Lotus tried to enforce its Notes-like UI on it, and it was really ugly - and often not user firendly, i.e. toolbars could only host buttons and no other controls (i.e. combobox, etc.)

The right click property inspector was introduced by Borland in Quattro Pro for Windows - it was nice, but it just did what in Word you could soften do from the toolbar without requiring a right-click, than a tab selection, and finally the change required - three clicks instead of one. It would be OK for complex tasks, but not for simpler ones. And again, it did use Lotus own UI, and I really hate applications that don't use the OS standard UI - more so if they are also not well designed.

Anyway, since Office 2007 you have local toolbars which appear when you select something...

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LDS
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Re: Mistakes?

1) It wasn't aimed at the typical home user Just like NT was more expensive than 95.

2) It came on CD also. But you had to buy a CD ROM - which were not yet common then. The "service packs" came on floppy, though.

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Re: You missed a key competitor

It was initially named Borland "Quattro" (the Italian word for "four") , "Quattro Pro" came later - and it was the reason of the "Borland-vs-Lotus" trial, which stated that software menu arrangement couldn't be copyrighted... different times from today, when somebody tries to copyright rectangles with round corners..

It was also the first spreadsheet to use the "tabbed notebook" interface, which led to another copyright infringment cause, this time against Microsoft.

Anyway, it was what put Borland into MS aiming target, and lead to its "destruction" (among many Borland mistakes as well)

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Windows 10: One for the suits, right Microsoft? Or so one THOUGHT

LDS
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Tiles should replace icons fully - everywhere.

Microsoft should replace icons with tiles fully. I would like to have tiles which can be resized and can look like simple icons (but yet display some info) when "minimized", or display more information when set at different sizes.

Why not having a mail or messagin app tile showing you incoming messages? Why not tiles informing you about an application running tasks and status? Why not an "icon" whose info displayed can be customized?

Icons are a relic of the past, when computers struggled to display simple bitmaps fast enough. Now even the less powerful graphic cards has no issue with simple 2D graphics - it's time to make app access "icons" something more that static bitmaps...

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Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really

LDS
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Re: Here we go again..

If you properly modularize it, you can install on each system only the required modules, to keep the OS footprint and resource consuptpion low enough. That's why, for example, Linux can be adapted to run on different devices. And meawhile even embedded systems became much more powerful and with far more resources.

If you ever gave a look to XP Embedded or 7 Embedded, you would have found something alike already. You believe that "Microsoft's approach to coding" never changes - but they are not so dumb as you like to believe. After all, Windows Phone is already far less resource hungry than Android...

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What's a Chromebook good for? How about running PHOTOSHOP?

LDS
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Re: No printer and scanners support, does it support graphic tablets?

Adobe CC was not well received by many users - who prefer to have software installed without any need to be connected to be able to use it. This experiment - besides looking silly given what Photoshop users usually needs in their workflow - looks weird for how much control about data it takes away.

And believe me, the last PC I'll ever use is a Google-controlled one. Which will never be as powerful as needed exactly because Google controlling needs.

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