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* Posts by LDS

1299 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

LDS
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Re: @Def - case insensitive file systems

And how do you handle differently two file names with the same human semantic but different one for a file system in a shell or index? And how the user can understand which is the file he or she really wants, when presented with different files just only different in case?

Even OSX file system is not case sensitive unless you change its default - because even Apple knows it's better for users and most users are not programmers.

Case sensitive file system are the classic application designed by a programmer to make his job easier, and the user one more difficult. Application should be designed for human users, not computer and their programmers. If a programmer can't master cases, Unicode and other basic string management task it's time he looks for a different job, the days of 1970 Unix and ASCII7 are over.

And BTW: Windows can handle different file systems - you just need to write drivers for them. If you didn't notice, it already supports NTFS, different version of FAT, and CD/DVD file systems.

Just nobody wants the mess of different file systems Linux is....

That's explain while Linux is still stuck at 1.4% market share on desktops - very few users wants a system designed for programmers and sysadmin still rooted in in 1970.... and unable to understand what "user friendly" means.

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LDS
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Re: Case Sensitive File Systems...

"1. Most users point and click through a file explorer or some app gui"

Absolutely false. User type the file name when they create files, and they may send them around and get them back after they've been modified - if the file for some reason change case they may screw up when saving it back.

Face it, humans are not case-sensitive, only bad written applications are, because programmers are obsssed with optiomizations, don't know about collation tables, screw up with characters outside the ASCII7 set and so on.

"File systems should be as unambiguous and precise as possible."

Yes, but for their human users, not for some bad written applications that can't understand what human means. Sure, case-sensitivity is much, much easier to code, if you limit the user only to ASCII7 even more, and if you limit to just uppercase letter from ASCII7 even more. Just, it shows how bad programmer you are.

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LDS
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It's useful for many people, especially power users working with many different applications at once.

They should have enabled it years ago, never understood why they didn't. Make it optional if you don't want to confuse some users.

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LDS
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Case insensitivity is good for most user. Most people doesn't really care about the case of a file, for them FILE1, file1 and FiLe1 are the same file. Most human languages are not case sensitive (thanks to god...)

Case sensitiviy would just allow them to create different copies of the same file and lost themselves in them.

Only C programmers and their offsprings like case-sensitivity because they can't fit a true collation table in 16 bytes of memory and lookups are less efficient than a single CMP assembly instruction...

If Git can't handle case insensitive files it's just because it's the usual tool written with just one OS in mind by lazy programmers.

Raymond Chen did explain why Windows choose to block replacement of locked files: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2008.11.windowsconfidential.aspx

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LDS
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Re: Whats this?

The funny thing is that Windows can create new desktops since a long time ago (at least since Windows 2000, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms682124(v=vs.85).aspx). The Winlogon "screen" and the screensaver "screen" actually run in different desktops.

But for really unknown reason Microsoft never made available a functionality to allow multiple user desktops easily as other OS had for a very long time.

There are utilities that creates true Windows desktops (i.e. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/cc817881), while others just hide/display windows and icons pretending to display multiple desktops.

But true desktop utilities were hampered by strange limitations, as the ones indicated in the Sysinternal page, i.e., there was no API to move a window among desktops.

It took 2015 it looks to enable that functionality fully... better late than ever...

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Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen

LDS
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Re: I know where there's one you can buy

If you tell Allen I think it will take care of everything... can't see any government in East Europe say no in front of a pile of cash.

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Microsoft splurges 2½ INSTAGRAMS buying Minecraft maker Mojang

LDS
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Re: For a small fraction of 2.5 gigabucks...

From this point of view, this is a game has some similarities with Flight Simulator - which MS shutdown -, although aimed at a different public. It's a game you start but or get addicted or leave after a while. Fans will use and mod it a lot - because you have whole world to play with(in).

The difference is that FS was aimed at a more adult customer - which could also spend more, look at the still existing market for FS add-ons and their prices (often justified by their quality) - while Minecraft is aimed at a younger user which may not spend as much - MS may try the DLC road with relatively low-priced in-app purchases, but if aimed at kids it may not bring much revenues.

And rememeber, when they tried to turn Flight Simulator into "Flight", it was a spectacular failure. The most long running game franchise was turned into a new product that was shutdown six months later (while Flight Simulator still survives as Lockheed Martin Prepar3D, but at far higher price and a different license).

I wonder who will be in charge of Minecraft at MS.... the guy who destroyed Flight Simulator?

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Italy's High Court orders HP to refund punter for putting Windows on PC

LDS
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I want a Mac and iPad without OSX/iOS preinstalled... and an Android without Google software

Or the Apple and Google taxes are OK for the FSF?

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SanDisk's record-busting 512GB SD CARD will fit perfectly in your empty wallet

LDS
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There are also 128GB and 256GB models available...

... if you're not ready to spend $800 for a SD card.

It's a pity there's not yet a micro SD one available, though...

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Apple Watch will CONQUER smartwatch world – analysts

LDS
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Re: Glasses will outsell watches...

There's a big difference between glasses to watch 3D TV and an HUD.

You never wear sunglasses? Augmented reality and other info delivered through an HUD are far more useful than those presented on your wrist.

What's more useful, GPS directions in glasses, or on your wristwatch? Even while running or cycling you can get better information delivered to you without the need to look at a watch - and that's also true in many other sports, i.e. skiing, sailing, etc.

If you just need to show off, an high-end luxury watch will work better and longer... non need to replace it when the new model comes a year later.

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LDS
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Glasses will outsell watches...

I'm sure glasses will outsell watches if prices becomes comparable. There's a lot more an HUD display can do for you, compared to something on you wrist. If the Rayban-Google project works, it could be a far more interesting gadget to wear. Just the price needs to be around $300-$500, not $1500.

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It's a pain in the ASCII, so what can be done to make patching easier?

LDS
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KSplice and Kexec overwrite kernel memory while the kernel itself is running. If it works or not depends on many factors, including devices status. That's why it is an optional kernel update system, and not the default one. It's up to you to assess if your configuration works with such system implemented, or not.

As another post pointed out (with the relevan Raymond Chen explanation), it was a design decision to forbid open files to be replaced in Windows because the risks were bigger than benefits (Windows and it applications usually heavily relies on shared libraries)

But, for example, recent version of Windows could replace drivers like the video ones without requiring a reboot any longer.

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LDS
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Re: Try, for example, patching Oracle

NO, it looks a lot of Linux "admins" don't know Windows (it's no longer a consumer only OS since a long time, but probably you didn't use anything past Windows 98), and Linux too.

If your convinced Linux doesn't need to be rebooted, well, you don't know how Linux works. Your "conscious" decision looks to be based on faith, not on knowledge nor experience. And of course you don't like to discover you don't really know Linux at all...

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LDS
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Re: Try, for example, patching Oracle

Oracle will happily update Oracle Linux for you, and its hw+sw systems do it (at a nice subscription price...). But not other Linuxes (especially since it wants to sell you its own one)

But updating a complex database - maybe in a cluster - is a little more complex than updating the kernel, which is a complex piece of software, but relatively small and compact.

Sure, everything can be automated -SQL Server is far easier to patch, and even MySQL under Windows now - but don't expect Oracle packages in any Linux repository soon.

Other products may not want to invest in packaging for each supported distro, and let you manage the updates yourself, nor they may want to publish their own repositories because they want to control who gets the patches and when (you may need to pay for a support contract for them).

The distribution model that works so well for open source software, unluckily doesn't for commercial one. Because open source doesn't cover every needs, it doesn't really matters if you run Windows or Linux when it comes to patching.

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LDS
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Re: I shutdown every evening... and don't use hibernate.

Just I have too many disks in my desktop to remove them each evening (it's a RAID-10 array...)

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LDS
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Re: Windows.

Even for servers, depends on the server. You have to assess which servers are critical and need more care, which applications they run, what's the risk of delaying patches, and so on. Then you can create different group to manage different update policies (what, when and where...)

One size doesn't fit all. That's why you are paid as a sysadmin - if your aim is being lazy, well, that's not the job for you.

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LDS
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Re: Post patch patch

I wonder why Windows Update has no option "update as long as important patches are available, and reboot automatically when needed". At least when you need to setup and don't have a slipstream installation available it won't require you to attend the machine for a while.

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LDS
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Re: Patching Servers

Linux can replace open files without a process being shutdown or a reboot - but you should understand when the new files start to be really used.... which it may not be immediately.

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LDS
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I shutdown every evening... and don't use hibernate.

It's an organization issue. I have no issue shutting down my machine every evening, and booting it up in the morning. I can easily get where I was in a few minutes. It's just a matter of organization - if you have a "clean desk" policy you get used to store away what you are working on in the evening, and get them back quickly in the morning. I may choose a tool over another because it let me access recent data quicker, but also it's a matter of organize your tools and data, using a computer should not be an excuse to be lazy about that because it can look for data faster...

Why do I shutdown? Because it is more secure (and hibernate is disabled for the same way, I do not want my memory stored on disk), it is safer (less risk to damages to the machine and everything else if something bad happens to the environment) and because I do not want to waste power if I actually don't need the machine. Also devices not designed for 24x7 workloads last longer.

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LDS
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Re: Indeed

Still Linux fan refuse to understand the same applies to Linux. Not everything can be updated from the distro repositories or others, a lot of commercial software running on Linux *is not* available from the repositories nor in a distro package, and that software will still require its own patching procedure (which sometimes can be even more difficult than in Windows, if instead of running a setup you need a more complex procedure). Try, for example, patching Oracle on a Linux machine...

Sure, you can be a Linux purist (or taleban...) and refues any "commercial" software non available from repos, but that's not how sensibile business are run, and without commercial applications, there would be far fewer Linux servers running

And while Linux doesn't ask you to reboot explicitly, it does need a reboot if the kernel was updated, unless you use some tools like KSplice and accept the inherent risks - which is not the default mechanism. And if you don't reboot, the kernel is not updated and the patched vulnerabilities are still there... just giving you a false sense of security.

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Quit drooling, fanbois - haven't you SEEN what the iPhone 6 costs?

LDS
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Re: OnePlus One

"Is it common to require headphones for FM radio? ", no, but it is common to require an antenna... those designed for cellular frequencies may be not good for FM ones.

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Keep that consumer browser tat away from our software says Oracle

LDS
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What Firefox lacks is a better integration with the OS (for example, certificates....) and being configurable via GPO. Some add-ons and other ways to achieve it exist, but it should be something out-of-.the box, if you really want it to be a business solution.

Without them, it's not a good application for large deployments under Windows - IE becomes a better choice despite what you may think about it, because you can manage it centrally. And in some deployment, something you can't manage is also something that gets forbidden.

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Jony Ive: Apple iWatch will SCREW UP Switzerland's economy

LDS
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Re: I don't see iWatch competing with conventional watches

Sure, maybe a 5" smartwatch.... face it, some devices are bounded by their own phisycal dimensions. Unless Ive redesign your wrist and forearm, there's little you can do in a small screen.

Glasses have a better chance to offer the services you are talking about in a convenient way. You can access info even if your hands are busy, and with the proper "screen" size.

For example if I'm skiing, there's no way I could use a wrist GPS or whatever...

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LDS
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Re: One moment...

Do you really believe someone wearing an high end watch cares about GPS and other features in it? These are the kind of people who usually have real people taking care of their needs... or do you really believe their will drive their luxury car, boat or plane using the iWatch GPS? Or be reminded of their next First Class flight while in the exclusive airline lounge, after being brought there by a driver and with a secretary taking care of everything?

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LDS
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Re: Battery life..

I have a wireless charging system right in my watch, it's called a "solar cell"... and work everywhere (but maybe at Poles in Winter...), without any need of carrying a charger around...

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LDS
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Re: When a design is essentially perfect why change it?

Dyou know how "good" Volvo is doing? Maybe with some new ideas it wouldn't have been sold to Zhejiang Geely Holding Group...

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LDS
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Re: Well said

" $10K Rolex on somebody under 40 means that daddy is/was rich."

Or that (s)he was able to get rich and was not a nerd...

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LDS
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Re: Switzerland still has plenty of other industries...

"Mind you, I think buying a watch that costs as much as a car is a very strange way to blow one's money. But I guess if you're at that end of the market and you already have everything else, why not go for it?"

There are also people who get crazy from some shiny stones and metals bound together, and they don't even tell you the time...

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LDS
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Happy

Re: You're reading it wrong

Just, a round watch as no corners...

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Heads up, Chromebook: Here come the sub-$200 Windows 8.1 portables

LDS
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Re: Chromebook competitor - not really

Have you ever tried the remote assist options? Again, your knowledge is really putdated. Also a well setup pc won't allow unskilled users to install crap. If you give your grandparents a badly configured pc because you're not able to configure it, it's only your fault. As moving target eveytime someone points out you're still stuck in very old prejudices towards Windows.

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LDS
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Re: Chromebook competitor - not really

Of course you never used a Win 8 system, otherwise you would know there is a "system refresh" options that restore the system while keeping apps and their settings.

Also you can make a system restore disk on USB disk or SD card, if you need to reinstall from scratch.

It looks your knowledge of Windows is pretty dated.

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LDS
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Re: People!

Not until I can install Win 8.1 on it!

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LDS
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Re: Chromebook competitor - not really

No, it still works without any need to be tethered to Google continuously....

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LDS
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Re: What a joke

In 2011 you couldn't forecast the success of smaller tablets with 7" screens. Also, you're speaking about a "developer preview" that is not the final OS and changes can be still introduced if needed. Also requirements evolve depending on market needs and device evolutions.

Only fools have requirements engraved in stone.

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LDS
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Re: re: There are also many who aren't happy with the limitations of Windows

So the problem is not SecureBoot itself, it's jus MS and greed/cheap people? Why someone should not be able to run a different OS on an iPad/iPhone if (s)he wants so? Are we speaking of freedom, or just greed? Should Toshiba, Asus and others not be allowed what Apple is allowed to do? And why?

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LDS
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Re: re: There are also many who aren't happy with the limitations of Windows

Excuse me, how many people run a different OS on an iPad?

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LDS
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Re: But how do they connect?

Just click the links.... the Toshiba is WiFi (up to n) + Bluetooth.

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Zuck: Yo, Mexico! My $19bn WhatsApp could connect THREE BEEELLION people

LDS
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Going to help Mexican drug gangs reach more customers?

Is he going to buy Silk Road next?

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Size matters – how else could Dell squeeze 15 million pixels into this 27" 5K monitor?

LDS
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Re: Sounds nice but

Most image processing software are designed with management and processing tool areas on both sides of the image, thereby a monitor with a different aspect ratio than 3:2 is ok.

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LDS
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ok, but the color space gamut?

For serious photo/video editing you don't need just a lot of pixels, but a lot of colors also. Whic color spaces does this monitor support? If it's sRGB only it's good for viwing, not editing.

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New software ported from Windows to Mac! You'll never guess what. Yes, it's spyware

LDS
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Re: More hints please

It's low risk now because it's not widely distributed (yet, and the target needs to visit a compromised site. It's not something that can exploit a vulnerability from remote without user action.

But if it's able to keylog, and open a remote shell, it's pretty dangerous.

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LDS
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Re: More hints please

It's exactly because of security plain users should be allowed to run application but not install them. If any user can install executables, it's far too easy to install malware anywhere and the wait for some privileged process run it....

One solution may be fully sandboxing each application, but again you're going to lose a lot of interoperability features you expect from a many complex softwares

Security comes at a price, you'll need to perform some operations with different privileges when those are needed, and drop them afterwards.

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Nokia Lumia 530: A Windows Phone... for under £50

LDS
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Re: Still think that the 520 is better

As the 630s are somewhat a step behind compared to the 620. Probably MS wants some user to move on the upper models.

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Work in the tech industry? The Ukraine WAR is coming to YOU

LDS
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Re: Thanks for the neocon talking points, El Reg!

"Yep. Fight against "Putin".

You mean someone who bypassed the two-term limit with an escamotage and wants to rule Russia for life? While, of course, ensuring nobody in Russia can tell anything bad about him. Someone who thinks that the fall of USSR was the most tragic event of the XX century?

If Russia was not in the hands of a dangerous megalomaniac , there would be no need to "fight against him.

Energy-wise, Europe will be always paralized as long as it depends on suppliers who can blackmail whenever they like. Ask yourself why Putin is going to sell gas to Chine at one third of the price he's selling to EU and half of the Ukraine one. Because blackmailing China is a bit more difficult?

And how much Russia exploited Europeans if it can sell gas at that price and still get revenues? EU made the stupid move to depend too much on Russia before Russia became a reliable democracy.

Putin has sent Russia one hundred year back in the past, just of his personal ambition.

Look at how Germany became rich again after the its tragic fall - it did it this time working inside Europe, not trying to conquer it again.

But people like Putin knows they can hold power only as long as they can yell at an external enemy. Without it, the finger they hide their thievery behind, will not work.

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LDS
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On the other end, lot of work for the tech industry aiming to protect your IT assets...

... from Russia and China... (and also the NSA)

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Look, ma, FOUR HANDS! Microsoft bigs up pixeltastic TWO-USER mega-screen

LDS
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Re: not a good idea...

"Take your turn its not bloody hard!"

Only if you play chess,,,

There are many situations where more than one people may work on the same screen at the same time. Look for example at the latest Dassault Sytems 3D CAD software....

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Oracle's MySQL buy a 'fiasco' says Dovecot man Mikko Linnanmäki

LDS
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Re: Is using Google proprietary APIs better than a RFC standard like IMAP?

No, it's more alike an RPC protocol to access a databases . There is far more today in email management than what a file system supports.

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LDS
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Re: Oracle's acquisition of MySQL???

Just like Apple got all the good ideas from Xerox? Or the way they bought the multitouch technology?

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LDS
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Re: Is using Google proprietary APIs better than a RFC standard like IMAP?

No, proprietary APIs means you own them and design and implement (and change) them as you like.

'Proprietary' never meant 'reserved' or 'unpublished' API. And who warrants you Google published all the APIs and there are none reserved for Google only use? Google itself?

IMAP was designed by IETF without being designed for a single company interests. Of course Google wants you to use its own protocol instead of standard ones, so you get locked in and it's easier to make send your data to Google for its own interested use. It's exactly what MS tried...

But again we see that MS is evil, Oracle is evil, Google is good...

BTW: CIFS was an old MS name for its SMB protocol. SMB predates AD, and is not tied to it.

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LDS
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Re: Is using Google proprietary APIs better than a RFC standard like IMAP?

Oracle or others, I frankly find hypocrite this "don't sell" unti they offer you millions (or billions) of dollars, and then all your "principles" go away. Nobody forced Widenius & C. to sell MySQL.

But I understand what is the new business open source business plan now:

1) Make an open source project appealing

2) Sell it for $$$$$$$$$$$$$ to X company, which usually people think is bad

3) Fork it

4) Tell people to use your fork and no the original product because X is baaaaad, very baaaaad

4 bis) If you can, cry X needs to give you back the project rights, because X is baaaaad, and doesn't deserve them because it's ruining the holiness of the project (this may not work, though)

5) Get more $$$$$$$ from the fork, if your plan works, while still enjoying those got at 2)....

I found this very hypocrite.

If meanwhile you plaud Google for introducing its own proprietary API and protocols to access mail instead of standard, "open source" ones, well, you're really like a "taliban" - you act on irrational "religious belief" only.

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