* Posts by LDS

2106 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

Sysadmins: Your great power brings the chance to RUIN security

LDS
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I prefer to work with machines too because their behaviour is predictable, usually, and far more interesting. But I also know I work in a big company with many people and everybody has his or her goals, sometimes not very well aligned with company and other people ones.

If I want to be able to be paid to work with interesting machines and tools, I know I have to be able to convince others that 1) what I do, or plan to do is important because the company has a valuable return 2) I'm very good at doing it thereby a replacement is not easy to find 3) others' are not as good

I just talked to the CTO last week who has to decide which new/research projects fund next year. I had to convince him our proposals are the best ones, even if he's not an expert in our field, being the company so big - we were acquired a year and a half ago.

I don't like to do these tasks, but I know that if I just sit down and wait for him to read a dense tech paper somewhere in his mailbox, someone else will get the funds, and I and my team should look for a new job elsewhere, or be assigned to someone's else stupid project.

Sure, in a perfect world the CTO will perfectly know who I am, what I do, and will give me the funds for the project because he read the specs he asked me, and found them so good. When I find one I'll uninstall Office from my PC, cut any tie with the world but an Ethernet cable, and stop 'wasting' time to explain clueless people why they should believe in what I say. Until now, I know sometimes I have to wear a suit, fire up PowerPoint, smile, and explain for the nth time simple concepts they should already know, and 'sell' them things to do they should ask me instead...

Until it pays well also for the 'gadgets' at home and other stuff I do beyond work and beyond IT, guess I will keep on...

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LDS
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Right, but in any environment you have to speak in a language understandable by your audience. Be it gaining management support for security efforts, or gaining investment for a new product idea, in some ways someone has to "sell" it to the people in charge to authorize and pay for it.

It is true that if they are in that very place, they should have already the knowledge and the skills to understand you - maybe in a "perferct world".

Too often you have to talk to someone who was put there without the proper background. It happens more often in countries/companies where tech skills are valued far less than legal/economic/sales/marketing ones. You may like it or not, but they will never learn about your world, thereby you need to learn how to "lower" yourself at a level they can understand.

Usually, it's not that hard. Sure, for example you can't just tell them the chosen flat AD and PKI infrastructure is the wrong choice for a so big company - they can't understand why. But show them pretty animations about an attack easily compromising it and crippling business activities (cite Sony here, with some news headlines and executive names under fire...), while another design better withstand it and lets most of the business go on, and they may have a glimpse of light... after all, what you need is some good "social engineering" at work for you.

Training anyway always needed to be tailored for the audience. Being a good teacher requires practice - and patience.

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Ballmer's billion-dollar blunders: When he gambled Microsoft's money and lost

LDS
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Re: There's also the Fligt Simulator franchise shutdown, and the utterly "Flight" failure...

Lockheed Martin still makes money from it (they licensed it) as Prepar3D, selling it as virtual training facility wher eyou can control the scenario fully. As more and more complex drones are available, it makes even more sense.

If you believe there are just a few dozen nuts, you're like Ballmer and have the same market sensibility. You may wonder it is actually used by real pilots and ATC controllers as well to train themselves (up it was used to test new real procedures in the simulated environment), and there are a good number of software houses making money selling add-ons, even for a ten years old product still widely used. It wasn't billions, but it was an iconic product, and the oldest one then still made by Microsoft.

But what was more interesting, it's not only the shutdown of the PC game studios (believing probably that XBox would have taken the world...), but also the total lack of proper product managment. Had they closed simply a product line with little or no revenues, ok, that's business. But they didn't. They believed they could "reboot" it following the fashion and believing to extract more money from customers with the "walled garden" approach.

They took a product manager known only for the "Ants" game (or something alike), put him in charge of a product he didn't understand, trying to turn it into something appealing to console users, decided to kill a long product heritage and its large 3rd parties support to impose a "freemium" model (fully controlled by MS) about which many warned MS it couldn't work for that market sector - they stubbornly went on accusing critics of being simply "whiners" - then after eight months the new product was shutdown wholly because only a few liked it, no money were made, but of course it wasn't because it was a bad product noone wanted really, it was just because of the "bad press".

Can you see a pattern here? It happened more or less in the Windows 8 years - an indication that within MS there was a culture shift leading to some key people being able to force their own personal views despite many signals - inside and outside - they were very wrong. How many billions allowing this kind of culture inside MS costed? And it's not getting better under Nadella...

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LDS
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There's also the Fligt Simulator franchise shutdown, and the utterly "Flight" failure...

... Aces Studio were closed, developers laid off (5000 of them), and Microsoft attempted to sobstitute it with "Flight" and its "freemium" model which utterly failed with the flighsim customers.

Total lack of that market understanding.

If Flight Simulator didn't bring in enough revenues to live on they could have simply closed it, or sold it. Instead some bright minds at MS decided to force it into a fashion-driven product which didn't fit its real market.

MS became really too fashion driven in the past years. Unluckily, Nadella is not the right man to change this trend. He just has a different fashion to follow, and he's too arrogant too to really understand the market MS products should be aimed at.

Windows 10 is on track to be another big debacle it looks too much like a "revenge" over Windows 8, than a proper evolution fixing 8.x mistakes.

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We put Windows 10 on a small fondleslab: STILL not ready, 3 days to go

LDS
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From one mistake to another...

8 tried to force a touch UI on desktop users, now 10 looks to enforce a desktop UI to tablet users. Frankly, the task bar is really useless in tablet mode - just like the start menu (of course they're ok in desktop mode).

MS looks really unable to understand the two modes really need different UI and interaction modes. Just like an even smaller device like a phone requires another one.

Moreover non-touch application may not work or be useful if you just run them maximized, you many need to run them in desktop mode even if you're using touch input (maybe using the stylus....)

It's pretty clear the Windows UI dept. is running in "headless" mode and little revenges are played here and there, hoping the free upgrade will lure people into using 10 anyway.

I guess I will wait several months to upgrade, and wait to see how 10 shapes itself - and how long it takes for the one in charge to leave MS after its release...

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New study into lack of women in Tech: It's NOT the men's fault

LDS
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Re: Media stereotypes?

In many jobs were women are the main force they gets their "hands dirty" - being a nurse, cook, factory worker (and even farmer worker) etc. requires to work with your hands, and often getting them really dirty. Probably some jobs were regarded too heavy or even dangerous for women, especially when machines were not available.

Archaeology is a subject that was depicted by media as a woman acceptable subject since at least the invention of the exotic adventure novel - how to get the young beautiful heroine in some remote exotic location to be saved by the mysterious fascinating hero? What better than an archaeologist looking tor a forgotten town? Then came Lara Croft...

Anyway Archaeology still requires little math. Linguistic skills may be more important, and languages always appealed to women. Also it requires patience - a lot of - and careful digging and handling. Qualities often easier to find in women than in men. Conservation and restoration are also jobs that attract many women, probably because it's something between arts and technology - still technology is a tool, not an aim itself.

It's like photography - there are many women in photography - and it also requires good technical skills. Yet you will still see less women interested in the deep technical knowledge of image making - like Ansel Adams for example did to achieve his art - and more in using it as a medium only to reach an artistic/social/whatever result.

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LDS
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Re: "maths is hard" says Barbie

It's not only teachers, often are the parents themselves. Too many parents raise children telling them "math is (too) hard", and show by example they had grown up anyway without it. And that, unluckily, happens more in the mother-daughter relationship than in the father-son one. Especially since even most men successul at math, are not anyway likely to choose their partner on a math skill basis...

Moreover usually male children are more likely to explore knowledge domains their fathers didn't, female ones are less likely, probably because for them is more important to look like their mothers than for boys is import to look like their fathers - often what they want is exactly to look *unlike* their fathers.

I believe male individualism plays a big role in this, while lack of it hinders to think more freely.

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LDS
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Re: Always thought this...

I don't believe it was CS degrees - I believe it happened when home computers broke the CS barrier for many well before university. Before, outside universities, government or big companies, access to a computer was impossible but for a very few lucky ones. In turn, it made a career around computers just a kind of career as any other.

Unluckily, home computers were too often seen and aimed as boy toys - like Meccano or game consoles (although my sister had her own favourite games) - and became soon associated to the nerd stereotype. It is true that when I was a teenager in the '80s, there was already very little interests by girls in computers which became availabe - but for some games they may have liked, usually those where you weren't shooting at something. The "art of programming" never touched them much.

I wouldn't have really cared if my sister had used the computer to make fluffy unicorns play with pink smiling balls instead of spaceships hunting ugly aliens - she would have mastered programming anyway. The good of computers is you can program them to perform what you like.

But she studied maths just to pass her grades, and was never interested - like her female friends - to "play" with it outside school.

Anyway, home computers flooded the market with males who already mastered computers well before entering any uni - and often choose a CS career because of they early interest in computers.

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US State of Georgia sues 'terrorist' for publishing its own laws ... on the internet

LDS
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"pay for development of the annotations using state tax dollars"

Well, that's exactly what I expect taxpayers dollars to be used for also - not to pay for some politicians whims to collect votes... if you don't use taxpayers money to make available to them the very rules taxpayers are bound to, how could taxpayers vote sensibly the next time? Or the issue is exactly this, keep them ignorant of the rules you're setting forth, including court interpretations, so it's easier to collect votes?

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Security tool bod's hell: People think I wrote code for Hacking Team!

LDS
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Re: if they used GPL code in their products...

Also you could turn most GPL code into a DLL/shared object and use it without being bound by the GPL...

I wonder how many people are using GPL code happily violating the licenses, consciously, or because plain ignorance of what the GPL actually is and requires...

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LDS
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Re: if they used GPL code in their products...

Even if you manually copy portions of it - and you can, under the GPL - into your code you're still bound by the GPL terms. That's why I wrote "used" - there are many ways to use code.

The GPL (v2) simply says "a work containing the Program or a portion of it, either verbatim or with modifications and/or translated into another language". V3 is even more generic: "A “covered work” means either the unmodified Program or a work based on the Program."

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LDS
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Re: if they used GPL code in their products...

Actually the boundary is "distribute or publish" - customers or not. Of course in-house use is not distributing or publishing. The matter is if HT used it internally only, or made available externally any work based on the GPL code.

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LDS
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Re: if they used GPL code in their products...

I suggest you to read at least once the original text of the GPL fully - and try to understand it really and fully.

GPL doesn't enforce copyright only - especially since its aim is copyleft instead - the aim if GPL is turning as much code as it can into GPL one - it's not the MPL.

I know there are many developers who happily exploit GPL code in their non-GPL code, ignoring the GPL requirements. Only the LGPL, or an "aggregate", are exempt.

So, if you're using GPL code in your non GPL code, there a big probability you're violating the license if you distribute it.

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Universal Pictures finds pirated Jurassic World on own localhost, fires off a DMCA takedown

LDS
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It looks whoever run the tool had his or her own pirated copy on the local machine...

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Windows 10 on Mobile under the scope: Flaws, confusion, and going nowhere fast

LDS
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Re: SatNad?

It looks exactly what they did - they listened to the whiners who never used Windows Phone because it wasn't like Android, so they're trying to make it look like Android - wasting one ot the best UI designed for a phone till now - and not one derived from Win 3.1/PalmOS like others.

The real mistake is still the "one UI to rule them all" - even trying to design an adaptive one is not going to deliver it soon, it won't work but for simpler apps. Let developer share code among applications, but let them design ad hoc UIs for every type of device.

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LDS
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Re: Enough.

Will it sell more? Or it will just lose even the actual users who chose it exactly because it was better designed than Android?

MS had recently a fair list of replaced products where the new ones were so worse than the previous, they went nowhere. And often the move was just because the need of following the fashion.

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LDS
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Listen to users...

... and then do what is sensible - not always users are right.

But I'm afraid Nadella & C. risk to make Ballmer and even Sinofsky look like geniuses. The "me too!" approach of Windows 10 UI design doesn't bode well.

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Jeep drivers can be HACKED to DEATH: All you need is the car's IP address

LDS
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No need to get those data from the same sensors attached to vital functions. Radio can get speed from the GPS, non need to get it from wheels or engine. It can use mics to get noise and correct for it.

It's just a bad, cheap design.

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SpaceX's blast shock delays world's MOST POWERFUL ROCKET

LDS
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Let's replace "1970s-era hydrogen technology"...

... with 1960s-era kerosene technology? (Saturn V first stage used kerosene, the other two hydrogen).

Just a note: without hydrogen technology, there would have not been any New Horizon near Pluto last week. The Centaur upper stage is so efficient because it uses hydrogen. And the reason nor Russia nor Europe or anybody else can send probes beyond Mars (without complex gravity assists) is exactly the lack of this kind of powerful upper stages. Sure, it's not a cheap nor simple technology - it's just the most powerful available.

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The Register's resident space boffin: All you need to know about the Pluto mission

LDS
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Given the trouble they had with a small rocket, think what would happen if El Reg tries to launch its own version of an Atlas V...

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Americans find fantastic new use for drones – interfering with firefighting

LDS
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Re: Armed firefighting aircraft?

Guess they will happily drop water on silly drones if the could do it safely.

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Happy NukeDay to you! 70 years in the shadow of the bomb post-Trinity

LDS
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Re: Bombing Japan @J_M_M

Hindsight is always 20/20, and noone *after* the bombs were launched liked and was ready to take the responsibility and the burden.

Anyway, it's interesting how the already "defeated" Germany, for example, could launch the Ardennes counter-offensive and almost break the US lines, or resist until Spring 1945 on the Gothic Line in Italy, despite the efforts to break it. What in 1944 looked an easy ride to Germany didn't happen. Arnhem is another example of an ill-fated operation thinking the enemy is already defeated... while Dresden was bombed in February 1945, wasn't Germany already defeated and supposed to surrender soon too?

Germany was effectively blockaded since the summer of 1943 - it didn't forbit it to fight two years more.

McArthur wasn't the one removed in Corea because he was about to start a total war against China and Russia, and ready to use nuclear weapons against them? Of course he would have far preferred to lead an invasion of Japan himself, and be crowned the "Caesar of Japan" while entering Tokyo. The bombs took the laurel of victory from his hands...

And anyway, starving a whole country - the mighty fleet would have started to sink fishing boats? - while bombing it with incendiary weapons like was done in Tokyo is any better than using nuclear weapons? Conventional bombing did kill women and children too, and a firestorm is no better than a nuclear one when you find yourself in the middle of it. Read reports from Dresden and Tokyo, your blood will chill...

Still people now seem to forget that Germany and Japan were then lead by fanatic leaders for whom the word "surrender" had no meaning. Did Germany surrendered before Berlin was invaded, destroyed fighting street by street, fifteen years old sent to fight tanks with their rifles, and the leaders committed suicide? Why allies didn't stop at German borders and waited for Germany to surrender? Just to looth the technology?

Have you ever seen the interview of Japaneses women who when schoolgirls were trained to try to kill enemy soldiers using bamboo spears?

Noone of those cited, but McArthur, were commanders on the field. All the typical Washington bureocrat who never saw a real, bloody battle in the Pacific. And all in search of a political career, and saying later "the bomb looked the only option then" was not what people wanted to hear...

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LDS
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Re: Scientific rigour

There are two kind of experiments, one to confirm an expected outcome, another to look for something you still don't know. Look at the LHC - it was used to confirm the Higgs boson, but now it's looking at what happens at those energies, and nobody really know what we could find, because nobody has been there, yet.

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LDS
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Re: Bombing Japan

Destroying a large island in such a way takes a lot of time and resources. Bombs and explosives don't grow alone in fields, planes burn combustible, engines wears and crashes, pilots needs replacements. Same for ships. How long can you sustain a large blockade? What is someone else somewhere else takes advantage of your forces being heavily committed? What about your own country supporting a longer war?

And what if your enemy meanwhile finishes a new deadly weapon you're unaware of?

Waiting too much is never a good way to win a war.

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LDS
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Re: Bombing Japan

The March 1945 bombing of Tokyo is said to have caused more than 80,000 casualties, with some estimates weill over 90,000. The very fact that number are so different, is another indication of how much devastating it was. It was more devastating than Hiroshima and Nagasaki (but for the radiations), just it required hundreds of bombers - but they were available.

This sort of attack became the norm in WWII. It was clear that only destroying any industrial capacity - including civilan workers and their families - and the morale of people, the war could end avoiding even larger battles and the risk to be blocked into something alike a WWI stalemate.

It was not a question of race. Germany attempted it on British cities first, than RAF and USAAF answered. Brutal civilian treatment and POWs were also a Nazi German standard. Sure, being looked at as the Evil Empire helps to justify even the most horrible air attack. Especially since pilots can't see their victims in the eyes.

The main issue with Japan was it was an island. And islands are notoriously hard to attack- as Nazi generals learnt the hard way. The initial phases of a landing were always very risky, because the infantry had no heavy weapons, the area is small, and the defender can concentrate counterattacks on it. The only way to establish a sound foothold is to weaken avaliable defences so much they can't destroy it, and ensure both the support fleet and the foothold can't be reached by new enemy forces.

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LDS
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Re: Bombing Japan

Russia declared war to Japan *only after* the first bomb detonated on Hiroshima, on August 8th, 1945. They didn't declared war in May, after the defeat of Germany. They were in no hurry to help US and British troops in the Far East, the more they would have had to fight, the more they would have been weakened, and probably, an invasion of mainland Japan would have required to move troops and weapons from Europe to the Pacific - just like the invasion of Europe required to move them the other way, weaking the defences in Europe. Then, trying to take advantage of the situation, i.e. taking control of more areas of Germany, could have been feasible, or start communist revolts in countries like Italy.

Although Stalin was probably aware of the bomb, probably he wasn't sure it was already ready for prime time, and when Hiroshima was hit, Russians had to scramble to obtain something before the war was over.

That's why Japaneses consider Russian jackals even today.

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LDS
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Re: Bombing Japan

Check what a "conventional" firebombing made in Dresda... and they were not so different, from a racial point of view. That destructive power was *already* available, just not in a single bomb launched from a single plane.

But there are still a difference between bombing an hostile nation that started the war, and killing your own citizens en masse just because you don't like what they think.

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LDS
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Re: Bombing Japan

Yalta asked for an unconditional surrender - those were the terms, there was no space for negotiating. Germany had no other choice. It didn't look they were so much worried about Emperor dignity, when they forced him to hide into a cellar when he decided he was going to accept those terms to save his country.

Diplomatics contacts were attempted by some senior officials close to the Emperor. Almost all the commanders in charge were trying to fight till the very end. Germany just did it until Berlin was just a pile of ruins- don't forget - and that was what allied commanders worried about. The fact that the Russians dismissed the attempts didn't help also.

A blockade of the Japan islands would have been a problem even for the then very mighty Pacific Fleet, especially under continuos kamikaze and submarine attacks, while there were still large Japanese forces to fight outside Japan, like those in Taiwan and mainland China

And there were no plans for a blockade - there were plans for a land invasion of Japan exactly like it was done in Europe instead. The chied commander was McArthur, do you believe he would have waited? Okinawa invasion had been planned exactly to launch a land attack to the main island.

And would have more heavy bombardments - look for what the one over Tokyo in March 1945 did - famine, pestilences, maybe a civil war been better?

Sure, someone also wanted to see the bombs in action, and what Soviets were plainning after the defeat of Germany was unknown. Anyway, they got their bomb so quickly it made the advantage useless.

But your hypothesis about a surrender in October is just that - an hypothesis - sure, in 2015 everthing is pretty clear, in 1945 the smoke of war made everything far less clear. Nobody then believed in a quick enough surrender - not in a two-three months.

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LDS
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Even Roman sunken ships are exploited for pre-bomb metals.

One detector IIRC placed in a laboratory under the Gran Sasso mountain was built using lead ingots found in the wreck of a Roman ship sunk in the Po delta, exactly because of their very low radiation levels, having being extracted two thousand years ago, and since then "stored" in the sunken ship.

The ship items are now in a permanent exhibition in Comacchio (not far from Ravenna, the last capital of the Roman Empire, and one of the main harbours of that era), while the wreck is in a special container to preserve the wood, but not yet visible to the public.

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LDS
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Re: What worries me...

I believe even the Russians are very scared an atomic devices can end in some uncontrollable fanatic hands. Helping Iran to get one may work and bring money in, letting a bomb loose is something I guess they don't want, especially because there are also some terrorists who would blow up the Kremlin as well, if only they could - and once you lost one bomb to people just looking at the money, you can't really know where it ends up.

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LDS
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Re: The Manhattan Project

IIRC German planned the A9/A10 two stage rocket to hit US soil. Just, without a very destructive payloads, all V-weapons were more expensive than destructive. Thanks to heaven Germany couldn't make a nuclear weapon, and put it atop a V-2, or a larger version...

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LDS
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Re: "test explosions should be resumed and held regularly with the world's politicians watching"

Do you remember how Heracles killed the Hydra? Burning each wound after each head was cut to hinder the creation of others. I guess a nuclear explosion is really good at burning hydras...

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LDS
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Re: Bombing Japan

With the available media back then, how to perform a sensible demonstration? Ask the Japanese commanders to trust you and come to a desert location to see your next marvellous weapon? Film it, and then show it in Japanese cinemas a few weeks later, with allied commander ensuring it was all true, and not a fake? Radio it, maybe by Orson Welles who was so good at making people believe aliens has landed?

It is also true, as you point out, that after the first bomb some Japanese commander didn't want to surrender (and also the Soviet Union ignored Japanese attempt to look for a truce, waiting for Japan to collapse to declare war...) , and some even after the second - up to the point they assaulted the Imperial Palace - considered sacred - trying to stop the capitulation the Emperor wanted to save his country from further destruction.

Yet, we have to understand how difficult was back then to propagate correct informations, especially in an already heavily damaged country, with reports, B/W photos and movies requiring time and proper assessment by all the involved people. In some ways, the visible aftermath of a nuclear bomb was not very different from that of an heavy bombardment using incendiary bombs (but radiations, but you can't see them). Aerial reconnaissance won't tell the difference, and you had to believe it was a single bomb from a single plane really - because noone was ever capable of that, or even close.

Then witnesses reports, and wounded people analysis can tell you it was very different, but in those times it could take days if not weeks to collect and integrate them, and have them pushed to the right desk.

It's debatable if there was so much hurry to launch the Nagasaki bomb, I'm almost sure someone wanted to test it too before it was too late - because of its different technology - maybe a few days more could have been allowed, but maybe they would have not changed the situation much.

Probably USA commanders could not understand also why Japanese didn't surrender immediately after being demonstrated the destructive power of the bomb, while probably Japanese were so stunned they couldn't understand fully what they were hit by, and that even the most crazy hopes were lost.

Remember that was not a movie script or a video game - it was people fighting against each other brutally, without knowing what the others really thought, had available and planned. You can't really let an enemy take the time to react and fight back.

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LDS
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Re: The Manhattan Project

Because "at Los Alamos no one discriminated" - Nazi fanatics had the "bright idea" of discriminating everybody, without understanding many of their brightest minds were among those who they were discriminating most and trying to destroy wholly. Also, they could not attract minds from anywhere, but other fanatics like them. In a horrible way, it was good, because Germany lacked first the human resources, then it also lacked the material ones.

That's what happens when very dumb people can get the full support of many other people who decided to be very dumb and believe them blindly.

The Manahattan Project was able to collect the best people around - although there were also some working for the next Nazis, the Soviets...

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Re: Bombing Japan

It was tested - this very experiment was a test to check if it really worked. There was not much nuclear material available then to perform many tests, or a public demonstration as someone thinks it was possible - if the demonstation had failed, it was very precious material wasted (and there were no TV, youtube or twitter than to show everybody the event).

It's very probable someone in the military services was eager to see the bomb used on a real target, but it's far to easy to think *now* that the war would have ended soon *then* - in the Summer of 1945 it was maybe clear that Japan had lost - but how long it would have taken to surrender, and at what price how many Japaneses and Allies would have died before it-, was totally unknown, try to put yourself in the place of those commanders, and think what you would have done.

B-29s were perfectly able to kill tens of thousand people even without a nuclear bomb, just it took hundreds of them and not a single one, but USAAF had enough to keep on destroying Japaneses cities, but without the monstrous menace of "the bomb". Heavy "carpet bombing" was somehow still accepted as a "normal" consequence of war, and thinking, that, after all, you could still try to defend from it. In a very horrible way, maybe the nuclear bombs even saved many lives, at the price of the horrendous death of others.

Also, with the Soviet army deep in Europe, keeping on a long, costly fight in the Far East could have been very dangerous. It was already clear the "ally" was the next dangerous enemy.

Sure, the long term effects have been severely understimated. Just you see in the photos people at the very site of the explosion, wearing shoe protections only. Nobody really knew then what they were "creating", because nobody really made anything close before, and theories and calculations (without computers) couldn't tell enough. It was a true "terra incognita".

Just thank heavens it wasn't first delivered in the hands of the most psychopatic leader of the time...

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North Korea's Red Star Linux inserts sneaky serial content tracker

LDS
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Re: "When analysing the OS ..."

I'm not sure GPL can be easily enforced in North Korea, although sending them Stallman for a while could be interesting, or he becomes the chief ruler, and open sources the whole country, or he gets executed...

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German police ARREST SQUIRREL for stalking woman

LDS
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Are they sure...

... it wasn't the woman stalking the squirrel?

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Your gadget batteries endanger planes, says Boeing

LDS
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Re: Really?

Batteries are used in far more devices than smartphones and cameras - some devices may be critical and used by people who can't wait, and thereby shipped by air, if needed.

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Hacking Team hackers questioned over Hacking Team hack

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Re: zero-day vulnerabilities that Hacking Team thought it had all to itself

Usually people are more interested in writing new code (because of commercial reasons, or even personal achievements) than reviewing old one, unless someone explicitly asks and provides resources for that. Even in open source code we saw big bugs undetected for years, most programmers prefer to write new code, and not read old one, unless theiy're forced to.

Especially flawed logic may be difficult to spot bcause it requires a deep knowledge of what the code attempts, and then verifying it does it in the correct way.

Writing secure code needs two efforts: learn how to write it from the start, and the have reviews to spot and fix whatever escapes, and the go back to teach how to avoid those mistakes. Unluckily, for years writing new code quickly often using languages and libraries with very little built-in security in the hands of barely skilled developers, lead to a big backlog of issues, that only now are being tackled.

IMHO, it's more an issue of bad coding than deliberate placement of backdoors.

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Roll up, roll up, for the Meta35: The hybrid snapper's data dumpster

LDS
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It it supported my Canon T-90 Data Back...

... I'd get one...

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Science sub spots lost Revolutionary-era SHIPWRECK

LDS
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Re: My dream job

Well, if you work in such projects, believe me, it won't happen to you anything that happens in the childish Cussler monkey-written novels.

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GOOGLE GMAIL ATE MY LINUX: Gobbled email enrages Torvalds

LDS
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Re: On No. Another Google Screw-up ahead?

Do you have any mail messages looking like gorillas? If Google used the same AI, I'm not surprised.

Moreover I believe the mailing list messages are very different from the average mail message because of their peculiar contents, and I'm sure they fooled that AI easily.

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LDS
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Re: DIY

You mean that there's no one among the LF supporters willingly to setup a real mail server and spam software?

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LDS
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Devil

Re: Perhaps Hillary Clinton could offer some useful advice?

Is GMail code open source?

I know it doesn't violate the GPL because it's never transferred to anyone, making it even more closed than non-open source code released as binary only.

Thereby, the fact it runs on some variant of Linux is close to irrelevant. Google does whatever it likes and you have to accept it.

If I where Linus, I would run the mailing list out of standard, well known mail applications, without Google-in-the-middle.

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Feel like you're being herded onto Windows 10? Well, you should

LDS
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You're compelled already to do it, even to access Microsoft sites. Some pages of MS knowledgebase have scripts that take forever to be executed on some older IE versions. Using Firefox they load without issues.

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LDS
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I started to hate Windows 10...

... since some moron in Redmond decided to push "Get Windows 10" apps and telemetry as important updates, and turned Windows Update into a Window 10 propaganda machine. Also, the idea of an icon in the tray always there and you can't easily remove if you're not skilled enough is another very stupid one.

I understand their will to move as many people as they can to Windows 10 as soon as they can, but using a system designed to convey updates - and especially security updates, to promote it is really, really silly especially in these days where keeping your system secure is more important than ever. Using a notification system designed to show a user what it needs while working - not an upcoming upgrade coming in weeks, follows the same stupid path.

Nadella is attempting the tricks of a desperate seller, and it's not a good omen. It also shows a contempt for users I really dislike - but I'm not surprised it was introduced since it became the CEO.

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ARM servers look to have legs as OVH boots up Cavium cloud

LDS
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Sacre diable! French ARM spammers in sight!

OVH should really use these machines to track and kick out all the damned Frech spammers it hosts, but I'm afraid it will rent these to them...

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Neil Young yanks music from streaming services: 'Worst audio in history'

LDS
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Any audio format is only good as much as what you put in it

It doesn't really matter if you stream in a format designed to handle one billion bits and frequencies going from 0.0001Hz to 1THz - it all depends on what you encode into it, and how.If anything from the original soure to the final data decrease the quality, any format - even the best one - will just encode crappy qualliy, and can't automagically improve it.

Thereby the real question is: how streaming services create the data they stream? Is there any stage in the pipeline where they take advantage of some reduction in quality to optimize storage and/or bandwidth for the format they chose?

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Uninstalled Google Photos? Thought your pics safe from slurping? WRONG, bozo

LDS
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Re: tech wonder of Nashville

That's valid only for what you've uploaded already, not for new contents you never intended to upload.

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Linux Foundation serves up a tasty dish of BUGS

LDS
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Guess you meant the *quality* of contributions, *diversity* really means nothing.

Also, here it's not a matter of well maintained projects, although in "low maintenance" mode. They spotted projects where bug reports couldn't be delivered and handled, and lacking a central code repository to ensure you know what's the latest code, and what modification has been made and by who - and who approved them. These are not well maintained projects, and they can be a risk from a security point of view. How could you audit a project when there's just several tarball around? If you're a distro maintainer what code should you package?

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