* Posts by LDS

1580 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

Privacy alert: Outlook for iOS does security STUPIDLY, says dev

LDS
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Re: Irrelevant when you use Office365

There's a big difference in storing the credential to access a service you offer (say O365 own mail), and to access someone else one.

In the former case, credential can be stored (hoepfully) in a far safer way (multiple hash, salt, etc.). In the latter, they have to be stored using reversible encryption, because of the need to submit them to the third party service... and that's a far bigger risk.

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LDS
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Re: Man-in-the-middle servers?

It's they can't "index" your email otherwise. Face it - all these services are designed to "index" (aka read and classify information) from evey piece of your personal data. Why some web email services (GMail & C.) prompts you to read "all your accounts emails from a single inbox"? Exactly for the same reason - access all your emails. Accompli just moved this model to a local application by exploiting a "proxy" server reading all your email before delivering them to you. Useless - but hey! - it works [probably] on HTTP - which you know, it's the only protocol you should use (and the only protocol most actual developers look to know...), why use those outdate protocols like IMAP4 designed to read emails without any man in the middle?

PS: IMAP4 handles push notification if the IDLE command is supported by both parties, otherwise it has to poll.

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Microsoft Outlook comes to iOS, Android: MS email now a bit less painful on mobile

LDS
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"Windows tablet and phone users are left to wait for Windows 10"

Well, my Windows tablet runs the full version of Outlook if I need it. Anyway Mail and Calendar apps are not that bad on a tablet. Mail is still a bit too limited on Windows Phone, especially when it comes to attachments.- thanks to the luser-oriented model they had to adopt to suit late smartphone users (everyboy who discovered smartphones after 2005).

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Bill Gates – I WISH I was like Zuck and spoke Chinese. Yep, I drink poo

LDS
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Surely a Linux AI will lack humor, like most of its users...

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LDS
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Re: French - Anything but easy.

Not true. C is always hard in front of A, O and U, or a consonant (unless it's another C, which follows then the same rules of a single C). It's always soft (but alike in "tch", not "ess") in front of I and E. CH is used to turn it hard in front of I and E (K is not present in the Italian alphabet), while CI turns it soft in front of A, O and U. Same is true for G (J is not present in the Italian alphabet) - but the sound GN which is a bit peculiar (but always the same) and a bit difficult for some.

C is never pronounced like "ess" in Italian.

What Italian lack are ways to indicate vowels height (but there are fewer ones, and don't change the word meaning, even different parts of Italy may have different one for the same word), and a way to tell you if S or Z are voiced or not.

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LDS
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Would a Debian robot be a grey-bearded one built with a very old design and materials, almost a steampunk one?

And guess any Linux AI would become schizophrenic in a little time... "I was Slackware, then Red Hat, then Mandrake, o no, Mandriva, Fedora, Debian, Ubuntu, CentOS, Kubunto, Mint... WHO I AM?????" - "rm -rf /".

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LDS
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Re: Well...

Unluckily, French were better at importing some French in England than England to export English to France... remember those are the guys who attempt to translate each and every IT term they come across... and are far better at defending their language than their borders...

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LDS
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Re: French - Anything but easy.

Someone would say French also... and regarding Italilans, depends on who speak that Italian. Some people from different areas of Italy may have deep local accents that can make Italian ugly to listen to.

Anyway a lot depends of what kind of labguages you're used to hear and listen to... what you may find pleasant for someone else could be really unpleasant.

For example I can't stand Spanish and Portoguese, English and French are OK, German is a bit harsh, I'm not displeased by Russian, I don't like Arabic, I'm puzzled by Chinese and Japanese...

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LDS
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Re: French - Anything but easy.

Sorry, but one of the most phonetic language is Italian - you read it exactly the way it is written, something it shares with Finnish, AFAIK (but I can't speak Finnish).

German is not, it has stricter pronounciation rules than English, but it's not really phonetic.

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LDS
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Re: French - Anything but easy.

That's often depends from what native language you're from, and the group of languages it belongs to.

For example, Italians are used to complex verb alike French, but Italians have far simpler pronounciation and writing rules. English speaking people may find verbs in other languages far more complex compared to theirs.

But Italian no longer uses declensions (despite its roots in Latin), thereby Italians may find harder to learn languages where declensions are used (unless they were forced to study Latin or Ancient Greek at school, LOL!). Languages not using the Western alphabet require those used to it only to learn new ones, and so on... also many languages have a common root, for example most European languages (and some outside Europe) have common Indo-European roots, and thereby some similiarities - others, for example most Asiatic languages, have different roots and thereby the "first impact" looks much more complex when you come from one side or the other.

Anyway, it's astonishing that in the XXI century americans are still wondered someone could speak a foreign language beyond English...

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Windows 10 heralds the MINECRAFT-isation of Microsoft

LDS
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Re: Uh, yeah ....

Most of Apple technology - including multitouch - was purchased as well. Google Android is built on borrowed technologies developed elsewhere, and other Google products were purchases as well.

Small companies far too often innovate more and faster than bigger ones, and are purchased by the latter. Just, a purchase could be just wasted money, or you can build successulf products on them.

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Does Big Tech hire white boys ahead of more skilled black people and/or women?

LDS
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There's the market and then there's psychology...

The main issue with "the market" is that it's made by people, and people are far from always being rational beings. People psychology drives a lot of decision with are far from being fully rational.

I believe people tend to hire people who are alike them - and I not talk about race or gender - but at the behavioural and lifestyle level. Having to spend a lot of time with the people you have to work for, you select those who will make you "feel well" working with - and they have a good chance to be somewhat alike you.

You can observe it in all people group, and you can also observer it in work group. Look at PR/marketing - are those peole alike the IT groups? No. You're going to meet in the former group much more open people, leaning toward dressing classy (not always achieving it), and often selected also for their physical aspect (a nice young woman works better in PR than an ugly fat old man - because of the behavioural aspects of the intended audience). There's a good chance they will spend time with the same kind of people outside work.

You see it in schools, where group forms based on behaviours, interests, and lifestyle. Children looks for other children somewhat alike them, and who make them "feel good".

Thereby purely rational "market" rules may not apply fully, especially if there is no so big differences at the skills levels to prompt those who select people to clearly steer towards a candidate regardless of everything else.

You can also observe this behaviour depending on who is in charge of selection. HR, management (without an IT background) and IT people could select very differend candidates from the same pool. Each group has different selection criteria, and many of them can be traced back to the behavioural level.

The main issue is that gender and race in our society have a big impact on how people develop their own behaviour and lifestyle. People who are going to refuse some behaviours/lifestyle and prefer others, will have far big problems to be selected into a given social group, and adapt to it, even if they have achieved the same skills. Although it may be also hard to achieve some skills if you refuse some social group lifestyle and behaviours. Try to work as a lawyer if you believe the legal system shoud work like an algorithm (and hate to wear a tie) or in fashion if you think there are only three colors, R, G and B, and you don' really care what to wear each morning.

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Wikileaks: We DO NOT approve of OUR secret stuff being LEAKED

LDS
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Re: Enema for the people

You're right, but that's not what Assange did. It just got whatever it could publish to sustain his personal ego and his "dolce vita". Between a true journalist working for the sake of truth and justice, and Assange, there are more light years than from here to the farthest part of the Universe we can see.

When you decide to reveal some secret, you need anyway to be careful and act with citizen interest in mind, and balance the damage you can do with the need to reveal that information because not doing it will be even more a bigger damage to the very foundations a democracy is built upon. Publishing blindly everything just to show off how cool you are (but letting others do the dirty work and then reap all the PR benefits...) it's not the way to do it, whatever good is in your work, it get discredited by many silly act you did.

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ICANN CEO criticizes domain 'hoggers'

LDS
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Re: Jelousy from shakedown artists?

Not to mention those happily selling thousand of domains to spammers and phishers without any control.... while being paid with what is actually criminal money. They should be fined together criminals using the domains they sold.

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Welcome to Spartan, Microsoft's persuasive argument for... Chrome

LDS
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Sensible companies don't allow Chrome at all. Mozilla is far better.

The last thing a company sysadmin likes is a browser like Chrome designed from ground up to exfiltrate informations running on all his or her systems. Mozilla is a far better alternative - just I can't understand why Mozilla refuses to play better with Windows (i.e., using its certificate store).

IE can be somewhat locked down and configured using group policies. Chrome support this as well, but Mozilla requires add-ons.

As far as I know, Spartan is a new engine designed to get rid of some old IE legacy stuff, and this is good news. Getting rid of ActiveX and BHO makes it a far more secure engine - but there's a lot of old stuff out there that wouldn't work without. Take Dell iDRAC - to run the remote console you can choose between ActiveX or having Java enabled in the browser - and you really don't know what is worst.

Anyway if Spartan and IE are compatible enough but for some specific support (ActiveX on one side, some rarely used newer web technologies on the other), I guess they will overlap enough most user won't mind what engine is being running at a given time - nor most web developers.

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'People ACTUALLY CONFUSE Facebook and the internet in some places'

LDS
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Re: Most tech types would get it wrong too.

I've always pointed out that the "Internet" is not the "WWW" nor other types of applications or protocols running OVER it. But whenever I say the "Internet" is just a trasnport layer designed to shuffle TCP/IP packets around people stare at me as if I'm a green alien just arrived.

That also explains the overuse of HTTP as a transport protocol instead of TCP/IP itself, and all the silly ideas to try to overcome the limits of the former and make it as useful as the latter (like WebSocket and other stupid, useless technologies). But that's a lost fight...

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LDS
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Re: Facebook = Internet; Google = Internet connection

Maybe once. Today for many Google is the home page, FB is the Internet. On phones, where the seasrch engine is embeded and not so visible, FB is "the Internet" even more.

The problem for Google is that you enter "Google" (the search engine") and then get out to land somewhere else, and for the "average social product" that's FB - where he or she stays much longer.

That's why Google tried its Google+, etc - to retain p(roducts)eople inside its network when it can track them. Ok, GMail and YouTube allow for a lot of tracking, but not that kind of DPI - Deep People Inspection - that FB allows.

Sure, if Google doesn't work on their PC to access FB they think "the connection to the Internet is broken", than they see that FB works on the phone and they still think the "Internet works". If Google works but they can't access FB, than the Internet is really broken... especially since they "can't do nothing".

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LDS
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Internet for dummies

That's how I've been calling Facebook for years. It was designed to be exactly this. There was nothing innovative in FB, just you got it in a single place with a dummies-oriented interface. In turn, it allowed its users to easily gather all the information they needed about products (aka Facebook 'people') without having to correlate them from different sources. FB was successful because of this. People who had troubles to use the different services available on the Internet, found FB, the Microsoft Works of the Internet, a simpler solution designed for their low skill level. From Zuckerberg perspective, it was a winning move. He's a dummy enough to understand what dummies want. Sometimes being clever doesn't help you to go far, you easily forget a lot of people aren't.

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Google splashes $80k on Chrome 40 bug splatting

LDS
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Re: Google doesn't respect its own 90 days deadline!

Of course the press release doesn't tell it - but it doesn't take much effort to go to CVE site and discover it ... The CVE entry was created at the beginning of October. Unlike Google, they don't publish detail whenever they like - they take security seriously, unlike Google which is now using it as a weapon against MS even if it put users at more risks.

But the very fact that the CVE entry was reserved, assigned and thereby "timestamped", mean that the vulnerability was discovered and sent to Google well before the 90 days Google decided *others* should fix their issues within.

Also, it can be very dangerous to fix vulnerabilities in beta and hotfix - because as soon as that code is released, a simple diff tells you where to look at, even if details are not made public. Vulnerabilities are not alike other bugs - disclosure *must* be very careful or you just get explotable zero days ones. A sound practice is to fix vulnerabilities first in production release and then backport them to any public beta or whatever - the other way round could be much more dangerous.

And, read: "be kept private until we coordinate disclosure" - so they keep them private until they are ready for a disclosure - no matter how long it takes, no deadline here - so what they ask others to comply with is not valid for them. What is funny is people like you thing it's OK.... but Google has washbrained a lot of people who are scared as hell if they have to pay for the software they use...

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LDS
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Re: Disclosure

They pay money so the researcher stay silent until the check is paid...

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LDS
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Re: Google doesn't respect its own 90 days deadline!

Can you read a CVE entry? Follow the link....

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LDS
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Re: Google doesn't respect its own 90 days deadline!

Ah, that's the reason Google is publishing them, they asked for money and MS didn't comply?

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LDS
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Google doesn't respect its own 90 days deadline!

CVE-2014-7923 was created on October 6th, 2014 (https://cve.mitre.org/cgi-bin/cvename.cgi?name=CVE-2014-7923) - and that is only the date when the CVE identifier was created - not when the vulnerabilty was discovered, which of course happened *before*.

(It looks the other CVE entries too were created on 20141006 - thereby it looks Google too needs time to fix things and release them... how many other later vulns are there and waiting to be patched well after 90 days?)

"Strangely" they waited a "few days" for the release of a patch.... but of course wait for googledrones flying in to say this is different....

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'One day, YOU won't be able to SENSE the INTERNET,' vows Schmidt

LDS
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As soon as an asteroid hits Googleplex, that's ok.

Than for many "Internet" would have really disappeared...

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Microsoft: We bought Skype. We make mobiles.. Oh, HANG ON!

LDS
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If they abandon the Tiles for the Win 3.1 look&feel of Android...

... I will stop using Windows Phone.

They got the best and useful UI for mobile, and of course they are going to ditch it to follow the antiquate Win 3.1 Program Manager style of others. Just because people say MS can't innovate, exactly because they can't see innovation and are afraid of it, and stick to old, outdated models.

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Hollywood vs hackers: Vulture cracks Tinseltown keyboard cornballs

LDS
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Re: data center without any kind of cooling

And what about the "Winter Soldier" aereoships datacenter (using blades, but with a strange enclosure which doesn't look designed for security and strength...( put in a very and easily accessible position - but with a sci-fi design, of course? An without any access control?

Usually those kind of equipement are in the most hardened part of a ship....

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2015 and IBM: But it wasn't supposed to be like this...

LDS
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Is anybody still using IBM software?

Everytime I get close to one I start to feel sick....

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2015: The year of MAD TV science, but who can keep up?

LDS
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"using Quantum Dot nano-technology. Frankly, I couldn’t tell the difference"

Maybe the PR drones simply didn't understand that showing sRGB contents on a wide-gamut display still will just show sRGB gamut.... moreover, what color space are going to cover thos wide gamut screens? Contents will need to be adjusted for it, or colorspace conversion will need to be performed on the fly.

Wide gamut monitors are already available for those image professionals needing to work in larger spaces than sRGB, and the difference is noticeable when wide-gamut images are used.

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Google reveals bug Microsoft says is mere gnat

LDS
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Re: Totally exploitable on college campuses

Maybe if the "client" runs a web server which fetch files from an SMB server you can trick it into delivering you some of its local files it would not normally do - say a config file. But you need to control the SMB server the http server fetches files from, and change it into a compromised one, or re-route SMB calls to another one you control.

It's a vulnerability, but not so easy to exploit, note that in the disclosure itself he needed to use a debugger to change the contents, or use Samba (when open source code is more dangerous than closed one, LOL!) because hacking directly the standard SMB server process in Windows is far more difficult.

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It's 2015 and default creds can brick SOHO routers

LDS
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Re: How nice

Not everybody is willingly to spend hundreds of $ for an "enterprise" router, nor they would able to configure it themselves - thereby they are forced to rely on the ISP router and its configuration.

And not everybody has a spare PC running all the time (maybe making noise, consuming power and increasing fire risks), nor has the skill to configure it as a router and firewall.

That is true for AP as well - I spent some $$$$ to get one (which is only an AP) which allows to associate each SID to a different VLAN (and also spent some $$$$ for a managed switch to configure those VLANs - and the needed ACLs), for example the Sky decoder can access the Internet but can't access anything else (it's a PC inside my LAN I have no control about what it does... and it can also download software from its satellite connection....) I use WPA2 + Radius for authentication but for that SID used by devices who cant use WPA2 Enterprise (and thereby set to a restricted VLANs). But that's an "expensive" setup that also requires some expertise to put it all together (DHCP, DNS and RADIUS don't run on the router also, requiring another device to buy, setup and configure), well beyond the average user one.

Most will have a single SID AP, an unmanaged switch probably built into the AP or router (or the all-in-one device they use...) thereby they need to rely on the security of that single device - and because those devices are also more common, so integrated, and widely deployed, they are also a far better target for some criminal activities - but you can't really blame the user for not adopting what from his or her perspective are just too expensive and too complex setups, unsupported by their ISP.

After all we IT nerds need to trust someone else also in matters we have no expertise of. If the ISP rents routers, it and its supopliers need to take care of its security. As I do expect my bank to be secure because I can't setup my own....

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LDS
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Re: How nice

And also unless you really need it for some good reason, don't allow the router to be managed from the WAN interface. The issue is those people who don't own their own router need to leave it open for the ISP to manage it.

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Want a cheap Office-er-riffic tablet? Microsoft Windows takes on Android

LDS
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Re: Readable review

Are you using POP3?? Even so, you can configure it to leave a copy on the server. Anyway, POP3 is today a really obsolete protocol useful only in some circumstances. It was designed when people usually used a single computer, and accessed mail only from there. And to keep mail server space usage to a minimum storing read emails on the user system.

IMAP4 has far better features, it syncs email from the remote server to the local computer, and allows to access the same account from different applications, including web clients.

I guess applications stop working - or may work in a limited, read-only fashion - if you don't renew the subscription.

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LDS
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It's not that easy. Metro application are designed for the keyboard appearing automatically, but with desktop application it may be difficult to show the keyboard with interfering with the application, especially if the input area is not in the "right place" when the keyboard appear. I guess that's one of the main reasons MS decided to leave the user the task to invoke the keyboard.

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LDS
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Re: Good for the price

It's just Google crippling other efforts. OAuth 2 is not mandatory in any RFC I know - is TLS/SSL deprecated by an official RFC now? Outlooks and Mail work without issue with IMAP and TLS/SSL.

I use them with my own mail server (which is not Exchange) without issues.

Of course Google wants you to use its Gmail web client or its own tools because it can't track you very well if you're so stubborn to use some old RFC protocols like IMAP and a mail client instead of a browser, preferably its own Trojan called Chrome, nor it can show you ads. Also OAuth 2 is far better to correlate all your activities across different services....

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LDS
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Devil

Re: Linux?

Does Linux brick things? And if you're a real "Linux hacker" you shouldn't be afraid of bricking things - and installing an OS in a supported way anyway it's not something that should "brick things". Or are you going to hack the BIOS and maybe its SecureBoot chain to install Linux? Or would you just give up as soon as it doesn't recognize your USB boot device and the Linux installer doesn't start? Usually Win 8.x devices let you create a recovery disk to restore a device.

But if I were an hardcore Linux fan I would risk to brick something more expensive, I mean, at least some $200-$500 device, not a $1500 one maybe, attempting to install it... otherwise you just make Linux look something for people who can't afford an OS nor the device to run it on...

I would also write the driver for the touch screen, of course, and donate it to the community.... don't tell me you just USE Linux and don't contribute to it, do you????

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LDS
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Re: I bought one of these for Christmas

When the competition is Android, security is not a feature on both...

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LDS
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Devil

Re: Linux?

Why Linux people are always in search of something cheap? Are they paid so little?

Also, are you sure you're able to use your average distro and especially your beloved shell without a keyboard?

Where are the cheap Linux tablets? Canonical can't made one?

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Video nasty: Two big bugs in VLC media player's core library

LDS
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I would not run a database nor on XP nor on W7. Neither are optimized for server tasks. Anyway the OS matters little when it comes to databases - raw I/O speed and memory size matter far more. And here a 64 bit 7 will outperform any 32 bit XP - and even a 64 bit XP which was mostly a "proof of concept". Moreover the 7 kernel is far better optimized to use a large amount of memory and multicore processors (which were not available when XP was designed - IIRC XP came also with an HAL optimized for single core single processor hardware...)

And if you're just running the client running the queries against a DB server, well, again, the OS matters very little....

If your code shows huge differences between the two OS, I guess you have some hidden issues in your code.

Surely not all bugs are fixed in 7, but XP won't get any bugs fixed. And newer apps may use APIs not available on XP.

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'If you see a stylus, they BLEW it' – Steve Jobs. REMEMBER, Apple?

LDS
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Wacom is behind the digitizers used in some Samsung and MS Surface (not the 3) tablets. Wacom has a huge patent portfolio, and may not be easy to implement many devices without hitting one, I guess.

But AFAIK none of this has tilt sensibility - which is someone professional artists often need. Also, supported sensitivity levels are usually higher in pro devices (and Wacom pro device let the user also change tool changing the actual "pen", which may have also the physical feeling of the real tool).

The very good thing with Wacom digitizer is their stylus is passive - it doesn't require batteries to work, and I by far prefer this kind. One device less to charge, and as long the tablet works, the stylus work as well.

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Increased gov spy powers are NOT the way to stay safe against terrorism

LDS
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Re: Too much data

'how would they ever find out?'

That's 'exactly the very meaning of 'intelligence'. You have to outsmart your enemy. It needs the right people in the right places, clever enough to understand what's happening. Sure, they will never be able to achieve a 100% success rate, but the right people can do well without crippling democratic principles.

The 'gather all' approach says 1) we have nor a real clue nor the right people so we pretend to do something and besides hoping we got something by chance, we could always explain *later* we got the data... even if nothing was done 2) protect politicians from dissent, cover scandals, bribes, crimes ensuring all communications, including whistleblowers and media, can be easily monitored...

Just, this is not intelligence. It's plain stupidity to protect just a small part of the population, which happens to be the same pushing these rules...

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LDS
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"It is the method favoured by regimes with dark secrets to hide"

"It is the method favoured by regimes with dark secrets to hide and a vested interest in hunting down those who would unveil those secrets."

You're spot on. The real aim is not to protect citizens from crime. It's to protect politicians and their friends from citizens - exactly what happens in any dictatorship.

They don't want scandals become public, they don't want whistleblowers communicate with media to uncover those dark secrets. Who would try to tell somebody something about criminal, illegal, unethical acts or behaviours by politicians & C. if they can be easily snooped with just an approval from a *politician* and appointed by other politicians - not a judge?

Politics became so remunerative those inside the system will fight to death to keep their place, against their competitors, and those citizens who are so "silly" to believe that politician should act in the citizens interest, not their own only.

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GRENADE! Project Zero pops pin on ANOTHER WINDOWS 0-DAY

LDS
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Re: Let battle begin

You forgot you can access Windows code. There's a lot of organizations and researches who have access to Windows code. You have to request access and not everybody will be allowed, but it's not true that only MS can see it.

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Re: About time....

If you were an enterprise engineer, you wouldn't be happy to work most of the nights and weekends to run after every patch released for every software you use...

Patching complex systems that run critical software is very different than patching your bedroom PC you use to download porn...

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Re: About time....

Unless you know the code, you can't really know how easy is to patch that code. It could be changing one line of code only, it can require extensive changes even for what may look a "simple patch" from outside. You have to assess and consider the ramification of any change. You need the people in charge of that codebase to be available to work on it.

But it looks most people here, if ever they wrote real production software, adhere to the "Hey, it compiles, ship it!" way of delivering it....

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LDS
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Re: Damn, crikey.. <fill in expletive of choice>

Scroogled was a silly campaign, but didn't increase security risks. Google is playing with fire.

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LDS
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Re: Damn, crikey.. <fill in expletive of choice>

It's pretty clear this is some kind of strategy decided at top exec level, not something a single group within Google can do without asking permission.

Why? It looks Google has some troubles (the step back in the Glass program, after all the hype including the agreement with Luxottica, can be a hint) and decided to become a bully to put competitors in bad light. What are they afraid of? Maybe the new free license model for some Windows version could start to make a dent into low-price Android devices market share? Flat ChromeOS sales?

The worst thing is they are increasing risks for users, and they don't care. And it could start an unecessary "war". Very childish behaviour, from Google.

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You'll get sick of that iPad. And guess who'll be waiting? Big daddy Linux...

LDS
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Re: THere's a missing "Sponsored: Canonical" at the bottom of this article...

You also, given you can write no more than four words without any useful content... keep on dreaming - Linux is not going anywhere where user applications matters. As long as there are no useful, successful, applications for user-oriented devices, Linux won't go anywhere. And because most successful applications are *commercial* ones, they won't target Linux and its (and its fanboys base) obsession for open source software - sure, you could write open source commercial apps, just somebody forks it and you're screwed because Linux users are greed and don't want to pay for applications. Just look at what happened when Oracle bought Sun. OpenOffice and other projects went immediately in "paranoid mode" and forked to avoid to be touched by an "evil commercial company".

You can also deliver closed source applications for Linux - it means - besides all the screaming because they are closed soruce and not available from the standard repositories - there's a big risk they stop working with every release of Linux because Linux cares very little about backward binary compatibility - after all you should be able to recompile them, right?

The whole Linux business model is flawed to support user devices. That's the reason because despite being free it never went far ahead - people needs applications, not OSes. And will keep on using those OSes for which the application they need are available. Even if they screw up with the GUI for one release. Just, ignorant people still believe user should choose an OS because they're told it's superior by some Linux ayatollah....

Android is successful despite its Linux roots because it got rid of all that open source obsession, and built a business model where you can actually deliver commercial applications without open source talibans in the way, although Google exploited the open source code as much as it could to keep development cost low. But it replicated the Apple business model, not the Linux one.

Maybe the day we'll see an OS built on the Linux kernel but away from the FSF/GNU "business" model, probably it will have more chances to become an end-user usable OS - but if - and only if - someone starts to develop real useful applications for it. Otherwise, keep on dreaming....

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THere's a missing "Sponsored: Canonical" at the bottom of this article...

And as usual you'll see some Linux phone/tablet aimed at the usual Linux nerds. Everybody else will keep on using Windows/OSX/iOS/Android. Especially as long as Linux application keep on being a pale imitation of true professional applications (or no application at all beyond the general ones...)

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Don't use Charlie Hebdo to justify Big Brother data-slurp – Data protection MEP

LDS
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Re: What fools

Even buses, metros and trains can be attacked by suicide bombers. It happened in Madrid and London. Why don't they ask for those passengers lists? No fly lists already exist to protect flights, they work the other way round. It's police giving airlines a list of 'dangerous' passenger. Now they want airlines submit the list of *all* passenger including also additional data like credit card numbers, meal preferences, etc. The usual dragnet attempt to hide lack of proper intelligence (in every meaning of it), and pretend something is done, while collecting a lot of sensitive data about *everybody* and keeping the for years. It's more dangerous than terrorism itself.

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LDS
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Re: Playing into Terrorists hands...

Face it. You win a modern war only when you scare your enemy so much he loses any will to react. Nazi German underwent that treatment. People saw their dears die under the bombs. They also understood there would be more bombs and deaths if they didn't surrender.

It's no longer the "king wars" where a field battle was enough to understand who won and who loses. Today war needs to be total, and is won only when the enemy lose any will to combat longer, despite its losses.

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