* Posts by LDS

1877 posts • joined 28 Feb 2010

A good effort, but a bit odd: Windows 10 IoT Core on Raspberry Pi 2

LDS
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> Certainly _not_ preemptive. It was co-operative, and often non-cooperative.

You're right, there's a missing "no".

> Raspian is a full Linux distro

Even a minimal Raspian is about 500MB. Anyway a Raspian doesn't come with many servers and applications pre-installed. Nor Windows 10 is just a kernel only, and moreover is a preview release which probably is still compiled with a lot of debug settings.

> As a comparison I can get a Linux distro

Sure, as I said you can make a custom OS stripped down as mush as you like - Linux, after all, is just the kernel, and if you remove lots of modules (and thereby flexibility). you can reduce its footprint a lot, especially if you use an older, smaller kernel. How much is really usable such "distro" but to show off among penguins, is debatable.. and it's something you need to support separately, especially if using a different kernel.

Just with the actual prices of SD cards and USB drives, why should someone try to run something from old, unreliable, unsupported floppies??

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LDS
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Re: the question is why is Microsoft putting Windows on Pi.

Wrong, MS is actually a company selling software first and foremost (unlike Google, for example, where software is mostly just a medium to sell its marketing services), and for that very reason it needs its software to be widely adopted and used - or die.

It's pretty clear that if new market emerges, it needs to cover them as well. It happened already - when x86 servers became a compelling alternatives to Unix minis and mainframes, server versions of Windows were needed - with a very different architecture and capabilities of the Win 3.x software.

When game consoles became fashionable again, it developed the Xbox.

When handheld devices became widespread, MS supported them far before Apple, with an unappealing product far from being well designed, true, but MS never thought the "desktop" PC market is enough to sustain itself, even if a lot of revenues still comes from it, and may have failed to gain the same relevant position in other markets.

And keeping a "brand" visible is not something only "marketing" companies need. Any company needs to keep its brand well known among possible customers - marketing is something any sensible company does.

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LDS
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Do you remember that WfWG 3.11 was a single threaded (preemptive "multitasking"... GUI atop DOS, with no security at all, no concept of services/daemons, barely supporting simple networks, etc etc.? Software changed and improved a lot form those days, otherwise, think about what DOS was capable of doing in 640K RAM and 360K disks...

Moreover, an ad hoc OS may probably stripped down even more, but if Windows 10 kernel still needs to be shared across different version it may still carry some inevitable "bloat" - it's the price you have to pay to avoid to maintain n completely different versions of an OS.

Even the Raspbian image is a 990MB download (zipped).

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LDS
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It's Windows needing the Pi, not the Pi needing Windows.

Sure, the Pi itself doesn't need Windows. But Windows needs to expand and cover such devices. It was the right move from Microsoft to start supporting such devices which despite their original aims, expanded outside the pure didactic environment.

Pi & C. became excellent devices for prototyping and building "cheap" more complex ones using the Pi as the brain and adding other hardware through Arduino and the like.

Keeping Windows outside this range of users would have been a stupid move (to Linux fanboys: from a MS perspective), and a lot of new developers may also start by tinkering with devices like Pi.

With the IoT madness all around us, it's also a good introduction to such kind of devices for old and new developers.

Thereby, it's Microsoft needing the Pi, not vice versa.

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Robocalling Americans? That'll cost you $1.7 MEEELLION

LDS
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Re: Get the ball rolling

Telcos are often very friendly with services making lots of calls (they still need to pay for them...), it's money for them, after all. Most telephone scams usually means money one way or the other for telcos as well. Do not expect them do anything to help stop those scams, they will probably help to cover them.

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'Millions' of routers open to absurdly outdated NetUSB hijack

LDS
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If you go for high-end routers from Cisco & C. you may get better support, and sometimes even better software, but you're going to spend a lot more and configurations are more complex, albeit far more powerful as well. And usually, you won't find all-in-one devices.

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LDS
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That's why i hate multifunctinal devices...

... I by far prefer multiple devices each doing one function only (router, switch, file server, etc.), so I can select each one separately, but I understand such setup is more expensive and complex to configure.

But cobbling together a lot of functions into a single device while squeezing costs will inevitably lead to a lot of low quality code written or borrowed here and there inside those devices. And each attack surface will probably compromise the other functions as well.

IMHO they should 'virtualize' or 'containerize' each function within the device so one vulnerability in one module won't affect the whole device, or at least will make it harder to compromize the whole device, and, if needed, you can wholly turn off one module.

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Microsoft's Surface 3 is sweet – but I wouldn't tickle my nads with it

LDS
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Re: We've been giving one a go at work

You can get any display port to vga adapter, you're not forced to buy the 'ms branded' one.

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LDS
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It looks the author didn't understand the tablet market has segmented

There's no more 'the tablet' there are different tablets models covering different segments, from landfill Android and Windows model you can carry in your trousers, to high end models like the iPad and laptop replacements like the Surface. What you need and what you buy depends on what you plan to do with the device, and what you could spend. No size fits all, and well, my Surface stores too precious data to risk to crack it while travelling, it's not just an MP3 player for me. All you need is just a nice light bag to carry it around.

After all, I do not carry around my €6000 DSLR + lens combo as I carry around my €199 phone...

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LDS
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Re: £419 (64GB, 2GB RAM), £499 (128GB, 4GB RAM) RRP

While a £600 phone (or worse, a smartwatch) is worth the price?

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Wrestling with Microsoft's Nano Server preview

LDS
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Re: The why and what for

As long as a nanoserver runs in a VM you may have little reason to log on directly. But if it runs on its own hardware, say some kind of appliance, you may need some direct access if the network components don't work for some reason. Otherwise, no matter how PowerShell is good at remoting, you're cut off, and you'll never know why...

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LDS
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It runs the usual minimal web stuff. It looks aimed at supporting one web application per server, to better isolate them. From a security perspective, could be a good idea. It's not a way to run complex, large server side applications yet. Anyway, larger, more powerful databases and the like can be still hosted on standard servers and be accessed from nanoservers, if needed.

Also, being unable to access a machine directly if there are issues that may hinder a connection, it's not something I'd like on some type of servers. It's PK with something you can easily replace with a copy.

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It’s Adobe’s Creative Cloud TITSUP birthday. Ease the pain with its RGB-wrangling rivals

LDS
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Re: CC, a lot of whinging about nothing.

If there is something good in Windows, it's its support for older software. And until an OS is EOLed, you may need not to upgrade unless you have good reasons to do so (usually, new hardware support).

That's exactly why they're moving to subscriptions, people don't feel the need to upgrade as often as in the past, so make upgrades mandatory.

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LDS
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Subscriptions transfer risks from shareholders to custmers

That's why they are so appealing to companies, especially those that stop working if you don't renew. You can no longer 'vote' for the quality/value of a release buying or skipping it, you have to get it anyway. The risk of a bad release is transferred from the shareholders to you, the customer.

Once upon a time there was the entrepreneur risk... then came Adobe...

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LDS
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Re: Paint Shop Pro

The last I upgraded to was X3 (I bought it first when it was Jasc PSP 5). Its three different interfaces built with different tools made it a mess to use. It also installed some background running applications without asking that scanned continuously the disk, beside its copy protection service.

Its RAW importing modile was too raw, and instead of improving tools a lot of amateurish features were added. I used it mostly for photos, thereby I switched to Lightroom and still use an old copy of PSP8 for some simple and quick bitmap edits.

Corel is a company able to kill whatever it gets its hands on, see Wordperfect, Quattro Pro, Winzip, PSP and its very own CorelDraw!

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NASA snaps first full family photo of Pluto and its five moons

LDS
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Re: Nomenclature

Why not Thorin then? Guess the fame of him will outlast any actually fashionable TV movie (and lame books) destined to be forgotten soon.

Anyway I guess the IAU will only accept classic names from afterlife mythologies, especially from the Greek/Roman one from which all names actually come from...

And for new bodies Tolkien's names from its deep, creative mythology would have IMHO better chances to be accepted (after all the largest Uranus moons are named after Shakespeare's characters) than names from any actual "bestseller" which may not stand the ages...

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WikiLeaks, er, leaks the Bundestag Inquiry into NSA naughtiness

LDS
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Re: "Siemens doing business with Russian Intelligence"

Do you believe Putin the Short is trying to save poor Russians in Ukraine and not trying to put his dirty hands on the naval yards and bases Russia lost when Ukraine became independent? Almost all of the Russian fleet was built in Nikolaev, the Russian operations in Ukraine are pure military moves to regain and re-establish a significative military presence in the Black Sea and the Mediterranean, without being forced to the far more limited Baltic bases.

Of course NATO has all the reason of being worried about such moves, especially made by a man like Putin who has clearly lost his head and is in the phase of believing to be a great dictator with no boundaries.

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LDS
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Re: Hmm...

Of course they knew about the collaboration, but I'm not sure they were aware that 'collaboration' in NSA lingo means 'spy your allies industries and other key people'

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Russia delays ISS crew mission over Progress launch safety fears

LDS
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Unless it's the only remaining option, I guess nobody would attempt a re-entry in something not man-rated, and missing the required equipment.

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LDS
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Not only the Progress is a modified Sojuz, but the launcher is the same.

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LDS
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Re: Captain?

Depends on what Navy you talk about. For example in the Italian Navy you have three 'captain' ranks (corvette, frigate, vessel captain, above there are admirals), you can address as 'commander' when in charge of a ship. If I'm not wrong US and Royal Navy use lieutenant commander, commander, captain for the same ranks. Royal Navy IIRC has the commodore rank above captain as well.

Anyway all those ranks are more or less equivalent to a colonel in other services, where a captain is usually the rank above a lieutenant.

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Scot Nationalists' march on Westminster may be GOOD for UK IT

LDS
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Re: "FPTP is not providing anything approaching democracy"

Just look at the Italian systems... they are designed so parties bosses and their entourages always get a seat, and others need to be puppets if they want one. In Italy the system changes more or less every ten years, but it is always designed to favour the ruling party, and its top members. No risks here to lose your seat, or to have to resign after a defeat... and very little control, or no control at all, like in the past system, about who you vote. Keep your system, may not be the best, but there are so many worse ones...

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For its next trick, Microsoft diminishes the iPad with just a driver

LDS
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Re: Just one problem

Actually the real issue with Windows 8 is being too touch oriented for desktop users. Used on a tablet, it works far better, and still lets you easily access desktop apps (especially with the right cover and a digitizer). .

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LDS
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Re: Just one problem

The Surface 3 isn't really aimed at middle management, as the article says more useful for a mobile workforce. Then there's the Pro, and those middle managers who want to do something useful also, not just show off...

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Russia and China seal cyber non-hack pact

LDS
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Re: What a surprise

"what would you do in their shoes"

Stopping being idiot dictators and trying to move the countries to a real democracy? Oh yes, there's a lot of money, power and easy women to lose... but you may choose to enter History on the same index as Hitler, Stalin. etc. of far better people who actually did something for their citizens.

But it looks fears - too many fears - is turning again Western countries to think "dictators" are the way to go to keep things quiet. History has shown several times it's the wrong bet. There's never a "good dictator" - too much power corrupts anybody, and then stopping them becomes terribly expensive - including lives.

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You say you want a musical revolution. Actually, have three

LDS
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Rock was born ten year before 1964...

... ant it was not the always highly overrated Beatles and Rolling stones to introduce it (especially the Beatles with their lame ye-ye sound). They were not a music revolution, but a 'behavioral' one. They understood that looking like idiots, and acting like idiots, would have paid much more than their music in years when young people wanted to 'feel different' and break with the 'old ways'.

From a musical point of view, other artists were much more innovative than the easy sound of Beatles (moreover, usually badly performed), and the repetitive sound of Rolling Stones. But on stage, they were the 'revolutionaries' people looked for regardless of the music. Perfect 'products' for the times. The same 'game' will be repeated often in the following years with other singers and groups...

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BILLION YEAR SECRETS of baking hellworld Mercury UNLOCKED by NASA probe crash

LDS
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Re: I don't understand how, please explain

Of course they didn't it for a single rock. But if a large enough area formed in the same time, say from melted rocks, it may have retained the old field, and today 'disturb' the actual field and that disturb being detectable flying low enough so the instruments read just a small enough area of the planet field.

It is also true for local gravimetric changes. If you fly high enough big mountains (or even local changes in density) don't matter much, but if you fly close enough to them you can measure a difference in the gravity force.

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Why don't you rent your electronic wireless doorlock, asks man selling doorlocks

LDS
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Just imagine when your smartphone is full of apps to control all the IoT things... "Oh no, I was trying to open the front door but opened the roof windows and it's raining hard [the windows are not smart enough to not open when it rains, you didn't rent the sensor], no, this is the fridge app - why I let Bobby get the smartphone and move all the pretty icons around??? - this is the oven, the washing machine, this is a bulb, not an handle, was it this? It has a lock on it... no, this is the password manager... oh, here it is!

[Enter]

The house has been robbed... the fridge is popping out ice on the floor, while the oven is set at 300° and is beginning to burn the furniture - while the washing machine is turning at 3000 rpm - the smart TV flashes "you've been p0wned - all your keys are belong to us".

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LDS
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Maybe he should have waited for DEFCON 23 to tell it?

It looks their going to look into these IoT things...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/05/06/defcon_23_to_host_internet_of_things_slaughterfest/

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Intel raises memory deflector shields in Xeon E7 processor refresh

LDS
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Re: Hmm...

Buf FADD worked well, it was FDIV flawed... those companies are always good at getting more, far less ad dividing...

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LDS
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Re: Hmm...

If your data processing needs didn't increase much, yes, it's years you can "downsize" your hardware and coalesce more and more processing on less hardware (but for redundacy reasons), or go cloudy. It's also one of the reason the PC market slowed down, far less need of a new one for performance reasons alone.

That was inevitable - Intel will have to find new revenue streams, and they know, although it's not that easy.

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Pacific nation accidentally does good thing in web crackdown

LDS
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Re: Imprisoning kids

Depends - being young don't prevent you to be nasty, very nasty - and biological age has very little to do with how really "grown up" you are, a lot depends on the environment you grew within - some make you much "older" soon. Then dealing with immigrants should be different than dealing with criminals, and immigrant children should be "managed" carefully because they may be at risk.

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Italian ISS trekkie sips first zero-G cup of espresso in SPAAAACE

LDS
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Re: A Red Shirt?

It looks you didn't go past the original Star Trek... since The Next Generation colors have changed and "red" became the colors of the "command" division (including captains), while "yellow" was "transferred" to the "operations" division which used to wear "red". Science/medical kept the "blue" color.

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LDS
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Next is to have Earl Grey tea...

... for the next bald captain...

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Australia cracks tech giants' tax dodge code

LDS
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"Where the value is added" is just a "weasel" statement. It really doesn't mean nothing - you can give it any meaning you like, and use it at your own advantage.

I could say that *real* value is create only where and when a "customer" is willingly to pay for your goods and he or she actually does. Otherwise, you just have a bunch of materials put together noone wants, and thereby without value, even if there was a cost associated in putting them together. Otherwise unsold items should be taxed (there is added value anyway, right?)

Also, you can create very little value in moving goods around, because, unless you are able to sell them at the end of the chain, there is really no value created - especially if all the chain is under the wings of the same company, thereby there is no *real* customer in the chain.

But of course, it's easier to pretend "value" is created somewhere else...

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LDS
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Re: Taxing the wrong thing

Yes, and if the part of company profit tax you pay escapes from the country, you pay it anyway (they don't make the good cheaper even if they move profit away), just you don't get its benefits...

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LDS
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Re: why should the coumtry in which the item is sold enjoy the biggest tax 'take'?

It would simply happen than unless it's something you can't do without, or produce locally, say, oil, you will find alternative products (or build it locally) because you won't stay in business otherwise: no profit, no business.

In fact oil siphoned off large amount of money from countries consuming it to those producing it... which may use it against you...

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LDS
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You can't compare a small country like Singapore with a larger one like Australia, and even larger one, territory and population-wise. There are very different needs to address - just think about infrastructures, transportation, education, etc.

A larger country, even without an inefficient government, will *always* cost more - even per capita - and will need to ask more taxes - it's inevitable. It's not a question of efficiency, it's just a question of size and people's rights.

Sure, if Australia could force all its inhabitants to move in a small area of the country, it could obtain significant savings - 23 millions? It's about four times Singapore, thee-four cities will be enough... just you won't be free to live wherever you like, of course.

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LDS
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Re: Taxing the wrong thing

"on top of already demanding sales tax"

Because the sale tax is usually paid by the buyer, not the seller? And you're paying it with money which were already taxed, increasing the total amount of tax *you* pay?

I would advocate for a huge reduction of sale taxes in exchange for "properly" taxing *real* profits, not taxing *expenses*.

But most government like the low hanging fruit, taxing taxpayers *expenses" adding a VAT or sales tax to it is far easier than trying to make large companies, from which also some funds for politician comes, to pay taxes on profits....

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LDS
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Re: why should the coumtry in which the item is sold enjoy the biggest tax 'take'?

There is no "right" solution. There are solutions that work better and solutions that work worse. Most actual tax rules were devised where company where mostly "local", and creating "fake" companies and move money around the world more difficult. So, those rules moslty worked.

Now, it became far too easier to implement schemes to shuffle money around, and pay little or nothing - the only drawback is that money can end in a tax haven, and then you have to lobby to bring them back with a laughable tax rate, not available to the other citizens...

The problem is that in such ways those large companies siphon off a large amount of money from one country and transfer them to others, returning very little in exchange (yes, some jobs... not enough to offset what they transfer abroad).

Still taxes have to pay for the State services (infrastructures, education, healtcare, police, etc...), and if the largest companies are able to avoid them, someone else have to pay for them... other smaller campanies unable to setup such schemes (stifling competition, lower margins, and increasing unemployment, which in turn, needs funds...), and the physical taxpayer, who sees his or her taxes increasing over and over... it looks actual rules no longer work well for most citizens.

If you're happy to see your taxes increase, or the service level decrease, be happy that Apple, Google, MS & C. are able to move the money you spend abroad and let you pay the taxes... or pay more for the same service than before.

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LDS
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Re: "but the Committee contends they are certainly cynical"

You may be surprised, but modern democracy is built on strong ethical, moral grounds. The very idea of basic, immutable, inalienable rights is strongly moral. The only difference from religions, is that rights don't come from an external divine being, and are not controlled by self-appointed intermediaries called "priests" (or whatever a religion names them) but are "endowed" to you automatically just because you exist.

Most modern tax systems are built on moral and ethical grounds too - that the whole community benefits if everybody contributes to the community expenses, and often those who were able to earn more can contribute a little more, especially since often to earn more they need to take advantage of those who earn less.

If there were no "moral" or "ethics" in actual laws, we would just see the "most powerful ones" impose their will (and, in some ways, it partially happens already) as it happened before "democracy" became the reference model in most developed countries.

I often reapeat that a true "liberal system" can only work in an environment driven by strong moral - call it "ethical", if you prefer - principles accepted (and observed) by all players - otherwise it soon degenerates in an oligarchy were a few powerful members can do whatever they like - and often unluckily, it happens already, even in those who call themeselves the best and great democracies...

I understand the wish for paying as less tax as possible, but there are even ethical boundaries. If companies trespass them because they are so shortsighted that short term gains will be paid later, well, a State - elected by citizens - has all the rights to modify the legislation to ensure the holes used to trespass the boundaries are plugged.

PS: in Italy you are forced to pay 8‰ of your taxes to a religion of your choice (among those that have a ratified agreement), or to the State itself for "charities" - and I believe it's not the only State requiring it, even in the Western world...

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LDS
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Aren't R&D costs already inside the product price?

I never seen a company that doesn't factor next products R&D expenses into actual products price, especially if they sell well. Never seen one asking they're selling branches to pay for them... it would be silly, but, of course, for tax avoidance schemes.

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New Windows 10 will STAGGER to its feet, says Microsoft OS veep

LDS
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Will Flight Simulator X run?

I'll upgrade to Windows 10 only if FSX will run on it - and no, not the Steam version. I'm not going to install the steam crap just to run FSX.

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Bruce Schneier's Data and Goliath – solution or part of the problem?

LDS
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They believe collecting enough data will factor out those 'errors', because their model implies most people feed in mostly accurate enough data. Sure, if enough people start to feed enough inaccurate data the model breaks, that's why they pretend they're doing their business in your interest.

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'Just follow the damn Constitution!' FBI, DoJ skewered over demands for crypto backdoors

LDS
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TSA locks, anyone?

Since when to travel to USA you are forced to ensure your luggage carries a standard backdoor - of course just to be used by TSA personnel for security reasons - your luggage can be easily opened by anyone, and if you really store anything valuable in it, you're really very naïve or an idiot. I would like to know how many terrorists have been arrested or deterred by TSA locks, and how many goods were even more easily stolen because of them. And often, by TSA personnel itself.

Is FBI going to ask a backdoor in every safe and door, because inside it or behind it there could be an evidence, or a crime is being committed?

Sure, just like technology can help investigations - think DNA - it could also make them more difficult, especially if law enforcement agencies chase the 'easy way' and don't get prepared for the difficult one.

Or they believe they could also enforce US backdoors in foreign devices? Or once the backdoor exists, refuse to give the key to some countries were it takes very little to be declared an enemy of the state and searched? What if some mobe, even of foreign citizens, is inspected in countries where, for example, homosexuality, or even carrying some books is a crime?

I may understand FBI fears of being unable to gather evidence. But tha is a risk that always existed in a democracy. Better they stop asking for a dangerous, unlawful easy way, and invest in training to better investigation techniques.

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ZuckerBorg assimilates Microsoft boffins into potentially world-threatening FART

LDS
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Thought Zuckerberg should have been happy...

... of having made so much money just on Natural Stupidity.

But probably now he needs machines to herd his sheep and extract even more money.

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Ubuntu to shutter year-old clock unlock bug

LDS
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Re: Insider risk not appreicated by interviewee

Especially since a remote attacker can find other ways to get his code run as an unprivileged user on a target machine, and then all he needs is exactly a privilege escalation vuln. Many attacks are carefully built using several holes at once, moving sideway, etc. not just looking for a single, high risk one on the target machine.

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SHA-1 crypto hash retirement fraught with problems

LDS
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Joke

Re: As always, Firefox

Yes, we all know that Firefox SHA-1 is far more secure than Windows one...

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REVEALED: The 19 firms whose complaints form EU's antitrust case against Google

LDS
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Re: A question

It wasn't web browsing - it was "web" rendering. Actually, the IE rendering engine is used in several part of the Windows GUI. Thereby, could an OS have its default HTML rendering engine and HTTP protocol support or not? Could a web browser use that engine or not?

But the real problem was not really IE preinstalled - although giving it away for free killed many competitors, but, again, free email services and web mails didn't kill many competitors as well?

It was how MS was using it to twist the standards to drive them to its own direction and advantage (not different from what Google is doing now, see HTTP/2). Just like it attempted to twist Java - and lost there too.

Same for APIs, Office was then able to modify the OS and add new features that could kept hidden for a while, giving MS an unfair advantage (but in iOS there are several APIs only Apple apps can call, but that's OK, it's "for security"...). But believe me, WordPerfect developers had far bigger issues in Windows programming than "hidden" APIs. For example, it looked they never tested on NT4 (I was using it...).

In fact believe the biggest outcome of the EU rule was not the "browser choice" - it was the publishing of "all" interoperability specs. Just, because it's something that matters moslty to developers only, it never made the headlines.

OS/2 was another very bad managed project - did IBM really believed it could rely on its ability to run Win 3.1 applications for ever?? It bought Lotus, and instead of delivering SmartSuite for OS/2 quickly, spent time in releasing the Windows 3.1 version first, riddled with bugs. Given how slow IBM moved, and how big was an OS/2 service pack (and not everybody had Internet then, it came in a pack of several floppies you had to order explicitly - yes, I used OS/2 3.0 from 1994 to 1997, I'm not a MS fan...), it was far too easy to break it with a minimal change. But OS/2 should have relied on its own software. not Win3.x one.

With Google the issue is not if paid for ads are displayed more explicitly - it's if knowingly removed/blacklisted links of competiting services (or put them far below from they would have appeared without manipulation), if it ripped other site contents (what, if it happened to your very own one?). It's like net neutrality: do you agree that telcos could give precedence to traffic for which someone is ready to pay more, at expenses of yours? Or the kind of services telcos provide (and all of them are private business) should not allow for it?

I would just image what would happen if MS decided to blacklist Chrome on Windows systems...

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LDS
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Re: @LDS - A question

False. A lot of PC don't (and didn't) come with Windows pre-installed - only the low-end consumer ones. And nobody forced to use it, you had to actively use Windows. Windows was there because people wanted Windows.

*Nobody* ever forced them to use Windows. There was AppleOS/OSX, there was OS/2, there was Solaris, *BSD, *nix. People consciounsly decided to buy - and wanted - a Windows PC. Stop pretending people didn't want to use Windows, it was just the 1.46% of them that didnt't want Windows just because of hating MS (just to get a pirated copy "just in case....").

Nobody ever forced you to click the IE icon - you can ignore it as much as you liked. Yo had to actively click the IE icon. MS never forbade you to install another browser. And today a lot of pre-installed PC comes with Google pre-configured as the search engine, with Google bar or Chrome installed.

Moreover, even if you don't use Google services actively, still you can be used by them. Google Analytics tracks people data without their active consent (unless you use special software to block it). Mail transiting through GMail accounts are still analyzed, etc. etc.

But that again, that matters little.

It's when *in any way* you achieve a dominant position that puts you in the place to abuse it and cripple competition (and you do), that antitrust laws come into effect. It doesn't really matter how you achieve it, it's how you use it. Again, learn why antitrust laws exist, and how they are designed and why. But it looks Google is very good at brainwash people, the word "free" helps a lot, it looks..

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