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* Posts by Headley_Grange

80 posts • joined 24 Feb 2010

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Mac security packages range from peachy to rancid – antivirus tests

Headley_Grange

Re: Sophos not good with Mavericks in my experience

Paul - I didn't have any trouble with scanning. `If it's finding stuff it can't delete it might be because it's scanning your backups (e.g. Time Machine). If Sophos is scanning your backups then that might be why it's taking a long time - or not finishing. If it does find bad files on your Time Machine then Sophos doesn't have the privileges to delete them and you have to do it manually.

My problem was that occasionally it would look like my wireless link was down cos I couldn't see the web from browsers. After lots of messing about I discovered that it was Sophos and the only way to fix was to uninstall it.

I've run without AV for a couple of months. I read all the stuff about Macs' inherent protection and the fact that there aren't many virus attacks for Macs, but I don't like not having AV. I've just installed a trial of Bitdefender, so I'll see how it goes.

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Headley_Grange

Sophos not good with Mavericks in my experience

On my 2013 MBA Sophos and Mavericks don't play nicely together. Sophos randomly prevented browsers (FF, Chrome, Safari) from accessing the internet connection. I fixed it by uninstalling Sophos.

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Amazon smacks back at Hachette in e-book pricing battle: We're doing it for the readers

Headley_Grange

Re: We all moved to sharepoint.

Rowling was turned down by half a dozen or so publishers and her agent thought the book was dead in the water. She only got a deal because the guy at Bloomsbury did her agent a favour, then couldn't be bothered to read it and gave the m/s to his kid. I wonder how many of those J.K. Nothings might be as bankable as Potter.

Remember - these poor publishers who think they, authors and readers need defending from Amazon are the same publishers who implemented the Net Book Agreement which fixed the price of books across the UK and prevented bookshops from discounting. Now they are trying to do the same with eBooks, but the problem is that instead of having a few relatively small book shops to bully they've come up against Amazon. Some might see Amazon as just a bigger bully (although as a reader I don't - yet.).

VAT apart - I don't understand why an eBook should be more expensive than a paper book. Even ignoring the savings in manufacture, storage, distribution, over-production, pulping, etc., readers only pay to rent these books. There's no second-hand market, it's very difficult to lend them to friends and family and they can't be left as an inheritance. So the market is automatically larger for an e-book than for a paper book because of the limitations of use*. Hachette and Amazon appear to have very different approaches to making money. Hachette want a protected market where they can charge what they want and make loads of money on each sale whereas Amazon are happy to make fractions of a penny profit on massive throughput. As a reader I prefer the Amazon approach cos I can get more books for the same money. For me the jury's still out on whether or not this will result in an Amazonopoly which acts to the detriment of authors - and thereby readers.

*I've heard that Calibre might help!

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Amazon says Hachette should lower ebook prices, pay authors more

Headley_Grange

Memories of the way publishers like Hachette used to fix book prices (Net Book Agreement) mean that I have little sympathy for them. They don't give a toss about their authors; all they care about is that they missed a trick somewhere and someone else is making the money.

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Maplin Electronics sold for £85m to Rutland Partners

Headley_Grange

Vouchers

I remember when the catalogue was a flimsy green affair with about 40 pages and you got vouchers for every £1 you spent. The first time I went to Southend with a girlfriend in the early 80s she couldn't understand why I dragged her off to visit the Maplin shop!

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Facebook's Zuckerberg buttonholes Obama, rages against NSA dragnet spying

Headley_Grange

And they say that Americans don't do irony.

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'We don't use UPS. If we did we'd have huge UPSs and tiny computers'

Headley_Grange

Re: Argument seems illogical

If they have no standby generator the UPS would have to run the cooling system to keep the system at temperature while it was doing the backups.

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TomTom GO 6000 satnav chews on smarties and tablets

Headley_Grange

Re: I think not ...

Unless otherwise marked the national speed limit on single carriageway roads in the UK for cars and vans up to 2 tonnes is 60 mph. It's 50 if you're towing or a goods vehicle <= 7 tonnes.

https://www.gov.uk/speed-limits

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Headley_Grange

Re: Caveat Emptor

You're right - you have no idea what I'm on about. There's no USB Mini B connector on my TomTom Go 540 Live. The connector is proprietary.

Whether you're correct or not about China being able to provide a screen mount, it's still the case that TomTom has effectively discontinued hardware support for my TomTom only 4 years after I bought it. My experience with their "support" staff is all the evidence I need that they don't give a toss about customers once they have spent their money. However, should I require more evidence then my 3 hour trip yesterday when the device was unable to access the traffic service for the whole journey would help.

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Headley_Grange

Re: Caveat Emptor

Oh - I forgot to mention the fact that they stop supporting stuff after 4 years. When I tried to buy a spare lead for my Tomtom they no longer make them. If my dock or car mount breaks then I have to bin the device and buy a new one. It's a proprietary connector - not USB. They clearly hate customers.

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Headley_Grange

Caveat Emptor

My TomTom is great except...

It takes it so long to connect to the traffic server that any time it might save me by avoiding traffic would be used up by my sitting in the car for 15 minutes waiting for it to connect.

I can save you time contacting the help desk; the answer will be to reformat the device. No matter what the problem is the first remedy will be "Go to this web page and follow the instructions to re-format the disk". I think that even if I told them that I'd scratched the screen the fix would be to re-format the disk,.

The device re-sets itself randomly - usually when I'm in the middle of a complicated one-way system.

The speed read-out freezes when I enter an average speed camera zone.

If the current location is not a road on its map (e.g .a car park in a new industrial area) then it cannot create a route.

BTW - when I said "great" above, I meant crap.

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Look at how many ways we ruin your life, Redmond boasts

Headley_Grange

Re: There are so many things you can do in a bathroom

Just as "toilet" is a euphemism for "water closet" adopted, initially, as the French "toilette" and anglicized over time.

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Wozniak: Please, whatever you do, DON'T buy me an iPad Air

Headley_Grange

Re: "Premium Enhancements"

"Making the full size ipad thinner and roughly a third lighter is a premium enhancement"

Other opinions are available. Making it 2 mm thicker to accommodate a bigger battery so I can go a weekend without charging and adding a memory card slot would, for me, have been premium enhancements and would have tempted me to buy one. Adding handwriting recognition in the OS (so all apps could use it) would have been a premium enhancement and I would have bought one instantly (even in its thin and virtually memory-less state). Making it thinner and lighter make no difference to me and I'm still managing to live without an iPad.

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Met Police vid: HIDE your mobes. Pavement BIKER cutpurses on the loose

Headley_Grange

No video for me - has it been stolen?

i've tried Chrome, Safari, Firefox and Firefox in safe mode.

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Whodathunkit? Media barons slit own throats in anti-freetard crackdowns

Headley_Grange

Home Taping Killed Music

Didn't it?

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BlackBerry will 'under-perform' beneath the sheets, says Wall St bod

Headley_Grange

Re: Maybe they've found out they can't synch calendars with BB Q10

Seven - I was quoting directly from BB Support. I want to do calendar, task and contact synch via USB. BB Support said it could only be done via cloud. Are you saying that BB Support are misleading me.

I use Outlook 2011 on a Mac.

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Headley_Grange

Re: Maybe they've found out they can't synch calendars with BB Q10

Levente -

My company does not allow use of cloud for company info.

I asked BB support if I could synch Mac Outlook 11 Calendars with BB Q10 using wire or local wireless. They said no - that the only way to synch would be by using a cloud service - I quoted their response in my post.

Are you saying that you managed to synch Outlook 11 on a Mac (calendar, contacts, tasks) with a BBQ10 without using a cloud service - i.e. over USB or local wireless?

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Headley_Grange

Maybe they've found out they can't synch calendars with BB Q10

I really like the BB Q10 but it's no good for me because it only supports Mac calendar synch via cloud, which is not allowed in my company.

""You can do wired but limited to Contacts. You are able to setup through synchronizing with the Cloud for both calendar and contacts.""

How could they fuck it up so badly for business users?

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Fanbois vs fandroids: Punters display 'tribal loyalty'

Headley_Grange

Re: Lazy

"And your laziness will mean you will have always have a feature set from the past. Enjoy 2007!"

I use my iPhone to make calls, read emails, manage my calendar and to-dos and listen to music - in that order. I've got a couple of apps that synch files with my Mac and I use Tripit and a map app that lets me store maps on the phone instead of relying on having a data link. I don't use the cloud, I don't Tweet, Facebook or anything else social. I buy music on vinyl and CDs and record them on my Mac; I've never bought music or films online. I don't play games.

I sometimes use the web on it, but even assuming there's a data signal (there usually isn't) it takes so long to do anything that it's mostly a waste of time and it's a last resort - usually to resolve pub arguments like when did Kraftwerk released "The Model". The only feature I'd add is a ten-day battery life - but I don't think that Android offers this. I miss my E52 and realistically the iPhone doesn't do anything practical/useful for me that the Nokia didn't - although the iTunes interface is a bit better than Nokia's music manager.

I'd be interested (seriously) in the 2013 features that an Android or other phone has that would make my life better.

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Headley_Grange

Lazy

I've got an iPhone (my 2nd) and my next phone will probably be an iPhone because I'm too lazy to change. I've paid for apps, spent time configuring them and, after much effort, the phone syncs reliably with my Mac's calendar, notes, contacts and useful files. My email accounts are all set up and when I buy a new iPhone it will look (functionally) like the old one within 30 minutes of plugging it into my Mac.

I'm sure Android phones are fine, but unless Apple messes up the next phone (e.g. makes it harder not to use cloud, reduces memory or makes it less useful as a telephone) then I just can't be bothered to start again with a new phone.

If Android want my business then the thing I'd value most would be to be able to plug the new Android phone into my Mac and have it auto-configure itself like my iPhone as much as possible (e.g. set up the synchs to Outlook, iTunes and wireless file sync so they just work, set up all my email accounts, etc) and automatically suggest equivalent or similar Android apps to the iPhone ones I've downloaded.

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El Reg drills into Google's search biz offer to Europe

Headley_Grange

Re: This is akin to

"To make it work CocaCola would need to control 90% of the vending machine market:"

But in a particular shop they do. If a shop has a Coke branded fridge then they specify that the shop is not allowed a Pepsi branded fridge and only Coke products are allowed in the fridge and they do deals to persuade the shop to to have their fridge instead of a Pepsi fridge. Many of the drinks in a Coke fridge are not branded Coca Cola but they are Coke products. Coke provide the fridge free of charge and maintain it. If you go into a particular shop and want a cold drink then you have no choice other than a Coke product.

Of course, you could go to another shop, if you don't like it, but your local shop sells stuff you like, at good prices, is environmentally aware, sells fair trade items, gives you coupons for stuff, has free parking and that nice young man once carried your stuff to the car. Given this, and the fact that some Coke products are OK, then you live with it instead of having the inconvenience of driving further, paying to park and going to a shop that sells your favourite Koker Kola but doesn't have that nice fairtrade tea you like.

I think that the analogy is good. Forcing Coke to allow Pepsi and Koker Kola in their fridge might be better for the consumer - but then again, Coke might decide it's not worth supplying a free fridge and it won't give the shopkeeper discount for Coke, so the thirsty punter might have to pay more for his/her drink or might find that there are no cold drinks at all.

BTW - Pepsi have the same arrangements with outlets, and I'm sure others do. The local newsagent was reported for having Pepsi in his Coke fridge and Coke came and took it away.

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Eric Schmidt defends Google's teeny UK tax payouts - again

Headley_Grange

Re: Hmm...

If you want to pay more tax than you are legally obliged to then you are free to do so.

I, however, am an avid tax avoider - I've got Premium Bonds, a bunch of ISAs, a pension fund, my charity donations take advantage of gift aid and and I take advantage of duty free shopping whenever the opportunity is presented.

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BSkyB punters drown in MASSIVE MYSTERY Yahoo! mail! migration!

Headley_Grange

It'll get worse

Yahoo! provide BT.com mail in the UK. If the service is as bad for Sky as with BT then users will have to get used to a few other problems:

- IMAP doesn't work very well,

- deleted mails reappear in the Inbox after a while (I think this is an IMAP implementation problem);

- continual reporting of password problems or access problems,

- you can't control the spam filters. Even with the BT spam filters turned off on my BT account stuff is still sent to my spam folders, but what's worse is that the Yahoo! servers filter out mails that Yahoo! considers to be spam before it even gets to the BT spam filters. The problem is that Yahoo! filters out real messages -- e.g. from the Whois service warning you of domain expiry.

To be fair BT don't offer an IMAP facility but you can download the settings from the BT forums and it sort of works.

At the risk of this post becoming unbelievable, BT have been very helpful over the last couple of months and tried very hard to fix it - including putting me in touch directly with Yahoo!. However, it's still not fixed and I'm in the process of moving all my important registration contacts away from BT internet (i.e. Yahoo!) mail to something more reliable.

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Is social networking good for anything more than cat pics?

Headley_Grange

Fed up of spam and pop ups

I've just deleted my Linkedin profile because of spam and the annoying popups asking me to endorse, download contacts, update profile, tidy my room, wipe my feet, etc etc. Linkedin's gone from being interesting and mildly useful to f*****g annoying.

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Amazon-bashed HMV calls in administrators, seeks buyer

Headley_Grange

You could browse, but they made paying difficult.

I love browsing and used to buy a lot of CDs from HMV - the only record shop left in my town. A couple of years ago my local shop got rid of the information desk and made each till an information point - and the tellers were all groomed to ask "did you find everything you were looking for?". The result was that each till could be, and often was, taken up with someone "....looking for a DVD for my husband's birthday. It's got John Wayne in it and I think it's a western".

After about the fifth time of standing in a long, stationary queue with a fistful of CDs while three tills were held up by people making queries I gave up with HMV. I mostly buy my CDs, DVDs (and vinyl!) online now and Amazon are happy to let me pay at any time night or day. I won't even go back to HMV for the fire sale because I know that woman will still be looking for the John Wayne film. Once you lose customers you lose them for good.

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Thunderbolt interface strikes YOUR PC: What's the damage?

Headley_Grange

Thunderbolt to Firewire Adapter - be careful

There are reports that the latest Macbook Airs can't drive some some Firewire devices via the Thunderbolt adapter because the thunderbolt port doesn't deliver enough DC power.

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When your squash partner 'endorses' your coding skills on LinkedIn...

Headley_Grange

AAAAAAAAAA++++++++++ Article

Fast delivery, just as described, no problems.

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Mark Zuckerberg doesn't know how to use HTML5

Headley_Grange

Re: Maybe ElReg could hire these guys to make the videos work on The Register's site

I wrongly (lazily?) assumed it was El Reg - but a bit of research and practical experimentation reveals it to be a Firefox bug with Vimeo.

My apologies to the Vulture.

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Headley_Grange

Maybe ElReg could hire these guys to make the videos work on The Register's site

Instead of having to pop out to Vimeo to watch them.

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Google given a month to wriggle out of Euro antitrust smackdown

Headley_Grange

Agreed

Google seem to be suffering because they're good. Windows created a bad browser and then tried to kill the good ones with its dominant position. I don't see Google in the same position. I switched to Bing a few weeks ago and I'm about to switch back to Google - tho' I might give the duck one a try first. I used to use Multimap and it had some good features that Google hasn't (e.g. post code at centre of map) but when Bing took Multimap much of the good stuff disappeared; they've still got OS maps, but I expect that to disappear.

People use Google because their services and apps are pretty good and they either accept or are ignorant of the way Google works. I don't see why I should suffer because of the ignorant ones.

BTW - I also agree on the SEO stuff and Google need to up their game. It is getting difficult to find stuff. Google need a "only one instance of a site" button so that the first 30 results aren't all variations of the same hit.

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Headley_Grange

I don't understand this

If Google isn't allowed to prefer its products when presenting search results then I assume that when I search for mince pies on tesco.com the site will have to tell me about Aldi's cheaper option and also not prefer its own products when it returns the search results.

I'm not stupid. In google I get a search engine, a portfolio tracker, maps, directions, an (if I wanted) a whole suite of apps -- and all for "nothing". It costs me £50 a year for just the maps element of this with TomTom, and that's for the UK only. If I had to pay the costs for everything Google lets me use for "free" it would be £££ per year - so I accept that Google are getting my data and selling it to pay for these services and to make a tidy profit. I don't begrudge them this and if I have to put up with some bias in the search results then so be it. If people do mind then they can choose not to use Google, or any other search engine -- or maybe the ECHR is about to decide that free internet search is a human right.

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I've got the 'fastest growing THINGY ever', boasts Google+ chief

Headley_Grange

Re: Ads?

I've never paid a penny to Google, so I don't see how they are "making money off me". If you are correct that they get paid by their customers based on the number of ads they send out, rather than evidenced increase in revenue due to the ads then their customers are fools, and we all know what happens to fools' money.

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Headley_Grange

Re: Ads?

HT for Ghostery. Thanks.

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Headley_Grange

Ads?

Google's collection and analysis of my web habits might be a bit sinister, but there are add-ons which make sure that I don't see any of the advertising they push my way. They'll also block the G+ icon from websites - although it takes a bit of effort.

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Google avoids tax with ‘Double Irish Dutch Sandwich’

Headley_Grange

Re: It's the wrong discussion

Exactly my point. Google would miss out the Ireland step and pay the tax they currently pay in Ireland to the Aussies. The Australian tax take would increase.

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Headley_Grange

It's the wrong discussion

Governments love this because it distracts us from what we should really be discussing; why is corporation tax in Aus (and UK) so bloody high? If Aus corporation taxes were as low as Ireland's then Google (and all the other companies) wouldn't have to bother with all this tax avoidance and the net cash tax take would be higher.

I assume that all those who criticize Google and the other companies who avoid tax in this manner are squeaky clean in terms of tax avoidance; no ISAs, no Premium Bonds, no shopping in duty free on the way out of the country.

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Apple MacBook Pro 13in Retina display review

Headley_Grange

Firewire Power

Did you try any firewire kit via the thunderbolt adapter? The port on the MBA hasn't got enough poke to drive many peripherals.

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Copper-obsessed BT means UK misses out on ultrafast fibre gold

Headley_Grange

Faster Infrastrtucture is Pointless for two reasons

Faster infrastructure is pointless (1) because the capacity will just be used up until it's as slow as it is today and was 10 years ago. It's just the same as widening the M25 - it's all good for a few months then more cars use it and pretty soon it's as clogged as it was.

Faster infrastructure is pointless (2) because the ISP's throttle capacity based on some random process designed to annoy me. I was getting about 150 kbps so complained to my ISP. ISP blamed BT. BT came and measured the line. BT said 4 Mbps - computer said 150 kbps. ISP said Oh! then admitted that at peak times they restricted throughput but they were sure I'd get the full 4 Mbps after 2AM. BT technician said that he gets this all the time.

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Microsoft's Bing bods exploit fanbois' Apple maps misery

Headley_Grange

Re: Oh Dear - It's Crap

If I'm looking for an address by postcode then it's no good at all. If I put my postcode into Bing maps I get a map of the whole city (about 6 miles across the width of the screen), with no indication of where the postcode is. I suppose I could assume that it's in the centre and zoom in, but it's a bit of a leap of faith, isn't it?. One would think that something as simple as an "X", or an arrow or a blob to give me a clue would be given. This, and the fact that after one search the search box disappears requiring an app shut-down and re-launch to get it back makes it less useful than Apple maps IMHO. I'll carry on with google website, but it's really too clunky to use in the wild without 3G.

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Headley_Grange

Oh Dear - It's Crap

I was so excited by this. I've just downloaded the Bing app; it looks good and hopefully they'll get it working soon.

If you search for a postcode it just gives a map of the town. No marker for the street or address, just the whole town. It then uses half the screen to say "Leeds - LS1 1AA - Get directions" so half the screen is unavailable for the map. I suppose that since the map is useless it doesn't matter whether or not it fills the screen or not. A bit of further playing has resulted in the search box disappearing and no way of getting it back. Now it's frozen, white and non-responsive.

If you thought that Apple maps were useless then Bing will set new levels of uselessness for you.

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Watch out, PC disk drive floggers: Cloud will rust up those spinners

Headley_Grange

Re: I'll miss them

"Uh, how about using the cloud as (an additional backup) for the stuff one finds important." - -precisely because it's important stuff. No point having important stuff backed up to somewhere I can hardly access and which could disappear at any moment.

I do daily backups when I'm at home. I carry a backup disc with me when I'm on the road and keep it up to date (mostly). Additionally all my "working" docs are backed up in plain on an Iron Key so if my PC dies a big death on the road I can be up and running with clients pretty quickly (albeit after the expense of a new PC).

There used to be a scam where a virus locked all the files on your PC and they were only released after a payment. The way that the "Cloud" is developing feels a bit like a legalized version of this. I'm sure there are some people for whom having files current on many devices via the cloud is useful and I think they're being sucked into finding it indispensable before they suddenly start getting hit for ££ to maintain a service they used to get for nothing. I'm not one of them and should the day come that I need global access to all my stuff across more than one device I'll pay my ISP the extra for a business account and static DNS and stick it all on a server.

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Headley_Grange

I'll miss them

I don't use any cloud services and, as long as I have a choice, I never shall - mainly because I don't / can't trust people with my stuff, but practically because I wouldn't have access to it most of the time. The concept might be great if you live and work in central London or Los Angeles - where WiFi can be sniffed out and 3G coverage is good, but my experiences in most of the UK is that I'm, effectively, disconnected from the web most of the time. I need (and have) two phones so I have simultaneous Vod and O2 just to guarantee voice calls to clients as I roam about the UK. Last week (Mon-Fri) I only had 3G access for about 4 hours (Norfolk, Scotland) - and a lot of the time there was no mobile signal at all. Most of my written comms is done by SMS because email isn't really available. I dream of Edge!

I'm sure that I'm a tail-end charlie on this and the article is more-or-less on the button and I guess that in ten years' time I'll be paying a fortune on eBay for those old drives (disk or solid) - a bit like the money I still spend today on Vinyl ;-)

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HP must throw its PC biz overboard to survive, says analyst

Headley_Grange

HP PCs and Printers Are a Disgrace to the HP Name

When I started work in the 80s HP were the byword for quality. My HP11C calculator gets almost daily use and is still going strong. The first computer I used was a 9826 (the second one was a 9836!) - a fantastic bit of kit for its time for everything from controlling test gear to running FE analysis. Nearly all the test gear I used was HP and all the other manufacturers just had to answer the question "is it as good as its HP equivalent" before I'd even talk to them about an alternative.

On the basis of these formative years when I first bought a laptop I paid a premium for an HP product - and bought an HP printer to go with it. They were rubbish. Poor build quality, poor performance, impossible to get them to work together wirelessly and no support whatsoever. The PSU was recalled twice due to danger of it bursting into flames. Full reboot needed to get a DVD to play. Screen hinge useless after 6 months. Printer impossible to use wirelessly and scanner function intermittent. I learned my lesson; both were consigned to the bin after less than a year of use. I'll never buy another HP product again - unless it's a vintage HP11C to replace mine should it get run over by a tank - and the tank comes off best. Good riddance to them.

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E.ON to flog stake in wind farms to private firms

Headley_Grange

Re: Subtle withdrawal

You're right. It also protects E.On from any massive decommissioning costs. The operating company can just go bankrupt and then it's up to the taxpayer to make them safe. This is what has happened in some parts of California.

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CIOs on the scrapheap - The Register wants your input for vox pop article

Headley_Grange

Re: Re: What's a CIO?

No feigned ignorance nor superiority intended. The original article was about doing a vox pop about CIOs. I just wanted to register the fact that I don't know what one is.

I agree that I could look it up on the web (I still haven't) - but that wouldn't give me any valid insight or view about CIOs - just evidence that I know what the letters stand for.

I read el Reg every day, I don't work in IT except to the extent that, because I have my own very small company, I do it all myself - from specifying and buying equipment, to setting up networks and fixing(or not) most of my own problems. Maybe I'm a CIO and just didn't know it.

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Headley_Grange

What's a CIO?

The post is required, and must contain letters

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Experts: We're stuck with passwords – and maybe they're best

Headley_Grange

I use mSecure

It syncs from PC to mobile devices.

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