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* Posts by karlp

67 posts • joined 11 Feb 2010

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You can thank Brit funnyman John Oliver for fixing US broadband policy, beams Netflix

karlp

Re: the real problem

Yes, but the complication is that wide-reaching physical infrastructure is a natural monopoly. There simply isn't any justification for duplication of resources on such a large scale as the Electric Grid, Water Works, Sewer Systems, or Datacom.

Non-discrimination (or, inversely, non-preferential) treatment is a great, and needed, goal, but it isn't the end-goal.*

What actually needs to happen is regional, if not a singular national, institution(s) that does all of the physical infrastructure. They deliver a link to your home/buisness/cell tower/etc, but not the the end user service. They are actually restricted from providing the end user service. They are also restricted from owning content, or participating in other competing markets.

This doesn't have to be a state-owned entity, but it would certainly have very strong state-oversight/regulation.

They would welcome any and all resellers / service providers equally, and leave it up to them to differentiate who throttles, who doesn't, who has value add services (website hosting, email hosting, etc) who uses static addresses, who uses dynamic, etc etc etc.

Then we can actually have meaningful competition, while still maintaining the needed natural physical connectivity / infrastructure monopoly that allows you to keep the critical mass for sustainability.

Karl P

*Even here, I am using a broad brush. The networks should be allowed, if not mandated, to treat certain traffic differently. I think we can all agree that VoIP/MultiPartyGaming/Etc should be treated differently than web browsing, which should be treated differently than large bulk data transfers, etc. What we don't want is two different VoIP packets to be given differential treatment based on some other factor (money/service ownership/whim).

We should be careful not to scream for equality to such a degree that we end up in a situation where someone can't make a phone call because someone else has decided a 4K video stream suits their fancy.

10
3

Not so ESXi? Open sourcery could help VMware win... virtually

karlp

Re: Most large companies are running at least two virtualisation platforms

I have some Xen installations that came about for the same reason (VDI deployments)

While Xen has it's own quirks, it's a very stable system at a very good (relative) price. While it is true that it doesn't have the breadth of 3rd party support, what does exist seems to be well built and well priced.

In short, I have moved some workloads to Xen and have been happy about it.

I could also tell similar stories about HyperV.

In short, it doesn't surprise me to hear that most people have multiple VM environments.

I would also speculate that VMWare has a pricing justification battle looming on the near horizon, if it isn't here already.

While I don't know if ESXi truly needs to go open source - I can envision a near-future where they will be forced into becoming far more competitive.

Karl P

0
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Look out: The Far Eastern white-box boys are coming for EVERYONE

karlp

Is the Channel a prerequisite?

The article makes it sound as if a strong "Channel" connection is a prerequisite for an ODM (or anyone) to sell into the enterprise space. While I am sure that is true in some cases, I would be careful about writing them off for the lack thereof.

My experience with "The Channel" has been overwhelmingly negative over the past 10 years or so, to the point where I try and avoid them at all costs. These days I either deal with purely mass volume box-shifters where they stack 'em high and sell 'em cheap, or -if the deal warrants it- with the manufacturer directly. I now tend to avoid equipment which can only be acquired by going through certain "traditional channel" players.

I simply can't believe I am the only one.

When it comes to knowledge and/or training concerns - If those concerns prove to be beyond either my or my teams abilities, then we will either find and hire an expert individual/team, or deal with the manufacturer direct.

Obviously large software deployments are a little different, but we aren't exactly talking about a new ERP system here.

All this to say, if I can get good-enough quality kit* at a reasonable price, you can bet that I am ordering one to play with.

Karl P

* I obviously don't mean garbage, I mean the thing is reliable, shows up when I need it, where I need it, and for how much I agreed to pay for it. Bonus points for simple to use call-center design and procedure which allows me to get, in less than 10 minutes from the time I dialed your number, a replacement for that memory stick which borked itself.

3
0

Pimp my lounge and pierce my ceiling: Home theatre goes OTT

karlp

Re: time to seperate switching amplification and processing

While having a separate processor is mostly relegated to the high end these days, Outlaw Audio makes a model 975 which does what most of you seem to be wanting for a relatively modest amount of money.

Still probably cheaper to use one of the recent onkyo or denon receivers, but if you love what you have......

Karl P

1
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Apple, FBI: YES we're, er, looking into the NAKED CELEBRITY PICS. Aren't you?

karlp

More involved than article suggests.

So far we know that many of the photos were taken on a variety of devices, including 2010 era blackberries, android, and iOS devices.

While this could be a cloud service issue, the time frames involved as well as the diversity of devices suggest that this is much deeper than that.

A Hollywood based IT service firm go out of business recently?

Someone wanting to show some of the goods regarding those NSA nude photo exchanges snowden was talking about?

Whatever happened, I hope it doesn't devolve into platform bickering and thee we do end up getting a straight answer about it so we can learn from it.

Karl P

8
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Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax

karlp

Re: one more time, with gusto

Indeed. People miss how big of an issue this is.

I had a machine, maybe 30 months old that died. The problem was known to the manufacture. There had actually been a public recall about it shortly after it was made. But they didn't widely advertise it and I didn't become aware of it. The product died and I went online to see if anyone else had similar issues and saw the recall.

I contacted the company and they wouldn't do anything about it. They said that the time window had passed and while they would be happy to fix it (at 50% of the cost of a new one...) there wasn't anything more they would do.

This whole scenario wouldn't have happened in the UK, or at very least, I wouldn't have been left with a dead piece of kit.

That said, the people who bought it in the UK paid 18% more for it, so at least it bought them something.

Whether that is a tradeoff I would want for myself long term I still haven't decided.

Karl P

2
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IBM's GPFS marries LTFS: You may now kiss the enterprise

karlp
Coat

Holy Acronym Batman.

Seriously though - I like this, now marry this with a smart director engine which can auto-file data with use frequency less than X or data matching pattern Y and we are really cooking.*

*I am sure this is already there, but who knows how difficult it will be to use.....

Karl P

0
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Price cuts, new features coming for Office 365 small biz customers

karlp

Re: testing 1 2 3

If you have 365 at home, that means you have hard apps, and hard apps can save and open from your local drives just like always.

If you choose to store all your stuff in One Drive, that can certainly add some lag. This is particularly true if they are large files. Hopefully you aren't storing things in OneDrive "just because", but instead for a valid reason which justifies the occasional lag of using any WAN solution.

I can't speak to your experiences with needing to repair unfortunately.

What I will say however is that the one-time(isn) CAPEX vs ongoing OPEX question is becoming bigger every day. That is particularly true now that MS has made using anything other than proper OpenLicense Office very painful for all but the smallest SMB.

It makes a lot of sense to go O365Biz when the decision is 15$ (now 12.50$) a month / 180$ (now 150$) a year per employee (which includes hosted exchange, share point, OneDriveBiz, Etc) when the alternative is 466$ per employee up front + server software + cals, etc.

Of course the funny (in the most sad and traumatic of ways) part to all of this is after you get all the open licenses purchased, server software deployed, CAL's loaded, etc - Someone from sales is going to call you for support because they just signed up for 15 seats of office 365 as they absolutely needed powerpoint on their iPads and now they want to figure out how to pull files from the central server. Oh - and while your here - the CEO was down yesterday receiving a presentation, saw powerpoint on the iPad and now wants to talk about getting this to everyone middle management and above.

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karlp

Re: and one more thing

The bigger boys get access to the things they tend to need, such as legal hold, advanced message filtering, yada yada yada. Whether they should be forced into it or not is a different question, but that is neither here nor there.

As for quantity discounts - If you truly get big enough you tend to negotiate your rates by way of an over-archving enterprise agreement where you acquire your 365 licenses along with the rest of your traditional MS products via that channel instead.

2
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Amazon woos dispute-stung Hachette scribes with 100% ROYALTIES

karlp

Re: Where is the FTC?

However, Amazon is the one who pulled the strings last time for a more-than-slightly dubious investigation. I doubt they would use whatever leverage they used last time to trigger a new investigation - on themselves.

The reality is that Amazon will fight to the death the ability to sell items below wholesale to either put competitors out of business, or more insidiously - devalue the work of others in order to set a lower price ceiling in future negotiations, as they are doing here.

3
2

Microsoft confirms Office 365 price rise

karlp

Re: Important Distinction

Also, and this is going to be bordering on a rant here,

I wish people would stop acting like hosted solutions were from the devil. They Aren't.

I also wish that people would stop acting like it's 2002 where we could have a technical solution that remained compatible with the rest of the wider world for longer than 18 months. - We don't live in that world any more.

I have lots of clients 1, 2, or even 3 years into ongoing SaaS solutions, which are happier today than they were the day they signed up. The reason, overwhelmingly, is ongoing support for new devices and the far lower pain and cost threshold to stay current.

In the past few months, here is what I have observed with my own two eyes:

A business who now has access to great (usable) CRM self service sites and mobile apps whereas their competitor doesn't (because they are using an on-premise install which needs a $XX,XXX upgrade to provide that functionality)

An office who made a big leap forward in productivity by leveraging heavy use of one drive and the new iPad office suite with remote employees.

A firm, who had a dramatic increase in throughput in their estimating department due to new functionality introduced in a core package that, in it's older on-premise history, would have been exceedingly difficult and costly to upgrade.

At the end of the day, the people I see buying and utilizing SaaS solutions are overwhelming appreciative of the fact that they aren't stuck with a system only compatible with the technology that existed when it launched, or having to shell out a meaningful percentage of the original whole on a regular basis just to stay current.

Arguably, at least for my clients, that is the true selling point of the competent SaaS solutions. The recognition that we live in a world changing faster than ever with expectations of ongoing support and integration for as-yet-dreamt-up technology. In that world, there needs to be a sane way of providing day to day ongoing development for compatibility, integration, and features that don't amount to a bill for 50~60% of the original purchase cost in upgrade fees and consulting time every 18~24 months.

Karl P

2
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karlp

Important Distinction

There is an important note about this change - and one that appears to have been glossed over here - this only applies to those who bought in via an overarching Enterprise Agreement but yet didn't buy into SA at the same time.

It also doesn't apply to renewals (at this time, according to the info I have). This effects very, very few people.

All of my 365 clients have no rises as they signed up directly through MS, or through a partner signup link. And for those agreements for which I have been privy to that come out of an overarching EA agreement practically always have SA attached.

Prices will go up inevitably, both for on-premise and hosted solutions, it's just what happens. But this is a pretty niche case.

1
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Use Tor or 'extremist' Tails Linux? Congrats, you're on an NSA list

karlp

Re: "and anyone else interested in online privacy"

The truly ironic part is that due to all the security focused interest and the associated sites and activism around it, if I was a 3 letter analyst, i would probably be much more skeptical of those who weren't on the list.

Karl P

5
0

US Supremes just blew Aereo out of the water

karlp

Re: bad news

This topic greatly interests me, if only for the minutia involved here. I can certainly see why its something that went to the SCOTUS. Personally, I have yet to make up my mind one way or another about it at the moment.

Let me ask a question, the question I am rolling around in my head.

What is a CATV system, as it was defined in the cited ruling, back in 1976?

From the replies here, people are talking about single vs multiple antennas, or even cable companies modifying the commercials or other content.

But is that really what it was, originally? I am assuming (yeah, I know) that at the time, the cable companies were not changing the signal, or otherwise modifying the broadcast in any way. I am also going to assume that, originally, in 1976, the number of antennas in use wouldn't have materially changed the outcome of the case.

Assuming (again....) that the above is true, then we should look at the Aereo case in a different light.

Maybe the case had much less (if anything) to do about the fact there was a DVR or antenna for each person, and more to do with the simple act of a company making profit solely through facilitating the movement of another's copyrighted content where the end user already had been granted rights to receive/view/consume that content. (IANAL, that may not be the technically correct way to word it, but I think it conveys the idea well enough for a forum post).

Now, the weird part is by that definition, there would seem to be all sorts of other systems and technologies that do just that, every day, and in a fully legal manner.

So if the issue really is one of a company making profit solely through facilitating the movement of another's copyrighted VIDEO content where the end user already had been granted rights to receive/view/consume that content, then that would seem to be an odd statement in context to many other observable parts of our society.

Maybe Aereo's mistake was in trying to prove that their system is legal / and or exploits an acceptable loophole as opposed to challenging the original 1976 decision which really doesn't make a lot of logical sense in the context of our greater society and common practices of information transfer*.

Karl P

*Under my wording above, I don't see how the original, 1976, CATV companies, or the Aereo of today would be significantly different than that of a trucking company, moving a case of pamphlets.

To be excruciatingly clear, while I understand this is how the law is written, I don't understand why these two things are different:

1. Let's say there is a supermarket, which is setting out boxes of pamphlets all over town for the free and indiscriminate use of the local populace (target market, so to speak) to educate themselves about the relative merits of Spinach vs Cabbage.

Now lets say that I, Joe Everyman, wants one of those pamphlets, and live in the area of the business and operations - the stated target market - of said supermarket.

I, Joe, do not feel like going to pick up the pamphlet myself, so instead I decide to call a local courier, and ask them to come up with a way to get that free pamphlet, and deliver it to me, while catering to my lazy tendencies. They offer to do it by me paying them to retrieve it, and receiving compensation for said action of only their time and expenses.

Thinking there might be more lazy people around me, that courier could call and/or market to all in my neighborhood (again, still in the stated target market of said supermarket) offering to deliver a pamphlet, in exchange for composition of solely their time and expenses.

Of course, at any time, if you, or any other individual do not feel quite so lazy, you are of course free to stop by any of the (many) points of pamphlet distribution and pick one up for yourself, free of any charges.

2. Let's say there is a broadcast station operator, putting their signal out for indiscriminate free reception of the local populace (the power of their transmitter / FCC license allocation area).

Now let's say that I, Joe Everyman, wants to receive that signal, and live in the intended local populace (transmitter power / FCC / etc).

I, Joe, do not feel like installing an antenna, or more likely my landlord will not allow me, or my wife will not tolerate it. So I decide to call my local low voltage contractor, and ask them to come up with a way for me to receive said signal while abiding to my other restrictions and or desires.

They get back to me and say they can make it happen by installing an antenna down the street, and putting a small cable in the ground for me satisfying my stated desires/needs, and in return only ask that I compensate them for their time and expense.

Thinking this is a good idea, they also offer to drop a cable by the other people on the street/block/city, again, restricting themselves to working within the intended local populace and only asking for compensation of their time and expense.

Of course, at any time, if you, or any other individual do not feel like working with this contractor, or do not have the same desires and/or needs, you are of course free to put up your own antenna and get a signal, free of any charges.

1
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karlp

Re: Are recordings fungible ?

Let's put this up where someone might see it....

0
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Cisco promises Lync link for its UC kit and collaborationware

karlp

Makes Sense

To be completely serious, the amount of Lync I have seen showing up lately makes this a no brainer.

Particularly with 2013, the software from an end-user perspective is quite featured and easy to use.

The fact that it is coming bundled into O365 "E" Suites without needing 4 or 5 boxen isn't hurting either.

0
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Huawei Ascend P7: We review the PANORAMIC SELFIE smartphone

karlp

Re: As an iPhone owner

iOS8, out later this fall, will have per OS battery usage statistics allowing you to see what is doing what and act accordingly. I'll try and put a link in, no idea if it will get pulled out or not. If it does go to google image search and type "ios8 per app battery usage" First result should give you an idea.

http://i-cdn.phonearena.com/images/articles/123219-image/iphone-battery.jpg

This goes along with iOS7 providing per-app data usage and per-app storage usage which has been around for forever.

Karl P

0
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My my, Intel, that's one speedy NVMe flash card you have there

karlp

I just took out a rack last year.....

There was 5 shelfs of disk, plus controller, FC switch, etc. Over 30U, 2008 acquisition cost of 100K$+.

It was part of a database backend. It is/was replaced by a 2000$ Card, in a 10K$ server.

The storage racket must be a frightful place these days.

Karl P

2
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Disks with Ethernet ports? Throw in some flash and you've got yourself a HGST p-a-r-t-y

karlp

An Interesting Future-SAN

I wonder if this, with some improvements, could act as an acceptable standardized SAN platform.

If these disk were to be made with dual ports, and preferably POE powered, you could then add a few bog standard servers with 10GB cards which act as the "controllers" for the iSCSI/FC fabric, or even direct NFS/SMB filer frontend.

Theoretically you could build a reasonable san with a couple standard ethernet switches, servers, and these ethernet drives which if talking to a standard, would let you be vendor agnostic at any of the individual stages.

Nonetheless, I believe we will see some creative uses for a directly attached ethernet drive in the next few years.

0
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Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully

karlp

Re: I wonder...

It would seem to me that if I had the ability to track a routine flight, clear on the other side of the planet, in near-as-makes-no-difference real time, I wouldn't exactly be letting on that I could do it.

Perhaps giving a couple, discrete, helpful nudges trickled out in such a way, and on such a timetable, as to not be suspicious. That is if I felt helpful - but even then, certainly not in a way that says "Here is where it is".

Note: I am not suggesting any conspiracy here, purely that if anyone did have the information, this incident, tragic as it is, wouldn't register high enough on the strategic-importance list to tip the cards.

Karl P

5
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Europe approves common charger standard for mobe-makers

karlp

I just went through this last week.

The simple answer is unless you are doing 6 or more chargers, the cheapest thing to do is buy a power strip and plug in a whole bunch of individual chargers, and deal with the Ugly that it causes.

It seems crazy to me, but it is what it is.

The "cheapest" multi-port USB-A-Female charger which can charge anything I throw it at is the Cambironix Series8 - Which is a 350$ piece of kit. http://www.cambrionix.com/cambrionix_products/series8-very-intelligent-charging/

On the other hand, I can say the same for the 30$ Apple iPad charger, so I am "forced" to use those right now for my less than 6 charge port solutions.

I really don't understand it. I can (and do) buy top-of-the-line Medical Grade 5-thru-12V transformers up to 150W every day. For less than 75$ as an assembled, ready-to-go, listed product. Certainly someone can figure out how to make the rest of the bits for ~100$

Karl P

1
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Parliament network prang: 'Supplier done it', no Office 365 yet

karlp

Link Speed and Duplex....

You'd be surprised the amount of "emergency" consulting work I do where the issue comes down to link speed and duplex. I can practically smell it these days.

On another note, it is kind of amazing how even now, in 2014, the sheer magnitude of multi-thousand $/£ network infrastructure equipment out there which can't auto negotiate as well as a cheap realtek NIC.

I was on a completely new build Fiber-MPLS network a few months back that had everything from Arista to Adtran, Cisco to Omitron in various places. They were having trouble all over the place, with the providers pointing to bad configs and the integrators pointing to provider problems and the local system admins wondering if this is just as good as it would be. At least half of the links had some sort of auto link speed issue or auto-MDIX issue. A day and a halve later - voila.

Of course, to most people these days suggesting that we need to manually specify link speeds and use crossover cables comes across completely foreign.

Karl P

2
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Recommendations for private cloud software...

karlp

Two Options

First option I normally recommend is LiquidFiles. It's an on-premise VM that is an all-in large file transfer solution. Completely stand-alone, simple to use, well supported, reasonably priced. http://www.liquidfiles.net

The second option is a bit more of a creative one. There is a company called MinnowIT which makes a piece of software called Foldr for accessing Windows File Servers from mobile devices. They have dedicated iOS apps, and can interface with most any webdav client as well as having a very slick web front end. Binds to Active Directory and (very importantly) respects NTFS user permissions. You could set this system up, have a large windows server "partners" share with folders for each partner. Give highly restricted AD credentials to be used by the partners to login with that are restricted to their sub-folder. Your employees can interact with their partners by simply browsing a local mapped drive. Your partners can either use the web app, or map the webdav drive to their Windows or Mac based endpoints. Again, simple to use, well supported, reasonably priced. http://www.minnow.it

The choice between the two comes down to whether you want to manage it from AD - or not - and whether you can live without local mapped drives on the vendor/partner side.

Karl P

0
0

Apple's new iPad Mini: ALREADY set for Black Friday PRICE SLASH

karlp

This is really funny if people traded in an iPad 1 in the recent 200$ gift card offering and then held the gift card for this promotion, allowing them to effectively get an iPad mini for just a couple bucks, or an Air for 200$.

Someone didn't realize what they were doing.

1
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AIR TIME! Our expert cosies up with the new top-end iPad

karlp

Re: Older models

iPad 2's are practically the defecto industrial and special-nice device right now.

Whether you want a solution for a self-guided museum tour, a mobile kiosk to take credit card payments, a digital sign for product advertisement or a reservation and seating utility at a restaurant - there is a good chance you will grab an iPad2.

They are still compatible with all the specialized 30 pin accessories that haven't made it to lightning yet, still perform good-enough on ios7 with non-gaming apps, and are cheap enough you don't care much about them.

The iPad Air is the first device that has finally gotten fast enough to make a meaningful difference. In fact I would sum up the iPad Air as "It's Finally Fast".

I imagine they will be around another two generations and then be phased out.

Karl P

6
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XBOX One SHOT DEAD by Redmond following delivery blunder

karlp

Re: So no, your console is not banned

The system was auto-banned by a whitelisting process that is currently in place. Honest (automated) mistake, but it still isn't open to the public so I understand why the system is in place.

However, MS has gone above and beyond here.

Major Nelson has talked with him personally. His console will be unlocked a day or two before general release, and he has contact information if that doesn't go as planned.

He is attending the MS launch event on their dime, and most likely will be showered with the usual launch-event gifts and nice-eties.

Target has apologized for selling him a device that doesn't yet work as intended, and has refunded him 100$ for the privilege.

I understand we can get into an argument about how your unit should or shouldn't work - but really - this guy did more than OK.

I really don't care for the fact that the article takes such a negative tone to what is really the story of a BigCorp (™) actually bending over backwards when they messed up.

Karl P

49
1

Google barge erection hypegasm latest - What's in the box?

karlp

Of course it could also be an offshore tidal powered datacenter with gimble-mounted active tracking microwave back hauls staffed completely by devs who banished by daring to bring an iDevice into work or install windows on their desktop.</sarcasm>

0
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karlp

Re: Showroom?

Could be for Gapps.

There are many business deals closed on some sort of junket or another of increasingly dubious utility. Having a "sales-floor" in two large cities with fancy hotels and good food too which they could bring medium to large contract negotiations into might be useful to them. The fact that it could accomplish that while publicly steering clear from the appearance of outright pandering would just serve to help them in their "do less-ish evil" quest.

2
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Moto X teardown shows US manufacturing adds mere $4 to handset costs

karlp

Supply Chain is the Key

I think the real key to asian assembly is the fact that the battery guy is next door, the fasteners two blocks over, pcb across the street, final assembler in the next town, etc etc etc.

It's very hard to practice just-in-time / lean manufacturing without (relatively) close proximity to the rest of your supply chain.

The fix to the supply chain issue is that someone just has to start making something somewhere and then other businesses will come in to support them.

Projects like these should be encouraged not just for the headlines of building something, but because they encourage investment in the greater supply chain capabilities of the given area.

2
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Optical archival system - where to buy from?

karlp

While I understand the longevity concerns of Magnetic, the reality is that you have a much better chance of reading your LTO drives in 15 years than your niche optical drives.

I am aware of the sony product, and it is a good product. However I wouldn't recommend it too you. You really need to transfer your archive footage onto a new medium every 10~15 years anyways.

Use LTO and call it a day.

3
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The future of cinema and TV: It’s game over for the hi-res hype

karlp
Stop

...... and you turned out to be wrong in your correction.

The digital sharing thing wasn't what some people made it out to be, but it was very cool, and was not, to be clear, a demo of any type.

While MS didn't respond as some may have hoped, the reality is that this topic is complicated and involves both technical and human (read: Contracts and agreements) angles.

While not perfect, MS seemed to have the best concept of a digital ecosystem I have yet seen. I and my friends preordered multiple consoles because of it. We are still debating whether we want them anymore.

We desperately hope they bring them back, and have reached out to number of senior MS execs to express that. Hopefully we will see a return at some point in the future, or at very least a better compromise.

Karl P

1
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Samsung wins Apple MacBook contract, starts spitting out PCIe SSDs

karlp

We already know, 100$ cheaper than the last one.

Karl P

4
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karlp
Go

Exit Strategies

I am sure that one or two of these companies could, by showing some initiative, take their experience working with accelerating certain workloads and turn it more into a consultancy gig where they help companies with general app acceleration and workload efficiency tuning.

That said, most of the these flash-repackagers+secret sauce would do well to start shopping their engineering talent to the same companies they have been buying the underlying dies from.

Flash is growing up awfully quick right now, hopefully most of these people can avoid being caught-out.

Karl P

0
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BBC's Digital Moneypit Initiative known to be 'pile of dung' for years

karlp
Stop

An Important Consideration

I sometime play in this arena, and I want to add a few things before everyone piles on.

It's important to note that while, from what we read here, the project may seem to have been a bit overambitious, there is some precedent for this being a worthwhile, albeit expensive project.

There have been a few networks and large, geographically dispersed, production houses who have stepped up to get off of tape, get all of their assets digitized (within reason) and provide access to their data in practically all of their edit-bays and injest-points.

This is a hugely expensive thing to do. Think PB level's of SAN, MAID, metadata and asset management systems. Now think about linking that out at 4Gb or better speed to many dozens or even hundreds of geographically dispersed points.

It's a complicated project, but one that has been done, and has delivered substantial productivity benefits and even many cost benefits. (You would be quite shocked the price of a tape-based infrastructure. Everything from 50$ tapes that won't be reused to 50'000$ tape-decks that need considerable ongoing maintenance.)

Whether or not everyone needs access from everywhere is highly debatable, but by some measures it wouldn't be that difficult. All you need is a server hanging off the san, tied to the metadata and asset management databases with a web front-end and some custom software rendering the video down to h.264 streams in real time. Maybe use some heavy CUDA or something. Once you had the rest of the system functioning, this might be a not-that-big-of-a-deal bolt-on.

I'd be curious to know where they stand today. The project, from what I can surmise so far, is actually not only valid, but probably still needs to be done, albeit under much different direction.

Karl P

15
2

Dell crams baby small-biz data center into a tower chassis

karlp

Pricing

I would be shocked if even a basic two node config and 6 cheap spindles is less than 15K.

I would anticipate a mid 20's price, for basic normal configs, and maybe 30K with full compute nodes. Even then I am very interested.

The addition of a high speed shared storage subsystem could be a clincher here. I'm guessing this will be almost DAS performance in a shared subsystem, something you would need to spend big money on to get today in a true external shared storage system. The fact it will be limited to four compute nodes is acceptable, considering the workload I can accomplish with 8 sockets these days.

0
0
karlp

I love it.

While I do have concerns about chassis reliability and hopes for the availability of a spares kit, the raw idea I love. I hope they do well.

3
0

EFF files objections with W3C decrying addition of DRM to HTML5

karlp
Holmes

Re: In an ideal world...

I install locks on my doors.

They exist for no other reason than to keep the honest people out and enable me to get homeowners insurance.

They are also by many accounts an inconvenience; trying as I am to juggle for this and that while attempting to get the insufferable key to mate with the door.

Judging by the fact that I have been burgled before, I can say with some confidence that they do nothing against people who want to get in.

DRM is similar. It gives honest people pause and provides the basis for which content providers feel like some effort has been made.

It really isn't a lot more complicated than that.

I do still wish I lived in a world which didn't need locks, but that is a different issue altogether.

2
1

Adobe kills Creative Suite – all future features online only

karlp
Thumb Up

Re: What a huge fraud! Adobe worse than Electronic Arts (SimCity fraud)...

I am in the same boat as you, I have a client who is now licensed up on 4 or 5 (maybe more now) copies of creative cloud. They were moving off of one legit CS5 and a bunch of bootlegs. They couldn't justify frontloading 15'000$+ of adobe software. 200~300$ish a month is seen as an incredible bargain. I wouldn't be surprised if they end up with 10 or 15 seats when it is all said and done.

You guys gotta remember that adobe has never been the right company to do business with if you aren't in the business of making money with your tools. But if you are in that business - the subscription options are perfectly reasonable.

Because it has come up as a parallel, I also have a number of clients getting ready to go office 365 E3. The price hurts a bit, but nowhere near as much as front loading 500$+ per Office OpenLicense. Plus they get to get rid of their exchange servers (or google apps accounts) and their skype premium group-conference accounts (for lync). This is to say nothing of the support niceties you gain.

In most cases when we are doing an ROI on SaaS, we are seeing payback times at or over 3 years vs buying it ourselves. It would be stupid not to seriously consider that.

I understand that for home users there are different realities, and those may need to be addressed in better ways and/or at more flexible price points.

Do try and remember, for as many people as are here complaining about the SaaS movement, there are many, many more that are either indifferent or even in support of these changes.

7
3

Office for Mac 2008 support umbilical chopped off

karlp

However....

While the jury is still out on the general concept of leased software, the article and some of the comments are a bit off.

They aren't taking away the ability to purchase the current version of office (2011).

I am sure if you really need 2008, you can continue to get that under volume licensing as per usual, or ebay.

While it has some new (and some old) bugs still about, Office 2011 is _vastly_ faster, at least in my experience (100+ nodes of various apple machines).

On the subject of 365 - it gets you access to install more than one copy if your needs fall within the licensing TOS.

Additionally, it gets you outlook, which makes the comparison more like 200$+ vs 100$ a year. Finally, you do get access to one note and other services, albeit in their online versions.

While I am far from a Microsoft evangelist, there are plenty of things to be upset about without making up new ones.

Karl P

1
2

Amazon boss salvages Apollo engines from watery grave

karlp
Thumb Up

Re: Technical Matter

Indeed NASA are aware and in support of the matter.

In Jeff's Bezos blog on the matter (already linked in this conversation) he states the following:

"

Finally, I want to thank NASA. They extended every courtesy and every helping hand – all of NASA’s interactions were characterized by plain old common sense, something which we all know is impressive and uncommon. We're excited to be bringing a couple of your F-1s home.

"

While not an outright declaration of their blessing, it is obviously strongly inferred.

3
0

eBay: Our paid Google advertising was a total waste of money

karlp

Brands

It strikes me as a bit daft for eBay to broadcast their internal findings on this matter.

It doesn't surprise me at all if eBay has found paid ads don't bring much to the table. However that finding is going to be specific to their circumstances I would suspect. With a brand that is so strong, most people willing to deal in a non-retail environment will automatically think of them.

If they can cut the adspend and still make money - they do it. By by brining this up, all they do is state the obvious and potentially piss off Google*.

*And that is just bad for (any) business.

0
1

Backdoor root login found in Barracuda gear - and Barracuda is OK with this

karlp

Re: Security by obscurity

In my dealings with Barracuda they have always been forthcoming with the fact they hold their own login points. They are, after-all, a managed-solution appliance provider.

I can't remember the exact wording of their T&C's, but I believe it's in there already.

The fact they had thought to clamp down the IP range in the first place and are now pushing an update to help secure things a bit more is good.

I am not saying that their solution is appropriate for everyone in all fields, but their are many applications where this is perfectly acceptable.

Karl P

2
6

Raytheon to build low-orbit, disposable satellites for DARPA

karlp
Mushroom

Re: Apples and oranges..

There are actually loads of justifications I can think of.

I think the real point though is the one mentioned above.

The current network of observation satellites have no good way of getting data directly to the people who potentially have the most use of it.

Why not just make the current system do/support that? My guess is that they can't. The multi-billlion dollar spy sats that are up there right now seem, more or less, all or nothing affairs that are live all the time and designed to be directed and downlinked only from very limited locales. I would also be surprised if they had any sort of access control built in (AKA, there is a reasonable chance that they _can't_ black out something, aka they can be used to spy on anything that happens to be in their FOV).

In order to open up sat surveillance to a wider group it would seem that we need all sorts of things such as the ability to talk to multiple people simultaneously, to be able to be controlled from one location and video downlinked from many more. to have control over who can access it when, where it needs to black out, be cheap enough that no one is going to overly balk at a wider range of people operating it (no one wants a field grunt of any type to have control over something that costs billions with a b, it just won't happen), etc.

Once you get down into it, it probably makes sense for them to be different systems with different capabilities. If someone wants to say that it also gives the US a leg up on the Chinese sat-killing rockets, (put them up almost as fast as someone else can shoot them down), then all the merrier.

Just a WAG on my part, but one which feels something close to realistic.

Karl P

1
0

Time Warner Cable to Netflix: We want your 3D films, not your network

karlp
Holmes

Re: probably won't notice

I guess it really depends on how you go into it.

If you go in with a bullet point list of things you want to watch, you are going to be disappointed in any of the all-you-can-eat streaming providers (I am excluding Apple / Amazon here as most things are available through them, however it'll cost you dearly for any significant amount of content).

However if you go in expecting quality entertainment without pretext and are willing to experiment a bit, you will struggle to find enough to watch.

I dropped cable and picked up a unthrottled/uncapped commercial internet connection and both hulu/netflix maybe 6 months ago.

I don't watch the same shows anymore (or at least, very many of them) but at last count have over 500 episodes of content waiting to be watched, all of which is very, very good.

A different way of getting content (OTT/streaming/ondemand) also, at least for the moment, necessitates a different strategy for consuming content. If someone isn't prepared to make that leap, then they really shouldn't be dropping their cable/satellite connections.

Karl P

2
0

Here's a free tip, Cisco: DON'T buy NetApp unless you're crazy

karlp
Stop

Rackspace and Citrix....?

So you can kill one of the best hosting companies and one of the great remote access/vdi/hypervisor companies all at once?

Seriously, Rackspace is just wonderful as they are, and Citrix is really starting to become exciting again in their own right.

The only positive thing I could begin to think of about this room is "at least it's not Oracle".

Cisco should learn to be competitive again in their core competency. Seriously, these days Cisco is #3 or 4 on my switching provider list and # 5 or 6 on my WLAN provider list. About the only place I look at them seriously is in core routing, but even there I am now trending further rather than closer.

Get me excited about your products again. Make them excellent at a manageable price point. Wrap them in straight-forward services which are both comprehensive and fair.

Do all that and then maybe we could talk about new additions to your company.

3
0

Tor node admin raided by cops appeals for help with legal bills

karlp
Pirate

I don't find it unreasonable at all.

Some cheap insurance if you ask me.

Any person with a vague understanding of how the modern world works probably has one reason or another to have some sort of plan b.

I can't tell you the last time I used cash for a purchase, much less a major one, but yet I still keep a reasonable amount of Cash handy in the event that I were to ever need it.

In this day and age, when even having the same name as someone else who happened to do a bad thing can be enough to have accounts frozen and services suspended (by error of course, but inconvenient at the very least), I think it might actually be a good idea.

Certainly a much better investment than any number of other dubious "insurance" policies one might be offered in the course of life.

Upon reflection, I may even add a pre-paid to the insurance pile.

As my dad always says "Either be prepared, or hang around someone who is" (:

2
0

Why Google and Amazon could end up cooking their own chips

karlp
Stop

Re: Samsung - designed to fail.

Saying that Apple is using A9 cores is quite disingenuous is it not?

I could just as truthfully say that they are already using A15's.

In reality both, and neither, of those are true.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6292/iphone-5-a6-not-a15-custom-core

In my world A15 shows interesting promise for certain computing workloads, but I can't help but feel that Apple did precisely the right thing by incorporating what is good about A9 and A15 in their own package that is laser focused on power efficiency and performance as hand in hand requirements.

My guess is that, at least for a time, others (including amazon) may decide they need the same design latitude in order to drive excellent user experiences.

3
0

Schmidt: Google deathmatch with Apple is 'defining' for the tech biz

karlp

Re: We think there should be more choice...

If your going to fault Apple for something, I don't know that I would start there. Not being able to set default apps as a general topic would be more appropriate, but then I understand where they are coming from by not doing so.

Maybe google should instead be required to open up (paid, licensed - of course) access to their raw vector data. Particularly seeing as that's why Apple had to leave in the first place.

0
0

Intel's chief chipman: '22nm better than expected, 14nm on track'

karlp
Coffee/keyboard

Re: Gullible hacks...

Because adding cores is only useful if you are running multi-threaded applications (many that you would think to use for casually judging performance aren't) or seriously multi-tasking.

Beyond 2 cores is really only useful to a group that while large in absolutely terms, is relatively quite small.

It's just the continuation of the GHz wars at some level.

1
0

Thomson joins vid-streamers' rush for MPEG-DASH

karlp

@Mad Hacker

You must be walking away from a lot of products then, Almost all of them, in fact.

Practically every streaming project I have worked on in the past two years involves transcoding into a variety of formats and resolutions. The only exception is when we are doing on the fly transcoding, but that is so proc intensive we only use that in special circumstances.

Hopefully that will change in the future. In fact, if we could only have a single format, I'd be happy to deal with the bitrates.

Alas, the world we live in is not (nor ever will be) perfect, and you do what you need to do.

Glad to hear we may begin to get some consensus on an HLS standard and a DRM package to go along with it. Sorely missing at the moment.

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