* Posts by DryBones

203 posts • joined 7 Feb 2010

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Android gives Google a search monopoly? Not so fast, says judge

DryBones

I think the issue would revolve around the effect that the element has.

Back during the period that the antitrust action took place against Microsoft, IE was not only not standards compliant, but it was seriously not compliant, to the degree that a website that looked right in IE didn't work at all for anything else, including those that followed the standard. This meant that it was likely that most sites would look right on IE, but wrong other browsers unless the owners had implemented detection and presentation of separate pages/files for the browsers. It was a deliberate act, adding functions and features that aren't in the standards to break compatibility with other browsers.

Contrast that with the search issue. Different search site/plugin is going to return different results, with different priorities. Google started as a webpage, and got to be the site of choice for search. They work based on content. Search Engine Optimization got to be a thing, and if I recall properly, it's against the rules with Google. Your content should be your content, and it should be relevant, and you shouldn't be stashing a bunch of keywords to push your ranking up. Sites get caught misbehaving, get dropped in ranking until they clean up the fake bullshit they put in to push themselves up.

Not sure that you can really compare deliberately breaking standards and by extension sites, and thus making other browsers not render them properly... with crawling sites and ranking them, and demoting them if they try to fake out the rating system. Google is just doing what it does, search, and there really are other choices. I presume the other search engines do similar in terms of ranking and demotion... or maybe not, if they return a lot of keyword-bait sites at the top.

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DryBones

So wait... Are they trying to sue Google because users are (fat dumb and) happy with Google search?

Good lord, I think they are. If I want something else, I search for "search" in the Play Store, job done.

And no, I don't want to. Some monopolies come because everyone else is rubbish.

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DoubleDirect hackers snaffle fandroid and iPhone-strokers' secrets

DryBones

Hmm.

Windows and Linux users would appear to be immune because their operating systems don't accept ICMP redirection packets that carry malicious traffic."

I think the important question that should be asked here is "How can they tell?" Do they not accept redirections and thus not comply with the standard, or do they have a central place they connect and get such updates from. If so you just have to redirect that first! Reminds me of The Invention of Lying.

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Oracle gives HR tool to track your fitness

DryBones

Oh Look!

Something else for us to have to fill out instead of actually doing work.

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'Tech giants who encrypt comms are unwittingly aiding terrorists', claims ex-Home Sec Blunkett

DryBones

Breathtaking

I, for one, welcome the time when all these politicians, and all these spook agencies, sit back wide-eyed and stunned, and realize, "My God, they're not buying it."

Lies, truth... They've shown we can't tell the difference, so we're forced to not believe any of it.

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Got a STRAP-ON? Remember to TAKE IT OFF at WORK

DryBones

Re: The only jewelry I wear is my Wedding ring.

Arc-heating hazard, I imagine.

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Antares apocalypse: Orbital points finger at turbopump FAIL

DryBones

Re: Some perspective on this

At least part of it is probably because NASA's COTS program was for more than just one entry, they wanted a competition going, so you kinda had to have other new entrants? Not sure, but I think the legacy folks were excluded from bidding?

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DryBones

Re: In this case, it's not the technology.

If it's just cargo (human spaceflight DOES NOT like rockets you can't shut off if an anomaly occurs), ATK was offering all-solid boosters that can fill the role and give Orbital time to bring a new engine online. Maybe the AR-1 that Aerojet Rocketdyne is offering, that'd put them up pretty well.

Really, as soon as this Antares blew, the AJ-26 was dead and the program was on the ropes. Combined with the test stand explosion due to corrosion cracking / old metal, their entire supply of engines is now suspect, and testing didn't catch either fault. It's like the Minotaur fairing issues but from the other direction.

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Microsoft's TV product placement horror: CNN mistakes Surface tabs for iPAD STANDS

DryBones

Re: The images really are telling...

Because they're not massive wankers like MS and Samsung? I've no love for Apple, but I can't stand kruft.

Looking forward to Android 5 on my Nexus 7.

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Qualcomm: Chinese patent licensees still aren't playing fair

DryBones

Is it really a monopoly if everyone else is pants?

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Pitchforks at dawn! UK gov's Verify ID service FAILS to verify ID

DryBones

Insert obligatory "Whereas we cant't trust the government about ANYTHING" comment here.

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Samsung says teaming up with mobe-maker Microsoft could violate antitrust law

DryBones

Re: Isn't that a bit risky?

Yep, I do. They're refusing to disclose them, just the way it was with Linux. Look how well that worked out for them.

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Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins

DryBones

Nice icon...

Shame about the shite code and interface though.

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Apple, Google take on Main Street in BONKING-FOR-CASH struggle

DryBones

Really?

"Many retailers have already seen the benefits and are delighting their customers at over 220,000 locations."

Bless me. I can't find the comic, but I seem to remember one about some card that got the user off when swiped through the reader. This is the only way I can visualize someone being justified in describing paying for tat using this language, and I don't think that's a feature even of the iPhone 6 "Size Matters" edition.

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FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on

DryBones

Re: Freetard redux?

No, actually it's more like having your television suddenly stop displaying any inputs. Cable, aerial, USB pictures. What's going on? You have no clue, you can't take it back as it's out of warranty. Oh, here's a news story, some company is saying that your tv has a counterfeit part in it, and that as a result they've disabled all its inputs. Have fun with your new flat lamp.

No matter whose due dilligence failed, they are going to have a very hard time tracking this down, or even determining where those chips came from. Meanwhile, YOUR stuff now does not work, and you have little recourse.

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Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit

DryBones

Stop thinking like an uber-geek. You need to be thinking like an end-user about this. Nobody outside of this forum and frequenters of perhaps a handful of other tech sites would know about this unless it manages to go huge online. Yon End User plugs the device in, it stops working, they have no way to find out why unless they think to go digging way into device properties. When is the last time you looked at a USB ID just because?

It is effectively bricked, for the average person's level of skill. Copy or not, this falls squarely into the Computer Misuse Act as malicious software.

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Chinese hackers slurp iCloud passwords, Apple's CEO jumps into his jet for China

DryBones

Chinese government to Apple: Your security is crap, improve your security!

Apple improves it.

Chinese government to hacker corps / ISPs: Break them

Chinese government to Apple, Chinese public: Apple security is crap, everyone should buy Xiaomi.

Job's a good'un.

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FBI boss: We don't want a backdoor, we want the front door to phones

DryBones

Also!

I'm not sure about anyone else, but the more I hear this sort of thing from them, the more I think "Good" and look for more things I can encrypt. Because obviously they need for their base level of difficulty to be a lot higher to make them focus their resources where they're actually needed, instead of getting into everything just because they can.

Anybody else thinking "Streisand Effect"?

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DryBones
Pint

Ah, consensus...

It appear that every single post in this thread is some flavor of "fuck off".

I'll go with "sod off, you big girl's blouse!"

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US Attorney Gen latest to roast Apple, Google mobe encryption

DryBones
Pirate

Captain Obvious to the Quarterdeck!

As the number of those with power or authority who seem to be trustworthy shrinks, so too does the number of people willing to trust them. Funny, that.

Fishing expedition canceled; too much ICE in the bay.

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15 MEEELLION malware-infested mobiles worldwide – report

DryBones

Re: Spyware, spyware, spyware

Well, the data mining has always been there. The difference is that now we get to be one of the end users of it, too!

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DryBones

So, cheap, old Android phone produced as an exercise in how weak of hardware will take crapware and still boot is behaving badly. Got it. Seems to compare well with the complaints about how long in the tooth (read: unuseable) the iPhone 3S got after iOS for the iPhone 5 came out. Anyway!

You might check the Moto G and maybe E, especially if you can get the Play Edition direct from Google. Direct updates, no carrier crap to get in the way and cause instability. They're as cheap as you can reasonably get a good smartphone off-contact, and Motorola seems to be on top of their game with updates for what does go through them. Reportedly might have beat the Nexus phones to one of the 4.4.X updates.

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DryBones

James,

So, what Android phone is it? I suspect Samsung, which is pronounced "marketing hype and bloated UI addons". Might want to try one of the Nexus for comparison.

Also, I believe for Android phones without removable battery, there is a watchdog chip that monitors the power button. Hold it for 10s and bip, it resets, even in the midst of a hard lockup.

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YES YES YES! Apple patents mousy, pressure-sensing iVibrator

DryBones
Holmes

This reminds me of...

One of my senior projects for undergrad. Combining a strain gauge and normal optical tracking to cut the amount of motion needed to move the cursor while still maintaining the full control that a mouse gives you. A nice thing if you don't want to set the sensitivity so twitching snaps your cursor to the far side of the screen, and you haven't got a ton of space to be scrolling way over to the side. Also less lift-and-place while circle-strafing the boss (in game, though it might be against your boss!).

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Google leaves STUPID vuln on Nest devices

DryBones
Facepalm

Blame Where Blame Is Due

Remember, Nest is operating separately from Google, they managed to cock it up all on their own. Sounds like they could do with borrowing some security auditors, though!

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Apple wins patent on charging iThings THROUGH THIN AIR

DryBones
Boffin

Re: Inefficiency is irrelevant

Even if it consumes 5A @ 12VDC to supply 50mA @ 5VDC to one device?

Inefficiency is never irrelevant, it simply varies in acceptability.

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Windows Registry-infecting malware has no files, survives reboots

DryBones
Holmes

Re: "a tool Microsoft uses to hide its source code from being copied"

" I'm just trying to imagine what would happen to the file system of a regular Windows PC if it had to deal with its configuration as a billion tiny files instead of the big hulking mess that the registry is."

Hmm. I rather think it'd read the configuration for the program when (if) it loads it up, like any sane person would do. The individual files are a million times smaller than the registry, so it's a doddle.

The Windows Registry is rather like memorizing the entire contents of your library instead of just looking at the table of contents for the book you want when you pick it up.

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Lawyer for alleged Silk Road kingpin wants all evidence thrown out

DryBones

Hate to Say It But...

I kinda agree with his lawyer. There have been too many bad apples brought to light, too much talk of being trained to construct "artificial" evidence trails for them to be worthy of trust, especially if things actually are rather vague about the circumstances under which all this was uncovered. It's much, much too close to the shenanigans that China and other such countries pull with their fully monitored networks.

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Android ransomware demands 12x more cash, targets English-speakers

DryBones
Angel

Re: Hmmm

"Such as Amazon's site?"

If you mean their app store, and it requires you to enable install of untrusted apps, then yes that falls under "third party".

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DryBones
Pint

Hmmm

Something seems off...

"In addition, the malware now asks to be installed as Device Administrator..."

Oh, there we go. Yet another social engineering attack that's only possible if you enable third party / untrusted apk installs, download it, and then tell it to install.

NEXT!

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L33t haxxors compete to p0wn popular home routers

DryBones

Re: And bad advice...

Obviously that guy didn't read the manual.

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Elon Musk GIVES UP ON SEX: He'll make do with a 'cheap' Tesla III instead

DryBones

Call it the Model A

Buy SAX, you all.

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Siri, did we just take a hit in that voice-recog patent fight?

DryBones
Trollface

Well done that man.

My thoughts almost exactly. .oO(Pot, meet kettle. He'll probably get you steamed.)

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Yet another reason to skip commercials: Microsoft ad TURNS ON your Xbox One

DryBones

Madness?

This is HILARIOUS! (/Sparta)

Seriously, I understand there's a certain amount of trolling going on with switched gamer handles... :)

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New Apple iOS to help fanbois thwart Wi-Fi network spies

DryBones

Alternative Title

Apple Makes War*ing Easier Than Ever

Seriously, help me out here. I'm struggling to see how this is more than security theater when the things actually being talked about are MitM attacks and other such untrustworthy network access points, when one is in public. OMG, someone might sniff my MAC address from the wifi that I leave on all the time hunts around for access points. 9 out of 10 access points that someone would care about broadcast their SSID, so what they should be doing is passive listening (multiple wardriving programs have shown this to be quite effective) and then directly connecting to the one that they're interested in.

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Ukrainian teen created in lab passes Turing Test – famous nutty prof

DryBones

Article Title Incorrect

It should be "Adults' Opinion of Teenage Writing Ability Now Equal to Chatbot". Seriously, that's all it is. The standard of perception is slipping.

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Glassholes beware: This guy's got your number

DryBones
Holmes

Re: And the/a flip side is...

Psst. Psst.

Hint: It's the same as if they did it with a cell phone camera. They can store all the data on the device, cutting them off the net does nothing, and they should have their own connectivity with them anyway.

Your line of thinking has met innumerable technological advances in the 21st century. You may want to check your perspective.

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DryBones
Holmes

How Droll...

This is what's known as an "attention grab". Usually (lately, it seems anyway) done by taking an odd or extreme measure with relation to a controversial topic that otherwise nobody would give two shakes about. Since we're techies here, obviously it found some audience/success.

Google Glass specs are here: https://support.google.com/glass/answer/3064128?hl=en

Hmm. 12GB storage, Bluetooth, wifi. Okay, so the guy may be able to do such, on his network. One I will never see, and never want to see if it's unsecured like it would need to be in order for some passing Tom, Dick, or Harry to link in. Given the out-and-about nature of most users, Glass will be tethered to their phone or a hotspot for data connection. They should have such a setup readily at hand, so if kicked off the network they will shrug and use their default method. Or, more likely, they won't have it on the network in the first place if it's not an approved device at work.

If they are allowed to use it at work as an approved device and bother to find out why it's being dropped, they will rightly conclude that he's a tit, and HR may get involved. Regardless (such as if the rules are his to make), their use of Glass via their normal roaming means will be unimpeded.

Storm in a teacup, sound and fury amounting to nothing, etc. If Glass users are behaving so badly as to warrant such measures and ire, they need reminding of common courtesy. You don't see people using their camera phone to take video of you during a casual chat, should be the same with this.

I'd say this was fear and paranoia, does anyone know if there's a "camera on" indicator seen from the outside (and positioned to not have prism imperfection mistaken for it)? Seems that would resolve the issue quite simply.

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SpaceX billionaire claims Air Force official 'likely' made job-for-spy-sat-contract deal

DryBones

Re: Wait a minute...

It adds up perfectly well if you figure in that most people in the aerospace industry (or any industry) tend to want to stay in it. You don't generally go from semiconductor design to brain surgery, you stick where your experience is because that's how you have the best chance of landing a job.

See F111F's post, above.

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DryBones

This is exactly the sort of thing that isn't going on, because if they did they'd have the FTC so far up their ass they wouldn't be able to move. There is no shortage of folks ready to point the finger either.

The problem is that the folks most qualified for these jobs are those that have been doing it from another angle. This isn't "build building", this is "understand convoluted regulations, follow procedure, and provide accurate requirements documentation for launching a rocket on government contract". It's kind of a narrow worker pool to pick from.

So you end up with folks that understand what's wanted, but they don't get to actually deal with most anyone that they knew from their former job. So you end up with negotiating teams working from packages those with the knack have given them.

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DryBones

Re: Well, this is a problem...

Not sure what there is to disagree with in there, but whatever. This should be interesting either way it goes. Either there will be improper hiring practices found at Aerojet (who are not part of ULA, contrary to what Musk is insinuating), or he's made a pretty good civil case against himself for libel and defamation of character.

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DryBones

Well, this is a problem...

An image problem for Aerojet, anyway. It's not ULA's responsibility or perview to vet a supplier's hirings. And yes, this is another angle to try and get the contact revoked, but I don't currently see how it would have influenced the outcome of negotiations, since he was only part of a negotiation team, and that one supplier doesn't have a major influence on costs. Have to wait and see what the look at due diligence says.

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Samsung mobes to get an eyeful of your EYE in biometric security bid

DryBones

Re: There's probably a lot of companies "looking at" iris scanning

NFC chip implanted in palm. Done and done.

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Spy sat launch wannabe SpaceX fails to stop rival gobbling Russki rockets

DryBones

Orbital Science has been air-launching payloads with the Pegasus for a while now, but depending on weights I suppose there's plenty of room in that pool.

As for bloated whales, I've said it before and I'll say it here: When you work goverment contracts, a rather non-trivial part of the cost is in giving the government what they demand in terms of auditing and compliance and proceduralism. There's this wonderful thing called FAR 15... no, it's not wonderful, it sucks really badly. To a certain degree, rules and regulations are a good thing because they keep folks from behaving too badly. But you have to balance them or it just ends up slow, unwieldy, and expensive. Sound familiar?

I think you'll be shocked when the comparison between SpaceX and ULA really IS apples-to-apples.

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London cabbies to offer EVEN WORSE service in protest against Uber

DryBones

Re: Maybe the cabbies in London ....

Well, I was going to say that "So, this means that the opinion of cabbies not open to using Uber is going to plummet, right? Nice own goal there, lads,". Looks like you got there first, though. :)

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SpaceX wins court injunction to block US Air Force buying Russian rockets

DryBones

Re: @ DryBones -- I like Elon.

@Someone:

Remarkably myopic comment. Seriously, 90% of EVERYTHING you see these days was not Made in the USA. Computers, watches, desks, cars. That building? Chinese steel. That battery? Lead from a Chinese factory.

Once overseas freight became almost free in the massive lots that are possible these days, it was a race to the bottom (line). Assembled in the USA to Comply With National Pride, is the uncomfortable truth. If you want to be nationalist, you need to look at it ALL.

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DryBones

Re: I like Elon.

It's not a "may be ", SpaceX do not have the facilities, do not follow the procedures, do the required auditing and reporting to meet government contacting standards, full stop. How many companies would you take seriously if they said " we don't meet your requirements, but here we're going to bid anyway :D"? That's what SpaceX is saying, if it was a contractor you'd look at them funny and walk the other way. It's a delaying tactic, pure and simple, as if it's sustained everything has to be thrown out and started from scratch, costing X amount of time and money. Oh, that's our (taxpayers) time and money.

ULA was explicitly excluded from CCDev, so of course they are not part of that, and there's no point in them designing and building their own capsule. The Atlas needed one additional box to meet man rating requirements, all the rest already met or exceeded where the safety and design reviews are pointing due to heritage and reliability requirements for DoD launches.

ULA has gotten funding to adapt the D4 second stage (proven design, meets specs) for SLS, and to throw the Orion capsule for a full functional test with reentry. That's a lot of pork? Your butcher must love you. Congress forcing NASA to use the RS-25/SSME for SLS instead of buying RS-68s that produce more thrust and are already in steady production seems more relevant to that. Love to see them change the engine control box for one with more emergency detection and call it the RS-69...

As for costs... Heh heh heh. Trust me, "government contract" is pronounced "bend over and spread your books". If someone says they do not have accurate cost figures they do not have access to them, or did not bother to read them. The government requires disclosure of costs and that they be kept up to date, they can recover costs that are not accurately stated / excessive, withhold funds, etc. Basically, they have a hand up the accounting department's backside.

SpaceX are an entirely private company that does not do any of the things that government contracts require them to do, including buying per Federal Acquisition Regulations for all that they do. So yes, SpaceX is cheaper. Expect the playing field to level as government requirements are added to SpaceX, and ULA sheds requirements that SpaceX is not held to as well.

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DryBones

3. Russian engines are better on an engine-to-engine basis than anyone other than SpaceX's latest. Only took 50 years to surpass them, looks like.

Personally, I'd love to see resources pooled and an oxygen-rich kerosene engine developed in the US that multiple companies can use. You'd get economies of scale, the latest tech advances, and can be nationalist to your heart's content.

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DryBones

Re: I like Elon.

He's pulling an Apple, pure and simple, throwing a tantrum and trying to use lawsuits and injunctions to get his way without any care for the collateral damage. Pulling the 'nationalism' card is a nice thing to be able to do when you're already in position for it.

Don't forget, most of the things we use today are made in places like China and India, and probably some in Russia too (can't think of any huge examples at the moment). How did this happen? They're able to produce them less expensively and in greater volumes. What can we expect to happen as a result of going insular? Oh yeah, prices will rise until folks find a way around it, or the pressure on the politicians to stop being stupid becomes greater than that of the Cold War mindshare.

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Rackspace refuses to enlist in cloud's latest price cutting war

DryBones

Re: Well, Good Luck to 'em

How's that support, though? Crap support is crap support, it being affordable doesn't make it acceptable.

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