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* Posts by A Non e-mouse

573 posts • joined 30 Jan 2010

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VMware 5.5: Plenty that's new and exciting... but what about the obvious stuff?

A Non e-mouse
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this means that until 2013 you were limited to a shade under 2TB

My standard operating practise, was the O/S drive was a VMDK on your VMFS file system. The data was held on a separate drive which was just a mapping to a partition/LUN/whatever on your shared storage. No worries about VMDK size limits.

I'm going to stick my neck out and say that I think it'll be a few years before the O/S needs more than 2TB of disc space.

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Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL

A Non e-mouse
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I recently opened an account with Santander. I now how something like eight passwords I have to keep track of for this one account. (Plus they can send me OTPs to my mobile too.)

Do I really need eight passwords?!?

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Surprise!

Hey, is that you Eden? We've missed you round these parts...

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Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes

A Non e-mouse
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Why have home LTE Femto cells and pay Mobile ISPs for the traffic you already paid for on on your ISP?

I suspect it's to do with the way the service is provided. The Femto cell just a (fairly) dumb device, and back-hauls everything back to the operators network via a VPN. The operator's central network then works out what to do. e.g. Do they have adult content allowed?

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Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released

A Non e-mouse
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Re: You left out

the successful exploit against the Cloudflare challenge took 2.5 million attempts

Fedor Indutny took 2.5 millions requests. Ilkka Mattila took just 100K requests. It is suspected (but not proven) that rebooting the server helped Ilkka Mattila.

blog.cloudflare.com/the-results-of-the-cloudflare-challenge

I don't know how many requests it took others to extract the key.

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NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS

A Non e-mouse
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As Thom Brow mentioned in another thread: What can you actually get from this security hole? The private key appears to be highly unlikely.

blog.cloudflare.com/answering-the-critical-question-can-you-get-private-ssl-keys-using-heartbleed

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OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts

A Non e-mouse
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More issues with OpenSSL

The lack of proper review has other consequences with OpenSSL's code.

Ted Unangst has two blog posts [1][2] about how OpenSSL's clever internal memory management code is actually hiding more bugs. It allows use-after free. There are also parts of OpenSSL's code that bank on a free-then-malloc returning the exact same block of memory.

When problems were found when OpenSSL wasn't used with its internal memory allocator (Four years ago!) the problems weren't fixed.[3]

[1] www.tedunangst.com/flak/post/heartbleed-vs-mallocconf

[2] www.tedunangst.com/flak/post/analysis-of-openssl-freelist-reuse

[3] rt.openssl.org/Ticket/Display.html?id=2167&user=guest&pass=guest

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A more zoftig Register

A Non e-mouse
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Please no.

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House Rules Red Background

A Non e-mouse
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House Rules Red Background

What's with the new red background to the House Rules header. Has someone been a naughty commentard?

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Gay marriage foes outraged at Mozilla CEO flap, call for boycott

A Non e-mouse
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No win.

There is no way Mozilla (or Eich) could win with this. Either Eich stayed, and people say "He (and by association Mozilla) are anti gay", or he goes and people say "What about freedom of speech".

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Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed

A Non e-mouse
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Does El Reg have any stats as to how many people running XP are reading its hallowed words?

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You can play Flappy Bird on a POINT OF SALE TERMINAL

A Non e-mouse
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Customers continue to claim they've been subject to charges/transactions they never made. Security researchers continue to find major flaws in the Chip & Pin security mechanism.

All the while, the payment card industry refuse to acknowledge that the problems are real (and even try to silence the researches)

Chip & Pin is better than the magnetic strip/signature method, but it's not perfect, and the payment industry needs to own up to this.

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Oracle smacks JD Edwards help site with cease and desist order

A Non e-mouse
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When will companies realise that a healthy customer community enhances their product, and lawyer letters just serve to nark customers off.

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Technology is murdering customer service - legally

A Non e-mouse
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Maybe some kind of customer service SLA could be in order when you sign up for things

In my experience, SLAs aren't worth the paper they're written on. Usually the penalties are trivial, so there's no incentive to improve.

At the other end, I heard of one contract where the SLA penalties piled up so high that the customer was told: "If you invoke the [SLA] penalties, we'll go into administration as we can't afford them"

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A Non e-mouse
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Paying for customer service

With several big (house hold name) companies my employer deals with, we've said that we would pay extra to have our own dedicated, customer service person/people. (when you're spending millions, the cost would be a rounding error) The large companies refused, saying we'd have to use the same pool of agents that everyone else uses. Crazy....

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A Non e-mouse
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BT

BT Do their utmost to not help the customer: They have a culture of customer disservice and buck passing. I'm sure their staff training is all about how to pass the customer onto a different BT division as quickly as possible.

If (and that is a very big if) you get to speak to a real engineer, they are usually very helpful and privately acknowledge that BT is a mess and is driven by middle managers who are wanting to hit cost-reduction targets. (Getting to that engineer is like the labours of Hercules.)

One BT engineer told me he was disciplined by his manager for not closing enough support tickets in a day. Another told me that he sometimes passes fault tickets to other BT divisions - not because they'll fix the fault, but that it shows that he's "dealt" with the fault within his allotted time and so has hit target for the day. Engineers also tell me that they're given sales targets they have to hit too. Again, not interested in solving your problem, just in hitting a middle management target.

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WIMPs wipe each other out in giant radiating spot at galaxy's centre

A Non e-mouse
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At that energy range (30-40 GeV), we should be able to make plenty of WIMPs on Earth. (The Higgs Boson was lurking at 125 GeV)

The only minor detail is detecting them...

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Who's up for yet another software-defined net protocol? Cisco wants to see some hands

A Non e-mouse
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Patents?

Any how many patents does Cisco hold on this? I trust no-one's forgotten VRRP www.ietf.org/ietf-ftp/IPR/VRRP-CISCO

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Dropbox nukes bloke's file share in DMCA brouhaha – then admits it made a 'HASH OF IT'

A Non e-mouse
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Actually, the only thing the article says has changed is that you must go to arbitration before calling a lawyer, not that Dropbox have suddenly started blocking access to files due to DMCA notices.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Or

Dropbox, Google drive etc are lazy solutions for people that can't be bothered or don't want to set up their own solution

Or for people who don't understand how this all works.

El Reg readers are probably quite tech savy. The general population less so. If the general population were tech savy, why are hundreds of millions of people still using Hotmail/Gmail/Yahoo/etc?

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Don't tase me Pro: WD brings out Thunderbolt external drive

A Non e-mouse
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Joke

If only El Reg supplied a link to submit minor typographical corrections...

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Say WHAT? ATVOD claims 44k Brit primary school kids look at smut online each month

A Non e-mouse
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Obligatory Dilbert cartoon:

dilbert.com/strips/comic/1996-01-24/

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Original iPhone dev team was 'shockingly small' - Apple engineer

A Non e-mouse
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In some ways, I'd say that this reveals how to run a successful project: Small, dedicated team, with strong support from senior management, clear requirements and a passionate project sponsor.

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What price justice? 73 CENTS in book price-gouging case

A Non e-mouse
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My understanding of the case is that Apple didn't set the selling price. They just said "Whatever you sell at, we'll take a X% cut" Which is why I don't understand why Apple are being fined.

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Nvidia unveils Pascal, its next-gen GPU with hella-fast interconnects and 3D packaging

A Non e-mouse
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Heat?

Don't graphics cards already have enough of a problem with heat? So won't stacking chips just make waste heat harder as there's less surface area? Or are they going to implement some kind of inter-layer heat extraction?

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It's EE vs Vodafone: 'How good is my signal' study descends into network bunfight

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Good luck if you're switching to O2

O2 won't sell me anything equivalent to Vodafones sure signal device

That's a shame. Their Boost Box devices (both the consumer & corporate variants which they're quite happy to sell to corporates) both work well.

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A Non e-mouse
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Horses for courses

IMHO, there is no "best" operator, just better ones in different areas.

According to the article and the comments (so far) 3 and O2 are supposed to have great coverage. Where I live & work, 3 is the worst, Vodafone the best and O2 somewhere in the middle. (I don't know what EE are like around here)

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MPs blast HMRC for using anti-terrorism laws against whistleblower

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Negotiable tax payments

So simply charge them an extra sum if it takes too long to work out their tax liabilities

How to you differentiate between companies being awkward to try to reduce their tax liabilities, and headaches caused by the ever increasing complexity of the tax system?

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From corporate bod to startup star: The 10-month gig that changed everything

A Non e-mouse
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Promotion

I've always resisted being a bureaucrat manager. It's so much more fun doing "real" work, rather than writing reports, budget applications and attending meetings where nothing actually happens.

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Middle England's allotments become metric battlefield

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Get a life...

I think Matt Parker has an excellent introduction to imperial units on YouTube:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7x-RGfd0Yk

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ICO decides against probe of Santander email spam scammers

A Non e-mouse
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I found spam being sent to my LinkedIn email address. I deleted my LinkedIn account and deleted the email address.

It can be a bit of a pain having to create email accounts for every system, but it makes it much easier to spot who's selling your information on.

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Reality check: Java 8 finally catches a multi-core break

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Good performance? Scalable?

You choose a programming language based on multiple criteria, including, performance of resulting code, ease of writing code, IDE support, libraries etc.

A language being the latest fad is not the reason to choose it.

You can read a bit more on Twitter's decision to switch to Java at the back end blog.twitter.com/2011/twitter-search-now-3x-faster

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A Non e-mouse
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Java has always supported multi-cores. Java was designed to support multiple threads (and Unicode) from the off.

Lambda expressions don't "add" multi-core support. They add functional programming to Java which has up to now been strongly object-oriented.

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QUIDOCALYPSE: Blighty braces for £100 MILLION cost of new £1 coin

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Deal With It!

Have a look at this Numberphile video on YouTube www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUCSSJwO3GU. It discusses constant width shapes & solids.

(Numberphile is an excellent geek YouTube channel BTW)

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This record-smashing robot solves a Rubik's Cube in 3.253 seconds

A Non e-mouse
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The robot demonstrates just how fast a Samsung Galaxy S4 can think

To my mind, the speed of the phone's CPUs is not the impressive part. That high-speed robot made of Lego: Now that's the bit that impresses me.

It would have have been nice if they'd captured it with a high(er) speed camera and then made a slow-mo video of it.

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Outsourcer Atos outsources hardware, data centre refresh

A Non e-mouse
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I heard of a public sector body that outsourced their whole IT division. They then outsourced the management of the outsourced contract.

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Wackadoo DIYers scissor-kick beatboxer

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Since when ...

when has it been spelled with a '-ize' ending

According to the Oxford Dictionary, -ize is the correct spelling, and it is not an Americanism of the British -ise. In Britain, both -ise & -ize are acceptable.

-ise appears to have come from French.

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Tiny heat-sucker helps keep Moore's Law going

A Non e-mouse
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You mean things like:

- Parallelism (multi cores/NUMA/Transputers/GPGPUs)

- Instruction designs (RISC/CISC/VLIW)

- Super-scaler architectures

- Branch prediction

- Multi-level caching

- Out-of-order execution

- Alternative high(er) level languages

- Compiler design

- Quantum computing

- Neural-net based systems?

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Slash tuition fees for STEM students, biz boss body begs UK.gov

A Non e-mouse
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Re: A new way

Isn't this called an apprenticeship ?

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Backdoor snoops can access files on your Samsung phone via the cell network – claim

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Lot's of speculation

It is getting common for ethernet controllers, modems, etc to become more capable with complex software stacks. Many of these ... can access all the system resources (RAM, peripherals,...) just as easily as the CPU can.

It's already been done.

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BB10's 'dated' crypto lets snoops squeeze the juice from your BlackBerry – researcher

A Non e-mouse
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WTF?

Re: Surprise!

Er, where in the article did it mention Microsoft?

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Top UK e-commerce sites fail to protect 'password' password-havers from selves

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Site fails

In particular, a certain bank which will only accept alphanumeric characters in your password

I found the Inland Revenue site a right PITA. It said my password didn't match their security requirements. After trying various permutations, I worked out that my password was too secure for their system and I had to use a weaker one.

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A Non e-mouse
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Re: Locking out does not "deny" service

I think you'll find the attempts may well be coming from a lot of different IP addresses.

I had one IP address in Hungry trying for weeks to SSH into my servers. Even with fail2ban set to ban for 6 hours, the machine kept on coming back....

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A Non e-mouse
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Security and ease of use are frequently polar opposites. Trying to persuade non-techie people that the good on-line practises of strong passwords, no password reuse, etc. are important is very hard.

I think the message is starting to get through to some people, but it'll be a never ending battle.

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Indestructible Death Stars blow up planets with glowing KILL RAY

A Non e-mouse
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about 1,000 astronomical units in diameter

I can't even think of a word to do justice to its size!

But with all that mass, how does it not immediately collapse into a black hole?

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Space-junk RAYGUN wins Australian government funding

A Non e-mouse
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Re: About bloody time...

There are two types of space junk: Big (satellites) and small (nuts, bolts, fleck of paint, spanners, etc).

I suspect this laser tech is intended for the small stuff.

Larger junk is gonna be a different kettle of fish. I believe newer satellites are now designed to have thrusters & fuel to either de-orbit them or push them into a very high (i.e. out of the way) orbit.

As to "mining" defunct satellites, I suspect it'll be a long time before that becomes commercially viable. Look at the practicalities: You have to launch a large vehicle, get it to the satellite, remove appendages that were never designed to retract (e.g. solar panels), bring it into the launch vehicle, then bring it all back down to Earth. (And you have to do all of that without creating any new debris too!) Only then, can you look to process the scrap. That's a lot of money & tech for scrap metal.

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A potted history of cloud computing

A Non e-mouse
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Re: Oh the security....

Since when are email servers and office apps "complex systems"?

When you're a small business and can't afford a full time IT person who can do all this for you. For this type of company, a cloud (or back in the day bureau) service is a no brainer.

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New 4G router pitched at biz bods sick to death of titsup networks

A Non e-mouse
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Cost

As others have mentioned, it does seem expensive. Then they want $500 for a second 4G modem? I can pick up a 4G USB stick for under £100. So what am I getting for the extra cost?

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