* Posts by Tom Samplonius

221 posts • joined 28 Jan 2010

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Porn on Blogger – Google takes stiff action

Tom Samplonius

"can only be seen by the owner or admins of the blog and the people who the owner has shared the blog with"

No, as private blogs can only be accessed if the owner explicitly shared it with you. So you'll have to email the owner, and request an invite.

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Hey, network giants: Facebook swigs from an 'open' 6-PACK of tech

Tom Samplonius

Re: As bad as Cisco for the naming

"...management blades."

Strictly speaking, those are the fabric blades. The management is on the line cards.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Unfair comparison

"Any idea what chipset is being used for the line card Wedge and what processor is powering those supervisors."

First of all, it is not a Cisco switch, so there are no supervisors. Each line card has a microserver, based on the Group Hug standard. The Group Hug standard is basically a pluggable single board PC. So normally, it would be a low-power Intel or AMD. But it could be ARM. Or something else, as Group Hug is a standard motherboard interface, so the switch is CPU agnostic. Typically, the microserver would run Linux with an OpenFlow service. The microserver's would be the closest equivalent to a supervisor.

Cisco cycles between including the fabric on the supervisor, or making the fabric a separate card (during the long life of the Catalyst 6500, Cisco tried both). The 6-pack has "dumb" fabric cards, that are under control of the microservers.

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Tom Samplonius

"...will these be available to the unwashed masses at any point to buy, or will it just be something for us to marvel at from afar?"

Well, the design has been contributed to the Open Compute Project, so probably all white box makers will be shipping these.

So try http://www.quantaqct.com and http://www.pluribusnetworks.com/

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Tom Samplonius

Re: This diagram makes very little sense

"It is probably me being thick today, but this diagram does not make a lot of sense :)"

It is only the control plane for the switch. So the "ASIC boxes" are hiding a lot of detail. This diagram just shows how the microservers and various control bits talk to each other.

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Sitting on one's ARSE is the new CANCER, says Tim Cook - and an Apple watch will save you

Tom Samplonius

"...covering 3,000 acres..."

Desert tends to not be very useful land. And California has deserts that are so hot, that dying of exposure is not uncommon. Four German tourists in 1996, decided to drive around in Death Valley, and disappeared. Only some of their remains have been found.

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/33919797/ns/us_news-life/t/death-valley-bones-linked-german-tourists/#.VNsXmnb1FP4

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Tom Samplonius

"...it is pretty clear this is a company that can ride along with the view green renewables are cost effective, whether they believe the science or not..."

And given the fact that the $848M gets them 130MW over 25 years, if the power is never delivered, they probably don't have to pay. Plus, given the Sapphire Glass contact, it will have a ton of performance guarantees. Who cares what the science says or not, if you've got a signed contract guaranteeing ti will work? You are going to have some disappointment, if it doesn't work, but like the Sapphire Glass debacle, they probably has a Plan B in the wings already.

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Big data, come to BIG DADDY: HDS gobbles upstart Pentaho

Tom Samplonius

Re: Not sure it is a smart move on Hitachi side.

"...the quantity of bugs and nonexistent support..."

Well, at $14,000 per server license costs, Pentaho is not the cheapest (but it includes all features; there is no feature licensing), and the support is there.

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Uber hits PANIC BUTTON after India threatens to BAN dial-a-car firm

Tom Samplonius

Ok, so..

So, if you are a woman and get on a bus, you could be potentially be gang raped to death by everyone on the bus. But if you into an Uber car, you could be potentially raped by only the driver? Seems like Uber still has a lower risk.

Given the prevalence of rape, and murder rape in India, it is pretty obvious that banning Uber after a single incident is really more about the status quo wanting to crush a new competitor, rather than dealing with sexual violence in India.

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Adobe and software pals haul Forever 21 to court over piracy allegations

Tom Samplonius

Re: Well...

"...West Texas kangaroo court..."? Maybe some science? Because statistically, West Texas rules in favor less often than the US average. However, West Texas was setup to process such suits more quickly. West Texas implement rules on the maximum number of pages that could submitted, etc, that reduced the length of the proceedings. So, West Texas is the preferred places to file these types of suits.

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We take bots down, but they get up again – you're never going to keep them down

Tom Samplonius

Re: When will the NSA do their damn jobs?

"The NSA was set up to protect the United State's infrastructure..."

No, it wasn't. The NSA is a signals intelligence (SIGINT) agency only. They have a secondary mission to protect communication of the US gov't only.

And besides, we already know what the real cause of this is: millions of partially patched Windows workstations. MS has been doing more to take out these botnet networks, but they haven't done enough yet.

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China 'upgrades' Great Firewall. Oh SNAP! There goes VPN access

Tom Samplonius

Re: Time for a steganographic VPN

"A VPN could be implemented as a stream of encoded normal-text, using some long standard text. It could use any part of the text - extra spaces, or substituted words. Making it still seem like normal text to censors while having some efficiency might be difficult."

Just sign up for the VPN service, and find out what IP or hostname they use for their server, and then block it. It is apparently what they did.

Because OpenVPN can simply use port 445 (htts), and since the packets are encrypted, you can't tell OpenVPN over port 445 from https.

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Symantec data centre security software has security holes

Tom Samplonius

" It's irrelevant for the most part that the management server is vulnerable to SQL injection, because the policy you create prevents any SQL injection in the first place"

Keep thinking that, and you'll find yourself in a Sony type situation, where obtaining a single password is enough to take everything. Not take down everything, because copying everything is better. And you'll also suffer the embarrassment of having your own web servers running Torrent software to distribute your own files, because you stored your web server passwords on your file server.

The SQL injection allows any logged in user to get access to the database. It is basically privilege escalation. And once you are in the database server, where can you go from there?

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Worst. Comic. Book. Ever. Marvell's Chipman defeated by France in another patent battle

Tom Samplonius

"...so we see a Yuropean company making hay off this in the US, which indicates that said company would support the protection of such reified elements of discourse in the EU in a heartbeat?"

Probably. And given that France Telecom is still partially owned by the french gov't, I assume the gov't would support a US style patent system too.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Oh dear

"Yes and no but I wasn't surprised to hear that a US jury didn't sign off on the 10 million against a French firm!"

Marvel is a US firm, so they didn't sign off on $10 million against a a US firm. And the suit was brought by a French firm.

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Cisco tears off gloves, throws copyright and patent punches at Arista

Tom Samplonius

Re: Fair cop?

"I have no idea if a CLI is patentable but if it is, it seems a fair cop to me."

Its not. There is case law to support that. In fact, by Cisco over 10 years ago.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Fair cop?

"If the CLI can be protected by law, then APIs can too...."

The matter of whether a CLI can be copyrighted, was already settled in the US some years ago. The bottom line, is that it can't.

As far as the API, Cisco routers and switches do not have an API. Cisco can you sell you some sort of provisioning software that runs on a separate server, that exposes an API, but the switches and routers do not have one. This is the big reason why Arista is getting business.

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UK banks prepare for Apple Pay 'invasion', look to slap on bonking protection

Tom Samplonius

Re: Where do Apple fit in?

"In which case, how do Apple justify taking any commission, even if it's 0.15%? "

I don't know what is like in the UK, but in US/Can the credit card processors take at least 10 times that, or 1.5% to handle a transaction. And if you are a small, less well known merchant, it is usually 2.5% or more. They just take it from the merchant as a "discount fee". As long as the merchant doesn't think themselves as being big enough to launch their own payment system as CVS and Rite-Aid think they can, 0.15% is very merchant friendly.

The real companies under threat here are Visa and MasterCard. And they are both completely embedded into the banking industry.

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Sneaky Russian hackers slurped $15 MILLION from banks

Tom Samplonius

Re: New Targets

"With the Rouble taking a tumble in value I think they might be avoiding Russian banks"

No, it is just stupid to hack banks in the country that you live in. Plus, banks in Russia probably have significant political connections.

And they are staying away from the EU/US for now, because that is probably where they store their funds. As does half of Russia. You don't want to hack banks that have a variety of international and treaties in place that allow them to seize funds stolen from a member bank.

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Google sues Mississippi Attorney General 'for doing MPAA's dirty work'

Tom Samplonius

Re: Only in America

"How can you sue an Attorney General for asking you too many questions?"

Umm, except he wasn't asking too many questions. He sued Google. And now Google is suing him since the leaked Sony emails reveal that the MPAA encouraged his original lawsuit. He is disingenuous to characterize a lawsuit as "asking questions".

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CoolReaper pre-installed malware creates backdoor on Chinese Androids

Tom Samplonius

Re: Click bait much?

"Obscure Chinese phone manufacturer installs malaware on devices."

Right. That is why CoolPad why a website @ http://coolpadamericas.com/ that lists a north american toll-free number and three US physical locations. Oh, and CoolPad is in the EU too. If CoolPad is obscure, what does that make Nokia?

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HORRIFIED Amazon retailers fear GOING BUST after 1p pricing cockup

Tom Samplonius

Re: Shurely

"ResellerExpress accepts liability for when its software messes up, and has an escrow account set up to handle those cases where the sale will go through, right?"

So for a 50 pound per month service, you expect to receive the vendor to hold in escrow funds equivalent to what is being offered for sale?

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Seagate: We'll bring down the HAMR in 2017. But will we give you SHINGLES?

Tom Samplonius

Re: And that will probably be the end of the road for new HD tech

"I've been told that since Seagate closed their advanced research facility and fired all of their bleeding-edge PhDs,..."

No, they just moved R&D to Ireland:

http://www.investni.com/news/major-research-and-development-investment-announced-by-seagate.html

And the announcement says they will doing the HAMR development at this facility.

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Wheels fall off bid to sue Apple over iTunes anti-piracy shenanigans

Tom Samplonius

"How does Apple know when the two people owned iPods? The could have been given as gifts, etc. How the hell would Apple know?"

Because the manufacturing date is referenced to the serial number. So the iPod's that the plaintiffs claim to own, were manufactured after the alleged activity took place.

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Google? Microsoft? What the heck do they do in cloud?

Tom Samplonius
WTF?

Re: Looked at the cloud, then went indoors

"...Disvovered that Google Apps converts files online to googles own format which meant that the files held / syned back to the server were not readable..."

No, it doesn't. Well, unless you ask it to open the files via the web client. If you download the files, they stay as-is.

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While the web stares at cat pics, the glue of the internet is being shifted from US govt control

Tom Samplonius

Re: No.

"...some way to build a more secure system on top of the existing infrastructure using a distributed trust architecture that cannot be hijacked again..."

I don't think you know what IANA does. So pro-tip: nothing that affects privacy. They manage things like numbering, and names that must be public for them to work.

But any article involving the Internet and the US must have some frothy responses from EU citizens, even though the EU is home to "right to forgotten" censorship schemes and mandated gov't mandated IP and domain blacklists. None of which exist in the US. Most of that is due to the fact that many telcos in the EU are still owned by the gov't . For-profit corporations tend to value privacy a lot more. The UK gov't is now claiming that the US isn't doing enough to shutdown "terror" sites, so they are advocating more censorship. Austrailia has also implemented mandatory internet filtering.

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Google gives Microsoft office an awkward hug with new plugin

Tom Samplonius

Re: Confused

"Surely Google have one too? if not, adding the ability to make the browser better for making the files seem local is something but hardly as good."

Yes, the Google Drive app.

"Another feature of OneDrive, possible extremely useful to those away from their PC is that all the files on the PC are available via the OneDrive web page should the user enable the feature."

Wow... you have to enable this? Incredible. Dropbox and Google Drive have this enabled by default. So I guess +1 for them? I wonder, if you have ever used any non-Microsoft software?

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Looking for a tip-top high-end storage array (and who isn't?) Gartner names its favorite

Tom Samplonius

Re: Storinator

Storinator is not a complete storage solution though. It just a JBOD and server. Unless someone ships it with some sort of storage software, it just isn't in the same category.

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New job in 2015? The Reg guide to getting out and moving on

Tom Samplonius

"On the flipside of this coin - I'm a software engineer who is frequently asked to review CVs for applications. It's actually often quite hard to give precise feedback on the reason for rejecting a CV."

I hire software engineers, and this is one of the most appalling approaches to hiring that I've ever heard. The only thing you mention that is objective is "spelling". Everything else you mention is subjective. I hope you go by more than feelings when you are engineering software.

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Tom Samplonius

"Why?" "Too busy, can't tell you. Bye""

It is legally tricky. The general HR approach is to say as little as possible, because saying too much can result in a lawsuit or a complaint to your jurisdiction's equivalent of employment standards.

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Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!

Tom Samplonius

Re: Single point of failure?

"I thought the whole point of TCP/IP and routing traffic was to automatically re-route traffic via an alternate path in the event of a link failure."

Unfortunately, budgets often don't allow enough capacity for full redundancy at most service providers. And even when their is redundancy, often the redundant links are "folded", meaning they follow the same route. And the other repair that was in process was probably one of their other major links.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: So...

"...my UK based business, handling UK data, using a UK data centre for storage and a UK ISP for email has its mail stored and handled outside the UK? That would have been nice to know when writing our data protection statements."

Not necessarily. The UK is an island, and sometimes running a cable around an island is cheaper than trenching through the island. I imagine there are a large number of short 1km to 10km marine cables in use in the UK, because it is easier than going under roads and train tracks and through private property.

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Nokia: Buh-bye LUMIA and cash-sucking handset pals... LET'S MAKE SOME MONEY!

Tom Samplonius

Re: Nice

"...writing was in the wall for that as soon as Elop got on board and fired the "burning platforms" memo..."

The damage was done long before that. Nokia R&D was dreadfully inefficient. And they totally missed the smartphone revolution. But so did all of the old handset vendors. The CEO before Elop is the one responsbile. Because when Elop sent the "burning platforms" memo, the platforms really were burning.

It is amazing how the pattern described in the "Innovators Dilemma" repeats over and over again, and people are still blaming the wrong guy at the wrong time.

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Walmart's $99 crap-let will make people hate Windows 8.1 even more

Tom Samplonius

Re: Welcome to Walmart =D

"Third world hardware for a third world nation."

Which of the 27 nations that Walmart operates are in the third world?

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Dormant IP addresses RIPE for hijacking

Tom Samplonius

Re: Spamhaus DROP/EDROP...

The Spamhaus list is somewhat useless. Hijacks typically only last a few days or weeks, so the list is constantly changing. Once the reputation of the IPs have been tainted, the spammers switch.

Plus, Spamhaus doesn't have a lot of legitimacy as it is so hard to get blocked removed from their list(s). Maybe for email, you'd trust Spamhaus, but for core network filtering? Not so much.

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Tom Samplonius

Use bgpmon.net

If you are an ISP or hosting company with your own IPs, you should use bgpmon.net to watch for hi-jacks of your blocks. As as side-effect, it allows verifies that your own routing is actually working.

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Has Switzerland cracked the net neutrality riddle?

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Eye laser surgery campaigner burned by Facebook takedown

Tom Samplonius

Since https://www.facebook.com/OpticalExpressRuinedMyLife is reachable right now, this take down really didn't last. Or, was it ever actually taken down?

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Wanna be Facebook? It just open-sourced some of its web server code. Now to find 1bn users...

Tom Samplonius

Re: But..

"... but this recent open handed release of code is a hopeful sign."

Because Facebook hasn't be making open source releases continuously over the last 10 years. And their unique hardware designs aren't open source either. And Presto (http://prestodb.io/), the tool used for the querying data from their "monstrous privacy invasion" isn't open source either. So this is a complete turn around for Facebook.

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LaCie Little Big Disk Thunderbolt 2 – dual SSD sizzler

Tom Samplonius
Stop

Re: About those ports....

"Intel claims Thunderbolt 2 will be able to transfer a 4K video while simultaneously displaying it on a discrete monitor." Well, maybe not read it at quite 1375 Mbyte/s = 11 Gbit/s, but close."

Not really. Thunderbolt has several logical channels. The video output on Thunderbolt uses the Display Port channel on Thunderbolt, but data uses the PCIe channels. The 2 x 10Gbps channels are dedicated for PCIe.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Thunderbolt_Technology_model_1_E.png

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Pixel mania: Apple 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display

Tom Samplonius

Re: "Don't like it, change it"

"...horrible standard Apple ones...." Personal preference? Apple keyboards have real mechanical springs, and have a short travel distance. Those are good things. I actually prefer them over most every keyboard at this point, even though they lack Windows specific keys.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Value for money?

"...2-year-old PC and works perfectly. Ah, the Mac aficionados will claim, but the Apple display has 5K pixels. But I already need to scale text up by 25%..."

So Windows still uses physical pixel sized elements in 2014? The 1980s called, and wants their CGA era display toolkit back. Maybe that is something that Microsoft could fix in Windows 10, and use absolute sized display elements.

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Big Retail: We don't hate Apple, we hate the credit card companies

Tom Samplonius

Re: I don't fully understand this

"Isn't that just like a bank debit card?"

No, a merchant still needs to deal with a payment processor to take bank debit cards, because it is impossible to be connected to every bank. These retailers want to be able to be paid directly. I have some sympathy for trying to avoid the constant drain imposed by the middle men. So basically these retailers want to connect to every bank, and provide all of the gateway services themselves.

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Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8

Tom Samplonius

Re: day late and a dollar short

"Firefox 2 to Firefox 3.5 or so were such bloated buggy..." So between 2007 and 2010? Are there any kids nearby playing loud music that you'd also like to shout at? Or maybe some kids on your grass?

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Microsoft discovers long-lost phone division down back of sofa

Tom Samplonius

Re: Image is important

"Nokia is a household name..." maybe on your side of the Atlantic, but Nokia hasn't ever had a significant market share in North America. A lot of the Symbian phones were never even sold in North America (which no doubt made their market share crisis in 2010 a lot worse).

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

Tom Samplonius

Re: Why 400 days for men and 300 days for women?

"Very few mammals exhibit the menopause.... it basically just us and whales. Why would it be a evolutionary advantage for a female to stop producing offspring? "

Because the genetic quality of the eggs declines significantly with egg? Children born to mothers over 40 exhibit more birth defects, higher infant mortality, and every other problem sort of problem in greater abundance than young mothers.

So it is not a population control issue. Long lived species eventually have to have a menopause or risk introducing so many flaky genes into the population, that the entire species suffers. Short lived mammals don't need menopause.

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Apple, GT in SECRET SAPPHIRE peaceable parting PACT

Tom Samplonius

Re: So how much...

"But think about it... Apple buys the plants, gets the money back, now has nice, shiny new plants for sale at no cost to them."

I know some people can't pass by a great deal. But it isn't such a great deal if the plants can't produce sapphire of a type and quality suitable for screens. And a reasonable production cost, which has been the issue with sapphire so far.

And Apple loaned GT $359 million. Since GT is in bankruptcy, that money is gone. If Apple bought these plants, all they would be doing, is returning money to themselves.

Also, why did GT setup so many facilities? Screens are small, and can shipped easily. Gorilla Glass was originally produced at only one factory to both keep costs down, but keep quality (and integrity of the process) high.

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Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease

Tom Samplonius

Re: I still dont see why this needs to be fixed in search engines anyway

"The content should be amended, if indeed there is any good reason to do so, search should just be search. It seems a bit lazy to target search instead of content."

No, it is a free speech issue. News sites do not have to amend the public record. Any laws forcing sites to remove or amend articles wouldn't stand up. They would be struck down as a violation of free speech, if they were passed at all.

However, going after the search engines is easier from a legal point of few, since you are not forcing the original author or publisher to amend the public record, so technically you are not violating free speech, just making it hard to find. So the law stands.

But why do Europeans pass crap laws that are intended to circumvent free speech to being with?

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Scale out sister: Open sorcerer pulls v3 Gluster cluster out of Red Hat

Tom Samplonius

"I suspect Windows Server 2012 R2 is still a much faster NFS 4.1 Server. And is somewhat easier to cluster and manage. And includes tiering / dedupe"

Windows 2012 NFS is not in the same category. Gluster supports NFS only for compatibility. Gluster isn't intended to be a NFS server. It is intended to be used as large scale block storage via its own API. How many super computers store their files on Windows 2012 NFS? None. How many super computers use Gluster? Almost all.

But now, the world likes virtualization, so storing VM images in Gluster seems like a good thing to do. KVM and Xen will get native Gluster support in their respective hypervisors shortly. And big cloud operators like the idea of using Gluster over some under performing hardware from NetApp or EMC.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: this ain't NFS chief.

"Don't know what "value add" enterprisey crud Red Hat throws on top of glusterfs..."

Redhat is Gluster, so they don't throw stuff on top, when it is all Redhat all the way through.

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