* Posts by Tom Samplonius

259 posts • joined 28 Jan 2010

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China makes internet shut-downs official with new security law

Tom Samplonius

Re: What makes you think

"What makes you think that any major western democracy will have any qualms to shutdown access to let's say Facebook, Twitter or messaging services in the case of major social unrest or a major ongoing attack of let's say "Charlie Hebdo x 100" type?"

Europe, maybe, but North America is pretty unlikely. And under what grounds would you get a court order?

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Red Hat promises lustre for Gluster, and heft for Ceph

Tom Samplonius

Re: Market segmentation

"How is Red Hat going to justify Gluster when Ceph filesystem becomes stable?"

Red Hat is not shy about switching horses. They shifted their primary hypervisor from Xen to KVM, once KVM became stable (and had the paravirtualization bits that Xen was good at).

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ICANN running the global internet? It's gonna be OK, it's gonna be OK, US Congress told

Tom Samplonius

Re: So... what enforcement powers do they have?

"...why not show two fingers up to ICANN and not in the good way."

But why? What has ICANN done wrong? They basically function as an Internet Quartermaster.

The only criticism I see, is of the new top level domains. But those don't hurt anyone. If you don't a .gay domain, you don't need to get one. Though theregister.gay is probably a good idea.

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Facebook vows to blow EVEN HARDER

Tom Samplonius

Re: "by using 100 per cent wind power"

"...abuse the grid using..."

Umm, no. They are the anchor tenant for the wind farm, which itself is a business enterprise. And with time-of-day billing, there is no "abuse" of the grid. Peak time KWh's cost more than offpeak hours. Winds farms will produce a predictable amount of KWh's per month, though not always at peak times, but it balances out. And the data centre uses a constant amount of power 24x7. Or maybe it doesn't. Google can turn data centres down, when load drops. No reason why Facebook can't run a data centre 12 hours a day. Or just the 12 hours, when the wind is blowing.

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Microsoft to HIKE Azure prices as exchange rates shift

Tom Samplonius

Re: Ouch

"That's going to screw a few budgets."

Very very very few budgets. After the 7 hour outage last week, I don't know how many Australian customers they have, or will be able to get. MS also seems to tone deaf to announce a price increase so close to a major outage, but that is typical for them.

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Adam Smith was right about that invisible hand, you know

Tom Samplonius

"According to a recent survey from the International Monetary Fund, Canadian investors allocate a mere 40 per cent of their total equity investments outside Canada. Their local allocation to Canada is about 10 times what it should be."

This is so stupid. A lot of money is held in funds, which to get certain tax incentives, must be 80% Canadian investments. Everyone knows this isn't great for diversity of investments. I assume all gov'ts have various tax incentives to keep money from leaving. Or, if you are Greece, just order the banks closed. Either way, there are a lot of reasons to invest at home besides being irrational.

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ISP Level 3 goes TITSUP after giganto traffic routing blunder

Tom Samplonius

"However it's another example of how policy needs to be defined elsewhere, and the limits of BGP policy configuration done via the current OSS model....

Please god don't anyone say "hey we need another extended attribute for BGP that will solve this".."

Umm ok, so you know about BGP attributes, but you don't know about routing registration databases? You are supposed to build routing policies based on routes registered in a registration database. Interestingly, Level 3 runs their own routing registration database (http://www.irr.net/docs/list.html). What Level 3 is supposed to be doing, is automatically building new route prefix lists and pushing them to their edge routers every day. And those prefix lists would contain all acceptable routes.

Since a large ISP may have several thousand prefixes, automatically generating them from a database is the only way to go.

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Tom Samplonius

"FFS Tier-1 ISP's have been using AS filter paths for 20 years - how the hell is this still happening in 2015?"

Given that you must mean prefix lists, not a path fitler, as a path filter would have allowed this through. As far as why, your comment is a perfect example: people don't know the difference between prefix filters and AS path filters, among many other things.

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Google to axe TXT reminders for Calendar events

Tom Samplonius

Re: I still miss GOOG-411

"Google is large enough to have peering agreements with all major carriers..."

For IP yes, but the transport has never been the problem with SMS. It's the transaction processing, and fact that all of the mobile operators use various clearing houses to exchange SMS with each other. And those clearing houses don't make money by giving messages away for free. And while you could theoretically connect direct to every mobile operator and bypass the clearing houses, adding additional SMS gateway connections to each mobile operator's existing switching software, is typically very expensive in licensing and/or hardware, so they prefer to let the clearing houses handle everything.

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Next-gen Freeview telly won't be another disruptive 4Ker

Tom Samplonius

Re: Live TV and record everything

"...I would not be surprised that in the near future you will be able to buy PVRs with so much storage that they just record all the time and there is no need for catchup over IP"

Probably traditional broadcast TV would be dead before that happens. Broadcast TV is dying pretty fast. I think you may be the one person in a thousand that likes live TV. And unfortunately that will not be enough to save it.

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Microsoft springs for new undersea cables to link US, UK, Asia

Tom Samplonius

"...yet we're lucky to get 10Mbps on land. What am I missing here? AND, it's over COPPER!"

Speak for yourself. I can get 850 Mbps. And that is measured via a third parties speed test site, that is routed out of the country and then back into the country. So that is pretty real world.

Though it sucks that Rackspace's servers can only manage 350 Mbps.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Microsoft has invested

"i.e. they helped fund the cables. Not their private network."

Though, it is fairly common to sell specific strands to different parties. Or an IRU: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indefeasible_rights_of_use

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Anonymous loose cannon admits DDoSing social services and housing websites

Tom Samplonius

Re: Meanwhile

"banks like HSBC are free to commit fraud, money laundering and tax evasion with no hint of prosecution."

HSBC was fined $1.6B USD in 2012 for money laundering. The tax evasion issues are before the Public Accounts Commitee (PAC), so hardly "... no hint of prosecution.." The PAC will probably recommend another big fine too. http://www.bbc.com/news/business-31799405

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'Photof*cket' men manacled, indicted over Photobucket password-protected pic plunder

Tom Samplonius

Re: Photobucket

"themselves were caught giving out users details freely to anyone willing to pay for them a few years ago."

Reference? Google searches turn up nothing.

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Husband of Facebook COO, Sheryl Sandberg, dies suddenly

Tom Samplonius

"...grief to remain personal and private."

The tradition of creating a eulogy for the deceased is quite ancient; in recorded history to at least to the 6th century BC. Just because it is on Facebook now, doesn't mean it is a new thing.

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Twitter's share price crashed 18% thanks to ONE LONE TWEET

Tom Samplonius

Re: Twitter

"... I think I can make better use of my time."

You forgot stock price manipulation. Apparently by breathlessly reporting accurate new a little bit before anyone else, will make your information seem explosive, when it is actually routine, because it seems leak-ish, leading to a stock price crash. I guess that is the Snowden generation for you: unless it is leak, they just aren't listening. This is worth billions to short traders.

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Microsoft vs AWS: If you can't bark with the BIG DOGS get off the PORCH

Tom Samplonius

Re: Competition benefits all

"...undisputed champs at making offerings for differing customer targets, form factors, and objectives work together, and also at providing an ecosystem as an infrastructure for third parties"

Umm.. what? First of all, I dispute that, so you can't claim that is undisputed. As far as ecosystem development, MS is awful at that. If anyone produces a substantial business in their ecosystem, MS just takes the entire category over, by using their control of the OS. Look at office productivity software: MS is the only player left. The Windows ecosystem has shown that MS tolerates minnows in their ecosystems, but anyone too big is taken out.

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Rackspace in Crawley: This is a local data centre for local people

Tom Samplonius

Re: Nice picture ....

"...3 kW for all the fluorescent tubes lighting up the empty space"

The lights need to be on to take the picture. Large data centres of this style have used motion detecting switches for lighting for years. I've been through Equinox centres a few times, and they all completely dark, except for the segments happen to have people in them.

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Budge up, Navy boys, I've got some broadband spectrum to flog – FCC

Tom Samplonius

Re: ps ...

"Seeing something similar Stateside is a bit of an insight?"

Gov'ts have always licensed spectrum. But the gov't is the spectrum steward, but it is not a provider of services. So, all radio stations, TV stations (expect UK, I guess) that were formed in the last 100 years or so, have paid the gov't for a license. So there is nothing new about this process.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Let me see ...

"Then those guvmints request the buyers, lease holders, successful bidders to retain data including metadata for security purposes."

No they don't. The terms of use are publicly available, as this auction is open to the public to begin with.

And if metadata collection was required (and it is not required), the gov't could pass a law to require collection. The medium of transmission is irrelevant.

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Google has tested its speedy QUIC internet protocol on YOU – and the early results are in

Tom Samplonius

Re: Nope

Well, once the VCs decide to monetize DuckDuckGo, then I guess you are out of luck. DuckDuckGo just needs 30 days to "substantial update" their privacy policy, per their existing policy. And I guess no time at all, if it is not a "substantial" change. And since DuckDuckGo is apparently not making money, that is just a matter of time. I guess at that point, all of the Freetards will flee DuckDuckGo, and go to the next startup.

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The VMware, Nutanix mud wrestle is hilarious, but which one is crying with fear on the inside?

Tom Samplonius

Re: Nutanix - Industry Ankle Biter

"Nutanix is a noisy startup with VERY limited IP."

And maybe IP isn't worth as much as you think it is.

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$23m to a WordPress biz? Why top-end hosting is big money

Tom Samplonius

Re: S&M

""The money will be largely spent on sales and marketing"

Anyone else see a problem with that?"

If your platform is built (and they are offering services right now), and the market is the entire world, then yes, it usually comes down to sales and marketing.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Expensive

"Can someone explain to me what a customer would get for that amount of money that they wouldn't get from a $4.99 per month (or less) shared hosting plan?"

Geographically diversity. Shared hosting is one server in one data centre. And WP Engine also uses a CDN.

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Crack security team finishes TrueCrypt audit – and the results are in

Tom Samplonius

Re: Canary it is then - still a bad sign for THEM

"Seems clear now that the devs didn't abandon the project because the code was defective or compromised. That leaves the canary theory. "

No, it leave the actual reason for it: a bunch of self-entitled users bitching about so called "missing features", and then spreading rumors of the developers supposed incompetence. The forums and mailing lists were full of this bitching just prior to the release.

Telling those bunch of freetards to go use Bitlocker was perfect. The developers knew their own code was good, and probably still are developing it themselves.

For another tales of freetards bitching to developers: http://sqlite.1065341.n5.nabble.com/SQLite-and-McAfee-Anti-Virus-td15283.html

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Tom Samplonius

Re: On the plus side..

"... will have to be done by people living in nations other than the US (and the UK, it seems.."

Other than your desire to spread FUD, why? Everything in Truecrypt is completely legal. And it is completely legal to use it. The US might be the only country with decent encryption use protection.

Yes, the PM of the UK would like to ban encryption, but so far no one in the US gov't is getting to chuffed about it.

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Comcast: Google, we'll see your 1Gbps fiber and DOUBLE IT

Tom Samplonius

Re: Marketing fluff?

"Why the bump to 2Gbps, aside from a one-upsmanship towards Google? To fully benefit, I assume this means you'll have to use the ISP supplied router, since running such a device in bridge mode will basically lock you down to 1Gbps..."

It will be based on GPON, and the ONT (optical network terminal) box will likely have as many as 4 x GBE ports. So you won't be able to get all 2 Gbps via a single ethernet port, but it will be there. The ONT may be bridged or routed. As a cable operator, Comcast probably prefers bridged, as that is how DOCSIS works.

What is interesting, is that 2.5 Gbps is the maximum performance of a single GPON port. I wonder how many homes will be put on each port. The technology supports a maximum of 64.

Also the shared uplink is only 1.25 Gbps per GPON port, so this 2 Gbps service will not be symmetrical. Probably will be 2 Gbps down and 1 Gbps up.

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SoftLayer and Telstra in cloudy embrace

Tom Samplonius

I don't see how Telstra could possibly adapt to doing business outside Australia. They are used to being a big fish in a small pond. They've never truly had to compete before.

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One day all this could be yours: Be Facebook, without being Facebook

Tom Samplonius

Re: Dip your toes with care -especially since

"There are allegations that Facebook "opened" stuff they shouldn't have. See El Reg last week."

Or, someone realized that Facebook has a lot of money in the bank. It wouldn't be the first time that a company adopted IP theft claims as a business model. See basically every article Reg wrote about Novell.

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The internet IS a series of tubes. Kinda: A Reg 101 guide to cabling

Tom Samplonius

Re: Why bother with all those speeds when the bottleneck

"is your internet connection ... as the guy who's in charge of our "broadband" (the term is laughable) 25mb/s ought to be enough for everyone."

10 Gbps may not be needed in the home, but surely business users can get more than 25Mbps?

I'm seeing 1 Gbps small business plans go for $250/m for 1000 GB and a static IP.

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Cisco wipes its memory from susceptible-to-Row Hammer list

Tom Samplonius

Re: Manufacturer error

"Any RAM chip that is operated within the manufacturer's guidelines should be able ..."

Yes, the memory is probably defective. But this kind of defective RAM is installed in many systems today, because the access pattern used by the rowhammer exploit is never found in real-world work loads, so they never tested for it.

http://googleprojectzero.blogspot.in/2015/03/exploiting-dram-rowhammer-bug-to-gain.html

MemTest86 v6 includes a test for rowhammer (test 13), but prior to that, MemTest86 didn't detect the rowhammer fault either.

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AWS flicks switch for cloud storage replication

Tom Samplonius

"It's only ok with the compliance requirements are the same for both?"

I think you are expected to know what the compliance requirements are, for your data.

The "look at the data and look at your business address and determine your compliance requirements" feature will be added in a successive release.

Or, you could store everything encrypted. Try to not lose your encryption key though.

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By Odin, Parallels thinks cloud service providers should buy Odin

Tom Samplonius

Re: Samsung won't be happy.

"As ODIN is the name of the tool to flash new firmware to their mobile phones."

The 1990s called and want their firmware update technology back.

"Do these marketing wallys ever bother to see if the name they want to rebrand themselves with is already in common use elsewhere?"

Well, a firmware update tool is hardly setting the world on fire with its popularity.

I think the number of non-Samsung sites offering phone Odin downloads is worse for the Odin, rather than it being a tool implementing an obsolete firmware update method.

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Hello? Police? Yes, I'm a car and my idiot driver's crashed me

Tom Samplonius

"That'll be exactly what you need when you've just had a prang bad enough to launch the airbags and your adrenaline is through the roof - a disembodied voice from nowhere questioning you!"

OnStar has been doing this in North America since 1997, and as of 2015 most GM cars include OnStar.

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Tom Samplonius

"This means that US government could potentially demand that the provider allows for this location functionality..."

And so could any European country. Search warrant law isn't that different in Europe.

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What’s new in Office 2016 for Mac (and why it doesn't totally suck)

Tom Samplonius

Re: Do I see what I think I see…?

" Do I see what I think I see…? … a menu bar? Up the top of the screen?"

Of course, Mac apps need to have a menu bar. All Mac apps have them.

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Apple: We could expose our WHOPPING 12 INCH iPad - but it's not real

Tom Samplonius

Re: Mouth, Meet Meal

"Oh. You mean "Christmas"?"

In the US, it means the entire period between Thanksgiving and New Year day. Black Friday and Boxing Day are basically consumer orgies in the US, and one of those days is after Christmas.

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Optus joins iiNet with free-to-download Netflix offer for Australians

Tom Samplonius

It is sort of meaningless. Netflix will give any ISP handling more than 5Gbps of Netflix traffic a free caching appliance (or more than one), to serve traffic locally. Supposedly, such an appliance drops the Netflix external traffic by 80% or more.

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Porn on Blogger – Google takes stiff action

Tom Samplonius

"can only be seen by the owner or admins of the blog and the people who the owner has shared the blog with"

No, as private blogs can only be accessed if the owner explicitly shared it with you. So you'll have to email the owner, and request an invite.

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Hey, network giants: Facebook swigs from an 'open' 6-PACK of tech

Tom Samplonius

Re: As bad as Cisco for the naming

"...management blades."

Strictly speaking, those are the fabric blades. The management is on the line cards.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Unfair comparison

"Any idea what chipset is being used for the line card Wedge and what processor is powering those supervisors."

First of all, it is not a Cisco switch, so there are no supervisors. Each line card has a microserver, based on the Group Hug standard. The Group Hug standard is basically a pluggable single board PC. So normally, it would be a low-power Intel or AMD. But it could be ARM. Or something else, as Group Hug is a standard motherboard interface, so the switch is CPU agnostic. Typically, the microserver would run Linux with an OpenFlow service. The microserver's would be the closest equivalent to a supervisor.

Cisco cycles between including the fabric on the supervisor, or making the fabric a separate card (during the long life of the Catalyst 6500, Cisco tried both). The 6-pack has "dumb" fabric cards, that are under control of the microservers.

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Tom Samplonius

"...will these be available to the unwashed masses at any point to buy, or will it just be something for us to marvel at from afar?"

Well, the design has been contributed to the Open Compute Project, so probably all white box makers will be shipping these.

So try http://www.quantaqct.com and http://www.pluribusnetworks.com/

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Tom Samplonius

Re: This diagram makes very little sense

"It is probably me being thick today, but this diagram does not make a lot of sense :)"

It is only the control plane for the switch. So the "ASIC boxes" are hiding a lot of detail. This diagram just shows how the microservers and various control bits talk to each other.

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Sitting on one's ARSE is the new CANCER, says Tim Cook - and an Apple watch will save you

Tom Samplonius

"...covering 3,000 acres..."

Desert tends to not be very useful land. And California has deserts that are so hot, that dying of exposure is not uncommon. Four German tourists in 1996, decided to drive around in Death Valley, and disappeared. Only some of their remains have been found.

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/33919797/ns/us_news-life/t/death-valley-bones-linked-german-tourists/#.VNsXmnb1FP4

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Tom Samplonius

"...it is pretty clear this is a company that can ride along with the view green renewables are cost effective, whether they believe the science or not..."

And given the fact that the $848M gets them 130MW over 25 years, if the power is never delivered, they probably don't have to pay. Plus, given the Sapphire Glass contact, it will have a ton of performance guarantees. Who cares what the science says or not, if you've got a signed contract guaranteeing ti will work? You are going to have some disappointment, if it doesn't work, but like the Sapphire Glass debacle, they probably has a Plan B in the wings already.

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Big data, come to BIG DADDY: HDS gobbles upstart Pentaho

Tom Samplonius

Re: Not sure it is a smart move on Hitachi side.

"...the quantity of bugs and nonexistent support..."

Well, at $14,000 per server license costs, Pentaho is not the cheapest (but it includes all features; there is no feature licensing), and the support is there.

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Uber hits PANIC BUTTON after India threatens to BAN dial-a-car firm

Tom Samplonius

Ok, so..

So, if you are a woman and get on a bus, you could be potentially be gang raped to death by everyone on the bus. But if you into an Uber car, you could be potentially raped by only the driver? Seems like Uber still has a lower risk.

Given the prevalence of rape, and murder rape in India, it is pretty obvious that banning Uber after a single incident is really more about the status quo wanting to crush a new competitor, rather than dealing with sexual violence in India.

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Adobe and software pals haul Forever 21 to court over piracy allegations

Tom Samplonius

Re: Well...

"...West Texas kangaroo court..."? Maybe some science? Because statistically, West Texas rules in favor less often than the US average. However, West Texas was setup to process such suits more quickly. West Texas implement rules on the maximum number of pages that could submitted, etc, that reduced the length of the proceedings. So, West Texas is the preferred places to file these types of suits.

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We take bots down, but they get up again – you're never going to keep them down

Tom Samplonius

Re: When will the NSA do their damn jobs?

"The NSA was set up to protect the United State's infrastructure..."

No, it wasn't. The NSA is a signals intelligence (SIGINT) agency only. They have a secondary mission to protect communication of the US gov't only.

And besides, we already know what the real cause of this is: millions of partially patched Windows workstations. MS has been doing more to take out these botnet networks, but they haven't done enough yet.

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China 'upgrades' Great Firewall. Oh SNAP! There goes VPN access

Tom Samplonius

Re: Time for a steganographic VPN

"A VPN could be implemented as a stream of encoded normal-text, using some long standard text. It could use any part of the text - extra spaces, or substituted words. Making it still seem like normal text to censors while having some efficiency might be difficult."

Just sign up for the VPN service, and find out what IP or hostname they use for their server, and then block it. It is apparently what they did.

Because OpenVPN can simply use port 445 (htts), and since the packets are encrypted, you can't tell OpenVPN over port 445 from https.

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