* Posts by Tom Samplonius

200 posts • joined 28 Jan 2010

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HORRIFIED Amazon retailers fear GOING BUST after 1p pricing cockup

Tom Samplonius

Re: Shurely

"ResellerExpress accepts liability for when its software messes up, and has an escrow account set up to handle those cases where the sale will go through, right?"

So for a 50 pound per month service, you expect to receive the vendor to hold in escrow funds equivalent to what is being offered for sale?

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Seagate: We'll bring down the HAMR in 2017. But will we give you SHINGLES?

Tom Samplonius

Re: And that will probably be the end of the road for new HD tech

"I've been told that since Seagate closed their advanced research facility and fired all of their bleeding-edge PhDs,..."

No, they just moved R&D to Ireland:

http://www.investni.com/news/major-research-and-development-investment-announced-by-seagate.html

And the announcement says they will doing the HAMR development at this facility.

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Wheels fall off bid to sue Apple over iTunes anti-piracy shenanigans

Tom Samplonius

"How does Apple know when the two people owned iPods? The could have been given as gifts, etc. How the hell would Apple know?"

Because the manufacturing date is referenced to the serial number. So the iPod's that the plaintiffs claim to own, were manufactured after the alleged activity took place.

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Google? Microsoft? What the heck do they do in cloud?

Tom Samplonius
WTF?

Re: Looked at the cloud, then went indoors

"...Disvovered that Google Apps converts files online to googles own format which meant that the files held / syned back to the server were not readable..."

No, it doesn't. Well, unless you ask it to open the files via the web client. If you download the files, they stay as-is.

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While the web stares at cat pics, the glue of the internet is being shifted from US govt control

Tom Samplonius

Re: No.

"...some way to build a more secure system on top of the existing infrastructure using a distributed trust architecture that cannot be hijacked again..."

I don't think you know what IANA does. So pro-tip: nothing that affects privacy. They manage things like numbering, and names that must be public for them to work.

But any article involving the Internet and the US must have some frothy responses from EU citizens, even though the EU is home to "right to forgotten" censorship schemes and mandated gov't mandated IP and domain blacklists. None of which exist in the US. Most of that is due to the fact that many telcos in the EU are still owned by the gov't . For-profit corporations tend to value privacy a lot more. The UK gov't is now claiming that the US isn't doing enough to shutdown "terror" sites, so they are advocating more censorship. Austrailia has also implemented mandatory internet filtering.

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Google gives Microsoft office an awkward hug with new plugin

Tom Samplonius

Re: Confused

"Surely Google have one too? if not, adding the ability to make the browser better for making the files seem local is something but hardly as good."

Yes, the Google Drive app.

"Another feature of OneDrive, possible extremely useful to those away from their PC is that all the files on the PC are available via the OneDrive web page should the user enable the feature."

Wow... you have to enable this? Incredible. Dropbox and Google Drive have this enabled by default. So I guess +1 for them? I wonder, if you have ever used any non-Microsoft software?

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Looking for a tip-top high-end storage array (and who isn't?) Gartner names its favorite

Tom Samplonius

Re: Storinator

Storinator is not a complete storage solution though. It just a JBOD and server. Unless someone ships it with some sort of storage software, it just isn't in the same category.

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New job in 2015? The Reg guide to getting out and moving on

Tom Samplonius

"On the flipside of this coin - I'm a software engineer who is frequently asked to review CVs for applications. It's actually often quite hard to give precise feedback on the reason for rejecting a CV."

I hire software engineers, and this is one of the most appalling approaches to hiring that I've ever heard. The only thing you mention that is objective is "spelling". Everything else you mention is subjective. I hope you go by more than feelings when you are engineering software.

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Tom Samplonius

"Why?" "Too busy, can't tell you. Bye""

It is legally tricky. The general HR approach is to say as little as possible, because saying too much can result in a lawsuit or a complaint to your jurisdiction's equivalent of employment standards.

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Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!

Tom Samplonius

Re: Single point of failure?

"I thought the whole point of TCP/IP and routing traffic was to automatically re-route traffic via an alternate path in the event of a link failure."

Unfortunately, budgets often don't allow enough capacity for full redundancy at most service providers. And even when their is redundancy, often the redundant links are "folded", meaning they follow the same route. And the other repair that was in process was probably one of their other major links.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: So...

"...my UK based business, handling UK data, using a UK data centre for storage and a UK ISP for email has its mail stored and handled outside the UK? That would have been nice to know when writing our data protection statements."

Not necessarily. The UK is an island, and sometimes running a cable around an island is cheaper than trenching through the island. I imagine there are a large number of short 1km to 10km marine cables in use in the UK, because it is easier than going under roads and train tracks and through private property.

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Nokia: Buh-bye LUMIA and cash-sucking handset pals... LET'S MAKE SOME MONEY!

Tom Samplonius

Re: Nice

"...writing was in the wall for that as soon as Elop got on board and fired the "burning platforms" memo..."

The damage was done long before that. Nokia R&D was dreadfully inefficient. And they totally missed the smartphone revolution. But so did all of the old handset vendors. The CEO before Elop is the one responsbile. Because when Elop sent the "burning platforms" memo, the platforms really were burning.

It is amazing how the pattern described in the "Innovators Dilemma" repeats over and over again, and people are still blaming the wrong guy at the wrong time.

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Walmart's $99 crap-let will make people hate Windows 8.1 even more

Tom Samplonius

Re: Welcome to Walmart =D

"Third world hardware for a third world nation."

Which of the 27 nations that Walmart operates are in the third world?

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Dormant IP addresses RIPE for hijacking

Tom Samplonius

Re: Spamhaus DROP/EDROP...

The Spamhaus list is somewhat useless. Hijacks typically only last a few days or weeks, so the list is constantly changing. Once the reputation of the IPs have been tainted, the spammers switch.

Plus, Spamhaus doesn't have a lot of legitimacy as it is so hard to get blocked removed from their list(s). Maybe for email, you'd trust Spamhaus, but for core network filtering? Not so much.

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Tom Samplonius

Use bgpmon.net

If you are an ISP or hosting company with your own IPs, you should use bgpmon.net to watch for hi-jacks of your blocks. As as side-effect, it allows verifies that your own routing is actually working.

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Has Switzerland cracked the net neutrality riddle?

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Eye laser surgery campaigner burned by Facebook takedown

Tom Samplonius

Since https://www.facebook.com/OpticalExpressRuinedMyLife is reachable right now, this take down really didn't last. Or, was it ever actually taken down?

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Wanna be Facebook? It just open-sourced some of its web server code. Now to find 1bn users...

Tom Samplonius

Re: But..

"... but this recent open handed release of code is a hopeful sign."

Because Facebook hasn't be making open source releases continuously over the last 10 years. And their unique hardware designs aren't open source either. And Presto (http://prestodb.io/), the tool used for the querying data from their "monstrous privacy invasion" isn't open source either. So this is a complete turn around for Facebook.

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LaCie Little Big Disk Thunderbolt 2 – dual SSD sizzler

Tom Samplonius
Stop

Re: About those ports....

"Intel claims Thunderbolt 2 will be able to transfer a 4K video while simultaneously displaying it on a discrete monitor." Well, maybe not read it at quite 1375 Mbyte/s = 11 Gbit/s, but close."

Not really. Thunderbolt has several logical channels. The video output on Thunderbolt uses the Display Port channel on Thunderbolt, but data uses the PCIe channels. The 2 x 10Gbps channels are dedicated for PCIe.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Thunderbolt_Technology_model_1_E.png

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Pixel mania: Apple 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display

Tom Samplonius

Re: "Don't like it, change it"

"...horrible standard Apple ones...." Personal preference? Apple keyboards have real mechanical springs, and have a short travel distance. Those are good things. I actually prefer them over most every keyboard at this point, even though they lack Windows specific keys.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Value for money?

"...2-year-old PC and works perfectly. Ah, the Mac aficionados will claim, but the Apple display has 5K pixels. But I already need to scale text up by 25%..."

So Windows still uses physical pixel sized elements in 2014? The 1980s called, and wants their CGA era display toolkit back. Maybe that is something that Microsoft could fix in Windows 10, and use absolute sized display elements.

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Big Retail: We don't hate Apple, we hate the credit card companies

Tom Samplonius

Re: I don't fully understand this

"Isn't that just like a bank debit card?"

No, a merchant still needs to deal with a payment processor to take bank debit cards, because it is impossible to be connected to every bank. These retailers want to be able to be paid directly. I have some sympathy for trying to avoid the constant drain imposed by the middle men. So basically these retailers want to connect to every bank, and provide all of the gateway services themselves.

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Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8

Tom Samplonius

Re: day late and a dollar short

"Firefox 2 to Firefox 3.5 or so were such bloated buggy..." So between 2007 and 2010? Are there any kids nearby playing loud music that you'd also like to shout at? Or maybe some kids on your grass?

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Microsoft discovers long-lost phone division down back of sofa

Tom Samplonius

Re: Image is important

"Nokia is a household name..." maybe on your side of the Atlantic, but Nokia hasn't ever had a significant market share in North America. A lot of the Symbian phones were never even sold in North America (which no doubt made their market share crisis in 2010 a lot worse).

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

Tom Samplonius

Re: Why 400 days for men and 300 days for women?

"Very few mammals exhibit the menopause.... it basically just us and whales. Why would it be a evolutionary advantage for a female to stop producing offspring? "

Because the genetic quality of the eggs declines significantly with egg? Children born to mothers over 40 exhibit more birth defects, higher infant mortality, and every other problem sort of problem in greater abundance than young mothers.

So it is not a population control issue. Long lived species eventually have to have a menopause or risk introducing so many flaky genes into the population, that the entire species suffers. Short lived mammals don't need menopause.

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Apple, GT in SECRET SAPPHIRE peaceable parting PACT

Tom Samplonius

Re: So how much...

"But think about it... Apple buys the plants, gets the money back, now has nice, shiny new plants for sale at no cost to them."

I know some people can't pass by a great deal. But it isn't such a great deal if the plants can't produce sapphire of a type and quality suitable for screens. And a reasonable production cost, which has been the issue with sapphire so far.

And Apple loaned GT $359 million. Since GT is in bankruptcy, that money is gone. If Apple bought these plants, all they would be doing, is returning money to themselves.

Also, why did GT setup so many facilities? Screens are small, and can shipped easily. Gorilla Glass was originally produced at only one factory to both keep costs down, but keep quality (and integrity of the process) high.

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Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease

Tom Samplonius

Re: I still dont see why this needs to be fixed in search engines anyway

"The content should be amended, if indeed there is any good reason to do so, search should just be search. It seems a bit lazy to target search instead of content."

No, it is a free speech issue. News sites do not have to amend the public record. Any laws forcing sites to remove or amend articles wouldn't stand up. They would be struck down as a violation of free speech, if they were passed at all.

However, going after the search engines is easier from a legal point of few, since you are not forcing the original author or publisher to amend the public record, so technically you are not violating free speech, just making it hard to find. So the law stands.

But why do Europeans pass crap laws that are intended to circumvent free speech to being with?

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Scale out sister: Open sorcerer pulls v3 Gluster cluster out of Red Hat

Tom Samplonius

"I suspect Windows Server 2012 R2 is still a much faster NFS 4.1 Server. And is somewhat easier to cluster and manage. And includes tiering / dedupe"

Windows 2012 NFS is not in the same category. Gluster supports NFS only for compatibility. Gluster isn't intended to be a NFS server. It is intended to be used as large scale block storage via its own API. How many super computers store their files on Windows 2012 NFS? None. How many super computers use Gluster? Almost all.

But now, the world likes virtualization, so storing VM images in Gluster seems like a good thing to do. KVM and Xen will get native Gluster support in their respective hypervisors shortly. And big cloud operators like the idea of using Gluster over some under performing hardware from NetApp or EMC.

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Tom Samplonius

Re: this ain't NFS chief.

"Don't know what "value add" enterprisey crud Red Hat throws on top of glusterfs..."

Redhat is Gluster, so they don't throw stuff on top, when it is all Redhat all the way through.

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Aggressive HGST hurls flashy humdingers at online archiving

Tom Samplonius

Re: Shingles

"As a lay person, everything I hear about shingled drives gives me the willies... I will never buy such a drive."

Don't worry. Such drives may never appear in the channel for you to buy. Millions of SMR drives have apparentlyl shipped, but apparently shipped directly to a cloud host (probably Amazon and Facebook). I can't even the find the model numbers for these drives.

Given that the big 5 (Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Microsoft) account for about half of all purchased computer hardware, more and more products will simply sold directly to the customer. It kind of sucks being a distie these days.

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Whopping 10TB disks spin out of HGST – plus 3.2TB flash slabs

Tom Samplonius

"I can tell you first hand since seagate introduced shingling ive seen the average life of drives when used in raid arrays go from 3 - 6 years to less than 1 year."

That is surprising since Seagate released its first shingled drive (SMR) in 2014, and it is not clear whether those are actually shipping to end-users right now or not (it appears that most SMRs have been shipped to a cloud provider). Your observed failure rate had nothing to do with SMR, and you probably have no SMR disks. Your other observations are probably similarly accurate.

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Drone captures shots of budding APPLE SPACESHIP HQ

Tom Samplonius
Stop

Re: Interesting form of words

"United States v. Causby 328 U.S. 256 says he doesn't have too."

Actually, no it doesn't. The way United States v. Causby is applied in the US, is that the navigable airspace is public domain. But that airspace also requires compliance with FAA. But this drone was flying below that limit, so technically it is was trespassing. Unless, they obtained permission from the land owner to fly there.

Even Causby obtained compensation from the US gov't, as the aircraft were flying at 83 ft, as the US gov't had to obtain an easement to fly planes through the immediate airspace about his property.

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Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests

Tom Samplonius

Re: Not surprising

"Try OpenVZ, it has a ton of tweaking features like this. I still can't figure out why Docker and LXC re-invented the wheel (poorly)"

Because the OpenVZ patches have never been accepted into the mainstream kernels. Now, that cgroups and namespaces are in the mainstream kernel, OpenVZ is dead. The OpenVZ devs have never been able to keep up moving their collection of patches to the newest kernel release. OpenVZ is still stuck on kernel 2.6.

And the OpenVZ devs know this, and are now adding cgroups/lxc support into vzctl, so you can provision LXC-like containers via their tools. Eventually OpenVZ will just be a wrapper around cgroups and namespaces.

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Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins

Tom Samplonius

Already patented...

Forward Error Correction (FEC) on Ethernet is already patented:

http://www.google.com/patents/US7343540

Implementing FEC in addition to TCP retransmits makes the most sense. TCP retransmits are the hammer approach. If packets are dropped, data transfer is really slow, but it won't fail. Adding FEC to the layer just reduces the number of errors appearing in Layer 3. And Layer 3 errors will just be gross errors (ex. someone unplugged the cable for a few seconds), which no FEC algorithm will be able to repair anyways.

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Tom Samplonius

"IPv6 ... requires tearing up the entire internet to implement it."

Provably wrong, since none of the backbone providers have done this. I'm turning up multiple backbone connections for a regional carrier now, all with simultaneous IPv4 + IPv6, and all backbone carriers are basically doing the same thing.

"You need to buy at least one new everything and to implement it securely you need to often replace "one new everything" with "several"."

Implement securely? What are you even talking about? Even if your 1999 firewall doesn't support IPv6, your 2014 firewall supports IPv4 and IPv6 simultaneously.

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Google outlines research priorities for boffin grants

Tom Samplonius

Re: \O/ Freedom \O/

"Just don't ask it to acknowledge the existence of your website if you say something it doesn't like."

Provable false. Just Google "Google Criticism" and find blogs and articles on this very thing.

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NORKS hacker corps reaches 5,900 sworn cyber soldiers - report

Tom Samplonius

Re: Out of curiosity ...

"3. Because they are constantly threatening war - they've declared war on the US twice this year. One day they might actually follow through, and then we all get an entertaining show."

More correctly, they've threatened to start fighting. An armistice was signed in 1953, which is just an agreement to stop fighting. North Korea and the US have been in a state of war since 1950, as no peace treaty has ever been agreed to.

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Boeing to start work on most powerful rocket ... EVER!

Tom Samplonius

Re: Totally wrong type of rocket,

"It would be much better to have more smaller rockets and a reusable crew capsule. Assembling things on orbit in multiple launches would give more flight time for Astronauts and experience in orbital assembly."

Because a manned mars mission would still need orbital assembly too. Food, water and air for about 6 years? Plus, fuel to make the return trip? Plus reserves? Even the biggest rocket in the world is going to have to make a few trips to lift all of that to a decent departure orbit.

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The truth on the Navy carrier debacle? Industry got away with murder

Tom Samplonius

Re: @Ledswinger Hmm@A J Stiles

"After all, we are continually hearing about the "100,000 dead" in Syria. (Without any remotely credible sources, however). But what about the million-plus dead in Iraq? (Plus at least as many wounded or crippled"

And your sources? The Lancet survey reported 654,965 excess deaths related to the war 2003 war. And Lancet survey reported the highest number of deaths of any credible sources. 1+ million is an exaggeration.

"... and 4-5 times as many driven from their homes and, in many cases, their country)."

Sources again? You are saying 4 to 5 million people left the country? The fact that the population of Iraq increased from 25 million in 2002 (just before the war) to 32 million in 2012, shows there was no mass migration.

There is a lot of media exaggeration about Iraq. Its true it is a very violent country. The murder rate in Iraq is 8 per 100K vs 1 per 100K in the UK. So Iraq is 8 times as violent as the UK. But Brazil has a rate of 25 per 100K, just to put that in perspective. So Brazil is over twice as violet as Iraq. Venezuela is 53.

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VC who wants to split California REVEALED as Silk Road Bitcoin slurper

Tom Samplonius

Re: Very puzzling and disturbing.

"These are bitcoins held by Silk Road for the customers/users? Not his personal bitcoins. So by a bit of a stretch, if the CEO of Paypal were charged with similar crimes, Paypal could be shut down and all assets or at least accounts could be seized???"

No. These Bitcoins were offered back to anyone who could prove ownership. No one came forward, and claimed them, so they were sold. This is sale of unclaimed property, not a sale of seized property. There is some more of that that will go for auction after conviction.

Since most of the money moving on the Silk Road was for illegal goods, claiming the funds was probably unwise for most of the owners, just like how money found during drug busts is never claimed either.

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Dropbox used as command and control for Taiwan time bomb

Tom Samplonius

"Seems risky for the perpetrators to me. Wouldn't any legitimate company just shut down the account as soon as a security researcher informed them they were being used as a C&C server?"

That goes for any C&C protocol. But the solution is already known: use lots of C&C servers, located via a hash function. Or lots of Dropbox accounts via a hash account. Dropbox needs just needs to stop xyzlkajsdfklzvc, xyxkawerup, and xyzupweas from signing up free Dropbox accounts.

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MIT boffins build 36 core processor with data-traffic smarts

Tom Samplonius

36 core processor, and the cores are called "tiles"? I've seen this movie already. It's called Tilera and they are shipping these CPUs. Microtik uses them in routers. http://www.tilera.com/products/processors/TILE-Gx_Family

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Verizon to turn LTE faucet back on for Chromebook Pixel users

Tom Samplonius

"So Verizon now says that those customers will get a full two years of service that they were offered. Shouldn't they also give a few extra months as well for the trouble those users went through? Nope, not the Verizon way."

Well, Google has already given the customers $150 in credit, so Verizon should be reimbursing Google for already doing that.

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Code Spaces goes titsup FOREVER after attacker NUKES its Amazon-hosted data

Tom Samplonius

"How lovely, so now disgruntled employee on his/her last day can take down whole company and permanently turn off the lights leaving the building. It's in the cloud folks, and it'll be there until wind blows it away."

And that is not unique to the cloud either. There are many accounts of disgruntled employees scheduling "dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=1m" to run on all in-house servers as they are leaving. Nothing new here. Plus, I've been called into to investigate a hack on in-house servers, where the attackers deliberately wiped Active Directory and IIS metabases on all servers. Because once you get into the domain, you get into all servers on the domain. That company also lost their entire business running on those servers, because while they had backups, reconstructing the configuration took two full days, by which time there were no customers left.

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Psst. We've got 400Gb/s Ethernet working - but don't tell anyone

Tom Samplonius

Re: Way ahead of the access layer

Backbone volume is increasing at least 30% per year.

https://www.sandvine.com/trends/global-internet-phenomena/

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Tom Samplonius

Re: Entire article fails to mention the other factor...

It is fiber optic, so several kilometers at minimum, depending on the output of the transceiver.

Distance is not really a problem, as there are people doing 400Gbps on fiber today for 100+ kilometers, but as 40 discreet 10Gbps channels. This is just standard WDM in use for 10+ years. The only thing special about 400Gbps ethernet, is that the WDM is done at the media layer, so it appears as one logical circuit. Eventually, telcos will be able to chuck all of that WDM gear, and just use ethernet directly on the glass, right off their core routers.

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Oracle shoves aside NoSQL upstarts with smart 'Fabric' tech

Tom Samplonius

Re: Run away

"Quite. SQL Server already does all of this perfectly well - plus a whole lot more, and it might not be free - but its reasonably priced and at least it doesn't involve Oracle..."

I think you mean, more expensive than Oracle. SQL Server prices have increased rapidly, and it is no longer "reasonably priced". Plus, it doesn't actually have this fabric feature either.

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OpenStack Icehouse: IT'S ALIVE! – live migration, that is

Tom Samplonius

Re: Please correct your use of "live migration"

"...you are an idiot for using this term to refer to an upgrade path :)"

Or not. From the Icehouse release notes:

Nova

* Live Migration Support

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Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare

Tom Samplonius

"...UK Windows Phone market share of over 11%..."

Feb 2014 was 10.1%, down from 11.3% in Jan 2014, and down from 12% in Aug 2013 (ComTech Survey).

So I'm sure the Lumnia 930 will right the ship.

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Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully

Tom Samplonius

Re: Isn't it funny...

"All the recent American attempts to design new rocket engines (with the shining exception of the SpaceX Merlin) have failed completely."

The US hasn't really attempted to build any new engines. And the US isn't really a singular group. This satellite was launched by the NRO. Normally the NRO used Titan IV Heavies, but they were really expensive. So they switched to the Atlas V, built by the United Launch Alliance. If you have the cash, the United Launch Alliance will put up an Atlas V for anyone. The Atlas V is scalable to various sizes of payloads and different orbits.

However, NASA is pretty close to obtaining a domestic RD-180. Except, until recently, there wasn't any reason to spend the money to do so.

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