* Posts by cyberdemon

110 posts • joined 26 Jan 2010

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Whopping 10TB disks spin out of HGST – plus 3.2TB flash slabs

cyberdemon
Angel

The trouble with Helium..

Is it has a tendency to seep through *anything* - even solid steel / aluminum..

A balloon lasts a day or two - a foil one a week or two, while an 80 litre dewar flask of liquid helium will noticeably ebb away over the course of a few months. Granted this is primarily via the oil film seal around the stainless steel ball valve once it has been opened and closed again (rather than the metal itself, though that does happen), but I suspect the slightest knock/vibration could disturb the seal on a helium-filled hard drive, enough for the helium to gradually percolate through the seams of the case and up to the heavens - and your data soon follows it!

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LG unfurls flexible SEE-THROUGH 18-inch display

cyberdemon
Devil

Re: What about Folded Displays

Actually if you ask me - the folded display will be the death of the roll-up display.

Because too many plebs will try to fold them!

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Who loves office space? Dell does: Virtualization to banish workstations from under desks

cyberdemon
Devil

Anxiety

"having all of a workgroup's valuable files in a central location — architectural models, feature films, automotive designs, whatever – can significantly reduce that aforementioned IT admin's anxiety."

I suspect the only admin whose anxiety is reduced will be the HR admin.

The "aformentioned IT admin" will be very anxious indeed, right before he ceases to be an IT admin @:

3
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Fukushima radioactivity a complete non-issue on West Coast: Also for Fukushima locals, in fact

cyberdemon
Boffin

Financial disasaters..

Maybe, just maybe, the "financial disaster" is caused more by "'Elf and Safety" parasites (and the hysterical individuals who they brainwash in the name of profit) than the disaster itself?

Other examples include Asbestos, Electricity, Whiplash and PPI.

The nuclear industry is especially vulnerable to these kinds of parasites, because nobody understands it, lots of people are scared of it, and nobody can see it except for the 'Elf & Safety brigade with their geiger counters and smear tests for whom it is highly profitable to inflate its risks.

Especially when you have concepts like ALARA - that is, the whole UK nuclear industry is LEGALLY BOUND to keeping radiation emissions "As Low As Reasonably Achievable" (despite what the safe or background levels may be..) That gives a massive bonus to the ambulance chasers, because all they have to do is present some new (and very expensive) way to reduce exposure to a new, even more hilarious low.

I work for an experimental fusion facility, and the rules there are that any area where there is more than 1 Bq/cm^2 Tritium (beta emission, one measly electron per second) detected on any surface then that area must be designated as a controlled area that nobody is allowed to enter without a pile of paperwork and five days of brainw^H^H^H^H^H^Htraining courses. (To put that into perspective, a Tritium-filled luminescent keyring that you can buy in high street shops for £10 contains about 1 Giga-Bequerel of Tritium) Anyone who comes out of these areas then has to dispose of their overalls, mask, and three layers of gloves straight into the contaminated bin which then becomes.. Nuclear Waste!

Yes - most of that zillion tonnes of low-level nuclear waste that you hear about is just gloves and overalls that "might" be contaminated.

They had to evacuate the whole site at Sellafield recently, until they found the cause of their "radiation leak" - As I understand it someone dug a hole for some roadworks and released some radon from the granite bedrock. For your "financial disaster", Imagine how much that little incident must have cost. Then think about the Nuclear Decomissioning Authority as a whole, and how much money it must be plowing into parasite industries for no good reason..

In reality, there is far more cancer caused by the chemical and OMG Nanoparticles!! emissions from cars, than nuclear war never mind nuclear power, ever caused.

And if we could have nuclear power, maybe we could have enough of it to charge everyone's electric car!

By the way, anyone who mentions Chernobyl should be reminded of Bhopal.

7
1

Fukushima fearmongers: It's YOUR FAULT Japan DUMPED CO2 targets

cyberdemon
Mushroom

Re: The elephant in the room

>So current power generation digs something out of the ground and uses it to heat its surroundings. The heating might be local, but do enough of it for long enough, over large area of the planet and one has to ask if there is a better definition of "Global Warming". What we are doing is systematically overloading the planet's ability to dump excess heat. The other "bad" things simply add to the problem.

Hmm.

Given that total global solar heating is around 100 petawatts, and total global power generation is about 15 terawatts, that means power generation contributes around 0.015% of global heating.

I get that the climate is a sensitive balance, but I'd be very surprised if we could influence it by heating, in the absence of any gas emissions.

Solar power would be nice, if it didn't need so much resources to make the panels. And in many cases the land used would be better off growing crops (the same applies to all biofuels - you are effectively burning food)

This debate both amuses and depresses me. We have hippies (climate) versus hippies (anti-nuclear), with us scientists caught in the crossfire.

4
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Google's Wi-Fi not good enough for its home town

cyberdemon
Trollface

Re: The problem is WiFi not Google

And the TLDR award for 2013 goes to.. btrower!

I keep reading your name as btrowel.. which is ironic since you always seem to be laying it on with one!

2
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Wanna run someone over in your next Ford? No dice, it won't let you

cyberdemon
Devil

Self-driving cars are never going to take off

One word: Lawsuit.

No matter how good they are, the whole concept of the self-driving car is doomed in today's society.

The average person (apparently) makes about 1000 road journeys per year. Therefore, even if a self-driving car were "nine-nines" safe, i.e. 99.9999999% certain to get you from A to B without killing you, that's still one death per year per million customers as a result of product imperfections, each with the likelihood of a nasty lawsuit or even a corporate manslaughter charge.

On top of that, 1% of the entire population every year are killed on the roads (730k in the UK, apparently), with a significant proportion i'm sure where the wrong person (or robot) gets the blame.

Even if the robot car were 100% perfect, humans are idiots, and there will be plenty of them ready to hurl themselves in front of the robot cars if there is even the remotest possibility of a big fat payout.

The nice thing about human-driven cars of course, is that there's a fleshy meat sack behind the wheel who assumes (nearly) all legal responsibility for its use.

Call me a cynical git, but I don't really see a way around it.

2
5

RADIATION SNATCHED from leaky microwave ovens to power gadgets

cyberdemon
Facepalm

This is about as daft..

as putting solar panels on your ceiling to collect the 'wasted energy' from your energy-saving lightbulb!

As for "1.8V, enough for most gadgets", this reporter clearly hasn't heard of electric current. In particular, that old relation P=IV!

Wait, forget I said anything - I hear another clueless mug, er I mean EPSRC executive on his way!

0
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Facebook Frankenphoto morgue will store cold, dead selfies FOREVER

cyberdemon
Trollface

Facebook are not storing YOUR data for YOUR benefit

They are storing THEIR data for the benefit of THEIR data-mining!

1
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Meet the Unmagnificent Seven: The critical holes plugged in Firefox update

cyberdemon

Re: Lamentable

Nope. No extensions.. The last time I used it was on a University PC with Firefox installed as part of their standard build. Whenever I tried to use it for literature surveys and the like, it would crash after about half an hour of heavy use.

I wouldn't be surprised if the culprit was the Adobe PDF plugin (the kind of steaming pile that Adobe is)

But then again, why should ANY plugin or extension be able to crash the entire browser? Surely there are catch statements to prevent that sort of thing?

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cyberdemon
Unhappy

Lamentable

Firefox used to be a really good browser, but I'm really not sure what happened to make it what it is today: Frankly a pile of cack.

It's still miles better than IE of course, but it's a shame that I now have to choose between a browser that is probably tracking my every move (Chrome) and a browser that crashes all the time, eats all my memory, and just generally plain sucks (Firefox). Regrettably I choose the former.

It was around version 3 when things started getting bad. I can't entirely remember why. Then they changed the menus, broke all the extensions, and started doing silly version numbers and it was all downhill from there.

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Redmond slips out temporary emergency fix for IE 0-day

cyberdemon
Angel

Re: The reason it is still in use IMHO

Ewww.

This dongle enumerates as what, a USB Network interface? Then you take the dongle and plug it into the meter?

Could be an interesting hack!

Btw, what happens if you run out of funds and the meter turns off. How do you put more funds in it then?

0
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cyberdemon
Coffee/keyboard

ActiveX?!

I thought that died in 1997!

Why the hell is ActiveX even allowed AT ALL in a modern iteration of Internet Exploder?

If anyone is unfortunate/lazy enough to need such an abomination they should have to confirm exactly which HTTPS certificates are allowed to run it, a bit like what Java is doing.

7
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Telstra scrambles to fix voice

cyberdemon
Devil

Faulty wiretap, perhaps?

Maybe a certain black box has spewed out some blue smoke.

0
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Chap unrolls 'USB condom' to protect against viruses

cyberdemon
Linux

Rubbish!

Those who are saying this device fakes negotiation to grab power are (probably) wrong.

I'd bet it just shorts the two data lines together so the device thinks its plugged into a dumb wall charger and draws the full whack.

I could even claim prior art on this one myself - I modified my n900's USB cable to include a simple switch between the two data lines to short them. Now I can plug it into a PC to charge at full speed (albeit completely flaunting the USB spec), with the added advantage that this also prevents the data lines from being used if I plug the cable into anything untrusted.

0
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Tencent offers 10TB of free cloud storage for all

cyberdemon
Devil

Mobile required?

Has anyone managed to sign up for this yet?

I made an account, but when I try to get the free storage I get this:

Does not meet all the conditions for obtaining

Conditions for obtaining:

1 Log micro cloud phone 1.6 version

2 registered handsets are not involved in this activity

3 your QQ number is not involved in this activity

* If you are already logged in before the start of Mobile try to log in again after logging out

It would suggest they want me to install something on either an Android or iOS device.

Even if I had either of those, they can sod right off!

0
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Microsoft Xbox One to be powered by ginormous system-on-chip

cyberdemon
Devil

Maybe I'm just cynical..

This seems to me like an effort to foil the mod-chippers.

Putting it all on a SoC with custom silicon could make it pretty much unhackable..

I'm sure a lot of managers at Microsoft would love it to be a black box filled with epoxy and only ethernet in one end and HDMI out the other, with a couple of antennas inside for controllers etc.

If it weren't for the small issues of cooling, and those pesky soldiers in their disconnected army bases kicking up a fuss about always-on connectivity, they'd probably have done that already!

0
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'Hand of Thief' banking Trojan reaches for Linux – for only $2K

cyberdemon
Devil

Re: Problem with this idea...

Quite right. Basic Safe Surfing practice means you avoid the vast majority of malware. (I personally advise against antivirus software. It is more trouble than it's worth and tends to lull users into a false sense of security)

Mind you, there is a lot of malware that can get in via javascript exploits in browsers, and there are quite a few privelege escalation exploits running around.

Javascript remote code execution exploit + privelege escalation + rootkit = one pwned box, with no permission boxes to click through.

The most effective defence per unit of user inconvenience, IMO, is to turn off javascript by default (only for selected domains), using something like NoScript (or NotScripts in Chrome). It has an added bonus of blocking almost all adverts and invasive trackers, whilst leaving non-intrusive HTML-only adverts alone.

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cyberdemon
Devil

Re: will the Linux Trojan have the same value as its Windows counterparts?

Or even just install the vboxaddons package, say, on your physical machine, and it'll probably think it's a virtual machine anyway!

0
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You still reading us? Not for long! Summer is THE IT meltdown hot spot

cyberdemon
Holmes

Servers don't like heat

In other news, cats discovered to dislike baths, the pope announces that he is in fact catholic.

4
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Asperger's and IT

cyberdemon
Unhappy

Re: Aspergers and IT

Speaking of Eadon, Aspergers, and prejudices, perhaps Aaron Milne could put a word in with the editors?

Eadon's basically been banned and all his posts deleted because he didn't know when to shut up. (he has Aspergers)

I miss him, I actually do!

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France's 'three strikes' anti-piracy law shot down

cyberdemon
Devil

Typical quango...

12m over 60 employees. That's a €100k _average_ salary taking into account the standard overheads formula..

0
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Microsoft to switch off MSN TV

cyberdemon
Devil

Quite. It has to be a complete write-off, surely.

In fact it's probably been losing money hand over fist for 16 years and only just now they have decided to write it off??

Maybe Steve Ballmer's mother still uses it or something.

0
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What happened to Eadon??

cyberdemon

I hope it's not permanent though. El Reg just won't be the same without him.

Plus it's not really fair to permaban him simply for not recognising when we have had enough of him:

http://smart-aspergers.blogspot.co.uk/ Recognise that guy?

0
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cyberdemon
FAIL

What happened to Eadon??

Every last post of his seems to have been deleted:

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/user/34672/

Is he banned? Wtf did he do?

I know everyone loved to hate him, but he wasn't THAT bad. I quite liked him really, he made me laugh.

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3-2-1... BOOM: Russian rocket launches, explodes into TOXIC FIREBALL

cyberdemon
Mushroom

You are having a bad problem

you will not go to space today.

4
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Eww! What have you done to the layout?

cyberdemon
WTF?

.....Don't fix it!

Wtf.. You've done the same for "Your Topics" in the sidebar. Why?

Needlessly adding clicks to a user interface is a waste of my time.

3
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cyberdemon
Unhappy

If it aint broke....

Why have icons been moved to a tab in the post comment box?

I am very unhappy and wish to express my discontent. ----------------------------------------------->

2
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Snowden speaks from Moscow: 'Obama lies'

cyberdemon
Devil

So basically..

If you want to be a human rights activist, then get out of Russia. Those kind of people are not welcome here!

(plus since you told us everything you know - we made sure of that - you are of no further use to us)

10
5

Unix luminary among seven missing at sea

cyberdemon
WTF?

Fneh

Is there some villain going round assassinating ancient computer science geniuses or what?

It was only two days ago that James Martin turned up dead off of Bermuda.

1
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'Do the right thing and tell on a pirate' - software bods

cyberdemon
Devil

Watch it! They'll start doing people for "Incitement to commit copyright infringement" next!

0
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That Microsoft-Nokia merger you've been predicting? It's no go

cyberdemon
Linux

Maemo

Personally, I think the best thing Nokia could do is resurrect their brilliant Debian-based phone OS Maemo.

There's still a huge community surrounding the n900, despite it being nearly 4 years old. It'd be brilliant if Nokia could take that and put it on a modern phone (a Huawei one, perhaps, if Nokia haven't got the cash to be making their own phones anymore)

Despite its age, the n900 is still the most powerful (in terms of things you can make it do) phone I have ever known. (mobile SSH terminal complete with agent, port and X11 forwarding, anyone?)

Absolute brilliance by Nokia, but it was exactly what the trojan horse Elop was (successfully) deployed to assassinate.

22
3

So, Windows 8.1 to give PC sales a shot in arm? BZZZZT, wrong answer

cyberdemon
Linux

Re: +1 avoiding an upgrade

I was going to say you could yank the HDD out of your old machine and put it in the new one and it won't notice the difference

But this being Windows, it'd probably BSOD because the SATA chipset had changed, or you'd lose all your software licenses because the CPU serial number had changed.

This is one of the of the many reasons I avoid Windows when I can.

15
1

SK Hynix coughs $240m to settle Rambus IP case

cyberdemon
Facepalm

Great.

Does that set a precedent for RAMBUS to start patent-trolling everyone else now?

I remember when they had a product. It was expensive, slow, and got extremely hot.

I guess they decided that if they can't innovate, they'd better get under the bridge and wait for some billy-goats.

1
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How NSA spooks spaffed my DAD'S DATA ALL OVER THE WEB

cyberdemon
Holmes

Shurely not THE Adam Hart-Davis?

Of BBC TV presenting fame?

0
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Google to punish sloppy mobile webmasters

cyberdemon
Linux

Re: Great!

If they insist on making a touch optimised version, then they should make it ONLY for multitouch phones. My n900 works much better on desktop sites with its old-style resistive touchscreen (the touch resolution actually comes somewhere near the screen resolution, unlike with Jesus Phones etc)

Or better yet, just implement the "mobile-optimised" bit in jQuery or the like, so we can turn it off. Saves the cost of parallel maintenance of two sites, and avoids the problem of "special versions" being forgotten about too.

1
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cyberdemon
Devil

Re: Great!

To be honest the best thing would be to just ditch mobile sites altogether.

Usually the full version works perfectly fine (even on my mum's ancient Nokia symbian phone), except for some sites where it is impossible to view the full site unless you hack your user-agent string, because otherwise you keep getting redirected to the borked mobile site.

5
2

MacBook Air now uses PCIe flash... but who'd Apple buy it from?

cyberdemon
Flame

Re: it's a chimney

It'll look even more like a chimney after someone mistakes it for a waste-paper basket!

2
0

Amazon SLASHES hosted database prices

cyberdemon
Devil

Re: Cloud - GET SPIED ON - AWS, Google, AZURE, hell even just Windows

You will still (probably) get spied on if you use Amazon's MySQL service (as opposed to one of the proprietary databases)

Whereas if you run your own instance of Oracle or SQL Server, you'd notice pretty quickly if it started opening connections to the NSA.

Granted there could plausibly be as-yet-unused backdoors in the proprietary databases, but IN THIS ARTICLE, EADON, It's about who hosts it, not what's hosted.

4
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ROBOT COW teaches Saudi kids where milk comes from

cyberdemon
Facepalm

Re: Having

PAT tested.

Good one. >_<

2
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NSA accused of new crimes ... against slideware

cyberdemon
Devil

Re: Death BY Powerpoint

> They also drew a prism wrong.

To me it looks oddly like the Zune icon!

3
0

Microsoft in sexism strife again over XBOX rape joke

cyberdemon
Trollface

A Microsoft developer in the Linux Kernel?

Don't say things like that! Poor Eadon will be offended!

0
1

Review: Beagleboard Beaglebone Black

cyberdemon
Devil

Re: Cost.

Actually Mr. Framelhammer, a child could quite happily understand SPI. :)

Master wiggles both clock and data (Master Out Slave In) in sync,

Slave wiggles data (Master In Slave Out) in sync with master's clock.

That's it. Simple.

USB on the other hand is one of those design-by-committee standards that only a <a href="http://www.fourwalledcubicle.com/LUFA.php">genius</a> understands completely, but the rest of us, including children, can quite happily take a well-written library like LUFA to make any USB device we like.

I certainly wouldn't like to have km123 as a teacher - he'd be one of those horrendous old IT teachers who has the class learning how to make a form in Microsoft Excess 97 (despite it being 2013), when we'd all rather be writing games in python.

It's teachers like that who are the reason why Britain has fallen so far behind in computer science in recent years.

1
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cyberdemon
Devil

Re: Cost.

Enlighten us km123. Who does make Atmel chips? My goggles are broken after trying to read your post from Mars.

4
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Peak Facebook: British users lose their Liking for Zuck's ad empire

cyberdemon
Devil

@gazthejourno

I don't use Adblock when browsing the Reg, but I do use NotScripts (ie NoScript for Chrome).

This ensures that the only ads I ever see are the plain HTML ones, which work without Javascript or Flash.

Conveniently, these ads are unobtrusive and I don't mind seeing them or even clicking on them once in a while.

However, as soon as I add doubleclick.net to my temporary whitelist whilst browsing the Reg, I am bombarded with flash ads, background-filling ads, foreground-interupting ads, ads with fscking sound, which insult my eyes and ears and I immediately revoke my temporary whitelist.

4
0

Microsoft: All RIGHT, you can have your Start button back

cyberdemon
Linux

Re: We told you it was shit

@Peter Simpson

> Given that there are different types of users and strong feelings on both sides, why do Microsoft (and Canonical -- sadly, Linux isn't free of this silliness either) feel that it must be "their way or the highway"?

The trouble is, I think, that any user configuration option can double the amount of testing that needs to be done in order for it to be considered rigorous.

So for something like KDE3.5, where rigorous testing was considered secondary to power and functionality, and bugs were fixed on an "as soon as someone moans about it" basis, we could have a gazillion options, so long as we had the sense to change them back when they broke something.

But now, where software is released by companies interested in profit margins and how many salaried software testers they can get away with laying off, we no longer have user configuration and this is a shame.

It might also be why Apple is doing so well - They pick the optimal configuration for the majority of users and then make it completely inflexible. With Apple it really is their way or the highway, even if it for you it is a good way.

0
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Good news: Debian 7 is rock solid. Bad news: It's called Wheezy

cyberdemon
Holmes

Re: Any connection to the Raspberry Pi Raspbian "Wheezy" based on Debian?

see icon.

http://www.debian.org/releases/

Wheezy has existed for a long time, as the "testing" distribution, but it has now become "stable", i.e. the official release, to which no further changes will be made apart from security updates. This ensures that no future update can break existing software.

Raspbian, being a rather experimental platform anyway, uses the testing distribution because the package versions are newer.

Many people use sid, because it is even newer.

0
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Attention large Linux workloads

cyberdemon
Trollface

Re: Shouldn't this be.......

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2001/01/22/register_tariff/

"Integrity? We've heard of it."

0
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Attack of the CYBER NORKS! Pyongyang in frontal assault online

cyberdemon
Mushroom

For a country where the Internet is completely banned...

Isn't it odd that they know anything at all about "cyber-warfare"?

Hopefully they subcontracted it, or the south koreans are just crap at security. Otherwise what else do they have more expertise in than we anticipated?

1
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Paying a TV tax makes you happy - BBC

cyberdemon
Big Brother

Re: Be happy, and enjoy your viewing!

WAR IS PEACE

FREEDOM IS SLAVERY

IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

TAX IS HAPPINESS

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