* Posts by Turtle

1581 posts • joined 23 Jan 2010

Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Uitsmijter

Turtle
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We *Could* Be Done By Now.

"It's a fair point that some of our wobbly dining delicacies do require a bit of dedication, but if we restricted ourselves solely to grub suitable for preparation by the truly incapacitated, we'd be done after a swift bacon sarnie..."

And the problem with that would be...?

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It's all Uber! France ends its love affair with ride-sharing app

Turtle
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@regadpellagru Re: Correction, here ...

"However, it is not true the service is illegal in France. This is up in the air at courts."

Although I am not very familiar with legal systems based on the Napoleonic Code, I'd think that this statement is probably wrong. Uber *is* illegal in France; the courts might eventually decide that it must be recognized as legal, but until they do so, it is, in fact, illegal. Laws are valid until actually annulled and the existence of a lawsuit seeking to annul the law does not invalidate the law and does not prevent its enforcement (unless the courts issue an injunction preventing enforcement).

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Biologists gasp at lemur's improbably colossal bollocks

Turtle
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Tanuki.

The Japanese tanuki is also known for the same thing. I don't know whose is bigger. I also don't know how much folklore concerns lemurs but there's quite a bit concerning tanuki. Apparently statues of tanuki are very popular in Japan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_raccoon_dog - and of course look at the pictures.

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Silly Google's Photos app labelled BLACK PEOPLE as GORILLAS

Turtle
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@ TRT

"Except Google don't have any sort of noble rationale behind why they are doing something so utterly stupid and offensive."

Look, no one hates Google as much as I do, but they didn't do this intentionally. And when they say "We’re appalled and genuinely sorry that this happened" I actually believe them. And I don't believe much of what they say, I promise you.

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Turtle
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@Bob Wheeler Re: AI is hard

"How do you define an algorithm to describe a chair, something to sit on. Is that algorithm good enough to correctly distinguish a dining table chair, a stool, sofa, a park bench?"

That's a good question. And what's particularly interesting is that scientists do not even know how the human mind is able to distinguish the incredible variety of things that are subsumed under the heading "chairs".

Because intelligence of any sort, artificial or otherwise, is hard.

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Teaching people to speak English? You just need Chatroulette without the dick pics

Turtle
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@Anonymous Coward Re: No True Statement...

"English people often understand each other when the speak a foreign language like French - yet the native speakers find them incomprehensible."

There's a very simple reason for this: people will learn the vocabulary of a foreign language but not its grammar and syntax. So someone might speak, as in your example, French words with English sentence constructions, or, for a native French speaker, English words with French sentence structures.

It's interesting to note that, once you have a very basic familiarity with a given language, you can begin to understand the reasons for some of the mistakes that native speakers of that language make when learning your own native language.

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Turtle
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No True Statement...

"Thus the increase in literacy is going to come about as a result of the existence of Facebook..."

No true statement could possibly be more depressing.

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Goodbye Vulcan: Blighty's nuclear bomber retires for the last time

Turtle
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Bad Year For Vulcans.

First was a farewell to Mr Spock, and now for the bomber...

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Supreme Court ignores Google's whinging in Java copyright suit

Turtle
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@Anonymous Coward Re: Amusing.

"What's truely interoperable are the tools to make software, and the knowledge and syntax in the heads of programmers who write it."

Kinda like how your idea of "interoperability" exists only in your head, and not in any court of law?

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Turtle
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Amusing.

"Asked for comment on the matter, a Google spokesperson told The Reg via email, 'We will continue to defend the interoperability that has fostered innovation and competition in the software industry.'"

Since Android/Dalvik and Java are not interoperable, it amuses me to see Google using interoperability as a defense.

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Giant FLYING SPACE ROCKS could KILL US ALL, warns Brian May

Turtle
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Raise High The Roof!

"Scientists are trying to raise funding by invoking planet-killing chunks of flying space rock with today's Asteroid Day."

Better now.

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THIS TIME we really are ALL DOOMED, famous doomsayer prof says

Turtle
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To Append A Necessary Phrase.

"...the 1968 book Population Bomb, which in early editions stated that basically everyone in India would inevitably starve to death due to overpopulation in the 1970s..."

If I correctly recall, he said a bit more than that. He said that we (the West, the US) should simply let them (India, and Egypt too, I think) all die and that we should make no efforts to help them. I was so impressed with this that I almost incapable of saying or writing the name "Paul Ehrlich" without appending the phrase "virulent racist" to it.

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Taylor Swift boycotts Apple Music over no-pay-for-plays shocker

Turtle
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Interesting Opinion.

For anyone actually interested in this, Faza at The Cynical Musician has something to say about this matter, and not what I would have expected.

His basic idea is that musicians should grant Apple a royalty-free window for the sake of insuring that Spotify has some serious competition in the streaming market.

For those of you without ADHD or similar, you can find his opinion at http://thecynicalmusician.com/2015/06/apple-musics-free-trial-period-a-lesson-in-windowing/

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Turtle
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@Anonymous Coward

"To be honest I'm confused as to why anyone would buy these albums in the first place"

I can explain it to you; it's really very easy. People would buy these albums because they have likes and dislikes that diverge from yours.

But could you please explain exactly what the fuck your personal likes and dislikes have to do with the fact that she's decided to call attention to a scheme that tends to do the most damage to artists that can afford it least - amongst which might even be some of the musicians that you seem to think are so much better than Taylor Swift.

PS One of the several (shallow) ideas underlying your post is that there's some formula that makes it easy to write hits. You could not be more wrong. Another is that "good music" resides someplace other than in the ear of the beholder, and that you are some sort of objective judge. As Duke Ellington said, "If it sounds good, it is good". Everyone gets to make that judgement for themselves. Neither your dislike of Taylor Swift's music or your need to advertise that fact make you superior in any way to people who do like her. Quite the contrary, actually.

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Turtle
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A Worthwhile Venture.

"I'm so glad an internationally recognised artist is standing up for all the smaller artists out there. It warms my heart that 'it's not about her' or her lost revenues. She makes me believe the world isn't so bad after all and her act of altruism should be awarded, arise Saint Swift. /sarcasm"

I'd venture to guess that you're exactly the kind of lousy human being that you accuse her of being.

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Verizon promised to wire up NYC with fiber... and failed miserably – audit

Turtle
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Can It Really Do That?

"Broadband is a key component of this Administration's fight to create opportunity and sustainable economic development in every corner of the five boroughs."

Does broadband actually create "opportunity and sustainable economic development" anywhere? And I don't mean menial lackey-work like Uber, or the mooted "Be A Delivery Drone For Amazon In Your Spare Time" gambit. I mean good, workable, middle-class payscale jobs on which people can live and have a family and place to live other than a refrigerator carton. I have the impression that broadband (and the internet itself) actually destroys more such jobs rather than creates them.

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'Oracle, why are your sales f-' CLOUD CLOUD CLOUD, blasts Larry

Turtle
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451

I know that this is kind of trivial but that jacket that Safra Catz is wearing makes her look like she just stepped off of one of those fire engines in Fahrenheit 451.

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Apple no-pay-for-plays streaming risks indie boycott

Turtle
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Re: @ecarlseen

"owning means I can keep playing after that single purchase, streaming requires an ongoing subscription so isn't owning. If we are going to compare streaming to owning then surely each track should only pay out once per subscriber - just as owning would. I stream a track, the artist gets paid and from then on subsequent plays pay nothing."

Once again, the key difference between streaming and owning on the one hand, and the radio on the other, is the ability to hear a song whenever you want. All other differences are trivial.

If you want to listen once, buy the stream. If you want to listen to it repeatedly, then buy it outright as a download (or a physical product if available). Streaming and buying are two very different products in that respect. But either way, that specific track is there when you want it.

The radio is not like that at all. In fact, it couldn't be more different from either streaming or buying: the listener has no control over what the radio plays. There is one and only one reason why airplay and the radio in general were considered important by musicians and record companies: it was the best way to spark sales. I hope that I need not explain why, but I will anyway: someone might hear the track on the radio and decide that instead of waiting for the track to be played again, they would like to spend the money to buy the record to have the ability to hear the track whenever they want.

So we have three purchase options:

1) Pay-per-listen: buy a stream;

2) Listen-at-will: buy the download or physical product;

3) Listen-whenever-the-radio-plays-it-and-hope-that-you-are-fortunate-enough-to-be-listening-when-they-DO-play-it: Buy a radio, because once you've bought a radio, there's no additional cost.

I think that these three options cover all use cases.

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Turtle
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@ecarlseen

"...comparing the price of a stream to the price of buying a track is so idiotically dishonest as to make the entire piece suspect. Any value above $0 is better than they made for radio, which is the traditional model for comparison. "

The radio pays. While some small radio stations pay a blanket fee, most radio stations (and television stations too I believe) keep records of what they play and each artist gets paid accordingly.

Irrespective of what you think is the "traditional" comparison, the proper comparison is between streaming and owning - irrespective of whether you consider it to be "idiotically dishonest" or otherwise. Why? Because both streaming and owning allow you to listen to a track whenever you want, which is not possible with radio. The FCC also uses "interactivity" to decide what rates an entity pays for playing music.

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Turtle
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Ethics

"No service has yet to cross the ethical line of demanding bands allow use of their catalogue for free."

But their failure to do so has nothing to do with ethics.

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Pirate Party founder: I wanna turn news into a series of three-line viral gobbets

Turtle
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The Consumer.

"His Falconwing News service will pump out three-sentence 'stories' scraped from real news sources and posted as images. Advertisers will be able to inject their ads into this stream."

I don't really understand why a person who would consume 3-sentence news stories needs to read the news at all. Couldn't they just get all the information they need to know from t-shirts, bumper stickers, and song lyrics?

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'Lemme tell you about my trouble with girls ...' Er, please don't, bro-ffin

Turtle
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He Has To Know Better..

He has to know better than to say that he's in favor of single-sex labs. The rest of it is foolish but saying that he's in favor of single-sex labs is a real problem. Once those words leave his mouth, irrespective of the exact circumstances in which they were uttered and irrespective of the remark being an attempt however feeble and stupid at humor then anyone who is so inclined would be fully justified in questioning how much his hiring and promotion decisions are effected by the same attitude.

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Belgium trolls France with bonkers new commemorative coin

Turtle
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Re: How about more annoying the French!

"To be fair we celebrate Dunkirk as if it was a victory when in fact it was our troops running away as fast as they could. That's not intended as a slur on their bravery, it was the right thing to do it's just that we seem to act as if it was some great victory."

As Churchill said at the time, "We must be very careful not to assign to this deliverance the attributes of a victory".

(Churchill if I recall did want to sent the whole of the RAF to France at the start of the war but his war chiefs refused, wisely.)

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FLYING SAUCER crashes into Pacific off Hawaii - NASA

Turtle
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@Elmer Phud

"'The number seven has many mystic properties' Why?"

You're going to have to ask Pythagoras, sorry.

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Turtle
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Seven Is A Lucky Number - And Thus A Key To Success!

"But the seventh mission succeeded and it just so happened that one of the mission's controllers was munching a handful of peanuts at the time. Since then good luck peanuts are eaten as a superstitious tradition in this most scientific of organizations."

For some reason, I find that reassuring.

Still, it is interesting to note that the Nasaeans, very capable sciencemologists, apparently overlooked the significance of the mission being the seventh. The number seven has many mystic properties which could well have influenced the success of the mission. For example, as the Pythagoreans taught: "The Hebdomad [i.e., the number seven]—as being motherless, and a virgin—possesses the second place in dignity." See https://books.google.com/books?id=Sve3fLUG3bEC&pg=RA2-PA8-IA8&lpg=RA2-PA8-IA8&dq=number+is+%22motherless+and+a+virgin%22&source=bl&ots=DC_Tjqrzjm&sig=IheluBOygkBx311l2lcx-h_j34s&hl=en&sa=X&ei=-2V2VZX1EsaYyASO8ICABw&ved=0CBQQ6AEwAA

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Cynical Apple says it'll gouge less cash from iTunes strummers' sales

Turtle
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Re: Cynicism

" I can't actually be cynical about a company reducing it's cut to try to increase usage."

Yeah, you can. But you're doing it wrong.

What they're trying to do is sacrificing their high margins which will result in making the field less attractive to potential entrants / competitors. This way, while their profits will decline, the lower profits will be effectively safeguarded. This strategy is not original with Apple. It's very much like predatory pricing. Apple is maximizing its profits in changed conditions.

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Turtle
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80/20. Pareto's 80/20.

"Apple made $10bn from app sales last year and even with the toughness of Apple’s checking and approval procedure, this is a very lucrative revenue stream."

I don't recall the details but I am pretty sure that I remember an article here on a report stating that the vast majority of that income was garnered by a very limited number of apps and devs. It was kind of like the Pareto 80/20 law taken to an extreme.

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Did you almost prang a 737 jet with a drone over Dallas? The FAA would like a word

Turtle
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Various Intentions.

"Given the popularity of drones amongst amateur videographers and the ease with which they can be operated, many owners are taking to the skies without first learning FAA rules on where they can and cannot fly."

Good. But maybe there will be people graduating from laser pointers to drones. I.e. what is the FAA going to do when people start flying these drones with malicious intent, hoping to perhaps cause an accident. (Which by the way could be done not only at airports but on any highway: imagine driving along at 30,.40, 50, or more miles per hour and having a drone collide with your windshield. Imagine how most people would react. Not a pretty sight, right?)

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Russia copies EU commissars with own right to be forgotten law

Turtle
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Re: How about a "Right to NOT be forgotten"...

"How about a 'Right to NOT be forgotten'... for when you notice that you've been mysteriously airbrushed from Glorious History of Soviet Nation?"

Photos were airbrushed only very very rarely, and my impression is that everyone who was airbrushed was dead when it happened, with the sole exception of Goldstein, uh, sorry, Trotsky*. Possibly the most famous example of airbrushing is the photo of Nikolai Yezhov with Stalin on the bank of the Moscow-Volga Canal. ( See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship_of_images_in_the_Soviet_Union ).

(I am discussing airbrushing specifically; cropping photos to remove unwanted people is not the same.)

* See Goldstein's picture here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:1984EmmanuelGoldstein.jpg where you can also find a link to his bio.

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UK's richest man backs music minnow merger to annoy Ticketzilla

Turtle
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Disruption.

"LiveNation's ownership of TicketMaster gives it a powerful control over pricing."

Now here's where I'd really like to see some "disruption". Provided by the anti-trust regulators.

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Kaspersky says air-gap industrial systems: why not baby monitors, too?

Turtle
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Not Quite An Air-Gap...

Here's what I used to do when I ran multiple networked computers: while all but one of the machines used TCP/IP, the most important machine - which I needed to have on the network but which I also wanted to isolate / insulate from the internet - was reachable only via NetBEUI which was also installed on all the other computers - and which is, as far as I know, non-routable. (To the limits of my knowledge about network protocols, non-routable NetBEUI was not accessible via the internet, so I considered this a very effective means of protecting that computer.)

I don't know what NetBEUI's disadvantages would be for other situations in comparison to TCP/IP but for me, there were no disadvantages at all.

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Turtle
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@The Vociferous Time Waster

"if you don't make it secure for the idiots you shouldn't be selling it to the idiots"

But they're such a vast and lucrative market...

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Star Trek's Lt Uhura hospitalised in LA after stroke

Turtle
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Ever.

Nichelle Nicols: possibly the sexiest woman to ever appear on television

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Ransomware-as-a-service business up for grabs to highest bidder

Turtle
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Power!

"While Tox says he or she is bailing because they do not consider themselves criminals,"

Some people have powers of self-deception which can only be described as "remarkable".

(I will leave it for someone else to comment on the syntax and structure of the cited sentence, which to me can only be described as "painful to read".)

.

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Bethesda all out for 'Fallout 4', fallout for global productivity foretold in countdown

Turtle
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@sisk

"That was about the time this wonderful thing called 'Real Life' decided to slap me upside the head"

I'd've slapped "Real Life" right back!

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Turtle
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Re: Fallout 4 In China

"If we're looking at non-American settings I would think China would be the most likely other nation. After all China and the US were the opposing sides in the nuclear exchange that flattened the world, so it stands to reason that they'd be the two most torn up."

There is the circumstance that Fallout 2 had a significant "Chinese presence" in that the later parts of the game, set on the west coast, featured a large population of Chinese "immigrants" (which I put in scare quotes because, in the context of the game, I am not really sure that that's the right word. Perhaps "colonists" might be better. I don't recall this plot point sufficiently well to decide.)

But I am not sure if the above circumstance makes it more - or less - likely that Fallout 4 might be set in China. (Although having the Chinese, in China, speak English, would seem to me to make for a kind of uncomfortable setting - even though today, there are 400 million people in China who are studying English.*)

* Obviously I don't know but I have read that that's the case.

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Chlorine gas horror leak at Apple data center puts five in hospital

Turtle
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Posting.

That woman on the right, next to the fire truck, in the black pants and white blouse - you see her, right? She's posting photos on her Facebook page.

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Trial halted as Kartoon defence attorney arrested after warrant discovery

Turtle
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The very idea...

"Kartoon defence attorney"? Kind of a caricature of a real defence attorney. then? The very idea is comical!

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'You wanted Silk Road to be your legacy. And it is. Now enjoy your life behind bars'

Turtle
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Tools.

"Just down the road at Harvard, a student at Mark Zuckerberg's alma mater has developed a tool to underscore just how creepy Facebook's tracking technology can be."

Harvard seems to churn out a lot of tools.

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World loses John Nash, the 'Beautiful Mind'

Turtle
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From "Not Even Wrong".

Two quotes from http://www.math.columbia.edu/~woit/wordpress/?p=7765

"Back in May 1979, just after our general examination, Mark Schneider and I decided we would write down some of the writings that Nash left on the blackboards around Jadwin. [...] I have made a PDF out of the musings." (Find link to pdf in the cited blog post.)

From a comment from the above cited blog post:

"Waiting for more information on Nash’s reformulation of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Anyone know more about this as seen in the Daily Mail (UK): ‘…Nash Jr. [...] told a friend he had discovered a replacement equation for Einstein’s theory of relativity. Award-winning mathematician Cédric Villani said Nash had explained the work on Einstein’s theory to him three days before his death …"

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Turtle
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@Jim Birch Re: At least...

"He's in equilibrium now."

Actually no, he's not. He's decomposing.

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Silk Road boss Ross Ulbricht to spend LIFE in PRISON without parole

Turtle
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Re: Keep in mind that "life" actually means ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parole#Modern_history

In the United States, courts may specify in a sentence how much time must be served before a prisoner is eligible for parole. This is often done by specifying an indeterminate sentence of, say, "15 to 25 years", or "15 years to life". The latter type is known as an indeterminate life sentence; in contrast, a sentence of "life without the possibility of parole" is known as a determinate life sentence.[7]

On the federal level, Congress abolished parole in the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 (Pub. L. No. 98-473 § 218(a)(5), 98 Stat. 1837, 2027 [repealing 18 U.S.C.A. § 4201 et seq.]). Federal prisoners may, however, earn a maximum of 54 days good time credit per year against their sentence (18 U.S.C.A. § 3624(b)).

You are probably thinking about "compassionate release" but I am not sure how it works, and it is *very* far from being given to whomever requests it - even if the person for whom it is being request is undeniably moribund.

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Turtle
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@Tim Worstal

Apparently, you've never had to live in a neighborhood where the externalities of drug-use really manifest them.

Here's the problem with libertarianism: it eventually begins to look like nothing more than economically-justified amorality.

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Android M's Now on Tap cyber-secretary is like Clippy on Class A drugs

Turtle
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Ambiguiity.

"Android M's Now on Tap cyber-secretary is like Clippy on hard drugs"

Do you consider that positive, or negative?

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Insurer tells hospitals: You let hackers in, we're not bailing you out

Turtle
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Out Of Pocket.

"When hackers swiped 32,500 patient records from Cottage Healthcare System, it was sued by its own customers for $4.1m – a bill that was settled by its insurance company. Now the insurance firm, Columbia Casualty Company, has claimed Cottage's computers were hopelessly insecure, and it wants its money back."

This is one of very very few things that can lead to better data and computer security: make the responsible parties pay the damages, settlements, lawsuits and fines, out of their own pockets.

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Google I/O FORTRESS: Sold-out dev conference is in LOCKDOWN

Turtle
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Roll Up! Roll up!...

"Somewhat annoyingly, however, the badges also come with a QR code printed on them. Anyone who scans the code will be able to read not only the name associated with the badge, but also the email address. Not sure I remember signing up for that feature."

"Somewhat annoyingly..."? Well yeah, okay, I guess some people might find that "somewhat annoying". Other people might "go ballistic". Or at least deface the fucking code.

And I would have expected that anyone going to a Google event would know that you can sign up for anything you want - and that Google will sign you up - along with the rest of the whole world - for anything they damn well please.

Don't like it? Go complain to any of your bought, sold, paid for, and delivered political representatives and be sure to let us know how that goes - we could all use a good laugh.

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Do svidaniya Roscosmos. By the way, any idea where that 92 BEEELLION rubles went?

Turtle
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Re: The wonder of it all

"To date the yanks have lost 24 astronauts in the space programs compared to 8 Russians, the russians still have a more or less working launch vehicle the Yanks own launches are mostly carried out with Russian motors. I dare say there is as much graft in the American system as in the Russian system. It just goes to show how good NASA is that it can carry on and deliver as well as it does."

That's a very ignorant post.

To start with, 14 of those US fatalities were on the two Space Shuttle disasters. The Russians have never had an operational equivalent to the Space Shuttle and the 135 missions which they flew. This alone makes comparisons between total Soviet fatalities and US casualties specious at best.

Recall that the Challenger was lost due to middle managers ignoring the warnings of engineers advising against the launch that proved fatal. This was not the result of an engineering failure, and not the result of graft, but the result of an "administrator failure". (You might want to play the first Half-Life game for an easy-to-understand example of this.)

Here's another example of "administrator failure":

On February 1, 2003, Columbia disintegrated during re-entry, killing its crew of seven, because of damage to the carbon-carbon leading edge of the wing caused during launch. Ground control engineers had made three separate requests for high-resolution images taken by the Department of Defense that would have provided an understanding of the extent of the damage, while NASA's chief thermal protection system (TPS) engineer requested that astronauts on board Columbia be allowed to leave the vehicle to inspect the damage. NASA managers intervened to stop the Department of Defense's assistance and refused the request for the spacewalk,and thus the feasibility of scenarios for astronaut repair or rescue by Atlantis were not considered by NASA management at the time. No graft here either, it appears. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle#Shuttle_disasters

Two of those US fatalities you include in your total were incurred in the loss of the Scaled Composites / Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo VSS Enterprise. What this has to do with NASA (or graft) as mentioned in your second paragraph, is not altogether clear.

We further have US astronaut fatalities while flying jets dues to bird strikes (Theodore Freeman), crashes in bad weather (See and Bassett), a T-38 jet crash due to an aileron control mechanical failure (Williams), a death in an F-104 while practicing a series of high speed, quick descent landings (Lawrence). There have been Russian losses for similar reasons. Please note that losses from bird strikes and bad weather, or while practicing dangerous maneuvers, can NOT be attributed to graft.

Note that the Russians have had TWO fatal incidents during space flight proper (the Soyuz 1 parachute failure with 1 death, and Soyuz 11 decompression with 3 deaths) while the Americans have had NO fatal incidents in the US equivalent vehicle, Apollo. (I am not counting the Apollo fire with 3 fatalities as that was a test and neither a launch or a space flight. But if we count that, then we need to also count the death of Valentin Bondarenko, who died due the same mistake that cost Grissom, White and Chaffee their lives: having an atmosphere that was dangerously and unnecessarily oxygen-rich. Both the US and the Russians corrected this situation after their respective fatal accidents. However, as the Russians kept the Bondarenko accident a secret, NASA was not able to learn from their experience, as they at least arguably might have done.)

So: for actual space flight, for space vehicles for which the Russian and the US each had equivalents (Soyuz and Apollo) the American record is no fatal incidents, while the Russians had two fatal incidents. The two space flights proper in which the US incurred fatalities were in vehicles for which the Russians never had an operational equivalent. (The Buran, the Soviet space shuttle equivalent, only flew once and was unmanned, I believe.) So you can decide which record is better, using something more significant and meaningful than the very misleading statistic "total deaths".

(Note that it is possible that the numbers might change if we had "fatal incidents per launch for equivalent classes of vehicles" but I kinda doubt it.)

(Most of the above information taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_spaceflight-related_accidents_and_incidents, q.v. for additional information on non-fatal accidents and incidents.)

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Turtle
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Intent.

"Vladimir Putin has already announced he will personally oversee the facility's development."

Evidently he is intent on insuring that the money goes into no pockets other than his own.

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Windows and OS X are malware, claims Richard Stallman

Turtle
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Re: So my choice is...

"So my choice is to be represented by corrupt, grasping, stupid politicians and shafted by uncaring corporations run by dead-eyed psychopaths who want access to every byte I've generated, or to be harangued at by a bearded crap-spouting passive aggressive ex-hippie who demeans people every time he opens his mouth, and wants every piece of technology to follow his hair-shirt credo that hasn't changed since 1972. What great options."

There *is* such a thing as BSD, you know...

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Turtle
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@ Zack Mollusc

"so your response to someone who claims that people should not be so stupid as to be seduced by the shiny into accepting evil is 'if you want to be taken slightly seriously then that look isn't helping him' ?"

You need to get out in the real world; maybe you'll find out what "evil" really means. Hint: it's got nothing to do with proprietary software.

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