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* Posts by James 139

108 posts • joined 21 Jan 2010

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Devs angrily dismiss Absolute Computrace rootkit accusation

James 139

Insidious menace

Damned thing is a pain in the ass.

My Dell came with it, just the BIOS part, and even though I've disabled it in the BIOS, it still keeps installing its evil sneaky service and drivers.

I say evil and sneaky because it tries to disguise itself as part of Windows, using a service name similar to the RPC service.

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UK.gov's web filtering mission creep: Now it plans to block 'extremist' websites

James 139

Re: Well

Its worse than that though.

The people with common sense and technical knowledge DO speak out, regularly, just the Government doesnt listen because the hysterical screaming nutters from the "think of the children" brigade just start shouting and screaming louder even though they are in a minority.

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Google in Dutch: Privacy changes BREAK data law, says Netherlands

James 139

Re: You might not use their services

Cookie and site blocking plugins can go some way to making your life less googley, google analytics is on my NoScript never allow list for example.

But every so often, some new google site pops up, or you use gmail and forget to sign out.

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Undercover BBC man exposes Amazon worker drone's daily 11-mile trek

James 139

Lowest common denominator

"We don't think for ourselves, maybe they don't trust us to think for ourselves as human beings, I don't know."

Probably right, but they're not paid to think, they're paid to be fast and efficient rather than waste time thinking and as some employees probably can't do both at once, all have to be treated equal.

If the warehouses were smaller, it would be automated, people are still sometimes cheaper.

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Private UK torrent site closes, citing 'hostile climate'

James 139

Re: Unfortunate

"Just don't sit on it. If you are unwilling to continue providing it to the public, through whatever means you want, then it should become public property."

Which is exactly how patents should work too.

You should patent something to give you a head start on producing the item, as a means to recoup R&D costs, or licence it to someone else thats willing to make it, not sit on it so no one else can make something vaguely similar.

Its interesting though, that from the other perspective, ie when the public has something they dont use, we get told "use it or lose it".

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Bigger frames make Wi-Fi a power miser: boffins

James 139

Re: say wot ?

Depends how you look at it, technically its an Internet of Packets, but packets are made of bytes and ultimately bits.

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Kids LIE about age on Facebook, gasps Brit ad watchdog

James 139

Re: Go ahead please... block social networks by default as well.

Again, thats the problem, almost the entire majority of the country do not go looking for things like that, and as such do not require a block to not look at something theyre not looking for.

It has nothing to do with thinking anything that is illegal should be legal, claiming its all about child material is the weakest and most feeble argument thrown about by screaming hystericals.

Driving over the speed limit is illegal, taking illegal drugs is illegal, but neither of those require someone appointed by the government to spend all day with me checking i dont do either of those things.

Either way, implementing filters only makes people complacent, when really education and taking responsibility for your or your childrens activities would be far better as those determined to access illegal things will always do so whilst the rest of us suffer snooping on our non-porn, non-illegal web usage.

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James 139

Re: Go ahead please... block social networks by default as well.

Its not the right to access streaming such content that should be at issue, its the right to personal freedom, freedom to make choices for yourself and also the freedom to accept responsibility for the choices you made.

Just because something is available, doesnt mean it becomes mandatory to watch it, doesnt also mean others should make the choices for you, if they did, id start demanding they stop showing religious programs on TV.

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Hooker in Dudley man's car 'just helping to buy tomatoes'

James 139

Re: Good Pricing!

*shrug* I confess, I watch TV and sometimes the dramas/soaps have such story lines, assuming Hollyoaks qualifies as either of those two.

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James 139

Re: Good Pricing!

Thats what im wondering too, 20 quid sounds very cheap based on how its portrayed on TV.

Of course, its entirely possible she wanted more and he was 20 short.

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Admen's suggested tweaks to Do Not Track filed straight into the bin

James 139

Re: DNT is a mirage

Excellent plan, that alone should destroy Facebooks entire business model.

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Man sues Apple for allowing him to become addicted to PORN

James 139

Re: Chancer

Depends, if it was an iOS device, maybe it corrected or predicted his typing based on previous use of the F word.

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Google 'disappoints' US congressman over Glass privacy controls

James 139

Re: Go tell a policeman

Depends where youre located.

If its a public place, plod has no powers to stop you nor do they have the right to see or delete the images, unless youre taking pictures of certain things of a "national security" nature.

That said, its still good practice to at least listen to the officer before making sure youre on public land and continuing.

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NYC attorney seeks mobe-makers' help to curb muggings

James 139

Re: Block by IMEI

I think some of the reluctance to block by IMEI is that a savvy criminal will have the IMEI changed, and blocking it will be pointless, not to mention each network would have to block it, not just the one it was originally on.

Quite why IMEI numbers can be changed is a mystery in itself, and worse still, theyre not necessarily globally unique, although with more people roaming, I'd imagine the newer handsets were.

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T-Mobile UK punters break for freedom in inflation-busting bill row

James 139

Re: It appears they are trying to lie their way out of it...

I think thats the key point, consumers assume its a fixed-price contract, but the operators sell you a fixed-term contract.

A quick glance at T-Mobiles T&C for the 24month plan starts with a sentence about you "promise to stay with t-mobile for 24 months", not a mention of the price being fixed at all, but I do wonder just what they say to people in stores.

Of course, hopefully some investigation and kickings by Ofcom (yea right lol) will eventually force them to be fixed-price like consumers assume.

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Black-eyed Pies reel from BeagleBoard's $45 Linux micro blow

James 139
Facepalm

Ahh

good to see that once again people misunderstand the Raspberry Pi.

Its an "cheap educational device" for learning and experimenting with, not a home micro desktop PC.

If it doesnt offer the power and speed you desire, youre not using it right, simple as.

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Music resale service ReDigi loses copyright fight with Capitol Records

James 139

How much?

Good grief, where do they get figures like $150,000 from? for tracks that are worth probably $0.01 each, before the addition of greedy corporate price gouges etc.

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Dongle smut Twitstorm claims second scalp

James 139

And thats why positive discrimination is far far worse than negative, it gives a hugely disproportional falseness to people, that ends up being reinforced and ingrained.

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ITV catches up with TVCatchup

James 139

When it comes right down to it, its nothing to do with taking the free OTA broadcast and sending it over the internet, its just down to ITV not knowing how many people are watching their shows.

If they cant tell how many people are watching, and given that people watching via Freeview are estimated using statistical guessing, they cant tell how popular programs are.

And if they cant tell how popular a program is, they cant figure out how much to charge for advertising slots.

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France stalls plan to make Google and pals foot broadband rollout

James 139

Re: Backwards people?

The implication was that Google were forcing data to the client PCs, rather than the reality that the site the user HAS CHOSEN to visit uses adverts to keep itself running etc.

Those arent forced or unwanted, theyre necessary and/or wanted by the site operators. Its free choice, if you dont like having adverts "shoved" at you, dont go to those websites.

That said, maybe it is time to change things, make every website advert free or subscription only, pay your $2 a year to get access to a site and no more adverts, yay!

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James 139

Backwards people?

I knew there was always something funny with the Frogs, all arse backwards based on this bit

"French broadband provider Iliad already tried to get the attention of web firms by launching a feature that blocks all online ads after Google continued to refuse to pay for the traffic it sends to customers in the country."

Google sends traffic to customers? In the rest of the world customers *request* traffic from Google, we dont have it forced down our intertubes.

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RIM adds 15,000 new BlackBerry 10 apps in one weekend

James 139

Re: Blackberry Playbooks bargain of the year??

I got one from PC World, where the monkey serving me muttered something about the PlayBook running android and would I like to buy a copy of some Symantec AV for android devices....

I was polite and refused, but makes you wonder.

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Prosecutor seeks sports-bodies guidance on troll-hunting rulebook

James 139

I think the simple tests should be based on malice and "pub chat".

Hate and continued harassment are one thing, but saying "<celeb/media tart> is a fag" is something else.

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Education Secretary Gove: Tim Berners-Lee 'created the INTERNET'

James 139

Same old problem all the media and non-technical people seem have.

Internet is NOT the Web.

Hard drive is NOT memory.

Information Superhighway IS a retarded term.

The "big boxy thing with the cup holder" is NOT a CPU.

You do NOT "log on" to a website unless you input a username and/or password.

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Net publishing happens in the server AND the eyeball, says EU Bot

James 139

Re: Translation:

When posting something, it may or may not pass through any given country, depends if it ever stops in said country.

The internet is vastly worse, as it may or may not pass through any given country each time its accessed, or sometimes even whilst its being accessed due to the way that packet routing works.

As far as jurisdictions are concerned, its much more like you flying from A to B, where youre carrying something permissible in both A and B, only to find you having to make an emergency landing in C, where you promptly get arrested.

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TechRadar shuts down forums after user database hacked

James 139

Re: phishing

Was the same for me, and I had to trawl my old emails to even find out what the username might have been

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Dish Networks locks horns with broadcasters over ad skipping

James 139

Re: Nice

In the UK its true, in-programme banners wont help as much, but where you have pretty much 100% ad supported channels, you wouldnt be able to escape them.

It is further complicated by channels just being carried, rather than owned, by whoever is showing them, as the owner sells the ad space, not the carrier.

Tbh, Id almost prefer in-programme banners, at least that way what im watching doesnt get interupted every 10mins.

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James 139

Re: Nice

Whilst I'd like to think that Dish, and others in the future, would be vindicated, you should also see where such technology will ultimately lead.

Once the money from adverts is reduced, there will be a move towards in program advertising instead, much like the US has a lot of those "coming next" annoying banners, so it will only be a matter of time until you get ones that say "Buy this crap!" instead.

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ISPs should get 'up to' full fee for 'up to' broadband

James 139

Re: Solution: charge by Volume

using miles per gallon is the wrong way around. Your gallon would take you 30 miles in anywhere between 1 hour and 30mins, depending on the road speed, but youd still travel the 30 miles on the 1 gallon.

If your ISP is giving you 10mb, and someone else 5mb, you can both download the same data, just you do it twice as fast, hence paying by volume would cost you the same.

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James 139

Of course..

..the real answer is paid usage, but no one wants that.

After all, the "up to" speed is totally irrelevant unless you happen to make use of it frequently.

However, if things were to go down a percentage of maximum speed, the physical line provider is the one that should take the biggest hit, not the ISP as they dont have any control over that in most cases.

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Mobile operators mourn death of embedded 4G

James 139

Re: I thought so. So here they are again!

Although, Three do expressly forbid tethering on anything other than their data only plans and when paying for the data add-on, but I think all the other networks do the same.

Still strikes me as dumb, its my allowance, why shouldnt I use it as I want to.

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UK Home Secretary approves TVShack's O'Dwyer extradition

James 139

Re: @James 139 I doubt

I never said they HAD proof, just that they would show it if the law were the same for both sides.

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James 139

Re: I doubt

Oh, I dont disagree, just because the US system requires proof, that their constitution requires, doesnt mean they shouldnt have to provide the same proof here.

However, its not beyond the US to provide all sorts of evidence, remember that a monkey in a suit convinced Tony Blair that Iraq had all sorts of nasty weapons.

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James 139

I doubt

it would matter if the "much needed" change, so that the US had to provide proof, would matter in any of the cases mentioned.

In O'Dwyers case, they would show he profited from crime, and the extradition request would be granted.

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Judges probe minister's role in McKinnon extradition saga

James 139

I think

its in the "Operating Systems" section, and once installed is called "telnet".

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Raspberry Pi Linux micro machine enters mass production

James 139

Hmm

You do know that anti-static bags are conductive, right?

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Acorn King Moir: BBC Micros, Ataris and 'BS' marketing

James 139

Ahh Artworks, one of two programs I can think of that survived the downfall of Acorn.

The other being Sibelius.

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GiffGaff boots freetards off mobile network

James 139

Exactly

the ACCUSED, in this case the 1%, is innocent until the ACCUSER, in this case GiffGaff, proves they are guilty. It doesnt work the other way around, since the accuser isnt being accused of anything. The assumption that GiffGaff are accusing people of tethering, or in some way improperly, using their phones hasnt been demonstrated, let alone proven, and until it is, it is utterly irrelevant to the issue. However you want to view it though, the 1% are probably in violation of Term 11c, in that it might "adversely affect other users".
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James 139

Not necessarily tethering though, tethering is where youre using the mobile as an internet modem, either cabled or wi-fi, with the other device accessing data via it.

If you connect your phone to the TV via a video connection, be it HDMI, composite or USB, then its not tethering.

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Apple said to threaten legal action over Steve Jobs doll

James 139

Actually

I'd think that accepting Facebook T&C that contained things like "you give us permission to use anything you post for our own evil purposes", then they would be one step closer to owning your likeness if you posted it.

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Satnav mishap misery cure promised at confab

James 139

Part of the problem is how much the base maps cost to licence, unless theyre spending time making their own, and also adding features and additional information, but I agree, every sat nav maker should be legally required to provide free, or at least cheap (as in £10 a year), map updates.

Somewhat unrealistically I also hope they decide to make it an offence to "blindly follow a Sat Nav", seeing as "driving without due care and attention" doesnt seem suitable enough.

3
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Credit card companies plan to sell your purchase data to advertisers

James 139

Why..

do I get the horrible feeling this will involve an updated set of terms that will mean you must accept them, and have your details sold off, or have your card cancelled?

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Google loses battle for goggle.com

James 139

Surely

it depends on how the new owner obtained goggle.com.

If he bought it from the previous owners, the rights probably would transfer with it, or at least there is a reasonable expectation that they would.

If he bought a lapsed domain, then I doubt they would, as the agreement was between Google and the previous owners.

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Patent troll lawsuits may be on thin ice

James 139

Hmm

that "uses" word isnt clear on its intention.

Personally, Id be inclined to believe that the term "uses" is in the context of "includes as part of something" rather than any other sense, at least in the original spirit of the law, but being the US, its any ones guess.

It just doesnt seem logical that you infringe a patent by using a patent infringing product, but then, the law isnt always logical.

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Big pharma discredited by Twitter drug-pushing: Official

James 139

Oh most likely

"Every doctor has a story about some neurotic woman (and it's usually women) bringing in a printout about some random disease she has read about on the internet"

And you can almost guarantee when it involves a child, UK or US, its ALWAYS the mother thats doing it.

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James 139

the bit

i love the most is when the voice over reads out the list of side effects really quickly, and one of them is almost always death.

Its also a different attitude to health over there.

Here we go to the doctor, the doctor has a think and prescribes something.

In the US, you go to the doctor, tell them the problem, tell them what you want done and complain if the doctor disagrees.

1
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Apple ups Mac Mini spec, lowers price

James 139

I think

youll find they removed it as Lion is intended to be installed without using physical media devices.

Apparently, you can reinstall it from the intermawebz during the boot sequence.

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States consider saner 'sexting' penalties for teens

James 139

Whilst

that part is somewhat dumb, the really stupid part is when its not even real, ie CGI or other art.

People seem obsessed with the idea that thought leads to reality.

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Netherlands first European nation to adopt net neutrality

James 139

Quite right

Either its unlimited or its not.

ISPs and Telcos should be required to state things properly, and I dont really mind which way its done, either advertised as "unthrottled capped" or "throttled capped" or actually provided as unlimited.

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Assange: Facebook a ‘spying machine’

James 139

Sadly

Some people probably would.

The difference is, most people know what jumping off a cliff is, at the very least, dangerous.

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