* Posts by (AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

144 posts • joined 13 Jan 2010

Page:

Should Google play carriers at their own game? There's never been a better time

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Thumb Up

Good points, all

Indeed, "owning" a ubiquitous comm device OS gives Google a very distinct advantage. Exciting (and competitively priced) services with immediate network effect can quickly roll out to a growing market. Mobile voice and internet is a killer app in its own right.

The potential market for SDN, IoT apps, cloud based calling, roaming exchanges and other cool ideas is huge. Gartner reckons another 1.2 billion android devices will ship in 2015 alone. I can see companies and users quickly ditching legacy phone contracts as more ubiquitous wireless-first telephony becomes a reality. The other mobe sellers would quickly follow the trend.

I am also a big fan of Google Talk / Hangouts and wish more people would use it. Video and voice call quality is better than Skype, there are no ads and dialing rates to regular phones remain very competitive or free.

And there are good reasons this is so. One is that Google went on a network infrastructure bargain/buying spree during the Great Recession, back when many were too afraid to invest. Once they start buying up the cell towers, it could be game over for Ma Bell's many offspring.

But I doubt anyone will miss being gouged by the Telcos, particularly in places like Europe. If the price of low-cost / free mobile telephony is more tracking/privacy issues (probably the main concern), I am willing to trade up as long as my calls and surfing get through anytime, anywhere for less or no money. If I feel overly spooked and all tinfoil-hatty there will still be options like the Black Phone, carrier pigeons and VPNs to choose from. Honestly, sounds like a win win to me.

1
0

Flash zero day under attack

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Help! My machine's infected with Eboda...

Interesting, for the last couple of days, my wife has had intermittent trouble playing random flash videos on FB (she clicks on a lot of videos). This is a new laptop running Windows 8.1 and Chrome, thank goodness. I smell badness.

Brrrrrr shiver.... now if only Flash could run out of battery power...... forever!

0
0

Want a cheap Office-er-riffic tablet? Microsoft Windows takes on Android

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Windows

Well, why not?

Waiting to see what the Clover traders think of my 3 landfill offerings: 1 cheap android phone and 2 cheap 7 " tablets. If they offer enough money and cover more than the postage, I might just buy one of these Windows 8 Linx doo-hickeys. Even the name has a subliminal open source "look and feel" about it and I'm pretty sure Torvalds can't sue for that.

Or perhaps I'll just wait until these puppies show up on Ebay with their lower priced brethren.

It is a clever marketing ploy by MS. Competing on price against Android might just work. The Walmart price demographic and small business user will certainly look at these and perhaps buy them. Once hooked, people with bigger budgets might eventually trade up to a Surface and more cloud storage. Commodity computing that runs Office for a 100 bucks does sound appealing.

Does anyone know whether this Office Personal subscription can be later extended to a "buy forever" license, i.e., not just a rental version? Don't want to cough up 299 bucks later just to keep using my 99 dollar tablet, you know?

0
0

Sony hack was good news for INSURERS and INVESTORS

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Thumb Up

Spare the rod, spoil the child

Nice article.

Sadly, even after many, many serious data security breaches, proper IT security still remains an elusive and fuzzy blip on corporate radar screens. Complex, ever-changing security problems with no "one-size fits all" proposals aren't easily grokked by execs and many world leaders (yes, I'm looking at you Dave). Ignorance, laziness, greed and dishonesty confirms the inevitable result.

Today, if a major US corporation sprayed loose asbestos on its workers, chained shut the fire doors in a burning factory, or sold flammable childrens clothes, they would be sued or prosecuted under consumer safety legislation (or both).

Until we can clearly establish similar liability standards for data-holding corporations, particularly those holding financial data, this will always be an uphill battle, Punishing negligent behavior by exacting massive financial damages is much more painful than hanging out the dirty laundry of a few pushy entertainment execs. Until that happens, the Sonys, JP Morgans, Targets ad infinitum will continue to play the clueless card and hand out identity theft insurance. There is no real motivation to clean up their collective security acts. Corporate entities do not possess a conscience or a desire to do the "right thing".

Money and legal action are a few of the things that corporate executives, shareholders, lawyers and insurance companies grok very well indeed. Public embarassement doesn't really compute because the spin doctors will fix it anyway.

What the world needs now is an IT Security consumer crusader. Someone like Ralph Nader in the 1960's. Gory pictures of heads being cut off by plate glass car windscreens, political pressure, legal action and robust safety legislation eventually forced Detroit to build safer cars. Data security would of course need new memes and horror stories, but you get the idea.

Otherwise, we will be left asking: what will make companies build and use safer information systems? Should we be forced to keep using systems where we frequently risk our reputations, personal security, credit ratings, and sanity every time we grab a keyboard?

A big brass rod with legal razor blades on it might just help adjust the playing field.

1
0

‘Whatever happened to Vladimir Putin?’ and other crap New Year prophesies

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

And now for something completely different

Here's a video with Y2K salesmen recycled as HP cloud marketeers.

http://gizmodo.com/5926616/hp-explains-how-its-doing-that-cloud-thing

Tres drole.

0
0
(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Go

Re: The most useful of these will be a cloud-connected zipper fly for men’s trousers.

I would be more concerned about the wi-fi's effect on my goolies pro-creation potential. Will it come with a health warning and radiation shield?

0
0

Hawking and friends: Artificial Intelligence 'must do what we want it to do'

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Facepalm

Re: "Our AI systems must do what we want them to do"

The AI scenarios that frighten me the most look like this:

Dave: HAL! If you don't reduce the surge flow now, the dam will burst and thousands will drown !

HAL: I'm sorry Dave, I can't do that.

Dave: For God's sake HAL, WHY NOT?

HAL: Budget committee Agile 777A did not approve the funds needed for the emergency flow reversal algorithm. Good bye....

5
0

'Apple of China' Xiaomi: Yep, we HAVE just bagged $1.1 BEELLION

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Gimp

Good phones, je suis un fanboi

I am the happy owner of a REDMI 3s bought on line for 138 USD about 5 months ago.

After testing multiple smart phones in the same price range and lower, I can only say the competition should watch out. This entry level, first generation phone displays none of the bad features typically found in other low-end, low-priced Android devices such as crap battery life, jerky displays, awful response times etc. You would be foolish to buy anything else in this price range. Performance is excellent and most of the native apps work fine. Battery life is good. The phone's Qualcomm snapdragon chip is the dog's gonads in terms of power efficiency and response. I can only imagine how good the higher end models are. The REDMI fills a niche and then some.

But there are small warts that definitely need to be fixed before taking over the rest of the world:

1) Western alphabet users will need a quick and painless way to remove Chinese language artifacts such as keyboards, download tools, etc. I know this is a Chinese phone, but non-chinese users will not enjoy finding and selecting google apps by visual icon identification. Many others will find life complicated when they accidentally switch to a Pidgin keyboard. This is not a cultural superiority thing, it is a GUI and international marketing issue. I just hope they address it soon.

2) Tighten up the MUIU rom upgrade process even further. When Xiaomi users can upgrade their firmware as easily as an Apple User, the debate between iOs vs Android will soon become moot for price-conscious users.

3) Segregate the apps store by languages (alphabet again).

4) Stop sending me links to Chinese films, I would love to turn this feature off but my Mandarin is really deficient (see above). Not too keen on trying the cloud service either, for obvious reasons.

But for those who have never tried a Xiaomi, I would highly suggest a test run, if you ever see one in the flesh. OnePlusOne is another brand worth looking at as well. Both of these manufacturers have brought quality components into the average users budget range.

0
0

El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Fucking shit

Not too impressed from my tiny laptop screen. Miss being able to quickly scan the articles with just a discreet headliner on top. Plus I really hate flash warnings. So I am not sure this will catch on but appreciate the effort. Keep trying.

8
0

AliExpress patches account mass harvesting flaw

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Neither here nor there....

Tried to use the sister site Alibaba to order some computers. I was soon getting mails from people purporting to be the original supplier offering increasingly lower prices.

I was a bit suspicous and checked with the factory Global sales manager, who told me the mails were bullshit, because they don't do electronics, just clothing and textiles. Nice

Beware.

0
0

Trevor contemplates Consumer Netgear gear. BUT does it pass the cat hair test?

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Thanks for the memories

Yeah good old Netgear. I'm still running a jungle of old Netgear router/switches in my lab. Most of them came from offices with +100 users. They just refuse to die. On the other hand my WRTG54s didn't last nearly as long as yours which is when I first switched to Netgear, so I guess YMMV.

I find the majority of my SOHO customers aren't ready to splash out for a 10Gbe layer 3 switch, yet. Any suggestions for a good lower end smart switch (8 x 1 Gbe) with VLAN features staying well within the sub 500 USD range? A comparative article about low end, budget SOHO LANs would be awesome. I know I would click on it.

Cheers

5
0

Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Terminator

Re: Welcome to the future of news

Hmmm...

A quick google on "sugarstring" indicates that the Streisand effect is alive and well.

0
0

Warning to those who covet the data of Internet of Precious Things

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Gimp

Re: How can IoT stuff help me?

Good points, most IoT applications seek to make global sense out of a lot of data, such as weather measurements, traffic flow, power usage and so on. Properly anonymized, managed and shared, this data can be used for much goodness.

As long as we don't use it to create a Minority Report lifestyle.

It is certainly OK if the fridge informs me my yogurt is running low, and (why not?) automatically and discreetly order more yogurt for immediate drone delivery, if I opted for that. What's not to like? Ideally, it would not link my PII for any use other than stats, billing and stock managment. These are solutions that can be built in from the beginning, if we think it through.

On the other hand if the fridge told all itinerant yogurt salesman in the area that I needed yogurt and sent then my home address, phone number and email, that fridge would soon be heading for a recycling center or a new owner.

I'd like to believe we are smart enough to prevent this from happening.

2
0

Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Windows

Re: Allegedly

Allegedly, the name would have been a bit awkward (and joke worthy) for German customers as in:

Achtung!

Windows?

Nein!

0
1

Keep a beady eye on your business's cloud service shopping

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Gimp

There is a worry or two

Firstly, even if the employee paid for the work related expense (and hopefully tried to claim it back later, to provide a trace) he has effectively introduced a new IT service or application into the company's infrastructure, which may or may not be a good idea.

Potentially happy scenario and outcomes:

1) Marketing department builds its own web server on Azure or MAAS (after begging for months). Successfully deploys new product offering, which then goes viral, raises revenues and everyone goes home in a Limo. Luddite CIO and board finally relent and define a new policy whereby individual departments will be allowed to use and manage IaaS or PaaS offerings, or even better, the existing IT department gets with the program and starts to successfully manage and deploy solutions for this type of service requirement.

Potentially unhappy scenario and outcomes:

1) A marketing (or other department) does the same as above. Employees then store valuable IP or embarrassing internal correspondance and docs on a poorly secured cloud server. Server gets hacked, company has massive egg on face and hopefully the right idiots are shown the door. CIO and board say "told you so!" and impose massive lockdown and witchhunt for anymore shadow IT. No one ever pronounces the C word again under penalty of death. Needless to say, the company somehow never discovers a way to put cloud services to good use.

Shadow IT and cloud (although I hate that word) technology can be successfully or poorly managed, just like any other tech. The secret is to find out where an XaaS technology or strategy can really add value, design a good solution, deploy it correctly and then manage it.

What makes this so hard to understand?

0
0

EU operators PLEAD for MERCY, may get roaming rates cut ‘reprieve’

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Go

Re: Oh crap, here we go.

There will never be a proper use of mobile communications in Europe until travelers can finally stop checking their watches while phoning. The EU is making steps in the right direction, but until roaming charges are scrapped and flat rates are the norm, mobile customers will continue to be gouged at every opportunity.

In many ways, European mobile service resembles 19th century America with its special tolls, traps and fees waiting at every state and territorial crossing. Surely we can learn from history? It is the 21st century after all.

0
0

Turn OFF your phone or WE'LL ALL DI... live? Europe OKs mobes, tabs non-stop on flights

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Pint

Re: Great...just what the world needs...

hmmm,

Most interesting, I think the "no-voice" option could be very popular (and civilized), particularly if +35000 ft roaming data charges remain reasonable. Easy in-flight texting and emailing would be nice, even though it will eliminate the "always-on" break time that air travel once provided.

I can still remember when phones were introduced on trans-atlantic flights. The 5 dollar a minute toll rates prevented most people from getting too gabby, though. I suspect reliable airline wifi services will work out the same way. Not too sure that your land-based provider will really be able to follow you across the friendly skies.

So here's to ordering some low-cost data minutes during the EasyJet / Ryanair booking process.

Higher end airlines might even build it into the ticket price.

1
0

Hackers thrash Bash Shellshock bug: World races to cover hole

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Linux

Re: How to check?

Wasn't that the BOFH's original handle?

0
0

Big Data's being held back by little talent, says Huawei head techie

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Happy

Re: What do you expect

And then you need to hire the expert for those few hours a month when the rest of the team needs help. Sadly, PHBs don't seem to get these concepts (my goodness, we can find data entry operators and VB developers, why can't we also find big data scientists at the job centre?). Sheesh

I doubt PHBs will ever get this. Perhaps only when clever start ups have eaten all of their big data lunch along with all the other lucrative, emerging tech markets.

0
0

Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Gimp

Re: Hmmm

Yes it is,

But at least Google isn't actively publishing links to people's hacked phone messages. That would be a bit evil.

Now if the Scots could get Rup to vote No for Independence, I suspect the Yeses will just pile in,

8
2

Qualcomm pumps LTE into quad-core CPU for sub-$100 mobes

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Linux

Re: Step in the right direction - BUT

The Chinese already offer competive products at good prices, check out the Xiaomi

here

http://www.versusos.com/xiaomi-mi4-vs-apple-iphone-6-comparison/

here

http://www.mi.com/en/

I have just bought a Redmi 1S and love it.

Old Chinese saying

"The dragon snaps hard on the heels of its competitors.... grasshopper" .....or something like that

El Reg needs an android icon

1
0

Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
WTF?

Re: Lipstick on a pig

Industries with high, artificial barriers to entry (like 1 M $ medallions) will eventually see their lunch eaten by Web 3.0. It is really just a matter of time.

FFS, hotels are still regulated by 19th and 20th century regulations, developed when bedbugs, rats, cockroaches and dirty water were the normal Traveler's Inn experience. Taxi regulations also sprung from horse and buggy days. They still refer to taxi cabs as "hackney carriages".

Once these regulations had improved services and established a collective service expectation norm, they should have been binned. Instead, they were used to create private and public fiefdoms that fleeced the public from both ends. Established, political entrepreneurs and players could always cash in. Newer, less-connected business entrepreneurs need not apply. In other words, do not pass go, do not collect 200 $. Consumers could go f*k themselves.

But today, such services can be regulated by their own users with reputation scoring and social media / sharing platforms. Suppliers then either listen to the crowd or disappear. Self-enforcement HAS GOT TO BE more effective than any nanny or sugar daddy (non) enforcement. You can't bribe the entire internet.

Eventually we won't need no stinking red tape or gold medaillons, just a smartphone.

This is as it should be. Tech should be creating new jobs, not protecting the old ones it will eventually destroy. That certainly didn't happen with manufacturing. I can't see it happening with services either.

The "sharing economy" is just another example of technology progressively driving out inefficiences from the service supply chain. When customers and suppliers can instantly exchange information (without gatekeepers) no one maintains a monopoly for very long.

So, good news for consumers with less disposable income (i.e, most of us). But very bad news for those coddled, regulated service industries that bar competition and restrict supply. There will be apps for you, just wait.

Economies can not simultaneously maintain artificially high pricing, drive down people's wages, slash jobs by the thousands and increase regulatory burdens without some backlash. This is because people will eventually figure it out and shop for alternatives which other people will provide.

So hello to Uber, Easyjet, Ryanair, AirBnB and all the other companies that spot these opportunities and seize them with both hands.

And IMHO, it is about bloody time.

The game is indeed over, time for a new one to begin.

2
1

Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: STILL no standard ?

I am quite fond of two-factor authentication (like that proposed by Google) which sends a 6 digit code to your phone when you try to log in from a different machine. Although that will suck when you don't have your phone handy.

1
0

The internet just BROKE under its own weight – we explain how

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Thumb Up

Re: A short IPv6 story

I did the same thing after our training VLAN was hacked via an IPV6 flaw in our router. I currently don't allow any IPv6 traffic or support into our LAN, likewise at home. IPv6 is disabled on all system NICs by group policy. Existing and future IPv6 security issues are no longer my issues.

In sum, Trevor's arguments make sense. If we don't need IPv6 internally and depend on NAT to protect us from Internet badness, what the hell is the rush?

Ideological purity, like a vacuum, is rarely encountered in nature.

1
1

Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Doom for US tech companies

@Dan 55 Loud and raucous laughter on the other side of the pond, would be my first guess.

But Irish jokes aside, it would be a valid thought experiment indeed, and it would be great to see an MS lawyer trot it out into court. I suspect he'd be cited for contempt.

The only good news about this is that the scary dark underbelly of US over-reach gets dragged out into the light for everyone to see. What happens now is anybody's guess.

Based on past performance, I am not very optimistic.

1
0

UK.gov's data grab and stab law IMMINENT as Drip drips through House of Lords

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Screw that, build your own

http://www.guillotine.dk/Pages/drawing1792.html

0
0

Google spares founders from TERMINATORS, but not Eric Schmidt

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Um... John Conner?

Perhaps they just haven't found him yet-

0
0

EFF sues NSA over snoops 'hoarding' zero-day security bugs

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Im all for bashing the NSA

The main issues with "hoarding" zero-day security flaws are these:

1) They will be kept secret and won't get fixed by the vendors.

2) You and I will never know whether our systems are vulnerable to these security flaws, until it is too late.

3) There is no guarantee these flaws won't be exploited by others, particularly if they are being sold on the black market.

All in all, an extremely irresponsible position to be taken by any government agency. They may have the power to penetrate a few bad guys, but the whole world is at risk of being pnwed.

5
0

The cute things they say

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Holmes

Yes it happens, when the BOFH is not on the payroll

Accounting dept: We need more storage space for our end of year reports

IT Dept: of course, we'll get right on it. clickety click...

Okay, you can start using this new drive share as of tomorrow morning.

Next day:

Accounting dept: We are still out of space.

Support Bod (me) dispatched to scene. I look at the complaining user's windows box and see the dreaded out of space bubble both for local and network drives.

Analysis reveals the accounts droid was cutting and pasting the department's extensive video collection (he was office video librarian and had more selections than Netflix, really) back and forth across the company network share and onto his colleagues C: drives for local viewing, pretty much whenever a hot new film was released.

Although traffic filtering rules prevented streaming video, they could not prevent resourceful users from home downloading, followed by an update of the office film repository with Hollywood's latest. Space quotas had long ago been vetoed by upper management.

Boy, did I enjoy explaining that one to the CFO.

2
0

We're ALL Winston Smith now - and our common enemy is the Big Brother State

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Boffin

@chris lively

There are other ways to make information gathering less intrusive>

1) Make all collected personal data more anonymous and collect only what is needed.

By all means, let AT&T gather and collect cell phone usage data to improve service, just ensure it can not be easily collated later and linked back to an individual.

This is slightly tricky but workable if the phone companies begin to police themselves. Google et al are already becoming proactive with encryption policies. It is high time that other businesses storing our personal data begin doing the same.

Personal data could be maintained separately for law enforcement purposes and billing. But this should only be for a reasonable amount of time (see below) and accessible only with a search warrant (remember those?).

We can also ensure that collected Personally Identifiable Data is assigned a fixed shelf life. Data owners (you and me) can then opt for either a) data persistence or b) data correction or deletion.

In fact, with a bit of effort, privacy, like security, can quickly become part and parcel of a good service/product design. Of course, it will require that policy makers and service providers speak and interact with some privacy experts.

1
0

Crypto-boffins propose safer buddy list protocol

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Happy

Re: Interesting development

Most of the unpleasant knock-on effects of ubiquitous technology can be solved by better technology.

SMTP was a crap protocol for securing email, but the correctly applied use of private/public key technology solves many of the security issues associated with its use.

I for one, look forward to an internet where strong encryption of all communications data is routine and expected. We might then return to the same levels of privacy afforded by paper mail when it was sent inside sealed envelopes-

0
0

I am NOT a PC repair man. I will NOT get your iPad working

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Obligatory Oatmeal comic reference

If you haven't seen it before you will love it

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/computers

0
0

Cloud computing aka 'The future is trying to KILL YOU'

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Mushroom

Of course the cloud will eat your lunch, time for a new diet

If you work from the premise that industrial evolution inevitably tends towards a more efficient system of production (a bit Darwinian, yes), many of the author's statements make complete sense.

Firstly, any startup business which needs IT or data center services will naturally gravitate towards cloud based offerings. Why? If investors must choose between building a million dollar computer site and a no capex, pay as you go model, which one do you think will win?

Secondly, if you are building and operating cloud centers and must choose between expensive proprietary OEM hardware OR cheap bulk-buy commodity hardware, what do you think will happen? Razor thin margins cut both ways and will continue to do so in future.

Thirdly, if you are a business with conventional data centers and about to renovate...... (unless you and your share-holders stuck your heads in buckets for the last few years).... you will have noticed the above trends and act accordingly.

All this spells a very disruptive future-present for companies that depend on proprietary hardware sales and outdated service models.

There are some clear winners already:

Google (sheer volume),

Amazon (sheer staying power),

and probably Microsoft (sheer presence in the enterprise and sheer marketing skill).

The losers will be the companies that refuse to adapt to the new reality.

The winners will be the ones who make the new reality work to their advantage.

And so it goes....

I see a future where the giants simply consolidate further and beat everyone else on price. New arrivals are going to have trouble competing with players lhat increasingly resemble the power utilities or telco monopolies of old.

Incumbents selling whips and buggies will need to up their game or find a new line of business. Has anyone seen a new PC or server manufacturer startup lately?

Of course, business owners and individuals will continue to shop around for cheaper electricity, gas, phone service etc. And the same will happen with computing resources.

But replacing the cloud utility with your own solution (unless it is a backup generator in an area with spotty power supply) will soon become foolhardy, because it just doesn't scale.

2
6

Puff on a hybrid – next thing you know, you're hooked on a public cloud

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

A fairly obvious bet.... BUT

Although movement towards public clouds may seem inevitable, companies that work with a hybrid, community or private cloud scenario are certainly not excluded from doing public cloud later.

If anything, a company's previous experience with private cloud solutions will make them very careful shoppers. Public cloud providers may need to work harder to win their business. And companies who choose private cloud technology can also work out their initial growing pains on their own terms and on their own-premises.

CAPEX and OPEX price tags are not the sole considerations for companies already running their own data centers., security, confidentiality, control and many other factors will also play a role in the business decision.

Whereas, for a startup, the decision to use cloud services is usually a no brainer.

0
0

Cheat Win XP DEATH: Little-known tool to save you from the XPocalypse

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

@Andrew Fernie

I also like DIsk2VHD. TBH, the only time I ever had problems with it was when the network connection between the source and target became shaky, was less than optimal or had too many hops.

Problems like this can be quickly solved by putting both systems on the same switch or linking with a cross cable.

0
0

Microsoft issues less-than-helpful tips to XP holdouts

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: It depends on the distro...

Or even a terminal window on a thin client, by golly

0
0

'Amazon has destroyed the unicorn factory' ... How clouds are making sysadmins extinct

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: as one of those unicorns

Re: as one of those unicorns

Yup,

IMHO, there are two or maybe three ways to correctly use cloud services:

1) as a palliative, quick fix for certain start-up data processing problems (not having enough to build and run your own data center is an obvious one). Of course, if your business goes viral, AWS and its brethren quickly become the more costly option, so remember to stay in touch with your disgruntled, unemployed but talented techie friends and associates.

2) A properly analyzed, properly specced solution to existing data processing problems (like not having enough resources to manage demand spikes, resiliency needs or other scale-out, scale-up scenarios).

3) A solution for rationally compressing and optimizing traditional data centers, after doing all the homework and analysis.

All these scenarios presume that the management and IT bods (if any are involved) can do the math that will honestly and accurately assess, measure and monitor real work-flow capex and opex requirements.

By extension, that also presumes their ability to distinguish between snake oil and offerings which can provide measurable ROI. Use of a cloud service, provider or technology does not automatically eliminate the need for sysadmins, support or other technical people in the enterprise. But these roles will certainly evolve, some may disappear, some new ones may be created. In the old days, it was called skilling up. Nowadays, pink slips seem to be the preferred solution and are the uglier side of technological disruption.

But those who believe cloud services can cure any disease and solve any problem deserve what they get. There are many vultures waiting in the clouds ready to pick apart their plump, juicy carcasses.

Again and again, the technology is never the real issue, it is the PEOPLE who buy, deploy and make the wrong technological decisions that cause the heartbreak.

Cloud technologies are just tools in a box, not the Second Coming. Realizing this is the first step towards more success stories.

5
0
(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Gimp

Re: Misleading

Et voila.....

0
0

Blighty teen boffin builds nuclear reactor INSIDE CLASSROOM

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Good lad!

Yes but every good conspirationist knows this part of the US is well known for its UFO crashes, top secret experimental government sites, missing gangsters and multiple sightings of Elvis Presley.

A Nevada teenager building a nuclear reactor probably wouldn't even make the evening news.

1
0
(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Happy

Re: @Spartacus

One vote up for a great comment! I just wish I could upvote the headmaster as well.

0
0

MtGox accepted new customers JUST DAYS before collapse

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Gimp

Except ----

" I don't really get the point of Bitcoin. Any legal transaction can be done just as easily and cheaply with PayPal or the right (no foreign currency loading) credit card. "

Bitcoin transactions incur little to no costs for parties involved in the bitcoin transaction.

Paypal doesn't charge when you pay someone else, but they do charge the recipient/seller. The same rule applies to credit cards (for which we normally pay a yearly fee). Merchants can pay as much as 4 % for a credit card transaction.

In a bitcoin transaction, you simply transfer money from your electronic wallet to theirs. This incurs no bank fees, no wire transfer charges, no currency conversion commissions, etc. With the current volatility of bitcoin exchange, it does incur some risk for private transactions, but merchants now have tools that allow them to convert bitcoin at the prevailing exchange rate to minimize that risk.

You can also quickly verify whether or not the bitcoin transaction went through (and when). The recipient can do the same. You just look at the block chain to see if it worked or is on its way.

Try to do that with an international bank transfer or by calling Visa when an online transaction has disappeared, gone awry or been trapped in the system.

The decentralized nature of the crypto-currency environment is both a weakness (because no one entity seems to control it, which causes concern, and leads to abuses) and a strength (because anyone who wants to can play at little cost).

The fact that the government has little to no involvement with bitcoin transactions is a mainstream-press sideshow that distracts the public from the true power of a bitcoin eco-system.

Fortunately for bitcoin and its users, nothing is more dangerous than a good idea.

The Silk Road bust has shown that the government can and will go after bad guys who use crypto currency for their nefarious deeds. Bitcoin is probably easier to trace then real cash.

Hence the reason cyber-crims are starting to make their own crypto coins and deserting bitcoin.

http://www.informationweek.com/security/vulnerabilities-and-threats/bye-bitcoin-criminals-seek-other-crypto-currency/d/d-id/1113864

Bitcoin enables small (and large) businesses to save a lot by using it for online transactions. Essentially the middle man is gone. I would argue that the crypto-currency model is exactly what online payments and transfers would be using (think PayPal 2.0) , if they had been designed correctly from the beginning, instead of being bolted onto existing payment physical systems.

Any bitcoin regulation will most likely come from the bitcoin community.

In this respect, bitcoin works a lot like any open source software project.

So when will El Reg get a bitcoin icon? Or better yet, a bitcoin donation button?

0
0

Fed chairwoman casts doubt on Bitcoin regulation in the US

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

At least one Fed Reserve person has read about bitcoin

Interestingly, Manchin's campaign was financed by JP Morgan (amongst others) so there is just the "slightest" possibility he has a banking industry axe to grind.

The Manchin letter also makes great reading (particularly when you substitute "US Dollar" for "bitcoin").

http://newsbtc.com/2014/02/26/us-senator-demands-federal-regulators-ban-bitcoin/

I'm impressed that the BTC foundation made such a level-headed response to the senator's transparent attempt to grab headlines before the mid-term elections.

The Bitcoin Foundation's response:

https://bitcoinfoundation.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/2014-02-27-Letter-to-Senator-Manchin.pdf

I believe bitcoin is here to stay and will most likely flourish. There are security warts of course, but the advantages are rapidly starting to outweigh the disadvantages. Once the Mt. Gox mess is resolved and some decent security best practices have been defined, I predict a very bright future for bitcoin. New types of online business, new payment systems, lots of potential work for unemployed financial services staff and analysts etc.

Could be just what we need.

0
0

Patch Tuesday brings Microsoft fixes and Adobe Shockwave update

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Gimp

Well....

Who can remember how difficult and time-consuming it was to patch MS platforms BEFORE the introduction of tools like WSUS and scheduled monthly patch releases?

Trust me... it was a lot worse... Now it is almost routine

5
0

Snowden: Canadian spooks used free airport WiFi to track travellers

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Nice article, thanks for the linkz

0
0

Judge orders Yelp.com to unmask anonymous critics who tore into biz

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Very local services: talk to neighbours?

There is a pretty succint definition of defamation (which can be either spoken "slander" or written "libel") here

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/defamation

If defamation with intent occurred, then the people who defamed the plaintiff can expect some civil or crinimal punishment, particularly if the anonymous defendants are unable to prove their claims and the judge or jury then rules that claims were intended to do harm Of course, they must first identify who made the comments in the first place, hence the interest of this case.

For me, putting a comment onto Yelp is somewhere on a par with running an ad in a newspaper or publishing an article in a consumer choice magazine.

If your business is all about reputation grading, then some due diligence is clearly in order. Should Yelp prohibit anonymous contributions or withdraw the shield from anonymous commentary when required by a subpoena? For the latter, my guess is yes, they may well have to. After that, there are still a lot of legal minefields to navigate, so it is anybody's guess what will happen next.

OTOH, putting something on a public forum (like this one) against a public figure is usually held to a lower standard, given that people in the public eye have to expect a certain amount of mud slinging.

Besides, people wouldn't normally come to the Register or the New York Times to ask about a restaurant or dry cleaner's service. But even if they did, smart posters would probably express their honest opinions and not willingly and deceptively defame a restaurant or dry cleaner's reputation. As far as I recall, expressing one's political views, parodizing or satrically expressing opinions about public figures is stlll OK, even in today's increasingly paranoid cyberspace.

All in all, this would be an interesting test case. Libel and slander cases are notoriously difficult to prosecute effectlvely in the US, perhaps less so in the UK. Most people will settle out of court for a retraction or public apology. Proving that monetary damages were incurred from defamation is also pretty hard.

But I am not sure I'd want our multiple fanboi rantings and the occasional tirades seen on illustrious sites like this one to ever be qualified as defamation (particularly anonymous ones!). But most of us reasonable types take the anonymous with the bad.

0
0

Well done for flicking always-on crypto switch, Yahoo! Now here's what you SHOULD have done

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: SMTP connections are (often) still unencrypted

Yeah,

Thanks for that reminder, I just checked a mail recently sent by my banks' robo-reply.

Interestingly (this is GMAIL) the message is not encrypted when sent to me from the GMAIL server via an unroutable private address 10.x.x.x, therefore not encrypted within Google's walls. More defense In-depth would be a welcome next step for our friendly neighborhood service providers but that may be a while coming, if ever-

The bank however is encrypting with ESMTPS and the mail content is indeed encrypted inside my header. The bank's encryption standard is (version=TLSv1 cipher=RC4-SHA bits=128/128) which isn't tops as stated in the article, but better than none.

Keep spreading the word, Marcel. If nothing else. this might make more people pay attention to the level of security (or lack of it) accorded to the private communications they send over public networks.

5
0

Inside Steve Ballmer’s fondleslab rear-guard action

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Re: Wrong.

Spot on....

Tablets are ok for performing basic software input functions and consulting cloud data and apps, yada yada.

I think of mine as a bigger, slightly better, more visible smart phone I can use to check my email, social networks, skype, flight reservations, and ebay. It lets me play games on the train, occasionally take a poke at the Android OS or even read the Register.

I willingly accept its limitations.

Because of their small size, light-weight, decent battery life and mobility, tabs CAN BE marginally better (or just more convenient) for some tasks but that's where it stops for me.

For real work, I still must go upstairs and fire up the big, fan-cooled iron/silcon beast sitting in my office.

That's why I'm now typing this post on a KVM guest session. Way easier and faster than typing it on my tab (and way, way faster and easier than typing it on a smart phone). And why is that so?

Primarily because it has a physical keyboard.

Do typing speed tests qualify as scientific proof? Methinks yes.

My laptop, desktops and servers can be used for testing, building VM environments and tools, doing backups, burning and storing media, developing/compiling code, or typing/creating documents and SO MANY, MANY other things.

A large percentage of tasks are too clumsy, slow or impossible to do on a tab. I'm still trying to teach mine to print, for heaven's sake.

Yeah yeah sure, I can SSH or RDP to another server from my tablet, but why would I bother?

It's like choosing a dial up network connection over a readily available 1 GB connection.

Maybe if both my legs were broken and I couldn't make it upstairs.

And if you needed any more evidence that touch hasn't quite conquered the world for anything more than the simplest tasks, try using a tablet with USB keyboard and kick stand for any length of time.

At first, the kludge is amusing. However, it will soon dawn on you that you've transformed your sweet little tablet into a mutant, bastard-child: a reduced-function, crippled, schizophrenic laptop.

And if you are like me, you will quickly return to finger mode and leave that bastard child alone, unless you have no other choice.

Chromebooks have combined the best features of both worlds (an Android OS and a physical keyboard) but still look like laptops without wifi hardware to me. I think we are still missing a few links in this technological evolution. It's either that or the economy has failed to cull enough marketing droids.

Tablets make sense if your business is delivering packages, taking notes, looking at pictures, reading web pages, taking opinion polls, taking bar/restaurant orders. visiting customers and so on.

They have their place in the data entry eco-system and that space will continue to grow.

But even today, I believe a web or graphics designer would balk at doing any serious work on a commodity tablet. As would most sys admins, developers or DBAs. I mean would you seriously drop a corporate database table with a finger swipe or from a mini keyboard?

Not on my tablet, you wouldn't, although it's OK for playing Angry Birds.

Will that ever change ?....... maybe one day.

However, there are good reasons why replacing the keyboard and mouse is not a trivial challenge, despite the hype.

Keyboards have existed since the 19th century and pointers have been around for decades.

This is because they work and are still the most efficient tools for data entry.

Such venerable devices need to be replaced by BETTER options before they can disappear completely.

In sum, when it becomes just as simple to do your job on a super-thin tab client as it is on a traditional thick desktop, you might. As long as the opposite is true, you, like me, will probably keep going back to that office/keyboard. And the five million souls who can only pay 30 quid for their tablet will still find its use restricted to certain tasks, at least for now.

2
0

Recommendations for private cloud software...

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward
Linux

Did I miss something?

Don't understand why the user won't use OwnCloud?

It is relatively easy to set up and use on a Debian platform, a little harder to set up on IIS, but doable.

Security is in the eye of the beholder, both platforms can be locked down to nearly anyone's requirements.

Inquring minds and all that.....

0
0

Backup software for HDD and Cloud

(AMPC) Anonymous and mostly paranoid coward

Try Owncloud, you can set up your own file sync service on the server of your choice.

Some assembly required-

Easy to set up and manage, particularly on a Linux box, a little more tricky to get running on a Windows box

4
0

Page:

Forums