* Posts by Dr. Mouse

1581 posts • joined 22 May 2007

Go No! Google cyber-brain bests top-ranked human in ancient game

Dr. Mouse
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Such a game already exists. It's called "dating."

Strange game, the only way to win is not to play.

No, wait, that one looses, too.

*shamless xkcd rip off, itself obviously ripped off from the classic War Games.

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LOHAN sponsor knocks up nifty iMac fish tank

Dr. Mouse
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Pretty cool.

On a serious note, how long has it been now? I remember boring my former wide with updates on LOHAN, and we split over a year ago now!

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Amazon crafts two more voice-controlled gizmos in its Echo chamber

Dr. Mouse
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Simple solution

There is a simple solution to the creepiness factor, IMHO: Make a Star Trek style beep when it starts listening (i.e. it hears "Alexa"). Or, for a more human interaction, maybe say "Yes?" or something.

Personally, I would also prefer it if it illuminated an LED whenever it was listening and kept a log, too.

And include the ability to change the hotword and voice: Imagine using "computer" and becoming captain of a starship, or "Yoda" and having a reply in yoda's voice.... Some serious geekiness would be possible!

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Ad-blockers are a Mafia-style 'protection racket' – UK's Minister of Fun

Dr. Mouse
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There is one thing I don't get, here. Why is this any of the government's concern?

There are rules for advertising already. There are rules for dodgy business practices already.

If websites want to serve up intrusive adverts, that's their business. It is likely to reduce visitors to their site, and/or encourage ad blockers, but it's still a business decision for themselves. It doesn't harm anyone.

Similarly, if a consumer wishes to use ad blocking software, what right has the govt to stop them? If the websites wish to put in place ad-blocker-blocker measures, similarly.

I just do not see the benefit of the govt expressing any opinion on this matter.

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Google risks everything if it doesn’t grab Android round the throat

Dr. Mouse
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Re: I thought the same at the time

As a final thought, a couple of months ago I bought an Nvidia Shield TV and have been very impressed with it. Today my Shield tablet arrived - I am likewise very impressed.

I haven't bought a Shield TV (yet, it's on my "options to consider" list), but I have a Shield Tablet and it's the second best tablet I have ever used, even ignoring the gaming features. Fast, responsive, timely updates and a useful stylus.

When you combine this with console mode gaming and a controller, it becomes a pretty good games console. I could never justify buying a games console (I don't play enough games, and I have a decent gaming PC), but having it built into the tablet is great. Game streaming from your PC works well, too, for those latest and greatest games.

The only better tablet I have used is the Surface Pro, but that's a completely different kettle of fish, and is also a vast amount more expensive than I am willing to pay for a tablet.

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Canonical accused of violating GPL with ZFS-in-Ubuntu 16.04 plan

Dr. Mouse
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Re: @HCV - I don't quite get your point

when does loading a kernel module cross the line into linking a dynamic library?

I find the logic of the SFC questionable here.

There are many binary modules used on a typical desktop Linux system. Graphics card drivers from the manufacturer are almost always binary and non-free. I would love to know what the difference between a distribution supplying Nvidia and AMD graphics drivers and them supplying the ZFS kernel modules are...

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Humans – 1 Robots – 0: Mercedes deautomates production lines

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Oh dear Brits

This post cries out for the unacceptable forum reply about a certain historically bad manager.

If this is a sideways invocation of Godwins Law, then all I have heard says you are incorrect. He was actually a very good manager and skilled politician.

The fact that he and his followers committed atrocities and cause huge devastation across Europe doesn't take that away: Until he lost, he managed that very well.

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Why use robots when the country just got a whole flood of cheap humans

That works as long as some of the tax revenues is spent on infrastructure which sadly it won't be.

Actually, Germany is quite good at investing in infrastructure, from what I have heard. Their roads and railways have a much better maintenance programme than most other countries, for instance. IIRC they are on a rolling maintenance programme, rebuilt to last on a regular basis, not just the patch-it-up-when-we-think-we-will-get-sued programme we have have in the UK.

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Yelp minimum wage row shines spotlight on … broke, fired employee

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Trump?

What I am saying is that prematurely blaming Trump when he isn't even in office is stupid.

I do not think the article is blaming Trump. He is blaming people like Trump. The people, especially in the US but also prevalent all over the world, who instantly blame the victim and tell them to work harder and earn more money or spend less.

I do have to question why she allows this to continue. If other companies in the area offer a higher wage for the same job, then why doesn't she try to switch jobs? And why does she not look at moving to an area which is cheaper to live in? Yelp can only pay people this wage because people accept it.

However, I do not know all the facts. Maybe she cannot get a job elsewhere for some reason. Maybe she is tied to the area somehow (sick relative etc). Maybe the cost of travel to work would outweigh the potential saving from moving out of the area.

However, it is also despicable that Yelp is putting it's employees in this situation to begin with. What is the point in paying for Silicon Valley perks when it's employees cannot afford to even eat? Why are they paying a significantly lower wage than other companies for the same job? And firing her for what is effectively whistle-blowing is outrageous.

This is one of the reasons why I will not move to the US. They seem to treat employees worse over there than contractors are treated here in the UK, without any of the perks. I see it in the attitude of my current boss, and American who resents having to give holidays, sick pay or any basic benefit to his employees. Sorry, but I'll take a nation who actually has laws to protect it's citizens, at least in part, over "The Land Of The Free" any day.

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Randomness is a lottery, so why not use a lottery for randomness?

Dr. Mouse
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Re: 3458127

@Benchops you got there before me, have an upvote sir.

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Google opens Cloud Vision API beta, world + dog asked to try it

Dr. Mouse
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I agree, they are not in this for idealistic reasons. All their other products are there to support ads, in one way or another.

However, you cannot deny that this is pretty cool. Submit an image and it can tell (roughly, with obvious capacity for error) what it is. It's something which has always been a challenge for computers, and now it's available to everyone (for a small fee).

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Patch ASAP: Tons of Linux apps can be hijacked by evil DNS servers, man-in-the-middle miscreants

Dr. Mouse
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Thanks for the update el'Reg. I'll get on with protecting my servers.

I just have to ask though:

bug in glibc's DNS resolver – which is used to translate human-readable domain names, such as theregister.co.uk, into a network IP address.

Was this really necessary? I would posit that anyone reading this site, or at least 99.99% of them, will already know what DNS is. Even most semi-technical users know what DNS is for. This line may be needed on a general news site, but on The Register, read mostly by techies?

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Official: Seagate notebook drive has shingles

Dr. Mouse
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(by which time SSDs will probably be closer or even lower in price, anyway)

And will need some independent, long term reliability tests done, to satisfy your previous requirement. By which time faster, cheaper, higher capacity drives will be out.

...And will need some independent, long term reliability tests done, to satisfy your previous requirement. By which time faster, cheaper, higher capacity drives will be out.

...And will need some independent, long term reliability tests done, to satisfy your previous requirement. By which time faster, cheaper, higher capacity drives will be out.

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Ofcom must tackle 'monopolistic' provider BT, says shadow digital minister Chi Onwurah

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Is the issue Openreach @Ledswinger

Openreach can undercut new entrants due to economies of scale, a massive existing infrastructure, and favourable terms with government (e.g. business rates on fibre).

If a new entrant wanted to provide internet access to a small area, they have large setup costs. Their product will probably be more expensive than BTs, especially as BT can use profitable areas to subsidise unprofitable ones.

However, BT won't roll out to all unprofitable areas. There are not-spots. These are the best areas for a new entrant to wire up. However, as soon as the new entrant is up and running, BT suddenly decide they do want to roll out there, so undercut the new entrant and wipe them out. This is abuse of their effective monopoly to keep new players out of the sector.

* I've used BT, when many times it was probably Openreach, but it makes no difference for the point I am making so I can't be bothered correcting it now...

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Is the issue Openreach

Part of the problem is that BT/Openreach are using their monopoly to kill competition.

There have been various innovative projects to bring good broadband to areas neglected by Openreach. What tends to happen is that, as soon as it is up and running, Openreach change their minds, deploy FTTC in the area, undercut them, and drive them out of business.

I had ideas of building out a broadband provider in a small area. Openreach had said they didn't plan to roll out there for several years. I'm glad I didn't: A few months later they started their roll out and my own business would have been dead in the water.

So competition in this market is nearly impossible. Openreach have an effective monopoly in most areas, and can easily undercut any startup. I don't know what the cure would be, but something should be done to "rebalance the market".

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UK to stop children looking at online porn. How?

Dr. Mouse
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I have to agree. It is the parents' responsibility to ensure their children are safe, but we now have a whole generation who think they can leave their children sat in front of a TV/Computer, ignore what they are doing, and assume they will be safe.

It is simple to implement appropriate filters to a child's internet access, and that should be the parents' job, not the government's. It is also a parent's job to take an interest in what their kid is doing and protect them from the evils out in the world (to an appropriate level).

This is all a symptom of the entitlement culture and laziness epidemic in this country (and beyond), as well as the government's wish to regulate and intrude on every aspect of our personal lives.

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'Hobbit' heads aren't human says bone boffin

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Homo Trumpus?

Politicians are the sad rements of a primordial species that bacteria and other unwanted things evolved from.

Hey! I think that's really insulting... to the myriad of bacteria who you are lumping in with such unevolved scum as politicians!

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Open APIs for UK banking: It's happening, people

Dr. Mouse
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Disappointed...

This was not the news I was hoping for, reading the article.

What I want is a standard API which will allow me to hook an accounting programme into my accounts, from multiple different banks, and get all the data out. Apparently, this is available in Germany, and also on some business bank accounts (for a fee, I think), but at the moment I have to export the data manually and import it into the software. Being able to initiate payments, with an additional auth check (2FA/password/etc.), would be a bonus.

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Danish Sith Lord fined in Galactic Republic rumpus

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Any Republic where Jar-Jar Binks can become a Senator...

Unless he was really a Sith...

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Er...

Or Northern Ireland?

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: unspecified techniques

Here was I thinking "The Force can have a strong influence on the weak-minded."

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Damn you!

I've lost!

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Safe Harbor crunch time: Today's the day to hammer out privacy deal

Dr. Mouse
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Re: It should never have exsted!

Compare and contrast that to how EU citizens are dealt with by the US

Actually, AFAIK, anyone in the US legally gets close to the same rights and freedoms and a US citizen.

It's non-US citizens who are outside the US who have no rights. This probably harks back to the old days before the internet: Why would they need rights in the US if they are not in the US?

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How El Reg predicted Google's sweetheart tax deal ... in 2013

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Corporation tax

Is this actually so? I hear it repeated often, but it seems unfeasible.

Ah, actually I'm not sure. I have heard it repeated many times, and accepted it, but from http://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2011/10/24/companies-do-not-have-a-duty-to-maximise-their-profits-or-to-avoid-tax/:

172: Duty to promote the success of the company

(1)A director of a company must act in the way he considers, in good faith, would be most likely to promote the success of the company for the benefit of its members as a whole, and in doing so have regard (amongst other matters) to—

(a)the likely consequences of any decision in the long term,

(b)the interests of the company’s employees,

(c)the need to foster the company’s business relationships with suppliers, customers and others,

(d)the impact of the company’s operations on the community and the environment,

(e)the desirability of the company maintaining a reputation for high standards of business conduct, and

(f)the need to act fairly as between members of the company.

(2)Where or to the extent that the purposes of the company consist of or include purposes other than the benefit of its members, subsection (1) has effect as if the reference to promoting the success of the company for the benefit of its members were to achieving those purposes.

(3)The duty imposed by this section has effect subject to any enactment or rule of law requiring directors, in certain circumstances, to consider or act in the interests of creditors of the company.

It seems the duty is to promote the success of the company. However, for many the success of the company is defined in terms of profit, balance sheet and PR. Legal minimisation of the tax bill, where it doesn't impact on PR, would be almost foolish to let slip, and could be considered a dereliction of this duty.

As for "The Dude":

But if we want to do this right, then we need to start thinking seriously about abolishing taxation - period - full stop.

Really?! If that were the case, how would they pay for essential services? Police, fire service, courts of law... Would you suggest that everyone has to take out an individual contract with a security service to protect them if a crime is committed? What if they can't afford it, do they not get justice? Does the criminal walk free?

What about roads and other essential public infrastructure? Do we say "No, you can't leave your house because you haven't paid the fee to this company to walk on their pavement"?

It is barmy to believe that, in a civilised society, we could actually manage without a central authority contributed to by all (AKA Government and Taxes).

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Corporation tax

It would work if and only if companies were forced to distribute profits to someone who in turn would pay the taxes. But they are not forced, so money can stay in company safes.

I do not believe this would happen. A company exists to make profits, and money sat in a bank account is not making a profit. It is more likely it would be invested, barring a reserve (like an emergency fund, or a future investment fund). Even then, it would eventually be either invested or moved to an individual.

As for structures which make it fall over (ownership of/by other companies), you could state that these rules apply only to UK companies, and treat a non-UK company as an individual, taxing on transfer of the capital. Also, any owners/shareholders of a UK company must be registered for UK tax and pay tax on their dividends.

The idea is not without it's flaws, but it is simpler and more likely to actually raise tax.

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Dr. Mouse
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Corporation tax

Corporation tax is, in my opinion, one of the most complicated areas of tax, and should be abolished.

My reasoning:

Companies are legal entities with, often, an incredibly large amount of resources. Their mandate is to generate as much profit for shareholders as possible. So, if they can spend £1m (say) on accountants, and those accountants find a way to work the profits so that they save £2m in tax, they are legally required to do so*.

On the other hand, individuals (normally) have much more limited resources. Until you reach the upper echelons, the cost of hiring a accountants to find the most efficient way to legally avoid tax outweighs the potential savings.

My solution would be to remove corporation tax entirely (which companies will pour money into finding ways out of) and tax individuals when those profits leave the business. This would end up leaving more money to get into the hands of people, and would reward companies who chose to invest in their business. It would cut down on the cost of accountants for businesses, too.

This argument is not based on morality, but pragmatism. The moral view would be that companies are making lots of money, so we should tax them. My pragmatic view is that they will always try to find ways to avoid paying that tax, so don't even bother trying.

* As long as it will actually net them bigger profits. Google, in this instance, is playing a PR game.

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IRS 'inadvertently' wiped hard drive Microsoft demanded in audit row

Dr. Mouse
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Exactly what I thought. If you told the tax man "Sorry, I accidentally deleted all my records, whoopsy!"... I don't think "Well, you did it and got away with it, so why shouldn't I?" would cut it!

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UK govt: No, really, we're not banning cryptography

Dr. Mouse
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Re: political lies...

Actually, from what I've heard, they can lock you up forever.

They ask for the password, you refuse, they lock you up for 5(?) years. When you are released, they ask for the password again...

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Updated Android malware steals voice two factor authentication

Dr. Mouse
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Joke

Re: Isn't it sweet...

Some Android handsets can be upgraded to Windows 10. That's about as secure as it gets at the moment in mobile. Zero malware so far across over 100 million devices.

Because there are only 5 users, all of whom work for Microsoft, and no apps available yet?

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Murderous necrophiliac kangaroo briefly wins nation's heart

Dr. Mouse
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Coat

Have you heard about the guy...

...who gave up Bestiality, Necrophilia and Flagellation?

He realised he was flogging a dead horse!

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Nvidia GPUs give smut viewed incognito a second coming

Dr. Mouse
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There is blame on all sides here, I think.

Chrome holds the majority of the blame: They are specifically stating that incognito mode keeps your session private. It should wipe anything which could be used to discover information about the session as soon as it is no longer needed. This would include the frame buffer.

Diablo holds some blame, as it should not be displaying the frame buffer until it has initialised it. It is not their fault that the data was leaked, but it is their fault that it was visible through their application.

NVidia should (although they may, I don't know) offer easy-to-use privacy hooks and APIs to ensure data is not leaked, triggering a zeroing of the frame buffer on release.

The OS (and applications) should use those hooks and APIs to ensure data is not leaked (e.g. on logoff or user switching).

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Nvidia's patent war on Samsung is a wreck – what you need to know

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Business as usual for Samsung

excluding those unable to spend on lawyers

This is a failing of the legal system itself, not of the patent system. It applies throughout all arms of the legal system in both the US and here in the UK (and most of the world): If you can afford an expensive lawyer, you have a better chance of winning. This makes a mockery of justice.

As a brief example, a friend of mine has been charged with a fairly serious crime (it is definitely a false accusation). Luckily, he is able to raise the huge amount of money needed for a good legal team to defend him (albeit by making huge sacrifices). This will give him good legal advice on the matter, and skilled barrister in court, and a team looking over the facts of the case to produce the defence with the best chance of a favourable outcome.

In turn, had I been the one charged, I would likely have had to rely on a court-appointed defence. I would have to make do with whatever quality of lawyer I had been assigned/were willing to accept legal aid fees. My chances of winning would be substantially lower, whether I had done what they say or not.

My chances in a civil suit would be even lower, as I would probably not be able to get help defending the case, although at least I would be able to claim costs if I managed to win (something you cannot do against the CPS in the UK).

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Reverser laments crypto game protection, says wares dead after 2018

Dr. Mouse
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Re: re: Expect government back doors in games in future....

A (video game) cracker is someone who removes the copy protection of a video game, so lamers like you can copy it and play it for free the legitimate owner is able to use it without the ridiculous restrictions put in place by the writers

FTFY.

I have, on many occasions in the past, had to crack games that I legitimately own in order to use them in the way I want. For example, I cracked Quake 2 so I could run it without having the CD in the drive. Had I not, I would have ended up with unplayable game I paid good money for, simply because the CD had become scratched. I would also have had to find the CD every time I wanted to play it.

Things have moved on, of course, but there are still legitimate reasons to crack a game you own. Many games, for instance, now require an internet connection, so you have to crack it to play it on a laptop away from home.

Also, even if your original statement is true, most crackers don't do it so that people can play for free. They do it because they can, because it is a fun and interesting exercise for them.

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US Marines kill noisy BigDog robo-mule for blowing their cover

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Yes, methanol fuel cells are readily available

Yes, methanol fuel cells are readily available

And cost about as much for a 100W fuel cell as a 3kW Diesel genset. They are not very good at power to cost ratio

I can't see cost being the massive issue for such military uses as it would in most other areas. I suspect there are other downsides which took precedence over cost.

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Cat fight: Watch out YouTube, here comes Facebook

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Facebook stats, pah!

I think there is a big difference.

I use Facebook to connect with friends, as an addition to tools like phone calls, texts, whatsapp, and the good old-fashioned face-to-face meeting (usually for several pints in a drinking establishment). If I do something and would like to share information about that with my friends, I will use Facebook as one of the methods. Pics, Videos and descriptions of events in my life others may find interesting. This is social networking, and where such content belongs.

Youtube, however, is generally a public medium. Many people seem to flood it with stuff which is only (or should only be) of interest to their friends and family. This is similar to Twitter, an entirely public forum mostly filled with personal content...

So my view would be that the world would be a better place if personal stuff was confined to Facebook, and Youtube and Twitter were used only for content you want the whole world to see. The quality of content on Youtube would go up, giving them a chance to make a profit.

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Boffins unwrap bargain-basement processor that talks light and current

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Sweet!

An early prediction for you

1) They wil patent the hell out of everything in sight

As they should. This is a novel, innovative manufacturing process.

2) They will charge and arm and a leg to license it

More likely, they will charge what people are willing to pay, or keep it back for use in their own products. What's the point spinning businesses out of a Uni unless they are going to make money from it? The most obvious way to make money would be to license the technique, and to make money from that they need to charge what people will pay.

These are not patent trolls, they are universities.

3) It will die a death as other companies take the ideas and make them work in ways the circumvent the patents

Fair enough. If they can achieve the result they want without using the specific technique described in the patent, there's no problem. Patents only (or should only) protect the particular innovation you came up with, not everything vaguely similar (*cough* Apply *cough*).

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New gear needed to capture net connection records, say ISPs

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Ask the people

should be put to a public referendum. Give everyone the facts

Haven't you realised that's not how referendums work in this country? See the AV referendum... FUD and mudslinging outweighed any facts by at least an order of magnitude!

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Contracting advice

Dr. Mouse
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Contracting advice

Hi all

I am currently a software developer in a staff role, but am looking to move on, and am considering contracting again. There are many reasons for this, and probably the least of them is the money. My plan would be to do fairly short, get-the-job-done projects.

However, it has been about 13 years since I last contracted and I know that many rules and regulations have changed over this time. Back then, I used an umbrella company who set up a Ltd co and funnelled all income through it, paying min wage as salary and the rest, after expenses (and their fee, of course), as dividends.

My plans are also slightly different this time. I have a few projects of my own which I intend to get going and attempt to make money from, and I will not necessarily be confining myself to one contract at a time.

So, given this, does anyone have any advice for me? I am looking both at financials, regs, and also general advice regarding contracting. It has been so long, and I only did it back then as a stop-gap. I have not decided for definite that I will go contracting, but it looks an attractive option. I am newly without ties or commitments, and the variety appeals.

Thank you all in advance.

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US government pushing again on encryption bypass

Dr. Mouse
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Re: for goodness sake

Encryption is hard to get right, even mega companies who can afford best in field experts like Google and Apple don't get things exactly right every time.

There are various open source libraries which provide encryption. You must make correct use of them, and you rely on them being implemented correctly, they generally make it simple to get "right" (for some value of "right").

If the library is compromised, you are screwed, although this doesn't happen often as is generally fixed quickly (many eyes and all that). Also, if you use it incorrectly (https://xkcd.com/1286/) you have problems. So you obviously need some clue as to what you are doing, but the job is made at least an order of magnitude easier...

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MPs slam gov heads over 'childishness' on failed farmer IT project

Dr. Mouse
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Of course the politicians themselves have absolutely nothing to be blamed for and are never childish.

I agree. I mean, when we watch PMQs or Parliamentary debates, we never hear the sort of jeering and booing that a primary school class would be severely chastised for, do we? Oh, wait...

It's one of the main things which turns me off politics. It's the one profession I know of where you get rewarded for acting like a spoiled 5-year-old, and encouraged to behave as such.

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EU governments reach agreement on passenger name data

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Good start

I haven't read it either, but the article specifically says terrorist offences and serious crime. I tend to trust Out-Law articles, and assume they have read the relevant proposed legislation and reported accurately.

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Dr. Mouse
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Good start

While I can see the down votes coming in for this comment, I'm impressed.

From what I can see, they have actually specified a limited scope. Unlike, for example, RIPA, they are putting specific wording into the law to stop this data being used (legally) for purposes other than specified. Our (UK) government could learn from this.

It remains to be seen whether this restriction is:

a) kept in the law,

b) followed, and

c) enforced by severe penalties for those who break it.

It is, at least, a step in the right direction.

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Goodbye, Hello Barbie: Wireless toy dogged by POODLE SSL hole

Dr. Mouse
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So Barbie has been subjected to penetration testing, and the probe has discovered several holes!

Fnar Fnar!

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Infosec bods rate app languages; find Java 'king', put PHP in bin

Dr. Mouse
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I have to wonder...

C/C++ is difficult to learn (relatively speaking) and develop with. Those who use it have generally spent a lot of time learning to use it correctly.

PHP & Javascript are easy to learn and develop with. People can "develop" with it just by copy-and-pasting from W3Scools and Stack, then modifying until it does what they want, without really understanding what they are doing.

So, is it a problem with the language or the the people using it?

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Microsoft encrypts explanation of borked Windows 10 encryption

Dr. Mouse
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Decrypted plaintext...

"Windows 10 is the best! You should use it!! We fix broken things on Tuesdays! There are ghosts here..."

Obligatory xkcds:

https://xkcd.com/1293/

https://xkcd.com/1032/

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GCHQ can hack your systems at will – thanks to 'soft touch' oversight

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Anon Cluetard Yawn.

Security services are often at a disadvantage. They could stop thousands of attacks, all of them in secret, but would still be considered to have failed because one succeeded.

That said, we do need effective judicial oversight of their operations. This means that open-ended warrants (or warrants issued by a minister) should not be allowed. A judge should sign off on every warrant, and it's purpose should be limited in scope and proportional to the risk.

International "hacks" should fall under this if there is a chance of them interfering with British people's data, but should also be subject to international relations policy and international law. What is GCHQ doing attacking Belgium, who are an ally? They could, in theory, take this as an act of war (or at least a hostile act), Britain launching an unprovoked attack on their infrastructure. We should work with the law enforcement and intelligence services of our allies, each sharing intelligence but collecting it under local laws. What I see is the opposite: Each country specifically attacking each other to get around local laws, then providing that intelligence back to the local agencies.

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Italians to spend €150m ... snooping on PS4 jabber

Dr. Mouse
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Is it just me who thinks this is an excuse for spooks to play video games all day?

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Don't forget...

How do you know of the need for Special Adaptations? :-P

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Sysadmin's former boss claims five years FREE support or off to court

Dr. Mouse
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Re: This does not happen just to sysadmin

As the previous commentard said, outrageous billing is the easiest way to get rid of these (or at least get paid hilariously for your trouble).

When I was at school, one of my friend's dads was a professor in a very specialist area. He was paid vast sums of money to do consultancy work.

One particular job he was offered involved an extended stay outside the country, and he did not want to do it. It clashed with family events and other commitments. Rather than telling them no, he quoted the job at an extortionate rate, 10x+ his normal (already very high) rates. To his astonishment, they accepted. The insane amount of money he was paid was adequate compensation for the inconvenience.

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Who owns space? Looking at the US asteroid-mining act

Dr. Mouse
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Re: I am surprised

Exactly! And here I thought "Team America: World Police" was just a comedy. They are not extending that to "Universe Police".

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