* Posts by Dr. Mouse

1497 posts • joined 22 May 2007

Ireland's tech sector fears fallout of Brexit 'Yes' vote

Dr. Mouse
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But for some people and some businesses leaving will be very disruptive indeed and possibly even disastrous.

I agree, and yet I would bet that for some people and businesses there would be a very positive effect. They probably wouldn't entirely balance out, but overall I doubt there would be a significant impact.

One thing that is certain, though, is that no one knows for certain what will happen either way. Except, maybe, psychics, if there are any true psychics out there. Oh, and of course His Noodleyness the Flying Spaghetti Monster, although he's too drunk to care what happens in the referendum.

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Dr. Mouse
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"Both campaigns in this sordid and rather pointless referendum are very poor. I think Mervyn King put this point very well in his interview with Richard Quest on CNN: where are the arguments."

The one thing I know about his referendum is that noone knows the future. There have been groups analysing potential consequences of both outcomes, and there have been varied results.

My own view is that there are more positives than negatives to staying in the EU, so that's how I currently intend to vote. However, I don't think either result would have the disastrous effect that the campaigns would have us believe. Life will go on, babies will be born, politicians will lie, we'll pay our taxes and then we'll die. I'm not going to lose any sleep over it.

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Edward Snowden sues Norway to prevent extradition

Dr. Mouse
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Re: the "land of the free" is normally taken to mean the US

Unidentified Congressman: "Think of it: an entire nation founded on saying one thing and doing another."

John Hancock: "And we will call that country the United States of America."

~South Park, "I'm a Little Bit Country" [S7, E4, 2003], written by Trey Parker & Matt Stone

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Official: EU goes after Google, alleges it uses Android to kill competition

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Others?

"So perhaps, you statement about Apple barring inclusion of other apps... might not be entirely true?"

Perhaps I just wasn't specific enough, or perhaps I have misunderstood articles on the matter.

I have, however, read several articles stating that a particular app has been removed from the App Store for no apparent reason other than Apple want them to use their own version.

If I'm wrong, fair enough. I don't use Apple devices at all, so have only ever paid mild attention to these matters.

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Dr. Mouse
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Others?

It is common practice in the mobile space to bundle the main services with the phone. Microsoft and Apple do this, too. Apple go even further in barring inclusion of other apps which could replace their own in their app stores.

The only difference between Apple and Google in this regard is that Apple only offer their mobile OS on their own devices, whereas Google "force" these rules on other companies who wish to build an Android phone.

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Furious customers tear into 123-reg after firm's mass deletion woes

Dr. Mouse
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Re: It's in the cloud

Personally, I would say that it is the customer's job (for these services, low cost and unmanaged) to ensure there are reliable backups, just as it would be with self-hosted systems.

HOWEVER, 123-reg's failure here is a clear case of negligence, probably gross negligence, and I would expect a clear cut case in court. If I did this as a contractor, I would expect to be sued, whether the client had backups or not.

Also, this sort of service is often used by non-technical people. They don't understand the risks of not having a backup, or expect the service provider to back up for them.

Any professional worth his salt running anything on this kind of server will have a robust backup and DR scheme, and will have tested restoring the backup on both another system from the same SP and on alternative systems. The only people outside 123-reg I can't feel any sympathy for are those IT professionals who lost data through neglecting backups. They should hang their heads in shame. While in this case the problem came down to human error, there are numerous failure modes which are down to dumb luck (multiple disk failures, natural disasters, etc) which they should have been covering off with a decent backup & DR plan.

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NZ Pastafarians joined in noodly wedlock

Dr. Mouse
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Re: >something to tell the grandchildren

"A wedding is about commitment and while a bit of fun is a good thing, turning the entire concept/event into a joke may indicate the level of seriousness with which they regard it."

I have heard about all sorts of themed weddings, from Alice in Wonderland to Klingon. A wedding is not a marriage, and the fact that they both share the same sense of fun bodes well for the future.

A wedding is about showing your family, your friends, and the world that you wish to be together forever. A marriage is actually staying together forever. I would suggest they have the same chance as any other couple, religious or not, of making this work.

I'll add that I'm not anti-religious. People may believe anything they want, as long as they do not try to force those beliefs on me or restrict my actions because of their beliefs. An agnostic atheist myself, I respect others' beliefs, but I don't think they make them a better person than a non-religious person. What matters is not what you believe, but how you treat others.

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Finally, a GOOD religion

It is indeed all-inclusive:

"That is to say, you do not have to Believe to be part of our Church, but we hope in time you will see the Truth. But skeptics, as well as members of other religions, are always welcome." [http://www.venganza.org/about/]

In all seriousness, it's a spoof. I don't really see this as much different to any other "themed" wedding, or a church wedding for a "non-believer". They are held not because the couple believe, but because it is what the bride and groom want and it makes them both happy.

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Brexit would pinch UK tech spend but the EU wouldn't care – survey

Dr. Mouse
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Re: There is so much bollocks ...

"There is so much bollocks ... being spouted as truth by both sides of this that I am struggling to not switch the radio off when discussion starts."

This is how "democracy" works. The proles can't be trusted to hear the facts and make an informed decision. They must be bombarded with FUD from all sides, designed to elicit a visceral emotional response. Some of this is true and relevant, some is true and irrelevant, and some is untrue. In the end, it doesn't matter which, as long as it encourages sufficient people to vote their way the politicians don't care.

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Bundling ZFS and Linux is impossible says Richard Stallman

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Open/Closed

"Distribution is the constraint which you are, can only presume purposefully, ignoring."

I am well aware that this would only apply if it is distributed. I am quite at liberty to take GPL code, modify it, mash it up with any other code I would like, and keep it for myself. However, if I (or anyone else) distribute it, this must be done under a GPL compatible license (if it counts as a derived work). I cannot distribute a derived work (to anyone), as a binary or as source code, unless it is under a GPL compatible license. If the nVidia drivers were classed as a derived work, they would not be allowed to distribute a binary driver under an incompatible license. It doesn't matter that they own the copyright: If it's derived, it's covered, if not, it's not.

Therefore, unless I am missing something (and I have done a lot of research on the GPL in the past), RMS and FSF are making a distinction that a ZoL binary module is a derived work, and yet for some reason nVidia's (and others') modules aren't. This is the distinction I would like to understand.

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Open/Closed

"The difference is, and this should be obvious, is that, as the above states, nVidia is the copyright holder of the source code they used while Ubuntu are not."

Let's take a hypothetical.

I write a kernel module. The copyright is mine. I choose to distribute it under a commercial license, but it "links" to the kernel in the same way as ZoL. If what RMS and the FSF is saying is true, it would be classed as a derivative work and, therefore, would not be allowed to be distributed as a binary blob.

It doesn't matter who owns the copyright. The only thing that matters is that, if it is classed as a derivative work of GPL software, it must be released under the GPL or a compatible license.

Hence, the defining test is purely: Is it classed as a derivative work?

So what I would like to know is how the graphics card binary drivers differ from ZoL. There must be some material difference in the way it interacts with the kernel for it to fall foul of these license terms.

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Open/Closed

"the copyright holder, for example nVidia, can build and distribute binary blobs of their own code."

"For Ubuntu to build and distribute binary blobs of ZFS, they would have to take ZFS source code, licensed under CDDL, and combine it with kernel source code licensed under GPL, which is not allowed under the terms of the GPL."

How is this different to what nVidia does? They must take their code, not under a GPL-compatible license, and "combine it with with" the kernel. Unless I'm missing something, they couldn't be distributing the binary blob without "combining it" with the kernel (i.e. compiling against the kernel).

When you compile the ZoL modules, you are creating a binary blob in the same way as nVidia. I really fail to see the distinction. If things worked the way this argument seems to suggest, anyone who released a binary kernel module would have to license it under GPL-compatible terms, and hence release the source code.

If there is a distinction, I'd love to see it.

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Open/Closed

I would love to hear the reason this is different to, for example, a closed source graphics driver binaries from nVidia. Distros can include them, why not a binary version of ZoL?

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Flying Spaghetti Monster is not God, rules mortal judge

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Excellent

Then there's the writing of the Jehovah's Witnesses, which are equally laughable. (The founder appeared not to know that the original books were written in Greek and Hebrew.)

I don't get this comment at all. I was a Jehovah's Witness, and all their texts are based on the Bible. They study the Greek and Hebrew in the scriptures often, and publish a book containing the Greek scriptures including the original Greek and the word-for-word translation alongside their own translation. Added to which, their bible is hardly any different from any other, just in more modern English and with slightly different wording here and there. And in practice, their beliefs only differ from those of other Christian sects in these main ways:

* They do not celebrate the fake holidays taken on from the organised Church from the pagans.

* They do not believe all good people go to heaven, rather that God will re-create the earth as it was intended later, and resurrect them to live in perfection (a slightly different interpretation of the words in the Bible)

* They believe strongly in Jesus' words to go out and spread his "Good Word"

All in all, I find their religion no more laughable than any other, it's just a slightly tweaked Christian sect.

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UK competition watchdog gripes to Brussels about Three-O2 merger

Dr. Mouse
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Re: BT+EE

So, by mergers we have ended up with one super-operator, way bigger than the others. The only way for the others to match that is through mergers but, hang on, they aren't allowed to...

I guess when one goes broke and we are left with 3 operators, that'll be way better...

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We bet your firm doesn't stick to half of these 10 top IT admin tips

Dr. Mouse
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"Everyone I've ever worked with who's responsible for premises or security has bemoaned how hard it is to get people not to “tailgate” – that is to let the person in front swipe their entry card then follow them in without doing so yourself. And anyway, we're all taught that holding doors open for people is good manners. It's a security nightmare, though."

At one place I worked, some guys nicked a large, expensive plasma TV. They walked in, went to the class room (in front of a class full of students), unplugged the TV and walked out with it. Noone questioned them, and the MD and owner of the company held the door open for them as they were leaving!

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Go No! Google cyber-brain bests top-ranked human in ancient game

Dr. Mouse
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Such a game already exists. It's called "dating."

Strange game, the only way to win is not to play.

No, wait, that one looses, too.

*shamless xkcd rip off, itself obviously ripped off from the classic War Games.

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LOHAN sponsor knocks up nifty iMac fish tank

Dr. Mouse
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Pretty cool.

On a serious note, how long has it been now? I remember boring my former wide with updates on LOHAN, and we split over a year ago now!

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Amazon crafts two more voice-controlled gizmos in its Echo chamber

Dr. Mouse
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Simple solution

There is a simple solution to the creepiness factor, IMHO: Make a Star Trek style beep when it starts listening (i.e. it hears "Alexa"). Or, for a more human interaction, maybe say "Yes?" or something.

Personally, I would also prefer it if it illuminated an LED whenever it was listening and kept a log, too.

And include the ability to change the hotword and voice: Imagine using "computer" and becoming captain of a starship, or "Yoda" and having a reply in yoda's voice.... Some serious geekiness would be possible!

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Ad-blockers are a Mafia-style 'protection racket' – UK's Minister of Fun

Dr. Mouse
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There is one thing I don't get, here. Why is this any of the government's concern?

There are rules for advertising already. There are rules for dodgy business practices already.

If websites want to serve up intrusive adverts, that's their business. It is likely to reduce visitors to their site, and/or encourage ad blockers, but it's still a business decision for themselves. It doesn't harm anyone.

Similarly, if a consumer wishes to use ad blocking software, what right has the govt to stop them? If the websites wish to put in place ad-blocker-blocker measures, similarly.

I just do not see the benefit of the govt expressing any opinion on this matter.

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Google risks everything if it doesn’t grab Android round the throat

Dr. Mouse
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Re: I thought the same at the time

As a final thought, a couple of months ago I bought an Nvidia Shield TV and have been very impressed with it. Today my Shield tablet arrived - I am likewise very impressed.

I haven't bought a Shield TV (yet, it's on my "options to consider" list), but I have a Shield Tablet and it's the second best tablet I have ever used, even ignoring the gaming features. Fast, responsive, timely updates and a useful stylus.

When you combine this with console mode gaming and a controller, it becomes a pretty good games console. I could never justify buying a games console (I don't play enough games, and I have a decent gaming PC), but having it built into the tablet is great. Game streaming from your PC works well, too, for those latest and greatest games.

The only better tablet I have used is the Surface Pro, but that's a completely different kettle of fish, and is also a vast amount more expensive than I am willing to pay for a tablet.

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Canonical accused of violating GPL with ZFS-in-Ubuntu 16.04 plan

Dr. Mouse
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Re: @HCV - I don't quite get your point

when does loading a kernel module cross the line into linking a dynamic library?

I find the logic of the SFC questionable here.

There are many binary modules used on a typical desktop Linux system. Graphics card drivers from the manufacturer are almost always binary and non-free. I would love to know what the difference between a distribution supplying Nvidia and AMD graphics drivers and them supplying the ZFS kernel modules are...

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Humans – 1 Robots – 0: Mercedes deautomates production lines

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Oh dear Brits

This post cries out for the unacceptable forum reply about a certain historically bad manager.

If this is a sideways invocation of Godwins Law, then all I have heard says you are incorrect. He was actually a very good manager and skilled politician.

The fact that he and his followers committed atrocities and cause huge devastation across Europe doesn't take that away: Until he lost, he managed that very well.

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Why use robots when the country just got a whole flood of cheap humans

That works as long as some of the tax revenues is spent on infrastructure which sadly it won't be.

Actually, Germany is quite good at investing in infrastructure, from what I have heard. Their roads and railways have a much better maintenance programme than most other countries, for instance. IIRC they are on a rolling maintenance programme, rebuilt to last on a regular basis, not just the patch-it-up-when-we-think-we-will-get-sued programme we have have in the UK.

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Yelp minimum wage row shines spotlight on … broke, fired employee

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Trump?

What I am saying is that prematurely blaming Trump when he isn't even in office is stupid.

I do not think the article is blaming Trump. He is blaming people like Trump. The people, especially in the US but also prevalent all over the world, who instantly blame the victim and tell them to work harder and earn more money or spend less.

I do have to question why she allows this to continue. If other companies in the area offer a higher wage for the same job, then why doesn't she try to switch jobs? And why does she not look at moving to an area which is cheaper to live in? Yelp can only pay people this wage because people accept it.

However, I do not know all the facts. Maybe she cannot get a job elsewhere for some reason. Maybe she is tied to the area somehow (sick relative etc). Maybe the cost of travel to work would outweigh the potential saving from moving out of the area.

However, it is also despicable that Yelp is putting it's employees in this situation to begin with. What is the point in paying for Silicon Valley perks when it's employees cannot afford to even eat? Why are they paying a significantly lower wage than other companies for the same job? And firing her for what is effectively whistle-blowing is outrageous.

This is one of the reasons why I will not move to the US. They seem to treat employees worse over there than contractors are treated here in the UK, without any of the perks. I see it in the attitude of my current boss, and American who resents having to give holidays, sick pay or any basic benefit to his employees. Sorry, but I'll take a nation who actually has laws to protect it's citizens, at least in part, over "The Land Of The Free" any day.

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Randomness is a lottery, so why not use a lottery for randomness?

Dr. Mouse
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Re: 3458127

@Benchops you got there before me, have an upvote sir.

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Google opens Cloud Vision API beta, world + dog asked to try it

Dr. Mouse
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I agree, they are not in this for idealistic reasons. All their other products are there to support ads, in one way or another.

However, you cannot deny that this is pretty cool. Submit an image and it can tell (roughly, with obvious capacity for error) what it is. It's something which has always been a challenge for computers, and now it's available to everyone (for a small fee).

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Patch ASAP: Tons of Linux apps can be hijacked by evil DNS servers, man-in-the-middle miscreants

Dr. Mouse
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Thanks for the update el'Reg. I'll get on with protecting my servers.

I just have to ask though:

bug in glibc's DNS resolver – which is used to translate human-readable domain names, such as theregister.co.uk, into a network IP address.

Was this really necessary? I would posit that anyone reading this site, or at least 99.99% of them, will already know what DNS is. Even most semi-technical users know what DNS is for. This line may be needed on a general news site, but on The Register, read mostly by techies?

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Official: Seagate notebook drive has shingles

Dr. Mouse
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(by which time SSDs will probably be closer or even lower in price, anyway)

And will need some independent, long term reliability tests done, to satisfy your previous requirement. By which time faster, cheaper, higher capacity drives will be out.

...And will need some independent, long term reliability tests done, to satisfy your previous requirement. By which time faster, cheaper, higher capacity drives will be out.

...And will need some independent, long term reliability tests done, to satisfy your previous requirement. By which time faster, cheaper, higher capacity drives will be out.

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Ofcom must tackle 'monopolistic' provider BT, says shadow digital minister Chi Onwurah

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Is the issue Openreach @Ledswinger

Openreach can undercut new entrants due to economies of scale, a massive existing infrastructure, and favourable terms with government (e.g. business rates on fibre).

If a new entrant wanted to provide internet access to a small area, they have large setup costs. Their product will probably be more expensive than BTs, especially as BT can use profitable areas to subsidise unprofitable ones.

However, BT won't roll out to all unprofitable areas. There are not-spots. These are the best areas for a new entrant to wire up. However, as soon as the new entrant is up and running, BT suddenly decide they do want to roll out there, so undercut the new entrant and wipe them out. This is abuse of their effective monopoly to keep new players out of the sector.

* I've used BT, when many times it was probably Openreach, but it makes no difference for the point I am making so I can't be bothered correcting it now...

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Is the issue Openreach

Part of the problem is that BT/Openreach are using their monopoly to kill competition.

There have been various innovative projects to bring good broadband to areas neglected by Openreach. What tends to happen is that, as soon as it is up and running, Openreach change their minds, deploy FTTC in the area, undercut them, and drive them out of business.

I had ideas of building out a broadband provider in a small area. Openreach had said they didn't plan to roll out there for several years. I'm glad I didn't: A few months later they started their roll out and my own business would have been dead in the water.

So competition in this market is nearly impossible. Openreach have an effective monopoly in most areas, and can easily undercut any startup. I don't know what the cure would be, but something should be done to "rebalance the market".

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UK to stop children looking at online porn. How?

Dr. Mouse
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I have to agree. It is the parents' responsibility to ensure their children are safe, but we now have a whole generation who think they can leave their children sat in front of a TV/Computer, ignore what they are doing, and assume they will be safe.

It is simple to implement appropriate filters to a child's internet access, and that should be the parents' job, not the government's. It is also a parent's job to take an interest in what their kid is doing and protect them from the evils out in the world (to an appropriate level).

This is all a symptom of the entitlement culture and laziness epidemic in this country (and beyond), as well as the government's wish to regulate and intrude on every aspect of our personal lives.

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'Hobbit' heads aren't human says bone boffin

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Homo Trumpus?

Politicians are the sad rements of a primordial species that bacteria and other unwanted things evolved from.

Hey! I think that's really insulting... to the myriad of bacteria who you are lumping in with such unevolved scum as politicians!

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Open APIs for UK banking: It's happening, people

Dr. Mouse
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Disappointed...

This was not the news I was hoping for, reading the article.

What I want is a standard API which will allow me to hook an accounting programme into my accounts, from multiple different banks, and get all the data out. Apparently, this is available in Germany, and also on some business bank accounts (for a fee, I think), but at the moment I have to export the data manually and import it into the software. Being able to initiate payments, with an additional auth check (2FA/password/etc.), would be a bonus.

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Danish Sith Lord fined in Galactic Republic rumpus

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Any Republic where Jar-Jar Binks can become a Senator...

Unless he was really a Sith...

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Er...

Or Northern Ireland?

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: unspecified techniques

Here was I thinking "The Force can have a strong influence on the weak-minded."

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Damn you!

I've lost!

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Safe Harbor crunch time: Today's the day to hammer out privacy deal

Dr. Mouse
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Re: It should never have exsted!

Compare and contrast that to how EU citizens are dealt with by the US

Actually, AFAIK, anyone in the US legally gets close to the same rights and freedoms and a US citizen.

It's non-US citizens who are outside the US who have no rights. This probably harks back to the old days before the internet: Why would they need rights in the US if they are not in the US?

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How El Reg predicted Google's sweetheart tax deal ... in 2013

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Corporation tax

Is this actually so? I hear it repeated often, but it seems unfeasible.

Ah, actually I'm not sure. I have heard it repeated many times, and accepted it, but from http://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2011/10/24/companies-do-not-have-a-duty-to-maximise-their-profits-or-to-avoid-tax/:

172: Duty to promote the success of the company

(1)A director of a company must act in the way he considers, in good faith, would be most likely to promote the success of the company for the benefit of its members as a whole, and in doing so have regard (amongst other matters) to—

(a)the likely consequences of any decision in the long term,

(b)the interests of the company’s employees,

(c)the need to foster the company’s business relationships with suppliers, customers and others,

(d)the impact of the company’s operations on the community and the environment,

(e)the desirability of the company maintaining a reputation for high standards of business conduct, and

(f)the need to act fairly as between members of the company.

(2)Where or to the extent that the purposes of the company consist of or include purposes other than the benefit of its members, subsection (1) has effect as if the reference to promoting the success of the company for the benefit of its members were to achieving those purposes.

(3)The duty imposed by this section has effect subject to any enactment or rule of law requiring directors, in certain circumstances, to consider or act in the interests of creditors of the company.

It seems the duty is to promote the success of the company. However, for many the success of the company is defined in terms of profit, balance sheet and PR. Legal minimisation of the tax bill, where it doesn't impact on PR, would be almost foolish to let slip, and could be considered a dereliction of this duty.

As for "The Dude":

But if we want to do this right, then we need to start thinking seriously about abolishing taxation - period - full stop.

Really?! If that were the case, how would they pay for essential services? Police, fire service, courts of law... Would you suggest that everyone has to take out an individual contract with a security service to protect them if a crime is committed? What if they can't afford it, do they not get justice? Does the criminal walk free?

What about roads and other essential public infrastructure? Do we say "No, you can't leave your house because you haven't paid the fee to this company to walk on their pavement"?

It is barmy to believe that, in a civilised society, we could actually manage without a central authority contributed to by all (AKA Government and Taxes).

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Dr. Mouse
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Re: Corporation tax

It would work if and only if companies were forced to distribute profits to someone who in turn would pay the taxes. But they are not forced, so money can stay in company safes.

I do not believe this would happen. A company exists to make profits, and money sat in a bank account is not making a profit. It is more likely it would be invested, barring a reserve (like an emergency fund, or a future investment fund). Even then, it would eventually be either invested or moved to an individual.

As for structures which make it fall over (ownership of/by other companies), you could state that these rules apply only to UK companies, and treat a non-UK company as an individual, taxing on transfer of the capital. Also, any owners/shareholders of a UK company must be registered for UK tax and pay tax on their dividends.

The idea is not without it's flaws, but it is simpler and more likely to actually raise tax.

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Dr. Mouse
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Corporation tax

Corporation tax is, in my opinion, one of the most complicated areas of tax, and should be abolished.

My reasoning:

Companies are legal entities with, often, an incredibly large amount of resources. Their mandate is to generate as much profit for shareholders as possible. So, if they can spend £1m (say) on accountants, and those accountants find a way to work the profits so that they save £2m in tax, they are legally required to do so*.

On the other hand, individuals (normally) have much more limited resources. Until you reach the upper echelons, the cost of hiring a accountants to find the most efficient way to legally avoid tax outweighs the potential savings.

My solution would be to remove corporation tax entirely (which companies will pour money into finding ways out of) and tax individuals when those profits leave the business. This would end up leaving more money to get into the hands of people, and would reward companies who chose to invest in their business. It would cut down on the cost of accountants for businesses, too.

This argument is not based on morality, but pragmatism. The moral view would be that companies are making lots of money, so we should tax them. My pragmatic view is that they will always try to find ways to avoid paying that tax, so don't even bother trying.

* As long as it will actually net them bigger profits. Google, in this instance, is playing a PR game.

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IRS 'inadvertently' wiped hard drive Microsoft demanded in audit row

Dr. Mouse
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Exactly what I thought. If you told the tax man "Sorry, I accidentally deleted all my records, whoopsy!"... I don't think "Well, you did it and got away with it, so why shouldn't I?" would cut it!

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UK govt: No, really, we're not banning cryptography

Dr. Mouse
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Re: political lies...

Actually, from what I've heard, they can lock you up forever.

They ask for the password, you refuse, they lock you up for 5(?) years. When you are released, they ask for the password again...

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Updated Android malware steals voice two factor authentication

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Isn't it sweet...

Some Android handsets can be upgraded to Windows 10. That's about as secure as it gets at the moment in mobile. Zero malware so far across over 100 million devices.

Because there are only 5 users, all of whom work for Microsoft, and no apps available yet?

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Murderous necrophiliac kangaroo briefly wins nation's heart

Dr. Mouse
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Coat

Have you heard about the guy...

...who gave up Bestiality, Necrophilia and Flagellation?

He realised he was flogging a dead horse!

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Nvidia GPUs give smut viewed incognito a second coming

Dr. Mouse
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There is blame on all sides here, I think.

Chrome holds the majority of the blame: They are specifically stating that incognito mode keeps your session private. It should wipe anything which could be used to discover information about the session as soon as it is no longer needed. This would include the frame buffer.

Diablo holds some blame, as it should not be displaying the frame buffer until it has initialised it. It is not their fault that the data was leaked, but it is their fault that it was visible through their application.

NVidia should (although they may, I don't know) offer easy-to-use privacy hooks and APIs to ensure data is not leaked, triggering a zeroing of the frame buffer on release.

The OS (and applications) should use those hooks and APIs to ensure data is not leaked (e.g. on logoff or user switching).

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Nvidia's patent war on Samsung is a wreck – what you need to know

Dr. Mouse
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Re: Business as usual for Samsung

excluding those unable to spend on lawyers

This is a failing of the legal system itself, not of the patent system. It applies throughout all arms of the legal system in both the US and here in the UK (and most of the world): If you can afford an expensive lawyer, you have a better chance of winning. This makes a mockery of justice.

As a brief example, a friend of mine has been charged with a fairly serious crime (it is definitely a false accusation). Luckily, he is able to raise the huge amount of money needed for a good legal team to defend him (albeit by making huge sacrifices). This will give him good legal advice on the matter, and skilled barrister in court, and a team looking over the facts of the case to produce the defence with the best chance of a favourable outcome.

In turn, had I been the one charged, I would likely have had to rely on a court-appointed defence. I would have to make do with whatever quality of lawyer I had been assigned/were willing to accept legal aid fees. My chances of winning would be substantially lower, whether I had done what they say or not.

My chances in a civil suit would be even lower, as I would probably not be able to get help defending the case, although at least I would be able to claim costs if I managed to win (something you cannot do against the CPS in the UK).

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Reverser laments crypto game protection, says wares dead after 2018

Dr. Mouse
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Re: re: Expect government back doors in games in future....

A (video game) cracker is someone who removes the copy protection of a video game, so lamers like you can copy it and play it for free the legitimate owner is able to use it without the ridiculous restrictions put in place by the writers

FTFY.

I have, on many occasions in the past, had to crack games that I legitimately own in order to use them in the way I want. For example, I cracked Quake 2 so I could run it without having the CD in the drive. Had I not, I would have ended up with unplayable game I paid good money for, simply because the CD had become scratched. I would also have had to find the CD every time I wanted to play it.

Things have moved on, of course, but there are still legitimate reasons to crack a game you own. Many games, for instance, now require an internet connection, so you have to crack it to play it on a laptop away from home.

Also, even if your original statement is true, most crackers don't do it so that people can play for free. They do it because they can, because it is a fun and interesting exercise for them.

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US Marines kill noisy BigDog robo-mule for blowing their cover

Dr. Mouse
Silver badge

Re: Yes, methanol fuel cells are readily available

Yes, methanol fuel cells are readily available

And cost about as much for a 100W fuel cell as a 3kW Diesel genset. They are not very good at power to cost ratio

I can't see cost being the massive issue for such military uses as it would in most other areas. I suspect there are other downsides which took precedence over cost.

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