* Posts by Matt Bryant

8767 posts • joined 21 May 2007

SURPRISE: Norks' Linux distro has security vulns

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: James T Quirk

"....HOWEVER, if UK, Europe, Australian Governments, Made a Linux dist standard @ all Schools & Uni, in a few years, NO MORE MS royalties, wonder how much that would save TAXPAYERS, BANKS, Business in General ?" I think you'll find that the Penguinistas have been trying to uproot MS from schools for years with very limited success (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Linux_Schools_Project for an example). Even leading lights such as the City of Munich have backed off Linux (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/08/19/munich_dumping_linux_for_windows/).

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Stop

WTF?

To all those security "experts" bragging about the security holes they are finding in the Norks' Linux - STFU! Seriously, you're doing free bug-testing for a repressive regime, put your egos back in the box and leave Kim Jr and co in ignorance, please. You are not protecting "the people" as the few users in North Korea are going to be Kim Jr's thugs and scientists.

4
1

LIFELESS BEAGLE on MARS: A British TRIUMPH!

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Arnaut the clueless Re: the probe landed roughly where it was expected

"Someone I know who was closely involved in Gulf War 1....." Oh, you've been reading Slate again? (http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/war_stories/2003/03/patriot_games.html) Trust you to drag a completely unrelated bit of political posturing into a scientific thread.

The warhead on a Patriot wasn't big enough to vaporise every bit of a Scud, the best it could do was hope to cause enough damage that the Scud would break up or be deflected. In military terms, you would use a ballistic missile with a conventional warhead against a high-value point target (an headquarters for example), so deflecting a Scud would be a success. But in the Gulf War the Scuds were being used against civilian area targets, so a deflection or break-up did not necessarily stop bits of the Scud falling on people and killing them (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIM-104_Patriot#Persian_Gulf_War_.281991.29). That is why the US definition of a successful interception was a Patriot exploding within lethal range of a Scud - Patriot missiles had proximity fuses and weren't designed to actually hit the target (despite that, some critics tried to claim Patriot "never hit a Scud" - well, duh! http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIM-104_Patriot#Success_rate_vs._accuracy). It didn't help the statisticians that Patriots were usually fired three or four at once against a single Scud - if the Scud was deflected or broke up it was a single "interception" but meant critics claimed only a 25% or 33% "success rate per missile".

Israel saw the problem as civilian area defence, so Scuds being deflected or broken up over Isreali cities was still a failure to them. That's why they looked at forward interception with Iron Dome, the idea being to deflect or break up an incoming missile before it can get over an Israeli population center.

".....The propaganda effect was successful." You seem to be the one suffering from an effectiveness of propaganda. The Wikipedia link above comments on the Scud casings being found to be riddled with shrapnel from Patriot warheads, evidence of successful interceptions.

Now, do you have anything to actually say about BEAGLE 2?

0
0

FBI-baiter Barrett Brown gets five years in chokey plus $890,000 fine

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Destroyed All Braincells Re: depicts Abuse of power at it's best

".....Azov battalion?....." <Yawn> Oh look, Destroyed is once again trying to imply anyone that doesn't share his point of view must be a Nazi. I suppose at least he tried to be (minorly) inventive with this latest bit of political blinkeredness. Still, I suppose it was a gigantic strain on his limited mental resources to stay on topic.

Brown has a lot of issues and his case should be explained to schoolkids as an example of the perils of drugs. His arrest video (http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-YYhy4JQpnk) should be used to teach schoolkids (a) commit crimes and you will be caught; (b) The Man is not as stupid and technically incompetent as you want to think; and (c) there is no honour and trust amongst thieves, shown by the fact one of his (smarter) chat room buddies was wearing an Anon mask because he realised what a security risk the junkie and wannabe Brown was.

0
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Desidero Re: Desidero Club Fed

"......he already has streetcred......" LMAO! No, he has cred with basement-dwellers, not the street.

0
2
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Stop

Re: Desidero

".....This raises uncomfortable similarities to the disturbing saga of Aaron Swartz....." I see the sanctifying of St Aaron is proceeding at a pace. The Wikipedia entry for him has been sanitized to remove any evidence of his own confessions of depression (http://www.aaronsw.com/weblog/verysick) and prior suicidal thoughts. Some of the Faithful need to take a reality check on the whole Aaron Schwatrz issue (https://www.popehat.com/2013/03/24/three-things-you-may-not-get-about-the-aaron-swartz-case/) before blindly applying it to every drug-addled wannabe that gets his knuckles rapped by The Man.

0
2
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Desidero Re: Club Fed

".... protection and streetcred......" I think your definition of streetcred needs a reality check.

0
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Ol' Grumpy

"......I never understood why they quote a numeric value for a prison sentence when it clearly would exceed the average lifetime." The authorities believe it has deterant and bargaining value. The reality is the majority of such cases end with a plea bargain and a much, much smaller sentence, especially if the criminal in question rolls on their fellow crims. if you are the DA trying to tie up a case, it's much easier to scare the accused if you can say "This crime will get you a maximum of 100 years if you don't co-operate", implying no chance of a future life, rather than the realistic "This crime could get you five years".

1
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: depicts Re: Abuse of power at it's best

"....doings us proud again...." LOL, take a moment and think - just how did his sentence end up at five years after charges could have made it one hundred? He cut a deal and grassed up your beloved Anonyputzs. I hope they send him to a prison where they like snitches.....

0
10

Copycat drug souk Silk Road 2.0: Another man cuffed

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: ST7 Re: ST7 ST7 bonkers bonkers

".....What evidence do you have that the outcomes would be worse and that I would have to increase my tax contributions if these substances were available in a regulated environment ?" Ooh, you want me to prove a negative? Well, you could start with the history of heroin. It was first manufactured (as a patented product) by the German firm Aktiengesellschaft Farbenfabriken (today known as Bayer), who gave it their trade name of Heroin in 1895. Ironically, they thought they had developed a non-addictive replacement for morphine. Whilst it was a very effective surgical pain-killer (so effective that the Allies specifically demanded that the patent was surrendered as part of the Great War's Armistace terms), it became clear very early to the German authorities that over-the-counter sales of Heroin was leading to a massive rise in addiction. The Allies soon came to that realisation too, and 1925 it was banned by the League of Nations. So, my proof of the negative is that heroin has already been tried as an over-the-counter drug for public consumption, and was a failure.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heroin#Etymology

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: ST7 Re: ST7 bonkers bonkers

"This is the pricing information for injectable heroin of BP quality....." That is the collectively-bargained, Government mandated and subsidised internal price for diamorphine for the NHS, not the commercial market price for the same drug. In the UK it is only prescribed for extreme pain or for court-mandated supervised heroin addiction treatment because it is both highly addictive and can have severe side effects beyond just pronounced addiction (http://www.patient.co.uk/medicine/diamorphine). The chances of such a powerful medical drug being legalised just for your enjoyment are pretty much zero, you'd have a better chance of legalising personal ownership of mustard gas, so your whittering on about its supposed cheapness is both stupid and irrelevant.

Indeed, the street price of heroin is cheap compared to other hard drugs (which is probably why you chose it for your deceptive argument), about €30-70 per gram depending on location (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_drug_trade#Heroin), but that typically contains only 5-10% actual base heroin. It still means an addict is going to be needing €100-plus per day for their habit, and that plus increases as they build up tolerance over time. It also means injecting, which is why it is a less popular choice with the trendy crowd ("You simply can't have collapsed veins and tracks when wearing Givenchy, daaaahling"). And when you're passed out in a high for 2-5 hours at a time as often as you can it doesn't leave much chance of earning that €100+ legally, despite what you want to pretend.

0
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Stop

Re: ST7 Re: bonkers bonkers

".....and less aquisative crime on your streets....." Bullshit. All those junkies that currently have to steal to fund their habit, where do you think they are going to find the money to afford a more expensive legal habit? Do you really want to pretend they're all going to go from thieves and muggers to productive and law-abiding citizens overnight if you legalise all drugs? The junkies will still be there, and they still have to steal to fund their habit, and they will still buy from the cheapest source, which will be street dealers selling illegal and unsafe products and not pharmacies.

0
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: AC Re: Solution

"Legalisation, regulation, taxation....." Will put a burden on a legal manufacturer that will mean illegal manufacturers will still have an advantage. You have to charge more for your product to meet safety and quality standards which the established drug cartels will simply laugh about or simply fake. This already happens with commercial medicines. The end of prohibition did not stop illegal alcohol production such as moonshine, and the establishment of luxury alcohol brands (such as Scotch whiskey) has led to gangs labeling their cheap (and often dangerous) product as those luxury brands. Criminals are criminals because they choose not to follow the law, so making new laws will do little to disincentives them from crime, especially if those laws guarantee them a profit.

0
6
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: bonkers Re: bonkers

".....Silk road does allow one to buy direct from a cheerful peasant....." You are living in denial.

".....drug use is a personal moral standpoint....." Your moral viewpoint being your denial of the facts (the evil you mentioned) allows you to convince yourself your drug habit isn't harming anyone else.

1
5
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: bonkers

"Silk road sounds to me like a perfect antidote to all the evils of a criminal supply chain...." No, it only makes it easier for the street dealers to make the final link in the chain - the sale to the end user - without getting caught. The drugs still have to be cultivated/manufactured by criminal gangs (often using slave labour - http://www.care2.com/causes/forced-labor-accounts-for-thousands-missing-in-mexicos-drug-war.html), smuggled into the target market (by gangs involved in gun and people smuggling - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_smuggling#Drug_trafficking), and protected from rival gangs through the distribution chain up to the point of sale (by turf wars, violence and intimidation - http://www.theguardian.com/world/2010/sep/03/mexico-drug-war-killing-fields), before the street dealers make the final and most risky exchange - dealing with a member of the public who may be an undercover cop. SR removed a lot of the risk for the street dealers, it didn't remove any of the evil from the drugs supply chain. If you think drugs are being dealt on SR and similar sites between end users and cheerful Colombian peasants then you missed a lot of the news for the last fifty-odd years.

5
7

Landlines: The tech that just won't die

Matt Bryant
Silver badge

Re: A Non e-mouse Re: Line installation

".....I was gob-smacked by the extortionate installation fee BT wanted to charge to re-connect the line....." A mate moved into a flat "with a BT line" just outside the M25. Unfortunately, the previous tenant had unbundled the line to another provider, run up a massive bill calling Pakistan, then skipped the country without paying. My mate was told the phone company wouldn't release the line for BT to reconnect unless someone paid the outstanding bill (plus the £150 BT reconnection fee you mentioned as a "new line"!). My mate told them to get stuffed, got a Vodafone dongle for Internet access and used his mobile instead of a landline, he says he doesn't miss having a landline at all.

2
0

Doomsday Clock says 3 MINUTES to MIDNIGHT. Again

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: Pete2 Re: All those nukes...

".....So would a system that was last end-to-end tested half a century ago, with all the subsequent innovation, upgrades, redesigns, changes and cost-cutting have any realistic chance of working?......" IIRC, shortly after the fall of the Iron Curtain, one of the ex-Soviet Republics found itself with dozens of Russian ICBMs, and managed to launch a salvo of four by accident. Thankfully, two failed to launch out of their silos and the other two both failed shortly after launch.

1
1

Snowden SLAMS iPhone, claims 'special software' tracks users

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Alert

Re: DougS Re: "He's got a simple phone"

".....other than using a dumbphone....." But, don't those 'dumbphones' all run proprietary code? I mean, do you even know what your old Nokia 3310 was actually running in the background.... it's not like they're crystal radio sets - even 'dumbphones' run an OS and you have virtually SFA chance of detecting any 'dial-home' nasties hidden in that proprietary code.

/so much fun tweaking the tinfoil.

1
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Google

".....Where's your news item on this, Vultures?" They probably missed it on account of how hard they were trying to not see this bit of news (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-30883472). Yes, Tinfoilers, read it and weep - the UK and USA at number 1 and 2!

0
0

NSA: We're in YOUR BOTNET

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: amanfrimmars1 No one should be surprised.

"I suppose you imagine that all you read here....." Nope, didn't read that site's article, indeed I didn't bother watching the actual address either. Obambi is a lame duck POTUS even before we get to the bit about him being unable to stand for another term, so all his SOTU address was going to be was a measure of whether he could overcome his ambitions for personal glory to actually work with the Republicans for a change. Surprise, surprise, he failed again, instead taking glee in announcing how he was going to veto anything from the Republicans put forth that might interfere with his "legacy". Considering that the Republicans are in the majority in both houses due to the will of the US voters, he basically spent the SOTU address telling the World how little he actually cares for democracy. It was even more ironic that, after trying to take credit for the performance of the US economy, he then said he wanted to take more tax from the very people that actually made that economic success happen! The remaining two years of Obambi's presidency are going to be a bitter pre-electoral battle of grandstanding and sniping, which really helps no-one.

BTW, the SOTU address had nothing to do with Vietnam and your being unable to comprehend that the state of US-Vietnamese relations have changed quite a bit since 1975.

0
2
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Roo Re: @ MB (amanfrimmars1 No one should be surprised.)

".... Fair play to Vietnam though, they are making rapid progress." Their economic progress having accelerated most since they dropped a lot of their Marxist claptrap, liberalised many elements of their economy, and opened up to Western (especially US) investment - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Vietnam.

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: amanfrimmars1 Re: No one should be surprised.

".....Vietnam....No wonder such folk and their colluding and supportive allies create such lifelong mortal and immortal enemies....." So you missed the bit where Communist Vietnam signed a trade deal with The Man waaaay back in 2001 (http://vietnam.usembassy.gov/mobile//econ12.html). Or how the Vietnamese economy is benefiting and encouraging tourism from those Nasty Capitalists (http://m.english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/travel/121032/vietnam-tourism-holds-great-promise-for-millions.html#).

0
3

Big Blue bleeds more red in Q4, promises better days to come

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: AC Re: "Bleeds red"?

".....IBM made money....." Yeah, all those reports of dropping sales figures in all sectors - nothing to worry about! The big question is did Sam leave Ginny any of the family silver to sell off, or has it all gone?

0
1

US drug squad cops: We snooped on innocent Americans' phone calls too!

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: SolidSquid Re: earl grey how many of them went to jail

"Subpoena != warrant and don't even necessarily have to be issued by a court, just a government body....." You are referring to administrative subpoenas which are tightly controlled. The DEA is allowed to use them for investigating commercial drug manufacturers (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Administrative_subpoena), not for general investigations into drug smuggling and not for wiretaps, so I suspect you will find this was not an administrative subpoena.

".....The National Security Letters which were issued (and arguably abused) by the FBI...." The article refers to the DEA, not the FBI. Do please try and stay on topic.

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: AC Re: This is not news

".....and the police finding large amounts of drugs....." So, if I understand you right, the police are catching drug smugglers red-handed, no-one else is being impacted (unless you count the drug addicts and drug lords), and you're complaining.....?

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: earl grey Re: how many of them went to jail

"how many of them went to jail.....the lying bastards in the DEA." I see you skim-read right past the bit about subpoenas, as in legal warrants signed by a court? If they had a subpoena then the DEA agents involved will not be going to court.

2
11

Possible Lizard Squad members claim hack of Oz travel insurer

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

SQLi? Skiddie.

<Yawn> It's a bit like a mugger bragging about using someone else's club to mug grannies with.

1
0

Give ALL the EU access to Netflix, says Vince Cable

Matt Bryant
Silver badge

Re: That Steve Guy Re: how about all content globally?

"I'm tired of UK netflix having so much less than USA....." Certain services are tied to location licenses, some will not work if the software detects that you are not where your license says you are entitled to be. But, if you are willing to pay for an US Netflix subscription, it then becomes a matter of fooling your system into thinking it is in the US. Now, I'm not encouraging any illegal/piracy activity (CYA statement), but a friend bought a Roku in the States last year and was annoyed in didn't work in the UK as well as it did in the US. He found he could fool the Roku with a paid-for DNS service called Unlocator (http://vpnfreedom.com/roku/how-to-use-the-roku-box-outside-the-us/), and he told me he now enjoys full US Netflix streaming wherever he can get the bandwidth. He makes sure he doesn't use the service for anything other than streaming (no work material, email or other coms).

1
0

You'll get sick of that iPad. And guess who'll be waiting? Big daddy Linux...

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: 420Penguin Re: @Jeff Lewis

".....I can live with Windows (NT) left with running games and Excel." Yup, totally parallel universe.

0
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Lee D Laptop/convertible+smart phone

"In my experience, places that care about support aren't using Microsoft for it. They are using a myriad of technicians, consultants and specialists......" Yeah, for stuff like security patches? I thought not.

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Lee D Re: Laptop/convertible+smart phone

".....there's not much room for Windows itself except for convenience, familiarity and licensing." I agree with 99% of what you posted, but you forgot support. It's great supporting yourself at home on Linux, but when you're a business you really want good support, not maybe-good-enough support, and you will pay good money every year for dependable support to ensure your workers are concentrating on working. IMHO, I only see Red Hat and SuSE providing the levels of Linux server support required for business, and that is why MS will remain the king of desktops and Google will be king for "Linux" mobiles and tablets for the foreseeable future.

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Go

Re: jbuk1 Re: Linux is possibly the only platform where the ...

"Linux is a kernel....." Exactly! Finally, someone remembers the difference between Linux and "Linux", the latter being The Movement made of differing OSs that use that kernel in one form or another, the users of those OSs, their app providers, and businesses hoping to make a killing off the freetards efforts.

Indeed, the most annoying line in the whole article - ".....The most visible face of Linux in mobile and, let's face it, the most likely to succeed beyond the small circle of the Linux faithful, is undoubtedly Canonical....." - just shows the author's fixation with "Linux" The Movement rather than Linux. The actual most visible face of Linux in mobile land is Android which uses a modified Linux kernel. Linux is already a massive success in mobile land (and tablets) because of Android, but Android (and Google's machinations with hardware suppliers) are exactly why "Linux" is failing in mobile (and tablet) land. Canonical? I'm a big supporter of Ubuntu on the desktop, but Ubuntu on mobiles or tablets as a commercial venture? Pull the other one, it's got bells on it!

2
0

Feds dig up law from 1789 to demand Apple, Google decrypt smartphones, slabs

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: NumptyScrub Re: ACturd @Camberwick Green

"......I see you unequivocally support the idea that deletion of data =: destruction of evidence...." So you missed the bit where I explained spoliation? Fail!

".....without stopping to ensure that the data in question has been properly classified as (or should be classifed as) "evidence" first....." Guess who gets to classify it as evidence - the coppers! You fail again!

".....In the absence of any warrants requesting that data, and in the absence of any arrest and/or charges, any data is not classifiable as "evidence", and thus can be freely destroyed without consequence....." I see you skim-read the original post as well as my replies. The original poster wanted to use a self-destruct to avoid a police warrant leading to an order to decrypt. You fail again, again!

".....Note that blanket assumptions that all data is considered protected as evidence sounds just a little bit totalitarian...." You really don't have a clue what you're blathering about. When the police ask for a warrant they cover all data on the system or device in question, not specific files. Any evidence of file deletion can be raised in court, and file deletion can be detected through the OS or surface scans. So you fail again, again, yet again!

Maybe you should just stick to the snarky, pointless comments.

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Stop

Re: ACturd Re: @Camberwick Green

Ah, I see you're sticking with your your usual level of offering and adding nothing to the conversation. This is my surprised face, honest.

0
0

Young CHAP CUFFED in Blighty over Xmas Sony and XBOX hacks

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

What a twit!

You've gotta love these skiddie gangs having their little online spats. I would suspect their habit of "swatting" each other just gives the cops two suspects - the swatted and the swatter - as likely cybercrims to keep an eye on. And he's 18 so proper court, prison and a criminal record for him if he's convicted, no getting off with a "joovie".

0
0

Paris terror attacks: ISPs face pressure to share MORE data with governments

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: FormerKowloonTiger Re: @G.D.

"......non-Muslims......" One of the victims in Paris was a French Muslim policeman, Ahmed Merabet, who was trying to intervene. In fact, the majority of the victims of extremist Muslims are other Muslims, most of them peacefully just trying to get on with their lives.

".....Churchill's acerbic wit...." Churchill, having fought Muslims, had no illusions about "Mohammedism", referring to it as the most retrograde theology (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_River_War#1899_unabridged.2C_two-volume_edition). Strangely, and little reported in the West, but Egyptian President Al-Sisi has also commented on "retrograde extremism" and insisted Islam must "modernise" (http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4612771,00.html). So I'd have to disagree with your portrayal of all Muslims as enemies

".....Neville Chamberlain seems to be, retrospectively, the epitome of gentlemanly, impeccable Western Civ......" Neville Chamberlain often gets poor press as some type of bumbling gent desperate for peace, but he was no fool. Whilst he did initially underestimate Hitler's willingness to lie, cheat and break treaties, when he went to Munich in 1938 he went to buy time for Britain to re-arm. As it was, even though he hoped the Munich Agreement had bought "peace in our time", he had learned enough about Hitler at that point to not trust him, so Chamberlain presented a public face of calm whilst accelerating British re-armament. If Chamberlain had really been fooled by Hitler then he would have scaled the expensive re-armament program back. It was Chamberlain's accelerated re-armament program that actually put RAF Fighter Command in the position of being able to fight the Battle of Britain.

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge

Re: scrubber Re: Cameron: "Do we allow terrorists the safe spaces to talk....."

Still being <CENSORED!>

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Destroyed All Braincells

"....Libya...." Hold on a sec, weren't you and your chums claiming only not too long ago that Libya was part of that "wonderful" Arab Spring, and all due to the Great Revelations brought to us by Bradley/Chelsea Manning? Seems that much repeated claim has been forgotten now that the Arab Spring has turned into such a big mess (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-30003865).

2
4

If cities want to run their own broadband, let 'em do it, Prez Obama tells FCC

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Lots of fun ahead!

So, City A decides to offer a broadband service using taxpayers' funds. Great! I assume that therefore means (on pain of plenty of lawsuits) that the City will supply exactly the same service to all taxpayers in the City boundary? Can a citizen sue if someone a mile closer to the cabinet is getting 2Mbps more than they are? Would City A have the funds for such suits, or choose to avoid them by crippling all links to the same speed?

What if a citizen moves to City A, does that citizen have essentially free broadband up until the start of the new tax year, or will the City have to stump up for a special tax billing system that charges monthly? What if they move out of the City before the end of a tax year they have paid for, do they get a rebate?

And those on social, I assume they get their cable service for free paid for by those citizens that do work? Yeah, have fun with that vote-killer! What if there is more than one family in a block, do they each get a line equal to an ordinary house or do those that pay higher house taxes subsidise those in city center blocks? Do you charge by the property or the number of taxpayers at the address?

And what if a citizen gets their line and sells access to his WiFi to his neighbours Outside the boundary, will the City be policing routers to check the devices connecting to a line belong to the taxpayer the line is allocated to? Wait, won't that have the Tinfoil Brigade shrieking about "privacy intrusions" and insisting the City is building a database of devices "for surveillance"? What if a person from outside the City boundaries visits a home in the City, do they have to pay a temporary tax to use the WiFi or watch Netflix?

Yes, it's time to break out the popcorn on this one!

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Jeffrey Nonken

".....and charge reasonable rates...." Er, "reasonable" by whose estimation? The freetards? The telco shareholders? The local city mayor, the county, the state or the Federal Government? Please state whom exactly do you see as having the right to set prices, then go check with a lawyer to see if he/she agrees. I bet they don't.

2
8

Warning: Using encrypted email in Spain? Do not pass go, go directly to jail

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: AC Re: Franko will be proud

".....giggles coming from Valle de los Caídos Basilica around Franco's grave....." Of course, because wanting to lock up politically naive idiots that endanger the public when they try to blow up cash machines and cathedrals just must make you a Fascist dictator, right?

0
2

FBI boss: Sony hack was DEFINITELY North Korea, haters gonna hate

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Vimes Re: Yeah...

<CENSORED!>

0
0

Erik Meijer: AGILE must be destroyed, once and for all

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: AC Re: AC @ TkH11

".....Any methodology that iteratively attempts to "home in" on a solution based on the next set of guesses is inherently broken....." COUGH* prototyping *COUGH.

I find a modified waterfall methodology works quite well as you can bolt in prototyping if the risk analysis / feasibility study show you actually don't know enough to fix the requirements and ensure the success of the project. Of course, advocates of modified waterfall will often tell you XP (Extreme Programming, presumably what Mr Meijer is a fan of) is 100% "guessing". The biggest problem is those that are inflexible in their approach and cannot bend to suit the project.

1
2
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Meh

Re: Handy Andy Re: Coders v the world

".....All the hangers on, BA's, PM's, architects and other work dodgers love it because they can't code but they can all talk none stop bollocks in a meeting......" IMHO, I think it's more to do with the management numbers game. Modern management practices taught on MBA courses and the like totally focus on efficiency/productivity and putting a number/value against everything in some Excel spreadsheet somewhere. They can then crunch the numbers and supposedly tell senior management "exactly where we are". They always want to be able to put a number on coder productivity, like estimating each coder will produce a thousand lines of code each per week with an average of three bugs per coder - complete rubbish, but it is numbers they can crunch. I have had great fun trying to explain that tasks differ in complexity, that a coder may complete a thousand lines on an easy task in a day or two, bug-free, because it is a task that is easy or well-known, but the same coder could struggle to complete a really tricky coding task in a thousand lines in a month. Inevitably, I get asked to "qualify" the difficulty of a task with some form of "difficulty factor" so they can slap a sum into a cell in their spreadsheet and think they have it covered. I have even had requests to "grade" project team members, irrespective of the fact coders are all different and how they performed on one task could have zero bearing on a new and completely different task. IMHO, they like Agile because it says every period of X weeks they get a sprint and a release, which is measurable.

1
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: macjules Re: move fast and break things

"Then again he did once work for Microsoft and man, have we been buying the results of the 'move fast and break things' approach for years now." Actually, MS has a very good testing perspective and had a suite of good testing tools long before its competitors. I suspect MS's problems are more due to conflicting headline requirements - "make it easy to use" vs "make it secure", with the former winning at the design phase but the latter becoming more important in later development. If you identify imperfect requirements then no PM process on Earth is going to save you from delivering an imperfect product, and subsequent attempts to adapt an imperfect product is always going to be harder (but less of a case of market suicide in the case of Windows) compared to just starting with a fresh design.

I suspect Erik Meijer's problem is he is a "gasshole" - a super-genius asshole who continually irritates his colleagues with statements like "What, you couldn't see that?". I suspect he is one of those people that is so smart and good in the narrow field they work in that they have a problem realising not everyone can work to their level, hence the disparagement of processes he deems "unnecessary" or "irrelevant" because he is just too smart to need them.

3
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Aristotle's Re: I'm a developer... WAAAAAAAAAAH!!!!

"Geez you "developers" sound like a bunch of self interested whingers...." I used to have an Aussie PM who joked that managing devs wasn't herding cats but herding Poms.....

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Lee Fear Re: No clothes.

".....Agile is by far the best way to build anything other than tiny projects...." Employed consultant says "otherwise".

1
1
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: TkH11

"....You've forgotten to say what one of the fundamental principles of agile is...." I think what the author and posters are pointing out is not the problem with the principles of agile dev, but the way it is often implemented by those who believe (due to the hype) it will magically deliver perfect results if only they follow the process inflexibly and unimaginatively. Processes can most definitely help, but having worked inside failed and successful CPM, PROMPT, PRINCE, PRINCE2, waterfall and agile projects/programs, all I can suggest is the most important aspect is the skills and capability of the people involved, not the process.

4
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Happy

Re: AC Re: @ TkH11

"....Which is a nice way of saying "guessing your way to the answer"." Yeah, but if I'm being paid to get to that answer then who cares how I got there if I actually got there on-time and on-budget!

0
0
Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Devil

Re: dogged

".....Scrum is what happens when you let people are a) idiots b) Americans* AND c) in marketing get their hands on Agile and it should be burned with fire....." LOL, too late! It's even got into the PMI certification setup, which means it has A Piece Of Paper that HR/agencies will want to see on your CV to get the big bucks.

"....And Unit Tests are not about predicting failure conditions in live! They are about making each unit of code modular and robust...." No, no, no! They are about showing that you have met the requirements in the contract because then you get paid! If you actually spend the time to make the product work as it should and that wasn't actually in the requirements then you just delivered something for free. Salesgrunts will not like you for that, they will prefer you to sandbag the fix/addition so they can sell it to the customer as a project extension. Of course, if you are internal and not a contractor, make sure you point out the issue (to cover your backside).

Too cynical?

0
0

Forums