* Posts by Matt Bryant

8666 posts • joined 21 May 2007

Deprivation Britain: 1930s all over again? Codswallop!

Matt Bryant
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Re: ST7 Re: @Time: inequality

".....The Government of a Sovereign Nation does not have to borrow the Nations currency from any market because as the sole issuer of this currency it can produce an unlimited supply....." Yeah, like economy-crippling hyperinflation just never happens if you just print money like crazy, right?

http://www.cnbc.com/id/102082864

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinflation_in_Zimbabwe#Causes

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinflation_in_the_Weimar_Republic#Hyperinflation

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Marsbarbrain @AC - @Phil O'Sophical - @The Axe - The reality

"Don't worry, Matt, I always excuse your ignorance....." So, would you like me to use my 'ignorance' to explain your business? What you did was use your market knowledge (pfnaar) to identify a market gap ('quality' bondage gear for cheap-ass doms) and you exploited that market with all the zeal of a good capitalist! Hopefully that shock to your socialist pretensions will have you choking on your ball-gag.

".....I would explain...." No thanks. Don't get me wrong, I support your right to whatever consensual adult sexual activity you like as long as it occurs in a legal manner in your home and has zero impact on me, but I have no interest in learning the details of your 'alternate lifestyle', thanks. It also has nothing to do with the topic of the thread. Seriously, get over yourself, you're not the centre of the World, mmmkay?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Marsbarbrain Re: @AC - @Phil O'Sophical - @The Axe - The reality

".....I also run my own business.....BDSM gear....." That does explain a lot!

".....but I don't gouge my customers for every possible penny....." 'Scuse my ignorance on the matter, and bowing to what I assume is your years of experience of self-abuse, but Shirley, in the BDSM biz, you want to be charging for gouging as well as the whipping?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: I ain't Spartacus Re: When I were a lad...

".....all this sex on television. I keep falling off..." Well, it is quite tricky with modern flatscreens. With the old cathode tube sets you had a bigger surface area, big enough even for the average Northern lass to park her backside on, though it did interfere with watching the football.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: sed gawk Re: The per captia figures may be better but that's not the point.

"@ Matt Byrant - do fuck off, you're a blight on this forum and the personification of the need for killfiles....." LOL, I take it that charming response is an admission that you can't argue the facts. TBH, cry more.

".....hence I got access to the likes of the Acorn Archimedes and a decent grounding in maths and science.....wouldn't have been available to me had I been born some twenty years later....." Rubbish! Throughout the Eighties and Nineties there was a massive investment in state school equipment, especially computers. One of my mates had the fun of running around Devon putting BBC Micros (and later PCs) into secondary schools and colleges. By the Nineties, PCs were becoming common in homes as the price of acquisition had dropped, and most schools had plenty of IT kit.

".....it would have cost me the princely sum of zero pounds on a grant....." Actually, the majority of students, even in the days of full grants, graduated with large debts. It was the introduction of Student Loans that helped fill the gap, making it easier for people from poorer backgrounds to afford a degree.

".....most people derive their income from work, if their work never pays them enough money to allow them to "upskill"....." What, never asked your bank for a loan? Apart from the many schemes for adult education, many banks have specific loans for career improvement.

"....but I grafted my arse off....." So you did it, but you somehow think you're so exceptional and modern youth so fragile that they can't?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Marsbarbrian Oh, well *that's* alright, then...

"Matt Bryant BINGO!!!" And your point? Oh, you were just making mine.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Charles Manning

".....Having grown up in rural Africa, this notion of Western poverty riles me no end......" When I was a spoilt kid and grumbled about my lot, my old man used to take me into the kitchen and point at the tap - "That alone makes your lot better than most of the kids on the World", he'd say. Took me a few trips abroad to actually realise it was a lot, lot more than 'most'.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Jim 59 Re: Re:TheOtherHobbes

".....I am influenced by how much the chief executive is paid...." Good idea, but you have to be careful as the charities are getting very good at hiding their employees and execs as "non-employees". The classic case is the rights group Liberty and The Civil Liberties Trust. The latter is the charity and as such makes a big noise about how little it spends directly on staff compared to how much it spends on "activities". But, they "outsource" their actual activities and campaigns to Liberty, which are an unincorporated "non-profit" association. Indeed, Liberty's sole means of income is the money paid to them by The Civil Liberties Trust (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberty_(advocacy_group)#Organisation). This means The Civil Liberties Trust do not have to declare Shami Chakrabarti's wages as Liberty's director as an employee, nor do they have to list her income from her tours, paid-for TV appearances (taxpayers' money in the case of "Have I Got News For You"), etc. In essence, Chakrabarti's wages (and those of Liberty's marketing people, lawyers, lobbyists, etc.) are declared by The CLT as "charitable operations activities" rather than employee costs.

Liberty and The CLT is (IMHO) the most blatant example I've seen of this dodge, but I'm told it also happens with other charities in a "you-scratch-my-back-and-I'll-outsource-my-activities-to-you" manner.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: LucreLout Re: Perception and reality

Love it!

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Matt Bryant
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WTF?

Re: sed gawk Re: The per captia figures may be better but that's not the point.

".....but it's harder now to change one's life by dint of honest effort....." Complete, unmitigated bollocks! It's simply more the fact that far too many people are not willing to put in the effort. I have a Polish graduate on my team, he is always asking for overtime, never says 'no' to being given a hard task, and produces work that is both consistently and reliably good. His father was a coal miner and worked sixty hours every week which probably explains a lot. He is surprised when he is praised for his approach, but then he's still got the work ethic most UK graduates (and non-grads) seem to think is not required. And even without a top-notch education, sheer hard work and smarts can get you ahead, just ask Sir Alan Sugar.

"....Education used to be the primary social ladder, it's now very difficult to educate oneself out of a subsistence level to a more comfortable existence....." Double bollocks! Modern education is the great leveler, it means I work with a multinational team of people with very diverse backgrounds that would have been impossible in the Thirties. Indeed, the chances of someone poor getting a degree in the Thirties was virtually non-existant, but now even kids from the poorest UK areas have the opportunity to get a degree. It seems some people are busier thinking up excuses than actually making an effort, either in school or in employment. Companies in the UK are screaming out for educated people.

".....Poor is not about money, it's about opportunity, it's about expectation....." Then stop expecting a Lear jet just because you got a GCSE. If your expectations are constantly not being met then don't you think maybe you need to reset your expectations and stop expecting the World to be handed to you on a plate?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Marsbarbrian Re: Oh, well *that's* alright, then...

Rather than address the actual issue, GM decides it's much easier to engage in another round of his favourite hobby of Leftie denial.....

TFTFY

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Matt Bryant
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Re:TheOtherHobbes

"From Barnardos....." No disrespect to Barnardos' staff and supporters (I have worked with them on charity projects), but there are a core number of people in the charity business that make sure they paint things in as bad a light as possible. They do so for the simple reason that it is a business and, just like all other businesses, it must continue to generate more money than it spends or it will cease to exist. Now, some of that core are happy to 'massage the stats' because they are caring people that are deeply committed to their cause and even volunteer their time and services for free, but some make a very handsome living as employees of such charities, and for that latter group to declare "yup, we won that war on being poor" would not be good for business. In some cases the level of renumeration may make you question their motives:

http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/212345/rolling-greenpeace/iain-murray

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/10232004/72-per-cent-increase-in-executives-paid-over-100k-a-year-at-best-known-charities.html

http://www.theguardian.com/society/salarysurvey/table/0,12406,1042677,00.html

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Amnesty_International#Excessive_payouts_to_senior_staff

In FY2012, Amnesty International USA's Exec Director, Suzanne Nossel, had a declared salary of $249,189 (http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3294#.VI3HZxuCOrU), which IMHO probably goes a long way to explaining why AI are so hot on 'exposing injustices'.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Nathan 13 Re: Spot on

".....We dont know how good we have it....." Those of us who have travelled to less fortunate lands certainly do. The problem is there is a large number of people in the West that make a very good living off feeding others the idea that "it's so unfair", etc. Just like Al Gores did with 'global warming' (http://newsbusters.org/blogs/noel-sheppard/2009/11/02/nyt-admits-gore-making-fortune-global-warming, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/12/al-gores-net-worth-green-energy_n_1961299.html), they hypocritically use the fears of "the poor" to feather their own nests.

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US Navy's LASER CANNON WARSHIP: USS Ponce sent to Gulf

Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: AC AC "...under the terms of the Geneva Convention it can't be used...."

"....Non indigenous Jews that had historically nothing whatsoever to do with Palestine started invading in the early 20th century....." Please go reads up on Jewish history <CENSORED! - it may have upset El Mod that I suggested your lack of knowledge was due to an 'education' solely based on Koranic recitals than historical fact> (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_Jewish_history).

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: AC AC "...under the terms of the Geneva Convention it can't be used...."

<Sigh> More guesswork as to which bit of the history lesson upset El Mod. Part 4....

"...."Israel can be held to the Geneva Convention as it is an UN-recognized sovereign state" One would think, but Israel chooses to ignore it - for instance still building settlements on occupied Palestinian land...." And another legal fail! This is another bit of the lawfare drive pushed by anti-Semites - "the Geneva Convention says Israel is illegally occupying Palestinian land". It is false for the simple reason that there is no sovereign state called 'Palestine'. The bit of the Fourth Geneva Convention they are trying to apply is (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourth_Geneva_Convention):

"Article 2 states that signatories are bound by the convention both in war, armed conflicts where war has not been declared, and in an occupation of another country's territory."

'Palestine' is not a sovereign state and does not have recognised borders, and therefore does not meet the requirement to be called a 'country' under the Fourth Geneva Convention, therefore the settlements are not actually illegal and neither is the so-called 'occupation'. Indeed, until the final borders are agreed in a final settlement (which the PNA are bound to by the Oslo Accords), any and all land in either the Gaza Strip or the West Bank could end up being horse-traded for peace and end up as part of Israel.

Of course, if the Fakeistinians want to try it, Israel can always do exactly the same with regard to Jews ethnically cleansed from the West Bank and Jerusalem area in 1948, as well as Jews that fled Arab and Muslim countries since (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_exodus_from_Arab_and_Muslim_countries#Comparisons_with_Palestinian_exodus) and maybe some of that oil money can pay compensation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_exodus_from_Arab_and_Muslim_countries#Property_losses_and_compensation), and the Jordanian Arabs that moved in to occupy Jewish land in the West Bank, especially in East Jerusalem (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_City_(Jerusalem)) and the City of David in Silwan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of_David#Modern_period).

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: AC "...under the terms of the Geneva Convention it can't be used...."

"....Considering Israel uses drones mostly for monitoring....." Oh dear, your lack of research also seems to extend to Israeli drone use. The majority of strikes on terror targets in the Gaza Strip are now carried out with drones firing missiles, they started replacing helicopter gunships in that role last year (https://medium.com/war-is-boring/israel-swaps-killer-copters-for-killer-drones-ff55a5db9a17). But, in the years when Israel isn't driven to mount large-scale operations like "Cast Lead" and "Protective Edge", by far the biggest killer of Gazan civilians is Hamas, but they get extra vindictive when Israel makes them look weak (http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/4706/gazan-hamas-war-crimes).

".....Utter rubbish...." You wish. Every bit is historic fact.

"....the area was historically known as Palestine....." Palestine was a much greater area and the term 'Palestinian' referred to Jews, Christians and many other ethnic and religious groups, not just the Arabs that invaded the area in the 7th Century and since. The hijacking of the term 'Palestinian' by the Arabs is a deliberate lie intended to infer sole right to the land.

".....long before the Jews invaded in the early 20th century....." Apart from the fact the Jews had been continually resident in the area for three-thousand years before Islam even existed, the UN Partition Plan of 1948 was based on the demographics of the remaining 24% area of Mandate Palestine left after Transjordan had been gifted to the Arabs. The areas marked by the UN to form the basis of Israel were not just those with Jewish residents but areas where the Jews were in the majority and had been continuously resident for hundreds of years. Even the Gaza Strip had a long history of an indigenous Jewish population from long before the creation of Islam (http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2009/02/gazas_rich_jewish_history.html). So your hilarious statement is easily shown to be wrong.

BTW, Israel can be held to the Geneva Convention as it is an UN-recognized sovereign state with legitimate armed forces and is a party to the Convention, unlike the Fakestinians. Israel also has the kind of high-tech military industry required to make laser weapons, unlike their neighbours. Like they say, winners have jet bombers. And tanks, artillery and warships. And probably laser cannons too soon.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: "...under the terms of the Geneva Convention it can't be used against humans directly..."

"....the Israelis...." Fakeistinian* mortars and rockets, fired from Gaza at Israel but falling short, actually killed more Fakeistinian civilians than Israeli drone strikes last year. Those mortars and rockets were, in every single case, fired at Israeli civilians, an actual 'war-crime' in every sense, whereas the Israeli drone strikes targeted known terrorists hiding amongst and behind Fakeistinian civilians.

*There has never been a people called 'Palestinians' nor an actual state called Palestine. The area known as Palestine is a historic area covering Syria, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and - at different historic periods - parts of Iraq, Egypt and even Saudi Arabia. The Mandate of Palestine was a creation of the League of Nations to describe part of the Ottoman Turkish Empire under British control after the Great War, and included many of the lands the Arabs had conquered in their invasion from Saudi Arabia. The creation of a modern 'Palestine' was a propaganda ploy by the KGB and PLO. Even PLO members have admitted this, most famously by Zahir Muhsein, the leader of the pro-Syria as-Sa'iqa faction of the PLO between 1971 and 1979. "....The Palestinian people does not exist. The creation of a Palestinian state is only a means for continuing our struggle against the state of Israel for our Arab unity...." More amusingly, Arabic does not have a hard 'p' in their vocabulary, meaning they cannot even natively say 'Palestine', instead using an old Turkish name for a Mediterranean people they are completely unrelated to, the Falastin, leading to the joke about 'Fakeistinians'.

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Matt Bryant
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Unhappy

Aw, c'mon Obambi!

i was so hoping Obmabi would recommission the submarine SSN-591 for this project (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Shark_(SSN-591)). Seriously, the guy misses all the good gags.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: VeNT Re: science eh?

"....called ka-fucking-boom?....." Shirley, given the expected progression through 9K to 10K, this is the BFG1K?

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Matt Bryant
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Re: TheVogon Re: "Ponce"

May just be me, but I remember the Vogons as being extreme beureacrats, not homophobes.

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Movie industry's evil plan to destroy the internet is going precisely nowhere

Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: Control your media better.

".... It is the duty of property owners to take all reasonable steps to secure their own property before they have recourse to law enforcement...." Rubbish! Legally, I can leave my doors wide open and even put my wallet on my front lawn, and whilst the coppers may think I'm an idiot for doing so, it makes not one jot of difference either when they charge you for trespass and theft or when you go to court. Similarly, if you copy a copyrighted DVD or CD, you are the criminal and your crime is not the fault of the distributor that put the material on an easily copied DVD.

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Heads up! If Tor VANISHES over the weekend, this is why

Matt Bryant
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Re: Old Handle Re: Mephistro (@ Matt Bryant) - this will upset Badger

"....As for the idea of keeping them running and directing people to a fake Tor network, that would be possible, but it would be awful brash......" Politicians actually like those big gestures that are supposed to give the masses the idea they are doing something useful. And Obambi is in his final term with a lame-duck Congress, he is 'building his legacy' (see immigration, Cuba), so some of us are already playing a game of 'guess the policy lurch' where we place bets on which bit of political silliness/'vision' he tries next. The pool was 5:1 on some form of forced Isreali-Arab settlement, 4:1 on gun control through ammo taxation, and only 2:1 on either "saving the Interweb" or pardoning Chelsea Manning. Surprisingly, given the level of cynicism prevalent in the group, using the new USN's laser cannon to draw his likeness on the surface of the moon (a Mount Rushmore in space) is currently lagging at 1:20 against.

".....It's not like it would go unnoticed." OK, so if the TOR network gets hijacked by 'The Man' and word gets round, how is that bad for 'The Man'? Those without 'evil intent', such as businesses and activists in Third World countries, may grumble about "NSA intrusion" but will probably still use it anyway. Legitimate businesses using TOR want protection from business rivals and corrupt regimes, not the NSA or FBI, and activists hiding from oppressive dictators are usually the ones the State Department wants to help anyway (remember, that was what TOR was originally designed for by the US authorities). But those with 'evil intent' (pirates, drug-dealers, e-criminals and terrorists) will probably stop using it, which law enforcement will see as a prevention-of-crime win. Those who are just paranoid and stop using it are both too small a group and too minor in importance to carry any political weight. The NSA might grumble about the loss of information TOR probably gives them, but they can then shift resources and start to look for and target any "TOR2.0" groups that spring up on the Dark Web.

Now, extend the idea one step further - if the Gubbermint has control of the TOR network but lets the people use it (in a policed manner), and you setup a new "TOR2.0", the political logic will be "that must mean with evil intent".....

Merry Christmas all!

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Badger Murphy Re: Hypothesis: butchering POTUS's name = complete lack.....

So pretty certain Badger voted for Obambi then! Shame how his outrage (or maybe it's just the ravages of old age) prevented him from debunking any of the points made.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Roo Re: Mephistro (@ Matt Bryant)

".....the DNS Root attack....." Good point. Unfortunately, there seems to be a whole raft of reasons (Sony hack, Anonyputzs, Lizard Squad, Silk Road x.0, etc, etc.) for the authorities to seek to regulate the Web. IMHO, all the 'hacktivists' have done is draw attention to themselves and ruined it for everyone. A regulated Internet will require funding for said regulation - say "hello" to Internet taxes!

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Mephistro Re: Mephistro (@ Vociferous)

"....I'm not aware of the existence of any EU security services able to play this trick across many different jurisdictions in such a short time frame....." Interpol/Europol could co-ordinate with Sony's European lawyers on European-wide action. They already have a history of doing so in video and game piracy cases, so the relationships and mechanisms are already in place. Interpol themselves have been targeted before by the Anonyputzs (allegedly using the TOR network to obscure their attack) in 2012 and they have co-ordinated with the FBI on tracking 'hacktivists' and webcrime (such as the Silk Road case) hiding on the TOR network (https://www.europol.europa.eu/content/global-action-against-dark-markets-tor-network). All it would take would be enough diplomatic pressure.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Destroyed All Braincells Re: MiniLove recommends...

"......guilty of liking their privacy....." Nice article, but it focuses on the idea that the only possible target for surveillance would be 'rights activists'. This paranoid preoccupation of the wannabes ignores the fact that the vast majority of surveillance by the NSA and GCHQ is of criminals and terrorists, not Islington's chattering class (or the like-minded Berkley commune). Further abroad, such as in Egypt, you might have a point, but that was not what the judge was advocating. He was saying the NSA was fine by him because it is overseen and warranted activity, ie not just some dictator's tool of oppression.

Now, give it a rest and go have a Christmas pint.

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Matt Bryant
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Pirate

Re: Mephistro (@ Matt Bryant)

".....but Sony's lawyers won't be able to get anything useful from this seizure....." As I understand it, the authority servers hold and propagate the tables of trusted routing and entry/exit nodes. Seizing those servers gives the authorities and/or Sony's investigators the data to map out the TOR network. If someone really is gunning for the TOR network then it would be logical to go first to the servers that list out the nodes, then mop up the nodes of interest (or just all the nodes they can) from there.

Now, to really get the paranoid twitching - if all the authority servers just simply disappear off the network, as I understand it, the nodes can still function using cached routes and the TOR traffic will still flow, but the clients and relay nodes will reject any new authority servers not proposed/listed by existing authority servers (the nodes look for a signed hash in any authority update). But, if you have all the authority servers, you can start directing all the traffic through a set of compromised nodes, allowing you to monitor TOR and de-anonymise the users.

If the authority servers all get owned then the clients and nodes would need a hack, patch or update to point them towards any new authority servers. Of course, it then does become a game of whack-a-mole, where the authorities simply watch for new updates and attack the new authority servers (and their hosting companies - how many hosters will allow you to run a TOR node if it risks their datacenter getting raided?), or issue compromised updates that send downloaders to sites where 'good' malware is waiting to log the user's identity and install some NSA/FBI/Sony tracking software.

"....I'll be glad to invite you to a pint of ElReg's delicious virtual lager....." Lager? Ewwwww! It's Christmas, have a virtual double vodka on me!

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Matt Bryant
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Big Brother

Re: Mark 85 Re: Mephistro

".....But does any court/agency that Sony's lawyers could use work that fast?" They do with the backing of the Whitehouse. Obambi has always had an "interesting" relationship with Hollywood and Big Media (just look at his choice of Kal Penn for public office - http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kal_Penn). Other companies get hacked and Obambi is too busy playing golf to quote, but a Seth Rogen (a Democrat donor) film gets in trouble and suddenly Obambi is all about 'justice' (http://deadline.com/2014/12/obama-sony-hack-attack-north-korea-1201330493/).

I'm not sure what Sony's losses on The Interview stand at (budget was $40+m) but Sony does have deep pockets and the will to want to hit back. I would suggest the FBI and NSA actually have little appetite for killing the TOR network as it's pretty certain they already own it at will and would probably prefer to keep skimming off info from it.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Mephistro

"The references in the article regarding seizure of the servers seems to point clearly to a government agency....." Actually, I'm more inclined to think this is Sony's lawyers, looking for a bit of payback. If their investigators can show the pilfered material from the Sony hack passed through the TOR servers, then they may try and claim the servers and data trail are material evidence of copyright infringement as well as "hacking tools" used in the theft. You may recall an Austrian exit node admin had similar problems with the law after some kiddie porn transited his node (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/12/10/tor_admin/).

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Judge spanks SCO in ancient ownership of Unix lawsuit

Matt Bryant
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Summary of of how the Big Hitters played.

This is how I saw it on the ground:

Microsoft - did have a directly-competing x86 OS (Windows), so took full advantage of the affair to FUD Linux; definitely slipped SCO some cash with "evil" intent; and provided their sales with FUD material to attack Linux (I sat through one from an MS partner). TBH, what else did you expect?

SUN - took advantage of the affair to FUD Linux in an attempt to defend their proprietary UNIX; paid SCO up front for a license early on when it was already clear the SCO threat was hot air; and sent out their salesmen with a FUD packet to attack Linux with, despite prior claims of "penguin love" (I sat through one specific SCO-Linux FUD session from a SUN reseller). Upset some old timers that though SUN should have been defending Linux more, alienated the Linux community.

IBM - took it on the nose and sent their flying-monkeys/lawyers into battle (partially with the intent of defending their profit stream from Linux on mainframe), despite having their own proprietary UNIX and large MS-on-IBM revenue streams; and provided their partners with anti-FUD material (I had a briefing directly from IBM). Won the respect of the Linux community.

hp - despite having their own proprietary UNIX revenues to protect, and despite being the number one vendor for SCO UNIX servers, hp told SCO were to go when asked to buy a license; despite being the number one MS server vendor, did not issue a Linux FUD pack for their MS salesbods, but did supply material to resellers to de-FUD the SCO issue in Linux sales; issued a public statement saying they would indemnify hp customers using Linux, nullifying SCO's legal threat; and doubled down on their relationship with Linux vendors (I sat through joint hp-RedHat and hp-SuSE briefings on the matter). Surprisingly, did not make as much publicity noise over their rejection of the SCO case as IBM, but then that is hp's "cold-dead-fish" marketing to a T.

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Megaupload overlord Kim Dotcom: The US HAS RADICALISED ME!

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Alan Brown Re: I assume this was their intention all along...

"....The New Zealand govt routinely seizes a defendant's assets in criminal cases in order to prevent mounting an effective defence...." Not quite. The NZ authorities, along with those of most First World countries, will seize assets and financials thought to be the result of criminal activity, under a court-granted warrant. So it is not a case of "Hey, let's grab that cash so we can screw his legal team" as you state. And Crim Dot Dumb had plenty of other funds to pay for his legal fees, he just did not calculate correctly the cost of his time-wasting defences.

".... One I'm personally aware of is the Lundy case...." Er, what? Lundy not only got a fair trial (which he lost by jury decision, but also two appeals, the final one leading to the quashing of his conviction. He was already in debt (due to his vineyard business) before the murders, so how you contend that the authorities tried to drive him to bankruptcy by delaying his trial is beyond me. His case is completely unrelated to Crim Dot Dumb's and seems to have zero common legalities either. Try again!

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Alan Brown Re: AC I assume this was their intention all along...

"....KDC's lawyers filed several motions to try and speed things up...." Only when his defence fund started to dry up. He could have saved a lot of time (and defence fund, and taxpayers' money) if he had just accepted the warrant and gone to stand trial in the States.

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London teen pleads guilty to Spamhaus DDoS

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: Eric Olson Re: going down

".....When you were 16 (the crime was 18 months ago), did you possess the executive functions to properly assess the consequences of your actions?....." Yes, but then my parents taught me right from wrong from an early age. I most definitely would have been able to discern money laundering, DDoSing and kiddie porn were wrong and illegal by the age of sixteen, and probably a lot younger.

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American bacon cured with AR-15 assault rifle

Matt Bryant
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Meh

.410?

No! For a start, the cartridge is so narrow it only holds three balls of shot in the buckshot cartridge. The birdshot out of the short barrel of the Taurus is good for maybe dispatching snakes at short range, otherwise I wouldn't recommend it. Against anything bigger than a squirrel I'd suggest solid slugs, or just use the .45 Long Colt alternative the Taurus already shoots. The latter was a military cartridge (in the old black powder version) and modern versions are roughly equivalent in punch to the .45ACP round.

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Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: Tikimon Re: The danger of Small Sample Sizes!

".....There is almost NOTHING you can reliably call "American" as in "to represent America"....." Definitely, and one of the reasons it's a pleasure to travel round the States, there's actually more real variety than in Europe (I know, I've done both).

"....And if you drop by Atlanta, come try my cornbread!" Er, no. Note to Anglos visiting the Southern States - 'cornbread' = looks like sponge cake but (generally, IMHO) tastes bad and salty. Even stranger are 'biscuits' = a salty scone often served with mash and gravy! Both will make you pine for those stodgy dumplings you used to get with school lunches. In fact, salt is still much more widely used in cooking in general in the Southern States than in the UK where we tend to be more low-sodium conscious. Do, however, try any of the steaks, and a visit to a Cheesecake Factory (I prefer Buckhead's) is recommended for a killer desert.

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NY premiere of The Interview cancelled after hackers' terrorist threats

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Destroyed All Braincells Re: The NYT, a frank necon propeller.....

I see you started early on the eggnog.

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Matt Bryant
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Alert

Re: Amorous Cowherder Re: Looks like the terrorists are winning again

".......Team America......" Ah, worth paying to see just for the bit when Micheal Moore blew up! TBH, I was pretty "meh" on The Interview, I would have waited for it to come out on Netflix, but I'll go see it at the cinema now just to see what Kim Junior is getting his knickers in a twist over (might even buy some hideously-overpriced popcorn). I will pay in cash though, given that the cinema chains probably have security that would make Sony's look good!

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Brit GUN NUT builds WORKING SNIPER RIFLE at home out of scrap metal!

Matt Bryant
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Re: asdf Re: Funny sizes?

"....My dad was medievac in Vietnam and if they actually hit enemy soldiers they often had to fly back under fire to pick them up.....He said he was also a real big fan of grenade launcher with smoke." They also used to drop a lot of CS tear gas around jungle landing zones as it was 'non-lethal' and therefore did not contravene the Red Cross markings. Around pick-up zones they used more tear gas than napalm as it could also be dropped closer to friendly troops. Of course it wouldn't have made such a good line for the movies - "I love the smell of tear gas in the morning...."

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Matt Bryant
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Go

Re: IMG Re: @AC @ Frosted Flake

".....In terms of choice of targets... there happens to be a wider variety of game in the US....." Indeed. The two sons, both college students, of one of my friends in Louisiana spent their summer working as part-time pest controllers. That didn't entail spraying cockroaches with Raid, but going out on farms and shooting the large numbers of wild pigs that are destroying crops in their area (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-29747529). Much more fun than flipping burgers! Ironically, both of them used the same type semi-auto Bushmaster AR-15s as used by Adam Lanza in the Sandy Hook school massacre, which kind of destroys the idea ARs have no purpose other than as 'urban assault rifles'.

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Matt Bryant
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Thumb Up

Nice job.

A surprising source for many ex-British WW2 small arms in good nick is Israel, which used a hodge-podge of European and American weaponry for many years. Wartime issue revolvers, rifles and parts often turn up on US dealers' websites, some not having been released from the Israeli reserve stocks until the late Eighties. They usually have a Star of David marking added to the standard British markings and have usually been well maintained. A common source of bad furniture, as I suspect the author stumbled on, is India. Whilst they used to make good parts at the factory in Ishapore, they also had a habit of selling on even parts that failed proof testing and these have also turned up on websites. Buying parts from eBay is not something I would recommend.

Happy shooting!

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Looking for a tip-top high-end storage array (and who isn't?) Gartner names its favorite

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Billl Re: AC Badges

"....Sun has not existed as an entity for over 5 years now...." So you were so quick to rant you missed the bit were the dig was aimed at Oracle? I seem to recall they are still in business. Sun were quite smart to badge the HDS Lightning, it gave them a good option when EMC fell behind (before that, hp and Sun both resold the EMC storage range).

"....If you're not aware, Larry likes to make money...." Yes, like when he tried to make a quick buck by selling his limping Pillar storage array business to Oracle (no conflict of interest there, well, not after he was forced to give the cash back - http://www.theregister.co.uk/Print/2013/10/04/oracle_pillar_case_settlement/).

"....and reselling others wares means less money in Oracle's coffers. Selling 10 of your own tech at a 30% margins makes you more money than selling 15 of someone else's tech at 10% margins -- simple math really...." Very simple math seeing as Oracle's storage sales growth figures are single-figure and negative (http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2014/09/19/oracle-weak-hardware-and-new-license-sales-dim-earnings-report-as-management-changes-loom/). OEMing storage means you pay a very small amount on support and development, whereas developing your own requires you to generate good sales or your support and development need to be cut, resulting in a death spiral of reduced sales leading to reduced support and dev, leading to reduced sales, leading to reduced support and dev, etc. Being a Sunshiner you'll probably be quite familiar with that scenario from the Sun SPARC days.

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REVEALED: Titsup flight plan mainframe borks UK air traffic control

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Jong Re: User submissions need pre-check

".....It's just they're heading to somewhere different to where they said they would.

How do you fix that in your submission systems ?" It's called a data quality check - you check the submitted data against a historic record of activity and flag and reject anything out-of-scope. An example might be checking the flight number and the associated historic destination with the destination entered, or simply doing a check that the destination is within the safe flight range of the aircraft's fuel load. Such checks are common in financial systems and are used to detect fraud ("why is Mr X's credit card being used to buy a smartphone in Singapore when his purchase record shows he is in New York?").

IMHO, someone cut some corners on the code (one bad data entry screwed the whole system?!?), but what's even more unacceptable was the cluster bouncing - no-one at IBM heard of non-automatic failback? TBH, re-write it for a distributed cluster and put the lot on a dozen Linux servers, then spend the savings on some real testing.

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What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?

Matt Bryant
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Go

Re: IMG Re: @Graham

".....Yes a 12 gauge pump with a pistol grip...." Ouch! Don't mess with the IMG! The 12-gauge is also much cheaper than an AR and ammo is both cheaper and widely available.

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Hooker beating: What if you read the Bible AND play GTA5?

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Pfffft!

".....Brian Wernham, author of Agile Project Management...." Two misnomers in one go! Project managers do not actually manage anything, at best they are usually project coordinators and project progress documenters, nothing more. They rarely have any actual ability to control the path of a project or the people on it. And slavish obedience to the latest process fad (such as 6Sigma or Scrum) does not equate to agile.

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A general's tale of the US's Gulf War follies and Glyn Johns' life in music

Matt Bryant
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WTF?

WTF?

"......Bolger explains that the traditional Arabic method of waging war – as described by such luminaries as T.E. Lawrence – involves raids and ambushes....." Er, yeah, in the First World War. Saddam's forces lost for exactly the same reasons the Arabs lost every war against the Israelis - the Arabs relied on outdated Soviet strategy and tactics that were meant for large-scale operations, and were consistently surprised and too slow to react due to more flexible tactics and strategies used by the Coallition (and the Israelis). The only people using the 'traditional Arab' strategies of raiding and hostage taking (an Arab tradition) are the Taleban and IS, and even they are tempering their battle tactics with those copied from the Coallition forces.

".....Bolger is ridiculously polite to his bungling political masters.... “The military offered advice hardly worth hearing”....." Like the surge, asked for by the generals on the ground, bitterly resisted by the politicians (especially by the Democrats for little other reason than "Predient Bush asked for it"), eventually agreed to and which worked? http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_War_troop_surge_of_2007

"......There was also a problem with the status of prisoners, who were not accorded the normal rights of prisoners of war. Bolger believes in a rare criticism of the politicos: “Leaving the detention situation so loosely defined would come back to bite them.".....The disasters of de-Ba'athification and the Abu Ghraib prisoner scandal....." So all political problems, resulting from political decisions, not those of the military.

".....unlike the locals, “the Americans lacked faith and staying power”....." Which has been the 'insurgent' mantra since first used by the Vietnamese (actually stated as such by Vo Nguyen Giap) against the US - that they cannot win a straight fight with a Western power and hence resort to a long-term grind in the hope the Western politicians will cave. Ironicly, Vo Nguyen Giap got the military training he needed from the American "Deer Team" during WW2 when he fought with the Allies against the Japanese. The lack of 'staying power' he predicted was as a political problem, not a military one.

TBH, it looks like Bolger was angling for a job with the politicians, he just timed his book release too late for Chuck Hagel's job. The next time the Sec of Defence slot is open he'll probably have to deal with Republicans, not Democrats, and I expect the latter might not be as willing to accept his whitewash.

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Assange's WikiLeaks: Give generously this Xmas – for STATUE of our DEAR LEADER

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Bleu Re: AC Offensive

".....There are no rape charges...." What, are some of The Followers of St Jules still trying to resurrect that 'zombie fact'?!? As already established twice in the English courts where St Jules tried and failed get the EAW rejected, what St Jules is alleged to have done in Sweden would constitute rape under English law. I suggest you go read this

(http://www.newstatesman.com/david-allen-green/2012/08/legal-myths-about-assange-extradition) before attempting CPR on any more zombies.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: AC Re: Offensive

".....Were Julian just an 'information broker' he wouldn't be afraid of the US....." A$$nut's original fears are his own creation due to his paranoia and 'interesting' upbringing. His actions at Wikileaks simply made those paranoias into realities.

".....In 1971 SCOTUS had a ruling that gave the press a shield....." All great if A$$nut was an actual accredited journalist, but he never has been. Remember, that was the whole reason for his jaunt to Sweden, a local Leftie rag having given him a column in an attempt to give Wikileaks some actual journalistic cover, but St Jules got his rape on with his followers too soon. So no protection for St Jules there.

"....If this were true, then Julian was more than just an 'information broker' and would have reason to fear a US extradition." St Jules has plenty to fear because he is accused of being directly involved with (if not actually controlling) Manning's theft of secret material. That puts A$$nut in breach of the Espionage Act. But, St Jules has nothing to fear in the UK because the Swedish-issued EAW trumps any US request (and one hasn't even been made), and the Swedes will not extradite St Jules to anywhere for a political or military charge. So, once again, going on and on and on about extradition is just a smokescreen used by A$$nut and his followers to try and justify his not facing up to his rape charges in Sweden.

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Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: Mark 85 Re: Where would this thing be displayed?

"....doesn't mean that any city/town would want it or even allow it....." Oh, they'll have no problems getting permission in places like Glasgow, where they'd burn the US and English flags twice daily if they could afford to. Also it would be welcomed at student union bars the World over, just so all the 'young-and-righteous' wannabes could sit on the extra chair. That's why the extra chair is there - the sculptor is smart enough to recognize that shoutie narcissism drives the followers just as much as it does St Jules.

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Alleged Silk Road boss's lawyers want murder-for-hire evidence blocked from trial

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Kevin 6 Re: Drug trial

".....Only reason I can see them trying to bring the hitman side into the drug trial would be to show what kind of character he has....." So you can't see that Roberts may have ordered the hits to silence witnesses who had knowledge of his drug crimes?

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Which country has 2nd largest social welfare system in the world?

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: ecofeco More money !=more in return

".....$3.28 per US gallon....." LOL, just filled up today outside Atlanta - $2.64/gallon!!!!

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