* Posts by Matt Bryant

9657 posts • joined 21 May 2007

She cannae take it, Captain Kirk! USS Zumwalt breaks down

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Kurt Meyer Re: OK it looks small to radar

"......Surely you will have wanted to recall another action......" The German ships in that action did have gunnery radar. The sinking of Glorious was part of the Norweigean Campaign, where - again, just as before and after Jutland - the Royal Navy controlled the North Sea and reduced the German Kriegsmarine to hit-and-run actions. Whilst the loss of Glorious was unfortunate, the RN could lose her and many more and still prevent the Germans from controlling the North Sea. Indeed, the Norweigean Campaign was so costly to the Kriegsmarine that it meant the British could safely send naval units to reinforce the Med (including Warspite) and commit more forces to the Battle of the Atlantic. The Kriegsmarine's losses in the Norweigean Campaign meant Hitler did not have a fleet of warships to control the English Channel in 1940, which meant he had to relie on the Luftwaffe to win the Battle of Britain in order to invade Britain. In case you forgot, the Germans lost the Battle of Britain. Both Scharnhorst and Gneisenau spent the majority of the War hiding from the RN, the former being caught and sunk and the latter being stripped of her guns and eventually used as a blockship.

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Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: Kevin Johnston Re: El Reg unit

".....and the lack of traffic wanting to drive through the New Forest to catch a ferry." precisely the reason I used to take the longer road down to Lymington. That and the much more appealing views.

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Security man Krebs' website DDoS was powered by hacked Internet of Things botnet

Matt Bryant
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GRE packets?

Surely, if you're not expecting any incoming VPN requests to the IP address of your website, just block the GRE ports and ignore such requests?

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Rise of the Machines at Sea: The British firm building robot boats

Matt Bryant
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Pirate

Re: Matthew Smith Re: Piracy?

"....if there is an unmanned vessel in international waters, whoever lands on it can claim it as their own....." The legal definition is not unmanned, it is "abandoned" - if a device is under remote control it has not been abandoned legally.

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Sad reality: It's cheaper to get hacked than build strong IT defenses

Matt Bryant
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Re: Mongo Re: Pinto was one of the few times a reputation took a sustained hit

".....(1) it was a stark pricing of life.....' No, it wasn't. The original Ford paper was nothing to do with "corporate culture" or "greed", it was simply a cost-benefit paper produced by Ford in 1973 for the NHTSA when the NHTSA was suggesting new rear-crash testing regulations. The original paper was a comparison of the costs to Ford of changing the Pinto fuel system and the cost to society of crash injuries and victims relating to burns from the existing design, not the cost of Ford being sued. This was subsequently taken waaaaaaaaaaay out of context by "progressive" Mother Jones journo Mark Dowie in a 1977 article, in which he even lied about the figures (he changed the analysis from 180 deaths to 500-900) to suit his Big Bad American Corporation theme. Ford was completely in line with the 1967 regulations when it originally designed the Pinto and the Pinto was later shown to be no more at risk from rear collisions than any of its competitors.

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Days are numbered for the Czech Republic

Matt Bryant
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Coat

Lol!

I await an EU announcement on the forming of a new EU bureaucracy with a sole mission of informing the EU member states what country names they are allowed to use. All decisions by the new EU Working-party on Appellations for National Conformity will be final (my money's on Bohemorasileszchia).

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Moron is late for flight, calls in bomb threat

Matt Bryant
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Lol!

Another example to wheel out when someone insists drugs aren't harmful.

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UK copyright troll weeps, starts 20-week stretch in the cooler for beating up Uber driver

Matt Bryant
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WTF?

Only 20 weeks!?!?!?

WTF?!?! I can only hope that some aspiring legal vulture contacts the Uber driver and helps him sue Mr Croucher into bankruptcy.

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EU U-turns on mobile roaming fees: No 90-day cap after all

Matt Bryant
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Lol!

So another piece of Junker male bovine manure gets exposed and - as usual - no-one in the European press seems keen to ask why Junker keeps making these stupid, populist statements whenever he needs to divert press attention from another EU fiasco. At least Cameron fell on his sword, it seems Junker, the politician actually most to blame for Brexit, simply doesn't have the morals to do the same.

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HPE sells off 'non-core' software assets

Matt Bryant
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Re: ToddR

"....The cloud companies, don't need the bells and whistles of a DL-380...." Good thing that HPE also make cookie tray servers, then! HPE will make a cookie tray to the customer's spec, in volume, and with the quality and management software that the white box churners can't.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: sigh. Welcome to the inevitable

".....the inevitable

Demise of HP....." Yeah, I think I've been hearing of that "inevitable" and "imminent" demise with boring regularity since before the turn of the century.

".....I'm an ex HP techy." LOL, but at least you're not bitter.

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Brit spies and chums slurped 750k+ bits of info on you last year

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Richard 12 Re: I'll use your maths then

"....Additionally, every single communication has two ends, and thus they snoopped (sic) on both ends - 8.6%.....' Gosh, you must be a great hairdresser with that amazing ability to split hairs!

".....That's 1 in 12 households...." No, that's the very unlikely and worst-possible-case scenario of one communication from one member of one-in-twelve households. Your hyperventilating is just proving my point about gullible readers being suckered by the misleading headline because they want to baaaaaaahlieve.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Smooth Newt Re: 750,000 messages?

".....an IP address." OK, so let's crunch some numbers. I'll try and keep the numbers as simple as possible so the majority of unblinkered readers (and Alexander J Martin) can follow:

UK population = @55m (nice round number, actually just over 56m).

Let's take an average household as 2.5 people (actually about 2.1 in the UK), therefore 55m = 22m households.

Assuming (generously, and ignoring floating IPs from mobile devices not on home WiFi) 80% have some form of Internet and an IP address assigned by an ISP, therefore worst case scope

= 80% x 22m

= 17.6m IP addresses. Make it 17.5m for an easier number.

So, making another generous assumption of all those being one single communication from each individual IP address (very unlikely), the actual worst case scale of "privacy intrusion"

= 750000 x 100 / 17.5m

= @4.3% of possible UK Internet users.

So, debunking the hysterical headline "Brit spooks and chums slurped 750k+ bits of info on you last year", there was actually very, very little chance any reader of El Reg had their communications "slurped". Maybe El Reg should assign a little maths homework to their more hyperbolic headline writers?

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Ransomware scum infect Comic Relief server: Internal systems taken down

Matt Bryant
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Re: Jemma

".....Why has Africa been bouncing from disaster to disaster for most of the last 60 years - oh yeah, that's right, western (mainly British) government policy....." Really? Are all the countries in Africa still under Colonial rule? It seems many of them have been independent and run by locals for many decades, but you seem very keen to absolve people like Idi Amin, Charles Taylor or Robert Mugabe of any responsibility. I am assuming that is because you are (a) ill-educated and need to do more history reading, and (b) have the typical liberal/Leftie arrogance of assuming all "people of colour" are actually too stupid to manage their own countries, and what they really need to do is just do what you and your liberal/Leftie chums tell them, because - of course - only you and your chums can actually protect them from The Evil Bankers/Capitalists/Globalists/Jews/<Leftie-bogeymen-du-jour>, right?

"....Rwanda massacres - British colonial rule....." Yeah, you're just heaping on evidence for the ill-educated case I made above. Rwanda was never part of the British Empire, it was part of the German's and then Belgian's, but it became independent in 1962. The Belgians gave copious warnings of the 1994 massacre based on the many similar massacres since Rwandan independence, all planned and actioned by local Hutus and Tutsis. To fill in some of the holes, you could start by reading up on Hassan Ngeze's part in the build-up to the 1994 massacres (and, no, he wasn't British).

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UK will be 'cut off' from 'full intelligence picture' after Brexit – Europol strategy man

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: AC Re: AC Drefsab_UK In which case

"You don't seem to make the difference between Special Forces and conventional forces unless Special Forces routinely use tanks so your spiel about armoured forces in the Gulf War is totally IRRELEVANT...." Which is why I pointed out the complete failure of the French "special forces" during their colonial wars and compared them to the successes of the British special forces. Please try reading the whole post before tryping (sic) a frothing response.

".....Fighting the OAS was the job of the police and security forces (who subcontracted the dirty work to underworld elements). So another irrelevant remark from you......' Really? Or does it just point out both the incompetence of the French commanders and politicians, and the unpreparedness of the French "special forces"? When the British and Northern Irish police and regular armed forces needed the SAS in Northern Ireland, the SAS was ready, willing and able, because the SAS was a smarter led, better trained and more prepared force.

".....On a side note I knew a French guy who did his National Service in Algeria serving in Military Intelligence ..... He told me MI owned the Algerians through a XX (Double Cross) type operation similar to what the British did during WW2....." So, they copied what the Brits had already done, but still lost? Not a very convincing argument for even parity!

"......If French SpecOps are so bad why did Saudi Arabia specifically ask for French, not American or British mind you, operators to handle a hostage situation in Mecca in 1979?...." Are you referring to the completely farcical French attempts to retake the Grand Mosque? Even the French GIGN tried to downplay their part in the drawn out and costly endeavor, insisting it was the Pakistanis commandos that actually screwed up! Of course, the reason the Saudis didn't ask the British for help might be because the SAS had spent many years defeating Saudi-backed rebels in Oman.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: Drefsab_UK In which case

".....most powerful military in the history of the planet has managed to crush a handful of third world uprisings....." Please take a break from the Yank-hating and go read some history. For example, the Korean War was an UN action where the US was the largest contributor, and the opposition included the Chinese, the most populous country on the planet, with some of the most advanced weaponry (some, such as the MiG-15, actually being more advanced than the equivalent US weaponry) the Soviets could give them.

".....When N Korea decides it has had enough and retaliates by launching a bomb to destroy every satellite in space...." LOL, you really need to watch some actual factual programming and less Sci-Fi! Firstly, even pretending a Nork nuke-tipped missile could make it into space above the US without being shot down (the US is already installing anti-ballistic-missile batteries in South Korea and has ships in the pacific with the ability to intercept ICBMs), a high-atmospheric or orbital blast from a Nork nuke would not take out even a third of the current satellites in geo-stationary orbit over the US, but would bring a very severe response. The idea that the US is not prepared for a retaliatory strike of every nuke silo, bunker, and command site in North Korea is amusingly naïve. Secondly, you'll have to wait to see if the Norks can even make a nuke small enough to fit on one of their missiles, which currently seems beyond them. Thirdly, the most likely scenario IMHO is that, should Baby Kim get too uppity, the Chinese will mount a coup using their own people in North Korea, or simply invade and install a new puppet regime. Baby Kim is only of value to the Chinese as long as he keeps an expensive chunk of US forces tied down in South Korea and provides a buffer to China itself. The two last things China wants is a war on their doorstep (the disruption to regional trade and traffic would mean the Chinese economy would implode), or the South and the US invading and installing a regime that might be less willing to toe China's line.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Drefsab_UK In which case

"....all the American military victories since WW2..." At least the Yanks have some, unlike the French! Two Gulf Wars and the invasion of Afghanistan, both military victories even if the politicians screwed it up afterwards (and that means Obama's administration, not Bush's). Korea - US-led military victory in driving back the joint Chinese and Nork invasion. Add Panama and Grenada to the list. Even in Viet Nam (caused by the failed French colonial action) the US military won the battles, it was the US politicians that turned military victory into political defeat. Oh, and I see you put in "since WW2" so you didn't have to face the embarrassing admission that Nazi-occupied France itself was liberated by the Yanks and Brits. In fact, outside of US-led UN operations like the Gulf War, the French haven't had any military victories since the Great War (when the Yanks and Brits also saved their bacon).

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: Really?

".....it appears that many Britons would like nothing more than to see Europe fail.....' It is already failing! Every time the French and Italians are allowed to flout the same financial rules used to punish countries like Greece it is another nail in the EU's coffin. That is why the lEUsers are so upset about Brexit as it is making it harder for them to paper over the cracks. As to the British wanting "Europe" (the EU is not Europe, it is a subset of Europe, thanks) to fail, so do the majority of Greeks, plus large numbers of Germans, French, Dutch, Spanish, Portugese, etc., etc. Nationalist parties all over the EU are winning more voters because so many EUers think the EU is already failing.

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Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: AC Re: Drefsab_UK In which case

"....I'd love to see you deliver your little rant to the French SpecOps operators on the ground in Mali, Libya, Iraq...." Mali? Yeah, you remember that Blackadder Goes Forth episode where they're talking about the "great colonial campaigns" fighting pygmies with sharpened fruit? France's special forces have a copious record of failure in their post-War II colonial adventures, losing not only abroad in places like Algiers and Viet Nam, but also in France itself in fighting the OAS. Meanwhile the British SAS was building up a reputation as a tier 1 special forces unit in successful counter-insurgency operations in places like Oman, Malaya, Indonesia and closer to home in Northern Ireland. Thanks, but there is nothing the French can teach the British about special forces.

"....Libya....." After the RN and RAF cleared out the core of the Libyan forces and the SAS did the tough work you mean?

"....Iraq...." The Gulf War is actually a perfect example of the lack of value put on the French forces. When planning the great armoured sweep into Kuwait, the French armoured forces were placed far out on the flank in empty desert as the Yanks were seriously worried the AMX-30s wouldn't be able to cope with Iraqi T-72s (which the British Challenger and American Abrams tanks had no problems dealing with). Indeed, the ten tanks claimed by the French were actually all hit first by A-10s sent to help the French out! Post-war the French couldn't get home fast enough, and the Yanks requested special forces help from the British SAS and SBS, not the French.

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Matt Bryant
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Joke

Re: Drefsab_UK Re: In which case

"....They have the most active personel...." Yes, but they're French - their best troops are foreign, they even have a special Legion just because their best troops are Foreign.

"....most naval forces....." With how much combat experience in the last fifty years? A few tiny involvements in UN actions? Great for picking up migrants out of the Med but probably not much else.

"......(greece has the most tanks) but france has more than us....." But they're French tanks, with French crews, which means they only work in reverse and come with the French armoured corp's special battleflag - a white fleur de Lis, flanked by two white lions rampant, on a white background. As history shows, all you have to say is "Est-ce un char allemande?" to get those French tankers waving that special battleflag with vim and vigour!

"....(thought they have almsot double the Aerial refueling and transport)...." Very important for "those strategic retreats" the French are so famous for.

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Matt Bryant
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Go

Re: Commswonk Re: A new term for you...

"How about "EUROFUD"?....." Sorry, Brussels would never allow that! Or, rather, the French never would, they would insist it be called "EUROPID" as the French for "fear, uncertainty, doubt" would be "peur, incertitude, doute", and we know just how much the French hate having any Eurostandard in English. I'm betting one reason the Europol database seems to be so useless is because the French insist every entry has to be translated into French.

So, vive la difference, vive l'EUROPID!

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Anyone who thinks the UK won't have accesss to some data or other needs to look at this:

Cough*BUDE*cough*TEMPORA*cough.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Len Re: Okay, riddle me this

".....Yes, an operational agreement can be put in place, no, it won't give access to all the systems that the UK can currently access." Not to worry, I'm sure the GCHQ and UK Police are the main populators of all the useful data in the Europol databases anyway. The limits on inter-country sharing of data inside the EU have been made horrifically obvious by the ease with which the Deash mounted the Paris attacks and Brussels bombings, all committed by known criminals with known connections to Islamic extremists. It seems whatever data is in the Europol databases the EU seem unable to make practical security use of it.

What isn't sourced from the UK the GCHQ will probably be accessing anyway, or getting via existing agreements with the NSA, FBI, DEA, DIA (and a host of non-EU police and intelligence forces).

This is just another pointless Eurosulk.

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Trump website server config snafu left interns' CVs exposed

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Mystic Megabyte Re: @Big John and Steve124

"......For an insight to right-pondian views....." No, that would be an insight into the "thoughts" of a small subset of right-pondians, thanks. The Independent in no way represents the views of the whole population. Indeed, going by their subscription figures, they could only represent a tiny minority.

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Matt Bryant
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Joke

Re: steve 124 Re: Big difference

"....how's that refugee situation working out...." Refugee "situation"? Officially nothing to see, just hugs and kisses all round, no attempts of lawfare entrapments, and definitely no discord between members of The Great Love-In known as the EU. Move along now, move along!

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Matt Bryant
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Boffin

Re: AC Re: Big difference

"......If Hillary wins, you'll never get those "refugees" out of your country. At least if we get Trump in office you guys can tell your leaders "hey, America's not doing this, why the hell are we?"" Waaaaaaay ahead of you, chap. Haven't you heard, we're already building our own wall, though it is not yooooooge nor likely to be very beautiful.

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Swedish appeals court upholds arrest warrant for Julian Assange

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Ah, yes, the famous "afraid of the US" bogeyman.

"".....with far less evidence of wrongdoing."...." Puh-leeeease! That (IMHO) waste of oxygen Lauri Love has so much evidence against him he wasn't even bothering to try denying what he did, he was just trying to get his trial and inevitable conviction in the UK because he thought the UK courts will go much, much easier on him. As it stands, he can still appeal the case he just lost, plus appeal to the Home Office, and then appeal to the courts in Europe. Lauri Love isn't going anywhere for a while yet, but it is looking more and more likely he is just delaying his trip to the States.

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It's OK for the FBI's fake hacks to hack suspects' PCs, says DoJ watchdog

Matt Bryant
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Hello, ego!

"Once again AP......we demand to be heard in the development of any policies addressing such conduct." Someone call the AP and remind them - despite what they think - no-one died and made them Gawd.

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US Marine Corps to fly F-35s from HMS Queen Lizzie as UK won't have enough jets

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Potemkine

"UK armed forces are just an extension of the US Armies....." Not so. Indeed, they are structured very differently, though they have learned to operate well on joint operations by recognising each others' strengths.

"......from military intelligence......" <Sigh> No, completely different structure and operation. Try again!

".....to nuclear missiles sold and controlled by the US....." WTF? Please go read up on Trident - the UK missiles have UK-built warheads and are completely under the UK's control.

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Matt Bryant
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Boffin

Re: MrXavia Re: They should save time...

"I still don't get why we didn't build nuke powered air craft carriers?...." There is one good reason and the rest are political. The political ones start with the carrier's being ordered under Labour, who are awash with old CND members. Then there is cost - it is cheaper to have conventional engines, both to build and service. And there is the political goodwill Labour got from other countries that have illogical desires to halt all nuke vessels. Of course there is also the one good reason, the benefit to taxpayers in that the UK has a history of selling on carriers to nations like India and Argentina, or the much cheaper cost of scrapping conventional ships if we don't sell them on. It would be verging on impossible to sell on a nuke carrier, and very expensive to scrap them. Note, none of those benefits actually have any military value.

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Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: Ledswinger

"......Given the complexity of the F35, the availability of the aircraft itself is going to be even poorer than anything preceding it....." That presumes that serviceability rates won't improve with experience. The F-4 Phantom II was much more complex than the preceding generation of USN jets, yet was recording better serviceability rates than the jets it replaced within five years of starting operations.

".....And, as the crash record of the Harrier showed, S/VTOL aircraft tend to have dreadful accident rates....." That is simply untrue. RN Sea Harriers had a much lower carrier accident rate than all prior RN jets (and for the USN jets too, the F/A-18 having a much higher accident rate) as it was simply easier to stop and then land rather than land and then stop. It seems that hardly a week goes by without an F/A-18 crashing!

".....whether through pilot error..... or other hazards like FOD and bird strikes that seem to be more significant for S/VTOL types." Again, simply not true. Any aircraft flying at low level is at risk of bird strikes, and they have downed a lot more conventional jets than S/VTOL types. Pilot error is no more likely in any type of aircraft, it is dependent on the pilots (duh! - it's why it's called a pilot error).

The original FUD about Harriers crashing was started by US manufacturers pissed at the USMC for ordering Harriers. It didn't help that the USMC started by putting helicopter - not fast jet - pilots into Harriers on the basis that helicopter pilots had more experience of vertical landings! But even then the USMC's Harrier accident rate was lower than that of many USAF jets such as the F-16.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Dan Wilkie

".....Switzerland probably has more fixed wing aircraft than we do." Seriously, why do you post such moronic statements when a minute spent perusing Wikipedia would save you looking so uninformed? The Swiss Air Force has a front-line force of 31 F/A-18 Hornets and 53 F-5 Tiger II interceptors, whilst the RAF has 137 Typhoons alone, to which will be added the 158 F-35Bs on order.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Ledswinger

"....given that countries like Argentina and Iraq successfully used near supersonic sea skimming technology against British and American ships three decades ago....." And exactly how many carriers from either the USN or RN did the Argies or Iraqis manage to sink? Oh, a big fat zero. The Argentines' few successes during the Falklands Wars were against the radar picketships acting as a defensive screen to the rest of the fleet, and did not stop the RN carriers. And the Iraqis didn't manage to sink any Allied ships during the Gulf Wars.

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Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: I ain't Spartacus Re: US Marine Corps will be flying F-35Bs

"....a missile that homes in on fake tan...." I hear the USAF was working on a countermeasures pod that spewed out photos of Christina Aguilera, only the Marines kept stealing the photos out of the pods.

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Matt Bryant
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Angel

Re: S4qFBxkFFg Re: US Marine Corps will be flying F-35Bs

"....In reality, if the UK/USA went to war....." That event is so unlikely it would have to be preceded by a long period of continually deteriorating relations, more than long enough for personnel from each side to be withdrawn before hostilities began. In the case of the Falklands War, following an established NATO protocol, US personnel on Royal Navy ships were asked to "excuse themselves from duty" and sent ashore before the ships left for the South Atlantic - Argentina was an US ally at the time.

In the event of a future and similar British conflict it would be proper for the US forces on the ships to again be put ashore, though the US government might make an agreement to "lend" the UK their F-35Bs for the duration and have them flown and serviced by UK personnel. Remember, during the Falklands War, then Prez Reagen sent the UK the latest Sidewinder missiles from USAF stocks, making our Sea Harriers much more effective in shooting down the Argentines. Reagan was a big fan of Prime Minster Thatcher, but it is highly unlikely his predecessor, Prez Carter, would have been as generous, and very unlikely Obambi would be (thankfully he'll be gone soon). So a lot depends on the resident POTUS at the time.

/Yeeaaarrgghhh, of course.

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Wait, wait – I got it this time, says FCC as it swings again at rip-off US TV cable boxes

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: AC

"....just put up the difference....." I predict an increase in the price of rented modems.

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Dude, you got a Dell lawyer: HPE sues high-flying ex-exec after defection to EMC

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: AC Re: As long as

".....These non-competes are almost never enforceable....." Tell that to Dave Donatelli and Dave Johnson. The former was forced to work in a non-storage part of HP for a year by his old employer, EMC. The higher up you are the more likely you will have a non-compete and the much more likely your employer will take action if you swan off to a competitor.

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UK Parliament's back for Snoopers' Charter. Former head of GCHQ talks to El Reg

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Oh dear.

From the posts in this thread I predict Tescos will be out of tinfoil again.

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It's OK to fine someone for repeating a historical fact, says Russian Supreme Court

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re; bombastic bob Re: Or the Russians haven't updated their website yet

".....Actually, the early collab between the Nazis and USSR could be a great lesson in history to the Russian people, about trusting foreign dictators to keep their word....." LOL! Stalin had a track record of screwing over even his supporters outside the Soviet Union. Take the Spanish Civil War, where he deliberately stoked the Spanish Communists and their allies into the ill-fated Popular Front government in the first place, then publicly proclaimed "brotherhood" with the Republicans before stealing the Spanish gold reserves, then abandoned the Republicans after he had used his NKVD to hunt the Republican Trotskyists and Anarchists he saw as a threat to his control of the Soviet Union and his plans for international revolution. And whilst the Soviets made great propaganda about how the Germans were sending troops, tanks and planes to fight for the Spanish rebels, he neglected to mention that it was the Soviet Union that had helped rebuild the Luftwaffe and Wehrmacht in secret in the first place.

In 1939, even before the end of the fighting in Poland, the NKVD and Gestapo met to discuss who would imprison which "problem Poles" during their joint occupation. The Soviets were already planning the massacre of as many Polish politicians, dignitaries and officers as they could get their hands on.

Poland in 1939 wasn't the only time Stalin used the World's preoccupation with Nazi Germany to expand his "empire". There was the invasions of the Baltic States, again agreed ahead of time with the Nazis. Indeed, as the records of German-Soviet Axis talks show, Stalin was more than prepared to join the Axis in 1941 as long as Germany would agree which bits of the World would come under Stalin's jackboot. At the same time, Stalin was using Hitler and the Nazis to weaken the other European Imperial powers (France and Britain), his plans being to turn on the Nazis and stab them in the back the moment it best suited Stalin. As it turned out, Hitler was just faster off the mark when he invaded Russia in 1941.

Stalin then made use of his position as an "ally" to manipulate the Americans into giving him mountains of supplies and later half of Europe. Roosevelt was completely blind to how the Soviets were leading him by the nose, even refusing to recognise Stalin's obvious plans after the Soviet abandonment of the Warsaw Uprising. Approaching Warsaw in 1944, the Soviet Army asked the Polish Underground to rebel against the occupying Nazis, then stopped their advance and let the Germans massacre the Poles, just so Stalin would not have to deal post-War with any "difficult Polish fighters". To compound the Poles' misery, Stalin refused to let the Allies use Russian airbases for supply flights to the Poles (though he had been quite happy when the same bases had been used by American bombers striking Germany). Polish RAF and South African flights to drop supplied to the Polish Underground claimed they were even attacked by Soviet fighters! Despite Churchill's repeated demands that Roosevelt stand up to Stalin, Roosevelt did nothing.

So, portraying Stalin as "misled" or "taken advantage of" by any Western leader is simply too stupid for wards.

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Bloke accused of Linux kernel.org hack nabbed during traffic stop

Matt Bryant
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Re: Adrian 4 Re: Austin's goal, according to the prosecution.....

"....As in 'infect early...." Or so he could sell access to modules to e-crims before their release, so the e-crims could find zero days and embed their own nasties.

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Is it time to unplug frail OpenOffice's life support? Apache Project asked to mull it over

Matt Bryant
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Alert

Re: VinceH : People still use this!?

".....When I set up Linux Mint on this machine only a few weeks ago, I noted that LibreOffice was pre-installed....." OMG - bundled software!!! I must call my European Competition Czar immediately, your right to choose has been eroded!

Seriously, save yourself some time and a lot of trouble and just go get a subscription to Office 365. If you're not a heavy productivity suite user (or just too cheap for that) then just use the free MS Office Online apps in-browser.

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Snowden latest: NSA targets Gaza, pumps intelligence to Israel

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: Roo Roo Jimal Gis Bun Hmmmm

.....<Crickets>......

Yup, Roo really wanted to answer that one - not!

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This is why Huawei's cloud is not like Amazuregoo

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: AMBxx Re: Another Huawei puff piece?

I don't see anything wrong with El Reg reporting what a large industry player has to say. Indeed, the article isn't fawning, it seems to cast doubts on some of the Huawei statements. IMHO, "Do not make apps. Do not Touch Data. Make Box Simple. Make Platform Open." sounds a bit too much like "don't differentiate, just sell in bulk", which would seem to be opening yourself to attack from the white box vendors. As the experience of IBM shows, the best margin is in the software and services, not the hardware platform, hence IBM's rapid exiting of the x64 market.

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EU ministers look to tighten up privacy – JUST KIDDING – surveillance laws

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Bernie Re: John Smith 19 "Governments should advertise.....

".....I think JohnSmith19 was suggesting that the majority of Guantanamo detainees were handed over by the Afghan police forces...." What "Afghan police forces"? The Afghan National Police didn't get going again until training efforts started in 2005. The only "police" in the Afghanistan theatre at the time of invasion was the Taleban's religious "police", and they were not going to hand over AQ or Taleban fighters to the Allies!

"....We have to ask where that 93% of captives came from...." There were a number of armed militant groups that the CIA befriended (and paid) to do the majority of the ground fighting, led by the Northern Alliance. These were the same mujahideen that had fought the Afghan Civil War against the Taleban, and who captured the majority of battlefield Gitmo detainees, handing them over to the Allies. The US bounty actually saved the lives of a lot of detainees as the militants fighting the Taleban had a lot of personal scores to settle, and often killed captured Taleban and AQ fighters out of hand (AQ allegedly assassinated the popular leader of the Northern Alliance just prior to 9/11). Another chunk of the Gitmo detainees were handed over to the US by countries that AQ had cells in, including Arab countries such as Egypt, Saudi and Libya, and some even from Pakistan. Some, such as the Uyghurs, were caught whilst training for other Islamic terrorist groups in Afghanistan, and it would be speculative to suggest they were detained in the interests of US-Chinese relations.

As far as I can recall, no-one arrested by the British Police has been extradited and sent to Gitmo, as John Smith 19 claimed, and it is certain no British Policeman or woman ever received a bounty for arresting an AQ member. He's probably confused by reading the male bovine manure spouted by McKinnon supporters.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: John Smith 19 Re: "That's where most of the detainees from Guantanamo....

"....Specifically Items 17,18 and 19." Wow, John, please do explain how those points in any way, shape or form, somehow translate into any of the Gitmo detainees having being captured by "corrupt" UK police? Oh, they don't. And those handed in by locals in return for the bounty, were they locals on the streets of the UK and handed in to UK police? No, they weren't, they were captured by armed Afghan groups allied to the Allies in Afghanistan, and handed over to the Allies who then vetted each one before issuing the bounty. Maybe you should try reading your own material before trying to claim it supports your debunked argument?

Indeed, the ACLU document (as with most ACLU documents, IMHO) is carefully slanted to paint as bad a picture as possible, for propaganda purposes. Note the bald statement that the US government admitted 92% of the detainees were not AQ fighters - that is irrellevant as the vast majority of unlawful armed combatants in Afghanistan were Taleban, allied to AQ. AQ itself is estimated to have had only about 170 foot soldiers, instructors, "scientists" and leaders in Afghanistan when the Allies invaded, whereas the Taleban fielded as many as 35,000. If the Gitmo detainees reflected an unrepresentative number of AQ detainees, that just anyone at random was grabbed for an unchecked bounty, then less than 0.005% of Gitmo detainees would be AQ members, so the US was actually very effective in detaining AQ members. Please do try and find an ACLU doc that debunks that simple bit of maths.

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Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: Cahrles 9 Re: AC lack of knowledge

"....What were you using the concrete for? Were you working in extreme temperatures or in heavy rain...." Summer job over several summers, building housing. Mostly concrete structural supports, foundations and driveways, with the odd tennis and squash court. Under the supervision of a proper civil engineer who taught us the most important ingredient in concrete is actually the water - dirty water, especially salt water, leads to concrete "cancer". Sand and gravel taken from the seashore is also likely to contain saltwater residue, which leads to the alkali-silica reaction and rusting reinforcing rods (when they rust they expand and crack the concrete), so good-quality or washed sand and gravel were also a priority. Once you had that under control, the rest was pretty much a cooking recipe, mixed well, no degree required. Up until a few years ago I used to regularly drive past one of the homes I contributed concrete to several decades before and it was still standing just fine.

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Notting Hill Carnival spycams: Met Police rolls out real-time live face-spotting tech

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: AC Re: My favorute quotation from this

"....The money they throw out at high tech toys would be better spent by having people in the crowd...." Wow, you really are determined to hate! If you had ever been to the Carnival (and I have, thanks), you'd know there is a large Police presence with plenty of boots on the ground amongst the crowd. This presence prevents a lot of crime, but they can't be everywhere and crimes still happen. Cameras with facial recognition software helps pick up the criminals the boots on the ground miss, and advertising the fact the Police have such tools also helps deter some of the smarter criminals.

".....but no, that would be dangerous. Better let the general public take the risk....." In case you missed it, the Police wear stab-proof vests at such events because they are very much at risk of being stabbed but the people they arrest. It's not the only risk they take, thousands of UK policemen and women having died whilst serving the public. You also seem very determined to ignore the real threat to the public from criminal gangs, especially young Londoners Just because you want to hate the Police.

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Matt Bryant
Silver badge

Ahem!

This shows why the Police are always looking for even more ways to catch those criminals that try to take advantage of the Carnival crowds.

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AT&T trash talks Google over Fiber fiasco: Leave ISP stuff to the experts

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Stop

What, never heard of "barriers to market entry?"

Now, I am no fan of Comcast or AT&T, but reading some of the posts on this thread is just too amusing! The truth is Google made a load of rediculous claims about fibre, about how they were some kind of consumer's white knight, hoped for some "assistance" from the Obama administration, then baulked at actually paying for the rollout. AT&T, Comcast and fellows are laughing because they saw this coming - they know how expensive it is to lay and maintain a network, and they knew they had a good chance of offsetting Google's schmoozing of Obambi with their own political contacts. The sheer cost of entering the market as a national network provider (and long time to break-even in a price war) is what stops competitors just waltzing in and stealing AT&T's and Comcast's lunch. The thing is, Google isn't short of money - if Google really wanted to they could pay for the network, the setup costs, and still underprice the incumbents, it's just it wouldn't be as profitable for them as they want. Despite the profits companies like Comcast make from their productive entities (and TV shows and movies actually cost a lot to make), it is more than matched by the massive chunk of change Google makes just flogging advertising (which costs a lot less to do). So, no, Google didn't "heroically fail", they just decided they could make more money elsewhere.

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Russia MP's son found guilty after stealing 2.9 million US credit cards

Matt Bryant
Silver badge

Re: buckyball Re: So smart?

".....why did he not encrypt the offending data on his laptop?...." It seems he thought that simply staying out of countries with an extradition treaty with the US was enough to ensure his freedom, which gives you an idea of just how corrupt the legal system must be in Russia. With - as he saw it - no chance of arrest, why bother to hide the evidence? Apparently he wasn't too smart over covering his tracks online either, which is why the case was such a slam-dunk when it went to court.

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