* Posts by Matt Bryant

9415 posts • joined 21 May 2007

Home Office ignores plight of BA techies as job offshoring looms

Matt Bryant
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Re: You won't have to worry about all those Indians from the EU now!

"Doesn't matter which nation owns the equity of a firm...." IIRC, Tata Consultancy Services are floated on the New York Stock Exchange, so whilst it might be a company of Indian origin it is probably "owned" by people from many countries and walks of life without them even knowing it (many pensions and savings funds invest in NSE stock).

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Tech firms reel from Leave's Brexit win

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: H in The Hague Re: London Falling

"......what century or culture are you living in that you think men shouldn't admit to emotions?" There is a big difference between (a) collapsing melodramatically in an emotional mess, and (b) admitting your feelings about a non-optimal situation but still dealing with the problem. The former seems to be more the Continental male norm, whereas the latter - "dealing with it" - is more accepted in the UK as "manly".

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Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: keithpeter Re: Assumptions, assumptions...

"....wondering how to get all this on the Gantt chart." Amusing as it is to imagine many a PHB scratching their heads at the possible impacts, the majority of manglement I have dealt with seem to have a hard time planning further than their next lunch! The reality is, even if Article 50 was enacted today, there would be a full two years minimum that the UK would still be tied to running with existing EU regs, so for most projects it will be zero actual change or impact involved. The fun bit is any new EU regs that get brought in during the negotiation period after the Article 50 announcement, which Brussels may want to force on the UK as part of the negotiations.

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Matt Bryant
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WTF?

Re: Elmars Re: There goes the EU data Safe Harbor business

"This seriously sucks for foreign companies using hosting services in the UK to meet EU data residency requirements.... no choice but to move....." Er, why? UK-based companies can still comply with the EU rules, there is no disadvantage there compared to EU-based companies. But, UK-based companies can now take a more flexible approach to non-EU customers, such as the US, whilst EU-based companies cannot. Take the example of a big US healthcare company like McKesson, say they want to build a DR center for US patients' data, and the choices are the UK or France. With the UK post-Brexit they may just have to worry about the existing cost of HIPPA compliance, but if they go to France they have to add the cost and complexity of complying with EU rules as well as HIPPA. So the UK option now has a cost and simplicity advantage as well as a language advantage (oh, and we don't have the French Union problems either).

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Matt Bryant
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Boffin

Re: ShelLuser Re: Assumptions, assumptions...

".....but what's with all the negativity?...." Well, from a purely business perspective, change of any sort introduces costs and requires planning, whereas stability means you can just carry on as you were. The problem for businesses is the Brexit introduces uncertainty, which makes planning even harder and more costly - staying on a sinking ship when you can predict the rate of sink makes for a more predictable business environment (especially when you can kick the can down the road for someone else to deal with) than jumping overboard and swimming to shore (will there be sharks in the water, or cannibals on the beach?). Hence the negativity amongst "business leaders". But, what business leaders want and what the average Joe on the street wants may not align. The problem for those business leaders promoting the predictability of continuing in the EU - basically, following the herd - was that the 2008 recession and the experience with the Greek bailout showed that following the herd off a cliff is sometimes not the smart thing for the average Joe in the street to do.

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Matt Bryant
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Stop

WTF?

Someone tell Gav that Remain lost so it's a bit late to be running "Project Fear" pieces.

As to tech companies relocating, the usual driver is not wages but taxes - if international companies can still have their offices in the UK and pay their tax in Luxembourg or Switzerland then nothing will change. International tech companies treat all the individual EU countries as individual markets and pay their corporate taxes where it's cheapest already. The EU would have to unify their tax system to kill that advantage, something they have shown they cannot do.

And do you really think the EU countries want all their ex-pats currently working in London to have to come home to their depressed employment markets? Just imagine - an actual British person serving in a London Starbucks instead of a Continental! The reason all those foreigners (many of them being graduates) are working in low-paid jobs in London is because companies did not just prioritise on wages, otherwise the companies would all be based in Athens or Lisbon and those Continental grads would be working in high-paid tech jobs there.

And despite all the predictable whining from the Fwench and Junker throwing a tantrum (mainly because Junker is terrified the current corporate tax benefits to Luxembourg will get negated by an independent UK), it's still in the EU's interest to not cut off their own noses out of spite. One little memo from the Treasury on the possible tax benefits of an import duty on wine and vehicles - to encourage British wine-making and car manufacturing, naturally - would shut the Fwench up. With the majority of UK exports going outside the EU it is the EU economies that would be burnt worst by a trade war.

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EU GDPR compliance still a thing for UK firms even after Brexit

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Pop!

"....EU citizens...." Yeah, that is the scope of the EU GDPR - EU only. So an UK-based company bidding against an EU-based company for a project concerning EU citizens' data is no more constrained or disadvantaged than the EU-based company will be. However, any EU-based company bidding for data storage for a customer outside the EU (such as hosting the DR center for a company based in the US) will have to comply with the EU rules, but an UK-based company would not, and therefore might have a business advantage in those cases (along with the existing advantage of speaking English as a first language). So, no actual penalty to UK companies in EU opportunities, but possible advantages for UK companies looking at opportunities from the rest of the World. Sorry, was that the sound of another Remain bubble bursting?

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Judge rules FBI can hack any time, any, place, anywhere

Matt Bryant
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Re: Lord_Beavis Re: Serious question

"Can you claim self defense if you are "reverse" hacking a hacking attempt on your system/network being that you don't know where it is coming from?....." No, your actions would be just as illegal, but it is highly unlikely the hacker would go to the cops to file a complaint. Of course, what you need to be careful about is the intermediate systems and whom owns them - if the attacker has compromised a business's server and used it to attack you, and you hack that same server in return, then the law is likely to consider you just as much a hacker as the attacker. Far safer to contact the business that owns the intermediate server and warn them their server has been compromised.

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Matt Bryant
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Boffin

Re: Antron Re: Turn about

"Well, my question is: is it illegal to block an attempted hack?....." No. If you are simply defending yourself against an unidentified threat then that is perfectly legal. Being unaware it is the FBI makes your actions innocent as defensive measures would be the reasonable response to an intrusion. You could probably even get away with deleting evidence by claiming you thought deletion of the data was the only way to protect your secrets from the unknown hacker, it would then be up to the FBI to prove you deliberately deleted evidence to avoid the FBI discovering it. But you might be called to explain in court why you thought your actions were justified defensive measures, and if the prosecutor can sow the idea in the jury's minds that you did it in bad faith.....

".....And the followup question: if you know it's the FBI trying to hack you, is it illegal to block the attempted hack?" If you become aware it is an attempt from the FBI, and you are in an area under their jurisdiction (probably including areas with co-operation and extradition treaties), and the FBI could prove that you knew (not sure how they would), then they could charge any further attempts to thwart their hack as interference with an investigation (or spoliation of evidence if you delete or encrypt anything after you become aware the FBI are hacking you). I suppose a defence would be, when an attack is detected, if you believed it was the FBI then call them and ask them - if they deny it is them then you have the legal protection of saying your further defensive measures were innocently made because "they said it wasn't them". Of course, if it's not the FBI and you call them, they may say "no, but we'll hack you now you're on our radar as thinking we might have an interest in hacking you, thanks!"

Outside the FBI's jurisdiction it becomes a matter of co-operation between local and US authorities. Ukrainian hackers have recently found out to their cost that hacking US servers can lead to extradition, but hackers in places like Ecuador, Cuba, China or Venezuela are laughing.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: As it should be

"FBI should hack Tor, Tor should secure against that. If FBI wasn't allowed to try to hack it, how would we know it was backdoored?...." Well, yes. But I suspect the FBI's NIT did not "break" TOR but simply made TOR's hiding of IP addresses in transit irrellevant. Note the article states the "malware" was put on the server, which is effectively outside TOR, then the identifying "signal" was collected after the package had exited TOR and was on the target's PC. All TOR does is encrypt the package and obfuscate your IP address in transit, it does not detect and prevent malware from broadcasting your IP address after it has reached your PC. This is how honeypots are used to track e-crims, it's nothing new, the only legal question was whether the use of TOR by the paedos gave some right or expectation of privacy, which the judge decided it did not.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Pascal Monet Re: So the FBI has the right to hack the world

"So the FBI has the right to hack the world....." Er, no. Despite the click-bait headline, the judge is clear that the FBI's rights only extended in this very narrow case due to the larger threat of child pornography to US Citizens. You may continue as you were (unless you're into child porn....?).

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Why you should Vote Remain: Bananas, bathwater and babies

Matt Bryant
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Stop

"European instability" just another bit of Remain bollocks.

The completely vacuous argument that the EU "saves us from endless European wars" is probably the stupidest amongst all the stupid Remain arguments. Post-WW2, the fear of the USSR and resulting Cold War stopped European bickering, not the EU, the EEC or any other European talking shop. The current re-emergence of that threat due to Pootie's carefully calculated actions will be met by NATO (US-led so hated by the Fwench), not the EU. Prior to WW2 the European wars were just that - Continental European, and not anything much to do with the UK (pretty much since Napoleon's time). Indeed, the UK got sucked into the Great War ("World War One" for Septic readers) when it was actually a continuation of the Franco-Prussian (where the Krauts regularly kicked the Fwenchies a new one) and Central European (Austro-Hungarian Balkan) wars. WW2 was simply a continuation of WW1. Without the Triple Entente the British Empire would probably have been a very profitable observer of the Great War, and would actually have been more like to supply arms to the Kaiser's Imperial Germany than the Fwenchies (whose overseas empire was more of a trade competitor than the tiny German Empire). Any highly unlikely and completely hypothetical future Continental wars being frothed about by the Remain crowd as the result of Brexit and EU break-up would actually leave the UK better positioned to pick up global trade the EU countries would miss due to in-fighting! Sure, you might claim it would be heartless to consider profiting from any future Continental conflicts (as the neutral Swedes did very successfully during both World Wars), but it would seem rather obtuse to claim we should therefore tie ourselves more tightly to the EU disaster simply because the rest of Europe might throw a tantrum and start killing each other again some time in the future.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Cynical Observer Re: E(USSR)

".....I suspect that the Baltic states who are now members of the EU were more than a little grateful that they had those ties in place when Mr Putin was flexing the muscles of Russian military might on the Ukrainian border....." No, membership of NATO was what they were glad of, not the EU. NATO membership guarantees mutual defence, not the EU. The EU's Common Security & Defence Policy makes zero actual guarantee of mutual defence, it is just another bit of airy-fairy gobbledygook which "strives to have a future common EU military force" but is completely reliant on NATO. This is just another bit of Remain propaganda. Without NATO (and that really means the US) Pootie could swallow each of the Baltic states at will and the EU would be able to do nothing other than issue strongly worded letters of condemnation. Indeed, the economic pain of a US-led banking embargo is much more of a deterrent to Pootie's ambitions than the collective whining of the EU.

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Preston Munchensonton Re: (E)USSR

"......given how brutally Soviet citizens suffered under the USSR with none of the protections afforded by the EU....." True, whilst not as extreme as some of Stalin's measures, you might find a lot of Greeks would like to disagree about the "protections afforded by the EU" after the economic hardships introduced by Greek participation in the EU. The biggest complaint I hear from Greek friends is that the baillout makes the Greek people feel literally enslaved to the German-led EU, like some indentured slave state, with zero control of their own future. Even the idiotic Greek policies that led to their economic downfall were a direct result of the EU's encouragement and policies, and the lackadaisical accounting and oversight that worsened the mess are definitely the fault of the EU's politically-inspired blinkers. The rise of both far-Right and far-Left parties across Europe (especially in the PIGS countries) is a sign of just how unpopular the EU's "protection" has become, especially as it seems to leave them unable to do anything other than follow the diktat of unelected officials in Brussels (rather like the USSR of old).

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Three non-obvious reasons to Vote Leave on the 23rd

Matt Bryant
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Re: Potemkine Re: Did UK make ever something positive to make EU stronger?

"....What UK wants is a common market, not a political union....." Exactly! The problem is that you Europeans just can't seem to understand why anyone would be reluctant to be forced into your EUSSR after we originally only signed up for a common market.

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Meet the 1,000 core chip that can be powered by an AA battery

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: AC

"....battery...." And an AA battery isn't proprietary enough for Apple, they would want an iAA battery with it's own proprietary terminals that could only charge off an Apple outlet and would cost $300.

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Friends with benefits: A taxing problem for Ireland in a post-Brexit world

Matt Bryant
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Que?

All the doom-laden "economic" pitches I hear regarding Brexit seem to be based on the assumption that (a) the rest of the EU will burn their own economies to punish the UK, and (b) the UK will change nothing to take advantage of being free of EU restrictions. A large chunk of European exports go to the UK whereas the majority of UK exports are to non-EU countries, so the EU actually needs to protect that trade to make sure they don't harm their own economies. Should the EU countries take action to make Brexit more painful than it needs to be then there is nothing to stop the UK retaliating by "doing a Switzerland" on financials; offering tax breaks and lower corporation taxes to foreign companies; continue to float Sterling as best for the UK, rather than suffer the Euro's best-for-Germany approach; ditch the reams and reams of EU red-tape and keep our workforce more competitive than Europe's, especially France's. The German's are beginning to realise - too late - that Brexit leaves them carrying the rest of the EU and hobbled by its politics. Ireland could benefit from a Brexit if Ireland negotiates with the UK and takes advantage of EU handouts, but it will always be dependent on keeping one eye on its bigger neighbour, the UK.

IIRC, Ireland's trade with the UK is larger than the rest of the EU, so

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Privacy warriors take legal action over UK gov's right to hack

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

LOL!

"....the IPT has upended 250 years of common law that makes clear such warrants are unlawful...." Yeah, you did such a good job of explaining that to the legally-trained individuals - not! Or could it be that was just another line thrown out there to scare the legally-illiterate, tinfoil-attired?

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Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image. Repeat. Microsoft has created its own FreeBSD image

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: Vic Re: M$ Loves (non-GPL) Open Source, Because They Hate to Share

"....That's what the BSD licence....." Yeah, shame that FreeBSD now comes encumbered with that cack called ZFS and its proprietary history. It's why I stopped using FreeNAS after version 7. If it ever becomes commercially successful in any form then Larry Ellison will send his legal eagles out to fund a new yatch. I'm avoiding FreeBSD until a truly open alternative like Hammerv2 or BTRFS is properly integrated.

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Matt Bryant
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Devil

Re: Christian Berger Re: Embrace, Extend, Extinguish...

So much fun forwarding articles like this to freetards and watching them go purple ranting on about "The Great Satan in Redmond"!

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Google is the EU Remain campaign's secret weapon

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Dimitri Re: Hopefully Brexit...

"....Germany's manufacturing capacity...." Actually, quite the opposite. Whilst Germany currently has more capacity (but nowhere near ten times as you stated), it is foolish to talk of Germany alone when Germany's future, by EU diktat, means you have to talk about Germany merely as the largest piece of the rest of the EU economy. Whilst Germany shines, countries like Greece drag on the EU economy like a lead-filled albatross. Even more of a problem in EU terms is the situation in France, where the unions are fighting against the deregulations required to allow French companies to compete with Germany. In short, the French unions are fighting to keep a minority employed and well-paid and saying screw the large number of unemployed. The Greeks can improve but it is highly likely the French will not. Germany needs a net immigration of about 100,000 cheap labour per year to remain at the level of competitive performance, so maybe the unemployed French can got to Germany? No, because migrants are flooding in from outside the EU and are a lot cheaper to employ, even if the French unemployed were willing to get off their state benefits and move to Germany for work. Italy is in a similar position to France - competitive only in a narrow range of the economic market, with too many young unemployed. So that's the second and third Euro economies going backwards. So, when you talk about the UK being unable alone to overtake Germany, the truth is we don't have to, we just have to get rid of the yoke of bailing out countries like Greece and then perform better than the EU average (which we already do comfortably), and the Germans will be the ones crippled by being left picking up the bill for the rest of the EU. Those are economic facts.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: djstardust Re: Must be copying the code

"From the BBC website...." The BBC has previous form what with their overwhelmingly pro-global-warming bias.

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Get ready for Google's proprietary Android. It's coming – analyst

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: boltar Re: Speaking as a consumer ...

"....If they can't find out what their never-met-them-irl "best friends" ordered via Deliveroo last night or how many other paranaoid neurotics are on this weeks fad diet of liquidised lettuce and bird droppings, then they have an existential crisis and can't cope....." Well, up until recently, that is. A fortnight ago I was asked if we had any "flip phones" on the company's approved phone list. Turns out Taylor Swift has been snapped using a "dumb" flip phone so now they're all the rage again. It would be ironic if the iPhone and Android were both killed off by Swiftees!

Of course, the diehards can always do what we used to do with Linux - ride MS's coat-tails. We used to buy MS-capable PCs and put Linux on them, so why not buy cheap Windows phones and just develop phone Linux to go on top? Oh, hold on a sec - already planned (it's called Ubuntu for phones.....).

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Why everyone* hates Salesforce's Marc Benioff

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: Linker3000 Re: So close

"I was working up to a state of worry...." Don't bother, this is simply more alarmist nonsense. Whilst some services are being replaced by web bots, those that require a personal interaction most definitely are not, otherwise AutoTrader would have finished off all the secondhand car salesmen many years ago. It did not, it was simply used by those secondhand car salesmen to broaden their audience. Same goes for estate agents - no-one buys a house from a bot, they want to be shown it by a person that can answer their questions. "Bankers" is also wrong as only frontline counter staff and administration staff are likely to be replaced by online banking, the fat cats at the senior levels are untouched, and even then there are so many face-to-face banking duties that branches with people are likely to be around for a while yet. What is happening is that the small, independent operators are being driven out of business by franchises and chains that can use the Internet to reach those remote markets the independents used to own. Those chains and franchises have nothing to do with Silly-con Valley and plenty to do with investors like Trumpet.

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That didn't take long: Shareholders sue Oracle in 'fake cloud sales' row

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Wait?

....Oracle still has a cloud business????

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Jacob Appelbaum quits Tor Project amid 'sex misconduct' accusations

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Meh.

I'm waiting to see what the actual charges brought by the authorities are (or if any charges are even brought). It could just be someone inside the team with an axe to grind. Of course, it is amusingly ironic that someone that works on a service beloved by paedophiles and drug dealers should be accused of "sexual crimes" by his own colleagues.

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Sick of storage vendors? Me too. Let's build the darn stuff ourselves

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: IMG Re: Anyone can build something small

"....But at scale....." Fair point, but the problem (for the monolithic array manufacturers) is that there aren't enough "scale" customers to go round. It also comes back to the core point of ALL storage considerations - the end user actually wants access to and safe storage of their data and couldn't give a rat's arse if it is on block or file or disk or flash or over Ethernet or FC. Their primary concern is usually cost. If an old PC running Linux will deliver that data with "good enough" performance then the users will accept the old PC. The 10TB of data I used to need a pair of EMC arrays and a 1Gb FC SAN for can now be delivered faster and cheaper by a cluster of two bog-standard x64 servers running something like MS Windows Storage Server over 10Gb Ethernet, and I don't need to pay for an EMC admin either. And x64-based solutions nowadays can provide scale and performance to cover 90% of business solutions, with professional 24x7 support on offer as well. So, yes, scale is still important for the few, but not so important for the majority.

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'Whites are taking over': Race storm hits heart of Africa's internet body

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: WatAworld: Then why does the police keep pulling me over? Let us examine this.

".....We are computer professionals. We have higher ethical standards than police." You were doing so well, but then you exposed your own blinkered prejudice against police. Please explain the "higher ethical standards" of credit card hackers targeting charities such as Feed The Children?

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That sinking feeling: Itanic spat's back as HPE Oracle trial resumes

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Destroy All Monsters Re: Ho-hum!

"....Did anyone ever manage to produce a compiler that generated good VLIW code?...." Better than Sun's native SPARC. Fujitsu had a demo of "the World's fastest Solaris server" of Slowaris on Itanium. We used to have a laugh running Slowaris on top of Transitive's QuickTransit emulation software on an Integrity Superdome to show how it was faster than any Sun server, just to annoy the Sun salesgrunts (a trick the hp salesgrunts showed us with some glee - http://www.itjungle.com/breaking/bn062007-story01.html). Such a shame that IBM bought and killed Transitive because they were worried emulation would smack a big hole in their mainframe biz (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/11/25/ibm_transitive_options/)

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Matt Bryant
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WTF?

Re: AC Re: Itanic is right!

"HPE should have taken the Tandem SQL and the Tandem non-stop architecture to IA-64...." Er, they did, quite a while ago. IIRC, you can still buy Itanium-based Nonstop I servers and now also Xeon-based Nonstop X servers (http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/servers/integrity/nonstop/nonstopi-rackservers.html#!&pd1=1).

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You deleted the customer. What now? Human error - deal with it

Matt Bryant
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Happy

The old OMG face events.

Not fun at the time, but definitely a good chuckle looking back at those times when your colleague's usual deadpan was replaced by that look of pants-filling terror, accompanied by the whimper of "<insert expletive>, I typed 'rm -r *'!" Strange how even the most experienced admin seemed to do that at least once, despite it being the most joked about error possible.

But I think the best was when a trainee electrician pushed the emergency power breaker button (the one behind a flip-up plastic shield, labelled in red "Only use in event of electrocution!") and dropped the power to a whole datacenter hall.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Shadow Systems Re: I concur with the procedure guides.

".....I still shake my head in disbelief at the stupidity of Manglement & their inability to figure out that the immediate drop in office productivity exactly matched the increase of Help Desk call volumes....." I had a similar experience, but the good work was undone by crafty consultants pulling the wool over the eyes of duh manijment. A colleague and I wrote up the procedures library over the course of a year, and they were much welcomed by the staff, reducing helpdesk calls and freeing up the IT staff's time for other work. Then a well-known UK consultancy outfit sailed in and offered to provide a "one-stop-shop" for support with an offsite (as in waaaaay offsite in Bangalore) helpdesk, centralized remote builds, etc., at a bargain price. Our internal IT team was gutted to fund the deal. The first thing the consultants did when they got the contract was delete all help files from the desktop and server builds and remove access to the process library we had written. Now staff had to call their helpdesk for even the simplest of issues. The consultants' justification was that the staff were hired to do their jobs, not IT work, which sounded good to manglement. But the real reason was helpdesk contract had a threshold for call volume, and removing all the help files and our process library pushed the volume of calls over the threshold and meant additional charges, making the service eventually cost almost twice what the old inhouse IT team had.

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Samsung: Don't install Windows 10. REALLY

Matt Bryant
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Re: Lost all faith... Re: What an absolute

"And you can confirm they have 100% driver support?" TBH, I'm trying to remember the last time I had any trouble with any OS automatically finding a driver for a device! Must be a good few years now. And that's Linux, Unix or Windows, they've all become pretty good at it, which makes the Samsung situation even more shocking. When we tested Win10 on its release it was boringly reliable to install on current kit, so much so we actually tried doing stupid tricks like loading it onto twelve-year-old PCs and old laptops we dug out of the back of the cupboard. To our surprise, not a single failure, covering Lenovo/IBM, Dell, HP and Fujitsu kit. TBH, Samsung's tardiness is very surprising given their image as a quality brand.

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Brexit? Cutting the old-school ties would do more for Brit tech world

Matt Bryant
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Go

<Yawn>

Go. Don't let the door hit you on the way out.

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UK eyes frikkin' Laser Directed Energy Weapon

Matt Bryant
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Re: Nick Ryan Re: Nice videos and all

"....rather dubious of "laser weapons"...." Indeed, their use so far seems to be primarily as a means of missile guidance, but they have also been used to dazzle the pilots of attacking planes. One interesting development is the US's Pike "personal missile", which is a 40mm, 2Lb missile launched from the standard M320 40mm grenade-launcher and laser-guided out to ranges of over 2km.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: DavidJB

"If I recall correctly.... Sea Dart only worked against high level targets...." Read, digest, recall accurate information next time - http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Sea_Dart_(missile), http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Sea_Wolf_(missile). Please note the bit about how, during the Gulf War, an RN Sea Dart saved USS Missouri from an Iraqi Silkworm missile after the USN's Phalanx was fooled by their own chaff. The RN decided they preferred Goalkeeper to Phalanx as Goalkeeper's 30mm shells are much more likely to destroy an incoming missile with one hit than Phalanx's 20mm shells.

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Russia poised to unleash 'Son of Satan' ICBM

Matt Bryant
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WTF?

Re: Asterix the Gaul Re: Two steps forward...

"....It is a country with enormous natural resources,whereas it's the USA\UK that are 'screwed'...." The USSR was an even bigger affair with much more resources, yet the it failed in economic competition with the West.

Rather than worrying about the US economy, I'd suggest the problem you should be looking at is closer to Gaul. The economies that are struggling in Europe are France and Italy, both due to slow reform of employment laws due to over-cosy relationships between politicians and the labour movements. France in particular is suffering from a lack of investment from abroad seeing as foreign companies are terrified by the way French unions act illegally and violently with impunity. Germany productivity is accelerating away from France and Italy, the second and third economies in the Eurozone, which is why the UK needs to make sure it doesn't get left holding part of the EU bill for France's and Italy's past socialist policies.

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Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: x 7 Re: Sorry that handle Voland's right hand Two steps forward...

"I think its (sic) now fairly well accepted....." Er, no. There was a particularly strident group of morons that tried to claim that the Patriots were a failure because they didn't actually hit the Scuds, but this ignores the fact the Patriots weren't designed to hit but to explode near bye, the shrapnel from the airburst then damaging the target so badly it would break up. This is common to the majority of SAMs - they don't usually aim for a direct hit. The same group of morons also tried belittling the Patriots' success rate by talking about "per-missile interception rates", which again ignored the fact that Patriots were fired in groups at a target to produce several airbursts around the Scud for maximum chance of breakup. But the biggest factor in the "low" rate of interceptions was the shoddy quality of Saddam's Scuds - many simply broke up on during flight, leaving nothing for the Patriots automatically fired in anticipation to actually hit! Plenty of Scud casings were recovered riddled with hits from Patriot shrapnel. Since then, Patriot has undergone a number of enhancements to make it even better as an ABM. So, think again.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: TheVogon Re: Two steps forward...

".....I think you mean since the demise of the British Empire...." The Middle East has been screwed for centuries, regardless of the British Empire. The bizarre baaaahlief that all was rosy in the area until Britain took an interest simply doesn't stack up with historical fact. Even under the Ottoman Empire there was plenty of bloodshed, such as the Armenian genocide, and Arab nationalism kickstarted anti-Semitism in the Ottoman Empire long before Britain got involved (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_the_Ottoman_Empire#Antisemitism). Britain (and France) just inherited the results of thousands of years of ethnic strife in the region.

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Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: Sorry that handle Re: Voland's right hand Two steps forward...

".....Has Patriot's been tested in that role?...." Even first generation Patriot could, as shown during the 1991 Gulf War when they swatted Scuds out of the sky. Iskander is little more than just a developed Scud, not the all-singing, all-dancing, magically-teleporting-about-the-sky superweapon Voland thinks it is. What Iskander can do that the new RS-28 can't is go out on the road and be launched from just about anywhere, making it much harder to strike pre-emptively or monitor for launch plumes. That was the real problem of Saddam's Scuds during the Gulf Wars - their mobility. As the RS-28 will go into already known silos they will all be under 24x7 surveillance from US satellites watching for any hint of launch activity (such as fueling up), even before we get to launch plumes (nice big IR indicator). As it is, the Kaliningrad Oblast is small enough that satellite tracking of Iskander mobile launchers trying to hide wouldn't be too hard a task.

Iskander does pay a penalty for being mobile and staying sub-orbital in that it is smaller and much shorter-ranged (@280-500km). Going orbital makes for true long range, staying inside the atmosphere requires a massive amount of fuel to go intercontinental, especially if you want to try maneuvering inside the atmosphere. Iskander only maneuvers on the downward arc of its trajectory, not during the climb, making it vulnerable to anti-ballistic missiles after launch. If the RS-28 wants to try hypersonic maneuvering inside the atmosphere without folding up it will not be making small turns but massive arcs, which will not be hard to track and intercept. Claims that any ICBM will be flying nap-of-the-Earth like a cruise missile but at hypersonic speeds are too stupid for words, as maneuvering at such speeds would require a structure made with massive amounts of reinforcing to handle the stresses, so much so the warhead would be tiny. The fact that the RS-28 uses the same engine modules as the old R-36M2, which are not designed for hypersonic maneuvering inside the atmosphere, goes to show the RS-28 is just the same-old-same-old in an updated wrapper.

Pootie needs his part of the MAD balance to be at least a viable threat, and there are rumours that the older Soviet ICBMs simply rotted in their silos to the point where only one-in-four were fit to launch, let alone deliver their warheads successfully. The RS-28 is just Pootie updating his old kit with new kit plus a lot of propaganda.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Dadmin Re: Birmingham

"....assholes...guns....bibles...." Really? I quite liked Alabama when I passed through, the people seemed a damn sight friendlier than in those bastions of liberalness like New York or Chicago (which both have much, much higher levels of guncrime). Per chance, are you posting from one of said liberal "wonderlands"?

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Voland's right hand Re: Two steps forward...

"....Iskander, Bulava and most likely the Son of Satan go on a much lower trajectory than USSR ICBM...." That low trajectory makes them vulnerable to the battlefield anti-ballistic missile systems that became popular around the same time. Even old Patriot can deal with low-trajectory ICBMs - oh, I wonder if that's why NATO keeps a battery near the border with Kalingrad?

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

LOL!

So, it uses the existing launch silos that NATO have already mapped out and have targeted? And it needs a nice, long, pre-launch fuel-up with liquid fuel, meaning it can be targeted in its silo long before it is ready to be fired? And it's so big and expensive to make that Pootie can only make so many with his crumbling economy?

Pootie has a similar fixation with "big is best" as Hitler had. He should have read some Cold War history and realised what really scared NATO was mobile and quick-response ICBMs like the SS-25/27.

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Aussie wedges spam javelin in ring spanner

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Meh

Re: Ledswinger Re: How impressive?

".....I'm only going to be impressed....." Upvote for the sentiment, but I can't say I find the idea impressive regardless of the size of spanner used by the spanner.

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Big Pharma wrote EU anti-vaping diktat, claims Tory ex-MEP

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Steven Raith Re: Snus

"....If Snus were banned...." Snus are banned in most of Europe.

"....They are terrified because they were caught on the back foot by all this...." Not really, they have simply developed their own e-cig products.

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Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: John Bailey Re: Have to ask...

".....They want e-cigs gone too. Bad for business." The nicotine in vape capsules comes from tobacco, which the tobacco industry are more than happy to supply to either the vape capsule manufacturers or cigarette manufacturers. Indeed, smoking has been trending downwards for decades in the developed World, so vaping is giving Big Tobacco a lifeline by allowing them to sell "safe" nicotine. If anyone is blocking vaping it is not Big Tobacco. For example, Phillip Morris (BIG Tobacco) has already released their own Marlboro Heatsticks.

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At the BBC, Agile means 'making it up as we go along'

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Flame

Not an "agile" issue, but one of management targets.

Sorry but, IMHO,this has nothing to do with "agile" and a lot to do with staff trying to work around senior management controls. In the old days we would have called it a "blue sky" project or a "skunkworks" gig - something that was intended to explore an expected future requirement that couldn't be clearly defined. The idea is you risk wasting resources on an endeavour that may actually return nothing of "benefit" (usually determined by management as benefit=profit) in the hope it at least gets you ready for what you may need to face further down the road. That type of project is very unpopular with the beancounters as it is usually impossible to define either the scope nor the likely costs involved with accuracy, and definitely not the fiscal benefits. The problem is then trying to run such an exploratory effort when management are fixated on SMART (specific, measurable, assignable, realistic, time-related) without having the scope of the exploratory work hampered by deliverables and deadlines. In essence, it is the most "agile" you can get, with an emphasis on prototyping to see what you can actually get to.

In science this is called research, and a lot of it actually makes a loss and is unsuccessful, but when it succeeds it leads to real breakthroughs and major profits. The problem is the majority of MBA types can't see beyond their profit-and-loss spreadsheets long enough to see the real benefits.

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F-35s failed 'scramble test' because of buggy software

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
WTF?

Seriously?!?!?

Apart from the virtual "see-through-your-plane" helmet software, which is kinda new (but not in itself a terribly hard problem), the rest of the F-35's systems should be pretty simple as it's nothing new. Artificial stability? Been done for years, indeed it was trialed in the '80s (BAe Jaguar ACT flew with "relaxed stability" in 1981, IIRC). Weapons launched from internal bays at supersonic speeds? F-22 got that covered. AESA radar is pretty old hat too. Integrated coms with encrypted links to external sources? The old Tornado ADV could manage that. And even the VTOL bits are not exactly ground-breaking (even the Ruskies managed it with the Yak-36 and -38). I suspect the issue is someone had the "bright idea" of ignoring decades of avionics development by actual avionics engineers and decided to hire some whizz kid programmers with zero experience in the field. Lockheed Martin are making themselves look seriously incompetent.

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Chap runs Windows 95 on Apple Watch

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Meh

Re: PNGuinn Re: Not like it was doing anything useful before...

"...w95 or the watch?" The watch, obviously. It's a measure of just how pointless the Apple Watch is that a user would waste time trying to emulate a completely different OS on it. It also speaks volumes of the waste of resources the Apple Watch is - 512MB of RAM and all it can do is act as a poor header to an iPhone!?!?! Then again, he may just have wanted what all Apple users ends wanting - a decent set of tools running on his Apple device (AKA MS Office).

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Central gov spent £6.3bn on IT. Nearly half handed to just 3 suppliers

Matt Bryant
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: ecofeco Re: Nice fact

"Now how about an article on how much of it was wasted on failed projects? You know, context.". Well, first you would have to set the context. For a start, the rate of project failure in IT outside of government is pretty high, and that is usually a lot smaller and less challenging projects. Maybe comparing the rate of failure against other leading European countries would be a good comparison.

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