* Posts by Matt Bryant

9741 posts • joined 21 May 2007

Give BAE a kicking and flog off new UK warships, says review

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: AC Re: Voland's right hand Nobody will buy them

"....Great Guh, did nobody learn from the problems the Americans had with the Sheridan firing guided munitions and normal shells out the same barrel, or the Russians with their BMPs firing missiles and shells out the same barrel...?...." WTF??? Seriously, go read up on the Copperhead 155mm guided shell, it's a better comparison.

"....Even early C20th plate steel was proof against popguns like that so modern layered armors probably won't even get scratched....." Firstly, no modern naval ship carries 20th Century battleship armour, so that is a moot point. Secondly, no "modern layered armors" in actual use is going to stop the penetration by a 46Lb shell (current RN 4.5in Mk8 loading) hitting it. Worse, the bit that armour cannot protect is all the electronics that a modern warship uses for finding and attacking enemies. One guided HE hit on the superstructure, even if you did have some miracle "layered armor" to protect the interior, would still strip the exterior of it's antennas and radomes, leaving the ship blind and unable to defend itself from further attacks and unable to do much to inconvenience its attacker. Game over!

"....By the time your underpowered toy has reached firing range your boat will be toasted, either by a long-range anti-ship missile or by the similar popguns carried on the patrol boats of your opponents." Apart from the fact the new frigates in RN service will have a comprehensive anti-missile system, you are forgetting that - in a wartime scenario - the frigate would be working with an RN or NATO fleet, which would mean any attacker would be toast long before it got within missile range. As for the idea of a swarm attack by smaller craft, again they would need to get past the helicopter (very good for picking off speedboats or Boghammer attack craft) and the frigate's own weapons (including that 4.5in gun), and then be able to do enough damage with the tiny weapons such speedboats can carry before retaliation arrives from the rest of the RN/NATO fleet.

"....And even though smaller calibre munitions means more can be carried, it will just be like the 9mm vs .45ACP problem where one .45 will stop a man but it takes 2, 3 or more 9mm to have an effect ...." This type of ill-informed nonsense has long since been debunked, and if you really believe 9mmP is so dreadful then why are many LEOs, such as the <a href="https://loadoutroom.com/12077/fbi-going-9mm-comes-science/>FBI</a>, switching back to 9mmP?

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Matt Bryant
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Pirate

Re: Richard Jukes

"...but the days of the aircraft carrier and surface ships are over for war." Whilst that is possibly a debatable point, surface ships are still very useful in times of peace, which is the majority of the time these ships will be used for. Especially for preventative roles such as anti-piracy and anti-smuggling operations, where just the sight of a warship on the horizon deters - sub hidden beneath the waves, not so much. And also for non-lethal activities such as providing emergency assistance to islands hit by hurricanes, or evacuating civilians from warzones, or saving refugees from the Med (how many refugees would you want to try squeezing into a Trident sub?).

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: Voland's right hand Nobody will buy them

"....but here in the US we are trying to figure out how to get them for under $700k a shot." You may want to check that again - the first suite of Excalibur 155mm guided shells are being bought at a total cost of much less than half that figure. You're also ignoring the fact that even a cost of $700k-a-shot is a bargain if it sinks or disables an enemy's multi-million dollar ship, or destroys a high-value land target such as a SAM or ASM radar (which usually cost millions each).

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC Re: Voland's right hand Nobody will buy them

".....But on the point the OP made, medium calibre guns are not an anti-ship weapon (not against another naval ship, that is)..... You are failing to understand the roles these frigates will carry out. These are not destroyers or cruisers, they are not expected to go toe-to-toe with the Moskva, in their peacetime role they are expected to be able to detect submarines, chase smugglers, pirates and illegal fisherman, and provide emergency rescue services. Medium caliber guns will most certainly be a big threat to fishingboats, dhows, trawlers, pirate RIBs and the odd merchant vessel! They also give the option of projecting force over the coastal region through NGS, proven to be a very accurate way of dealing with threats such as beached pirate craft well out of range of the type of weapons such pirates can employ. In wartime they would operate as part of a larger fleet, either a NATO one (vs the neo-Soviets), where they would provide anti-submarine support; or an RN fleet against some Third World navy like Argentina's, which is currently little more than four "destroyers" (actually frigates), three subs, and some older corvettes which seem crippled by a lack of spares. In either case they are not meant to be Dreadnought-like battleships.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Voland's right hand Re: Nobody will buy them

".....They possess significant anti-ship and anti-land target capabilities. The BAE boats have none....." I see you have as little knowledge about naval ships as you do warplanes! See the turret on the foredeck? It will mount either the current 4.5in gun or the proposed 155mm "future naval gun", both of which give it quite a capability for NGS. The 155mm will also have a range of guided munitions, making it even more deadly to coastal and shipping targets. And the there's the fact it carries a helicopter, giving it the ability to conduct over-the-horizon anti-shipping, anti-sub and anti-coastal operations. And that's before you consider that the design has the stretch capability so that customers can add their own missile systems in addition to the standard suite, if the customers actually have any further requirements beyond coastal patrols, anti-piracy and fishing enforcement, which the existing design has covered already.

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Tobacco giant predicts the end of smoking. Panic ensues

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: Paul Woodhouse Re: I know what's next...

Lethargy?....I could never be arsed with that one...

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Vegans furious as Bank of England admits ‘trace’ of animal fat in £5 notes

Matt Bryant
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Re: Pontius

"....try looking at the world in a more considered way." Well, right now in the real world there is a buzzard eating a rabbit in my backyard - you want me to try telling the buzzard he's being egotistical?

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Microsoft’s ‘Home Hub’ probably isn’t even hardware at all

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Francis Boyle Re: If you're in the US

"....Arabic which remember they don't understand...." Ignoring the fact that the CIA reputedly employs more Arabic (all five regional dialects, and Farsi) speakers than any other government organistaion in the Western hemisphere, if your buddy Snowden is to be believed then the NSA also has automated eavesdropping tools that can understand all forms of Arabic without the need for a fleshy translator.

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Matt Bryant
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Pirate

Re: mmeier

".....They are on the AD and network already....." For those that have failed to notice, M$ has a neat tool in Win10 called Microsoft Family Features that allows you to group your home PCs, phones and Xboxes into one cloud-based "organization" that the family admin can then control and configure online. It wouldn't take much for M$ to expand that into a more active form of domain control for administration of an IoT setup, and as it is cloud-based the controlling software can be expanded and developed without the need to do much to the PC OS or IoTs' OSs.

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Grand App Auto: Tesla smartphone hack can track, locate, unlock, and start cars

Matt Bryant
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Re: Voland's right hand Re: You don't mention...

"OAuth2 is retarded by design...." Being so stupid as to let a phone app control your very expensive car's security is retarded by nature.

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Put down the org chart, snowflake: Why largile's for management crybabies

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: Champ Re: In 5 years?

"Yeah, cos <del>waterfall was</del> humans are renowned for producing complete, fault-free software...." There, fixed that snark for you. Whatever method/fad you choose will fail if you have either a bad team or bad stakeholders involved. I have worked on some very complex software and hardware projects using waterfall that succeeded because the people involved were simply better than the industry average.

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Matt Bryant
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The truth.

".....They started the project with several hundred pages of requirements that business analysts had build up like a perfect cathedral. After throwing this pile of paper to a unified, balanced "two-pizza team" who walked through the user problems and how to start the discovery cycle for solving them with weekly builds, most of the cathedral was dismantled and ignored....." LOL, my guess is either the BAs were crap or the coders ignored the majority of the stakeholders. That is why you need proper project management, regardless of whether it is agile, waterfall or back-of-an-envelope practice, because one of the key jobs of a project manager is validate the requirements!

I have been parachuted in to take over failing projects where exactly what you describe has happened - the agilistas set out to prove they knew more than the BAs and trashed the requirements. They regularly forgot the end users were not the people paying for the work, huddled up to a small subset of the actual stakeholders, and missed a big slew of what the project was contractually obliged to deliver because the end users in question did not know all the business's requirements. In one hilarious case, the end users (help desk staff) persuaded the coders that the requirement (from the help desk management) for a module to gather stats on their performance was not needed! You can probably guess how well that went down when the management sat down to do final acceptance testing.

It is a simple fact of human behavior that you like working with people that you are comfortable with, and coders are renowned for their inability to suck it up and deal with people that don't pat them on the head and say nice things, or just aren't "geeks", hence they often do not talk to the business stakeholders they see as "troublesome". Part of being a good project manager is being able to identify and deal with ALL the stakeholders, not just the ones that you can have fanboi conversations about the latest iPhone or Flash vs HTML5 flamewar.

The idea of trying to run a large program in an "agile" manner is - IMHO - laughable.

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Sysadmin denies boss's request to whitelist smut talk site of which he was a very happy member

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: AC Re: Smut access

".... firewall logs...." In my experience, it's always the firewall admins that have the largest p0rn stashes.

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BOFH: The Hypochondriac Boss and the non-random sample

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

True Stories From Corporate America - Part Duh!

"......The antivirus coordinator at a place I once worked sent out an IT security CD to all staff - with a virus on it." LOL! Many years ago, a support employee of a leading IT super-vendor in Singapore sent an email to all his customers advising on methods to avoid getting infected by one of those new PC virii. Unfortunately, the email was infected with the then unknown "I Love You" virus, and that email from a trusted source was probably responsible for the speed with which the virus subsequently infected a large number of corporate customers around the World. Such was the state of innocence/ignorance in those days that those infected said they had trusted the source but hadn't questioned why he would send an attachment titled "I Love You"!

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Integrator fired chap for hiding drugs conviction, told to pay compo for violating his rights

Matt Bryant
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Meh

"Honesty" in IT.

Considering this is another week I'm dealing with the results of an IT company's representatives "not being wholly truthful" (AKA, lying to us, their customer), I'm once again struck by the hypocrisy of such a company firing someone for NBWT. It seems many such companies have the attitude "we don't care what porkies you tell the customer to get the contract/sale, just don't get caught, but if you ever lie us, your employer, you're f*cked!"

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Facebook Fake News won it for Trump? That's a Zombie theory

Matt Bryant
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Meh

Re: Maty Re: Objectivity

"As a matter of interest, during the US election the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) made its preference so obvious that it was widely referred to as the 'Clinton Broadcasting corporation'." The BBC News website warped into the Bolsheviks Broadcasting for Clinton, and is still mainstreaming as many anti-Trump stories as they can. Some of the Beeb's antipathy may stem from their biased support for AGW and Trump's supposed "anti-environment" stance, the rest seems to be just the mask slipping.

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HPE is creaming Dell in HPC

Matt Bryant
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Larger blunder missed!

Whilst chuckling at CISCO's decline in HPC, you missed IBM's even more amusing and continued decline. IBM stated that they were withdrawing from the general x64 market to concentrate on "smarter" x64 markets like HPC, yet now they are being trounced by Lenovo - the people they offloaded the majority of their x64 to! HPE is almost double Dell in HPC, but they are now more than four times IBM!

HPE – $446,081,000

.....

Dell – $224,170,000

Lenovo – $142,725,000

....

IBM – $110,657,000

Indeed, if IBM had stayed for the fight, they could have captured those Lenovo customers and challenged Dell for the third spot.

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Zuckerberg says just one per cent of news on Facebook is fake

Matt Bryant
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Stop

The Clintonites need to stop blaming everyone else.

LOL, the Democrats are just desperate to blame anyone except themselves for Trump's victory. The truth is Hillary lost the election. The Republicans didn't convert thousands of Democrats into Trump supporters, the Republican voting figures hardly changed between Romney in 2012 and Trump in 2016, whereas Hillary's figures are way down on Obama's. It's that simple - people that wanted to vote for Obama didn't for Hillary Clinton. The truth is what Bernie's supporters said all along (and the biased DNC ignored), that Hillary Clinton was simply too unpopular with Democrats, let alone Republicans or floating voters. The media and pollsters simply reported what they wanted to see and didn't dig any deeper into the views of voters, especially not the Republicans they constantly ridiculed. Johnathan Pie's hilarious rant against his fellow Clinton supporters sums it up nicely (WARNING, NSFW, or for Democrats outside a "safe space").

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Matt Bryant
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Happy

SNL calls it!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHG0ezLiVGc

Love Chris Rocks line; "You got a big day of moping and writing on Facebook tomorrow!"

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The sharks of AI will attack expensive and scarce workers faster than they eat drivers

Matt Bryant
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Boffin

Re: Mage Re: You missed the case where it has already started.

"Automatic Trading isn't AI...." Robo-trading is not automated trading. A typical factory robot does not make any decisions, it just carries out the same programmed process regardless. Similarly, an automated trading system simply uses buy and sell figures. However, a true robo-trader makes automated decisions based on a set of rules to predict future stock performance, just as fleshy traders do. Some of those decisions made by robo-traders can be based on very complex algorithms with a vast number of variables, both historic economic and share price data and realtime, not just buy and sell prices. Such robo-traders already exist and advise on funds containing thousands of different stocks and positions, and may be predicting a strategy as long as ten years into the future (longer with bonds).

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Matt Bryant
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You missed the case where it has already started.

Yes, AI will replace the expensive people that generate the biggest profits, not just the expensive professionals. This is shown by how AI is already being used to replace day traders with robo-traders.

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Britain must send its F-35s to Italy for heavy overhauls, decrees US

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Voland's right hand Re: Widow Maker

".....is a set of missiles which vastly exceed in range and operational capability anything USA was willing to export...." What tosh! Never heard of the JASSMA? As it is, the Dutch would be far more likely to buy the European Storm Shadow rather than a poor Turkish clone.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Voland's right hand

".....Though to be honest, the spread of the supply chain across such a wide geography does not bring confidence that parts will be available when they are most needed - during wartime....." But this is only intended for peacetime. In the event of a major NATO war (not "peacekeeping"), the RAF would recruit and expand and take on their own maintenance duties. This sharing out of duties means all the buyers get some economic return whilst minimising the costs of peacetime servicing.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Archtech Re: Take back control

".....there was no such nation as "Ukraine" - it didn't exist independently until 1990-1....." Which begs the question why did the Ukranians welcome the Germans in 1941, seeing them as liberators from the Soviets? Yes, in time the Ukranians realised Hitler was just as bad as Stalin, but in 1941 they thought otherwise. But the Ukranian people had their own identity for centuries before 1990, going back as least as far as the Cossack Hetmanate of 1649. You can see that the Austrians recognised that distinct Ukranian identity seeing as they recruited Ukranians into the Ukranian Legion to fight the Imperial Russians in WW1. Post-WW1, that Ukranian Legion morphed into the Ukranian Galician Army that fought the Bolsheviks and the Polish in an attempt to keep the West Ukrainian People's Republic independent. So to claim that Ukraine and the Ukranian people did not exist before 1990 is simply false and possibly due to falling for the Soviet's or Putin's revisioning of history.

".....Or that the sensible Russian precaution of moving some military forces close to a threatened part of its border (while still within Russia)...." So Ukraine is "still inside Russia"? If you really believe Putin didn't send troops and heavy weapons into Ukraine then you're living in a bubble.

"....is in any way comparable to NATO piling up soldiers, armour, aircraft, ABM systems and cruise missiles within spitting distance of Russia?" LOL, what "piling up"? The NATO troop levels have plummeted since the fall of the Wall.

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Blighty will have a whopping 24 F-35B jets by 2023 – MoD minister

Matt Bryant
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Re: Annonymous Comrade Re: Good deal that it'll still take a really long time

".....war mongers in GB and Nato....." COUGH * Crimea * COUGH * Ukraine * COUGH

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What should the Red Arrows' new aircraft be?

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: Voland's right hand Re: Plenty of air forces out there...

".....Most of the time the Su in that video is flying at a speed at which the Eurofighter will be in pieces on the ground 10 times and it enters flat spins at least 3 times....." You really do know nothing about aerodynamics. The delta-canard design of the Typhoon is designed to give the best compromise between low drag at supersonic speeds and sustained agility, it allows a much higher and sustained angle of attack than the Sukhoi can manage even with vectored thrust. The Typhoon's wing will also bleed energy less than the Sukhoi in a sustained turn, which means the Sukhoi will stall, spin and crash long before the Typhoon. That is the opinion of aerodynamic experts, not the ranting of pro-Russian kiddies.

As to your other fanciful claims, the Eurofighter (in both German and British hands) has beaten the F-22 in numerous NATO exercises, and the French have been very careful to avoid putting the Rafael up against it. In the recent Indian MRCA selection competition (to replace existing Su-30MKI jets), the final choice went down to the Rafael and the Tranche 3 Eurofighter, the Russian offerings (Mig-35 and Su-35) being rejected very early in the competition despite the Indians' long history of using Russian jets. The final selection was Rafael on price, the Indian pilots preferring the Eurofighter which was the leader on technical points. Please note that competition included the Super Hornet, your other fanboi choice.

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Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: As Veritech Alphas are probably not available....

"The A10 is not something you want to do aerobatics in....." Rubbish! At low levels (which is where air show displays are flown) the A-10 is extremely agile and has won in practice dogfights against jets like the F-16. But there is no chance of the U.K. shelling out for a foreign design, especially not an expensive one like the A-10 which would mean buying second-hand and introducing a new airframe requiring new logistics into the RAF system.

".....Out of the list only the Alpha Jet is remotely capable of them...." Except it is (a) not British (the Red Arrows serve a flag-waving role for British industry), and (b) simply not in the same class as the Hawk T1, let alone the T2, due to the French crippling of the requirement so as not to threaten Jaguar sales. It would also mean introducing a new airframe into the RAF logistics, so again unlikely. I suggest it was only put I the list so as to draw forth cries of "No bloody way" from traditionalists.

".....This is the primary reason to the spectacular defeat of the RAF against the visiting Indian team flying Su-35s....." LOL I hear lots about this mythical occurrence on pro-Russian websites, but none from reputable sources. For a start, there was a mock dogfight between RAF Typhoons and Indian Su-30MKIs (not "Su-35s") in the 2007 and 2010 "Indrahanush" war games, but the Indians lost every engagement. A lot of misunderstanding was generated by the RAF commenting on how they "respected the agility" of the Sukhois, but the Typhoons' superior electronics and tactics meant they easily dominated the Sukhois. Ignoring that the Typhoon can super cruise faster and at higher altitudes than the latest Russian Su-35S (meaning it enters any dogfight with superior energy), and that both have helmet-mounted sights and off-bore dogfight AAMs, as a last ditch tactic, a Typhoon can maintain a combat turn for longer, losing less energy than the latest Su-35S, until the thirsty Sukhoi has to quit from lack of fuel, giving the Typhoon the chance of a shot at the retreating Sukhoi's tailpipes. That's if the Typhoon hasn't simply jammed the Sukhoi's radar from range and used PIRATE IRST to track the enormous Sukhoi and shoot it down long before the Sukhoi's pilot even realised the smaller Typhoon was in the neighbourhood.

".....In fact, out of the "real" fighters the choice is only between SuperHornet and Su-35. Everything else has been crippled by the Stealth Madness or is crap, sorry Eurofighter." Whatever, TBH. I suggest you do more factual research.

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Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: Rich 11 Re: Alpha Jet

"It's the nearest thing to the Hawk in performance terms...." Er, no. The French stuffed the European project for a common trainer because the British requirements (which led to the Hawk) promised an aircraft too close in capability and far cheaper than existing French attack jets. So the Alpha is an anemic, nine-stone weakling compared to the Hawk, which is why the Hawk had massively outsold the Alpha worldwide.

I think the Hawk T2 is the most likely choice given the Tucano is out of production and the next gen trainer under the UKMFTS has yet to be chosen. Of course, an interesting option would be a display team of BAe Systems Taranis drones.....

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Computer forensics defuses FBI's Clinton email 'bombshell'

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: Kiwi Re: I sense political meddling.

And there's the Winner of the Weekly Completely Irrelevant Whataboutism Award! Whatever Trumpet did or didn't do doesn't excuse Clinton's acts.

/C'mon, Reg, where's the "Whatabout" icon?

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Matt Bryant
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Go

Re: IMG Re: I sense political meddling.

".....What fails is that the author is definitely trying to defend Clinton and that's sad....." Very true. Let's start with the (frankly) either idiotic or deliberately obtuse suggestion for filtering the emails given in the article:

"....will have been forensically trivial, as all will contain the unique string "clintonemail."...."

Seriously?!? That filter would not catch an email where classified material had been forwarded by Abedin from a Clinton email but the email headers had been deleted to hide the origin. Remember, part of the investigation is not only looking for evidence of classified material, but also cases where the sender (Abedin) knew what she was doing and attempted to hide the origin of the material. In such cases, you would need to catch both emails - the one from Clinton to her aid, and then the forwarded one with the "clintonemail" removed - to show intentional transfer of classified material and the attempt to hide its origin. We already know Clinton and Abedin had a cosy relationship with some pet journos, so it would not be surprising to find Abedin leaking classified material to them with its origin deleted.

Also, if this second investigation turns up just one email with classified content that Clinton's lawyers did not forward as "relevant" in the original investigation, then they are guilty of obstruction and - if they deleted the original - spoliation of evidence. No, this second investigation is not the triviality suggested by Campbell's obvious bias. I expect the FBI are treading extremely carefully so as to leave no possibility of legal challenges to whatever is discovered.

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Whoosh! China shows off J-20 'stealth' fighters and jet drones

Matt Bryant
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Alert

Re: Ian Emery Re: Chinese have been selling drones for some time

".....each armed with an Li-ON warhead." Each armed with a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 incendiary device!

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Matt Bryant
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Headmaster

Re: Waldorf kitty Re: Clint would approve

"....i'm guessing someone hasn't seen the movie to have down-voted that comment... in the movie, the firefox craft was soviet so the pilot had to think in soviet...." "Soviet" is not a language, it is a societal term. In the movie Michael Gant has to think in Russian because the plane's computer had been configured to understand the pilot's thoughts in Russian. A "soviet" is a term for a societal group operating under supposed socialist principles (the nuttier Left in the UK forms silly little "Soviets" all the time).

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Matt Bryant
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Re: streaky Re: Stealth..

".....haven't the western military powers and Russia all figured out ways to eye stealth aircraft these days anyway?....." More of a problem for the Chinese is that their pilots have been traditionally trained in the old Soviet home defence, GCI techniques and tactics. Those techniques got shown up as long ago as the Vietnam War and as recently as over Iraq and Libya. The ambitions of the Chinese are to use the J-20s to project Chinese air-power at very long range over the China Sea and the disputed "Nine Dash" air zone (hence why the J-20 is the size of an airliner, it needs so much fuel). Acting at such long range away from the comfort of their home defence systems is going to leave the J-20 pilots awfully exposed to ECM, a situation where the intense training in individual decision making of Western pilots and their superior integrated systems will give them an advantage.

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Want to spy on the boss? Try this phone-mast-in-an-HP printer

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Re: Valeyard

"the phone trusts the dodgy base station because the police and gchq etc want your phone to trust dodgy base stations...." Wow, the paranoia! Actually, it's because most telcos allow roaming, which means your phone will always query any cell tower it finds within range to see if it will provide a better service than your carrier's nearest tower. Roaming was introduced due to international customer demand, not the government nor the GCHQ. if you disable roaming, all the fake tower will be able to do is record your IMEI and details from your phone's registration request (unless it also spoofs the real carrier's SID), which anyone with the right toys can do already just by listening to radio traffic between phones in an area and local cell towers.

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Run a JSON file through multiple parsers and you'll get different results every time

Matt Bryant
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Alert

Re: tiggity Re: JS drives JSON use

".....hipsters....as you can get something up & running quick & looks nice which is what lots of clients want as too often the decision makers are more bothered about shiny than scalability, security etc." COUGH * agile development * COUGH.

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Possible reprieve for the venerable A-10 Warthog

Matt Bryant
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FAIL

Re: A_Melbourne

"They should just buy - the better - Russian planes and stop pretending....." Where do you start with such silliness!?!

".....The SU-34 is superior in every way to the A-10....." LOL, okey, let's take a look at the SU-34. See the way the Thud has the engines in pods well clear of each other? That's so one engine can be shot away without affecting the other. Now look at the engines on the SU-34 - both side-by-side and in the fuselage, so fire can spread between the engine bays and take the whole aircraft out. And on the Thud you can swap entire tail plane, fin sections, and undercarriage units - can't do that on the SU-34. And when the Thud runs out of luck and redundancy, you see those main-wheels sticking out? They allow it to belly in with less damage than a bellyflop in the SU-34. The Thud will take a licking and keep on kicking long after the SU-34 is a pile of smouldering wreckage. The SU-34 is just an attempt to wring some more out of the tired SU-27 design. You could compare the SU-34 to the F-15E Strike Eagle, but it would be a more of an untried, bargain basement option vs proven American weapon comparison.

".....Even the SU-25 is way ahead of the A-10 on every count...." The SU-25 Frogfoot is just a poor attempt to copy the Thud. It doesn't even have the Thud's big gun, and records from Afghanistan show it definitely doesn't have the Thud's ability to absorb battle damage even half as well. I suggest you go do some actual factual reading before you try your next post.

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Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: @redpawn ...Don't look to the past

".....They wouldn't win a lot of dogfights....." I upvoted the rest of the post but the idea the Thunderbolt couldn't dogfight is simply untrue. The original P-47Cs had problems with slow climb rates and acceleration over Europe, but even the early P-47Cs were knocking down Luftwaffe fighters long before the paddle-bladed propeller was added. I suggest you read up on Hub Zemke and his Wolfpack for an idea of just how effective the P-47 could be in aerial combat. Ironically, Zemke himself was captured when the wing of his P-51 Mustang was torn off by turbulence, something that would have been unlikely in the tougher Thunderbolt.

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Belgian court fines Skype for failing to intercept criminals' calls in 2012

Matt Bryant
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Facepalm

Belgians trying to deny facts.

The Belgians seem determined to deny that any of the factors that made Belgium a nice hideyhole for Islamist terrorists were due to the incredibly poor Belgian security apparatus.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Six

"I suppose the simplest solution would be to stop offering the service in the legally incompatible country....." Technically, Skype does not provide a "service" as the non-commercial version of Skype is a peer-to-peer connection. All Skype provides is the software, the "service" is then provided by the ISPs that make up the connection. Since the Skype connection is encrypted, intercepting it at the ISPs is also pretty pointless unless you have access to the encryption keys or a massive amount of processing power to break it. That's no doubt why the terrorists chose it in the first place.

".....There's very little Skype or Microsoft can do to comply with this and the ruling is simply ignoring reality...." The interesting bit is whether Skype will appeal or simply take the smaller cost of the fine.

".....If this is going to be a regular thing, then the only solution would be to conclude that Skype can't operate in Belgium." Or that this is the Europeans trying to force an American software provider to implement a backdoor into their communication software so conversations can be intercepted and decrypted at will.

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Middle East hackers exposed

Matt Bryant
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Happy

Re: Re: AC

Or possibly Moroccan Skype sex scammers taking a break from scamming all those Palestinians.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: AC

"I didn't know people of Gaza could use internet....." Ironically, telephone and 'net services are provided to Gaza by the Eeeevviiiiiill Jooooooos.

".....In my net life, all(3-4) of the Palestinians I met was refugee living in some neighbouring country." There are plenty of them surfing the Web in London, New York and Los Angeles, many off the back of alleged cronyism, corruption and diversion of international aid. It's the Palestinian way. Having said that, it's more likely this group are Turkish or Egyptian skiddies.

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I've arrived on Mars. Argggh, my back!

Matt Bryant
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Re: Stevie Re: A never-ending study on how to mess up humans...

".....Why not a module tethered to a large asteroid by space-age cables?...." Because (a) asteroids don't come as neatly balanced packages, they're usually odd-shaped masses of materials of differing density and rigidity, making the task of controlling their trajectory and spin a complex task; and (b) because an asteroid might disintegrate under the strains of both being spun, pulled on by the cable's anchor, and driven through space by the main engine.

A better idea might be a spun central core with the main engine and supplies, plus two counter-balancing modules for the crew on tethers. A mini gymn in each crew module for exercising and retaining muscle density and job done. The problem I do foresee is that non-rigid tethers mean you would have to reel the modules in before braking the core at your destination.

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Adobe emits emergency patch for Flash hole malware is exploiting right this minute

Matt Bryant
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FTFY

"Adobe emits emergency patch for Flash hole malware...." Adobe Flash is malware as far as I'm concerned. In professional terms I mentally write "cretin" in laundry marker on the forehead of anyone who suggests using it (yes, I am looking at certain people at the Beeb - you know who you are!).

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AT&T's spying millions

Matt Bryant
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Yawn.

".....call times, recipients, and locations of caller data...." So metadata, probably just from the standard phone bills, linking landlines to addresses and registered account holders. Very underwhelming. Google probably sells more marketing information on US citizens to anyone that pays them to, let alone the authorities.

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Smoking hole found on Mars where Schiaparelli lander, er, 'landed'

Matt Bryant
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Re: Destroy All Monsters Re: Andy Nonsense Malfunction now explained...

".....Still triggered by a mention of Sparc....." LOL, you posted with a mouthful of hook, line and sinker, I see.

"....Don't you have some IBM overpriced software to laud?....." Duh - why would I be defending M$ if I was an It's Being Mended software salesgrunts?

".....RTLinux, PikeOS, eCos, RTEMS, Nucleus, ThreadX, OpenComRTOS, VxWorks (as per a port by Gaisler Research), LynxOS (also per a port by Gaisler Research), POK[ (a free ARINC653 implementation released under the BSD licence) and ORK+ an open-source real-time kernel for high-integrity real-time applications with the Ravenscar Profile." So nothing at all to do with Windows then.

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Matt Bryant
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Re: Andy Nonsense Re: Malfunction now explained...

"......Windows 10......" ESA is one of the minute number of SPARC licensees, which means their latest failure was much more likely to be a case of Slowaris turning into Freefallaris (finally, a Slowaris variant that actually gets up to speed!).

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10x faster servers? Pop a CAPI in your dome

Matt Bryant
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Stop

Re: POWER only

"....AMD....." Hmmmm. The article lists the following big-name vendors: "....AMD, Dell EMC, Google, HPE, IBM, Mellanox Technologies, Micron, NVIDIA, and Xilinx....." Note the absence of the 3000Lb gorilla, Intel?

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Mysterious algorithms, black-box AI recruiters are binning our résumés

Matt Bryant
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My advice - watch the defaults!

My first experience of "AI" and an ATS sums it up as far as I am concerned. I was working for an American company in the UK and they implemented the ATS system as used by their US HR team. Suddenly, our usual deluge of CVs for each opening shrank to nothing! HR insisted the ATS was fine until I insisted on having a dig through it. The system worked by allowing the HR grunts to select tick boxes to create the list of minimum requirements for a job spec - if you didn't meet the requirements, your CV was rejected and was never seen by human eyes. Selecting some of the tick boxes automatically included other tick boxes by default, the fun being that selecting "degree required" automatically included a scan your CV for the name of a reputable college or uni. If it found none from its default list it would assume you didn't have a "good" degree. The first problem was the default listing only included US-based colleges and unis! Not surprisingly, none of our UK applicants had studied in the US so all got rejected. Having edited the text file of reputable academic institutes to include the latest from UCAS, I thought we'd solved the problem. Not so! It still rejected all European applicants. A second pass turned out the fact that selecting the "degree required" option also automatically included the default search for an "HSD" in the applicant's CV. No-one in our UK HR department realised this meant an American highschool diploma, and - not surprisingly - none of our European applicants had one of those either! More manual editing of the default selection files later got us past that problem, but left me with a very dim view of ATSs.

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Just what Europe needs – another bungled exit: Mars lander goes AWOL

Matt Bryant
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Re: DanceMan Re: There shouldn't have been a KaBoom!

"Landing on that planet has not proven easy." For the Europeans. Not so much for the Yanks. At this rate the Chinese will beat the Europeans to it.

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Meanwhile, in America: Half of adults' faces are in police databases

Matt Bryant
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Re: Syntax Error Re: It will fix itself

"It would be funny if it identifies people who are in fact recorded dead." They just cross-check against the Democrat voter registration database to weed out the dead people.

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