* Posts by Yet Another Anonymous coward

6468 posts • joined 31 Dec 2009

Boeing 787 software bug can shut down planes' generators IN FLIGHT

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: So...Garbage from Non-Aviators

They shut off the generators but does that necessarily shut off the power to the computer controlling the generator?

Are they sure that a particular check disconnects all the many redundant power supplies to the GCU? Is this documented in the check?

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Burger me! Microsoft's chainsaw rampage through sacred cow herd

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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The risk would be destroying any project which threatens the Office on Desktop/Server business - and the previous managers already did that,

The interesting bit will be whether he can get beyond the Gates era = "the Internet is new, it is a threat to Windows/Office we must dominate/destroy/own the Internet" to actually benefiting from new ways of using computers

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Visual Studio running on OS X and Linux for free? SO close

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: some thoughts...

If you are building software that can cause death or injury then YOU are on the hook anyway.

If you use GPL software you are responsible for any flaws in it in exactly the same way as software you write in-house.

Interestingly you are also responsible for any flaws in closed software you use - you have a much tougher job demonstrating to the regulators that you have a way of testing the COTS software to show that it doesn't have any flaws and have plans to remedy them. If you don't have a contract with the supplier saying that they WILL fix any flaws you find then your only remedy is to pull your product from the market.

It is far easier to build (or at least do the regulatory paperwork on) a safety critical system with open source software than closed

The same applies to hardware - I just spent the equivalent of a nice BMW getting a PC built by a certain CPU maker beginning with "I" - EMC tested.

It failed - despite the approval stickers all over its case. I now have to modify the PC to make it pass and show that I will apply the same modifications to all the other units I sell.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: some thoughts...

Unintentional harm - no.

Deliberately finding competing products and damaging them ....

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Ryanair stung after $5m Shanghai'd from online fuel account

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Well... color me surprised...

And so it should be if the loss is still detected, reversed and the money returned.

If you have a contract with the bank which says that they are liable then you don't bother wasting money making your operations less efficient in the name of security.

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Free markets aren't rubbish – in fact, they solve our rubbish woes

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: We could have dedicated networks of rag-and-bone men

Similar problem here with the 5/10c recycling on bottles/cans.

Mostly it works very well - an army of "independant contractors" with shopping carts mean you don't see many cans around. People even put their empty cans on top of rubbish bins to help them.

But you also get people with trucks who will collect everyones blue box, have a minion in the back picking out the cans and then dump the emptied blue boxes and their other contents in a pile at the end of the street before starting on the next block.

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Give me POWER: How to keep working when the lights go out

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Here's two more words for you:

I think it was actually the giant spider that was to blame.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Hurricane Sandy

Similar problems in London "an incident" closed off access to our office - no problem as we had a backup site 1/2 mi away.

Trailed down to the street to find that the dear old bobbies of the Met (Total Policing (tm) wouldn't let us into the street.

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New EU security strategy: Sod cyber terrorism, BAN ENCRYPTION

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Make the tubes smaller

If the internet tubes were made smaller then you could order the Kalashnikov (other assault rifles are available) online but it wouldn't be possible to deliver anything larger than a peashooter to your web browser.

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The Government Digital Service: The Happiest Place on Earth

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Rawhide!

They don't need to because they are dIGITAL(tm)

(capitalization is important)

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Martha Lane Bloody Fox

Does her name mean anything in Thai by any chance?

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WHY can't Silicon Valley create breakable non-breakable encryption, cry US politicians

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: There is...

> that only the American government can pop the lid on.

Obviously this would be unworkable, unfair and wrong. Instead the data will also be accessible by your own government, and security forces, and police, and parish council and those of any other Eu country.

The same keys will also have to be shared with all the agencies where the same software is sold.

So say 200 countries * 10 layers of three latter agency + 10 different levels of government + 10 different law enforcement agencies + the milk marketing board= 10,000 government depts havign access to your data.

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Range Rover Sport: Like a cathedral on wheels, only with comfier pews

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Hmmmm

I think knowing the existence of Tesco disqualifies you from reviewing high end cars.

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ESPN sues Verizon: People picking their own TV channels? NOOoo!

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Not fine enough.

Torrents definitely fund terrorism AND pedophiles.

While mix-tapes merely kill kittens

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Not fine enough.

I don't remember the exact argument but I think buying only the TV programmes you want to watch supports terrorism

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Apple BIGGER than the U.S. ECONOMY? Or Australia? Or ... Luxembourg?

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: They can't leave the money overseas forever.

Leaving aside the rights/wrongs and the Apple specifics, but can they leave it overseas for ever?

Firstly they can use the offshore money to build factories, buy raw materials, buy competitors - but this is pointless since they wouldn't pay tax on those anyway.

But they could use them to buy other companies/investments and become essentially a hedge fund.

There would be no US tax to pay if Apple Bermuda bought shares on the US stock market, or bought Heathrow, or the port of Grimsby in the same way that the Dubai National Investment corp, or the Govt of Singapore did. then Apple's share price would rise, since it owned $Tn of profitable investments, and the shareholders would be happy.

Ultimately it could stop bothering to make shiny things at all.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: US GDP

> But the ones they make in the US they don't stick in foreign. They cough up the tax just like good little boys.

Then they are idiots who are going to get hit with a minority shareholder lawsuit.

As an Apple shareholder I demand that they stop wasting my money by giving it to Washington and instead sell the rights to the Apple logo to Apple Bermuda for $1 and then have Apple Bermuda charge them $500/item licensing fee.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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US GDP

Apple takes US consumer's money and sends a small fraction of it to China to make the thing, an even smaller fraction to Cambridge for an ARM license and sticks the rest of it in Apple's offshore tax haven.

Surely it's only contribution to US GDP is wages paid to those low enough on the totem pole not to have their won "tax efficient" compensation plan.

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Eco-loons hack Thirty Meter Telescope website to help the 'natives'

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Green scientists

Slight mistake - don't know which bit of US government owned it. I'm just saying that the astronomers aren't cutting down redwoods and stamping on baby seals to build the telescope.

The limits on the number of telescopes, which included shutting down Keck-Interferometer since each little outrigger telescope "counted" - is purely negotiating by local interest groups for money. They protested the Japanese Subaru telescope until each Japanese engineer gained a local assistant to sit around and watch. The same groups who are perfectly happy to have massive tourist hotels.

Yes sure it's their sacred native land - in that case can we get all these Anglo-Saxon, Norse, Norman and other foreign invaders out of mine and return it to the Welsh?

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Green scientists

There is no nature there. The summit is bare cinder at 14,500ft, there is no water, except in winter when it is under several m of snow, there is nothing to eat except a few bits of lichen.

The scientists wanted to close the summit above the 9000ft level to the public because tourists drive up there in hire cars and need rescuing when they get altitude sickness or sunstroke (you can get sunburn in minutes at that altitude), local idiots drive up there in 4x4 and cause a lot of damage and need rescuing when they get stuck.

But it's federal land so you can't restrict access. When I worked there all the land below 9000ft was a massive army training ground which made a great nature reserve, now I think it's mainly used for cattle which has destroyed most of the local wildlife.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Direct action

>This particular volcano has not been active for 4000+ years.

To a God, 4000years = Meh

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Direct action

The presence of the telescope on top of an active volcano angers the local volcano god....

I don't think defacing the website is the worst that can happen

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So how should we tax these BASTARD COMPANIES, then?

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: "we want to tax capital incomes at lower rates than labour based incomes"

It even taxes people investing capital differently.

If you are poor and put money into a savings account, you pay income tax on the interest.

If you are rich and buy shares, you pay lower capital gains tax on the profit.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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>The only people who benefit from increased productivity are the owners of the company's capital.

Which is us - almost all of every major company is owned by your savings, pension and insurance policies.

The real reason fro taxing capital less than income is that the people that propose it - such as economics columnists - are self employed and can pay themselves in dividends.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Hmmm

That's why it's an economic theory -> not even good on paper + impossible in practice.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Fair Tax?

Then you simply avoid being the final retailer.

Just like the contractor paying yourself in dividends. You simply buy that new TV/Computer/BMW for your side business and don't pay sales tax.

Since your side business is doing Nigel Farage impersonations for children's parties you don't get a lot of work, but you do get to claim a lot of expenses

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Hubble hits 25th anniversary IN SPAAACE – time for telescope to come home

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: A lot can happen...

Except for thermal IR, where you need to be a couple of million km at L2 or x-ray ground based telescopes are now better.

We are building 30m mirrors, compared to hubble's 2.3m or JWST 6.5m, adaptive optics can beat hubble's resolution and you can build new instruments every year. Building on the ground will always be much cheaper, so you get much more data for your money

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: >> removed one of the scientific instruments and installed the corrective device

>why not go the other direction and keep it going

For how long? Just boosting the orbit would need continuing amounts of fuel, eventually that will run out and you have to deorbit anyway.

Operating it means replacement components, generally gyros but batteries, data recorders and computers all die. It also involves a lot of expensive ground support to schedule time, upload missions, collect and store data and pay for people to work on the data.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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It's a much nicer neighbourhood - Hubble has some huge limitations because of the need to put it somewhere that the Shuttle could get to.

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Surveillance, broadband, zero hours: Tech policy in a UK hung Parliament

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Balanced, detailed election coverage?!

for ( x : [parties] )

Party X claims that they will increase public spending, reduce taxes, make life easier for decent working people, fight terrorism, invest in Britain.....

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: What about skills?

>We've got 1.9m officially unemployed, 0.9m not in education, employment or training, and about >1.5m disability benefit claimants not in work

And the number of those with physics degrees and 10years software development experience is ...?

So a company in the city needing to expand it's trading system can either:

Take somebody unemployed and totally failed by the education system, educate them to post grad level and teach them software engineering and have staff ready in 10years - unless they leave.

Up the paycheck to persuade somebody to leave an identical job down the road. So if every company simply doubled salaries there would be no unemployment.

Not care about the skin colour or accent and hire from whereever in the world they can.

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Licence to chill: Ex-CIA spyboss Petraeus gets probation for leaking US secrets to his mistress

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: SMH.... His sentence was expected.

That's one of those irregular verbs, isn't it?

I give confidential security briefings.

You leak.

He has been charged under section 2a of the Official Secrets Act.

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The huge flaw in Moore’s Law? It's NOT a law after all

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Exponential growth has happened before

Actually with 28nm -> 14nm you get 4x as many devices.

And if you have a single point flaw which destroys a single device on a wafer, you now have 4x as many devices per wafer so the cost/defect drops to 25%, you then get another few % win because with smaller devices you can get closer to the edges of a circular wafer so don't waste space.

But with more devices you waste more space to allow for the saw cuts between chips (kerf loss)

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Exponential growth has happened before

Moore's law wasn't that there would be exponential growth in computer chip power.

It was that the MOST COST EFFECTIVE feature size would decrease exponentially (or transistor count would increase exp)

So although a new smaller fab process would be more expensive to build and operate all the advantages, more chips/wafer, defects/chip, edge losses, kerff loses, all decrease with the square of the feature size.

With the new 14nm fab it isn't clear that it will ever be cheaper/chip than 22nm and it is even less certain for <10nm. There may be other advantages in power usage and fitting more features into a small phone - but that's not what Moore originally claimed

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FBI alert: Get these motherf'king hackers off this motherf'king plane

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Either

Boeing's definetly isn't isolated, the FAA statement says that they rely "on firewalls and other software devices". But is typical US/UK government fashion, you don't have them fix it - you just threaten anyone who points out the flaw.

In fact the NTSB are probably terrorists for pointing out why planes crashed - we should arrest them.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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But then you would need a separate GPS receiver to feed the moving map display on the seat back. These things could cost $10 - it's much easier and cheaper to just have the map display connect to the aircrafts navigation system

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Either

They arrested a drunk guy for trying to open a door inflight - with about 5ton of air pressure on the door that is somewhat impossible.

So presumably if you stick pins in airfix models of a plane you can be charged with terrorist attempts to destroy it with voodoo.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Either

You know they can be compromised - in which case pull their airworthiness certificate now and ground them all. Or they probably can't in which case why arrest the guy for suggesting they can?

Unless of course your intention was to stop people discussing the question - but the FBI would never engage in that sort of behaviour.

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Fed-up Colorado man takes 9mm PISTOL to vexing Dell PC

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: I think that may invalidate his warranty...

Lucky it was a Dell.

If it was an HP the bullets would have $99 each - although the gun would only have cost $39.99

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Republicans in sneaky bid to reauthorize Patriot Act spying until 2020

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Where are those dictatorships again?

I think this is the obvious solution. If the law is going to lapse in 2015 - you just turn the year back half a century or so.

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Something's missing in our universe: Boffins look into the SUPERVOID

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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A more detailed image shows the text "this space deliberately left blank"

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Japan showcases really, really fast … whoa, WTF was that?!

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: It would be great...

Fortunately in America the government is completely immune to interference from corporate lobbyists and the aircraft/defense industry has no real power

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Lawyer: Cops dropped robbery case rather than detail FBI's StingRay phone snoop gizmo

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Unwarranted Search

>So if operational details are not the issue, what might the problem be?

The system may allow them to generate fake calls or a fake handset location on the network.

So if the evidence in a totally unrelated case is that your cell phone was recorded at the scene you might get it thrown out if you can show that the police routinely fake cell phone locations using this piece of kit.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Protect pedophiles in the name of fighting terrorists -> treating everyone like a terrorists in the name of fighting pedophiles.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Couldn't happen over here, of course ;-)

We can however allow evidence obtained illegally to be used in court - at the judges discretion.

There is no 'fruit of the poisoned tree' rule as in the USA.

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Ad-blocking is LEGAL: German court says Ja to browser filters

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: It's my computer

But watching TV without watching the ads is stealing - according to Ted Turner

Remember - "If you put the kettle on between programmes, then the terrorists have won".

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Yay, we're all European (Irish) now on Twitter (except Americans)

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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An Eu based employee can't be ordered to break eu law - but a US employee at head office can be ordered to remote in and copy the data.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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>If there's a conflict of demand between the US and a country like Ireland

i think we can rely on Ireland to stand upto the US - even if it means US corporations being forced to move out of Ireland.

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