* Posts by Yet Another Anonymous coward

6242 posts • joined 31 Dec 2009

So how should we tax these BASTARD COMPANIES, then?

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Hmmm

That's why it's an economic theory -> not even good on paper + impossible in practice.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Fair Tax?

Then you simply avoid being the final retailer.

Just like the contractor paying yourself in dividends. You simply buy that new TV/Computer/BMW for your side business and don't pay sales tax.

Since your side business is doing Nigel Farage impersonations for children's parties you don't get a lot of work, but you do get to claim a lot of expenses

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Hubble hits 25th anniversary IN SPAAACE – time for telescope to come home

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: A lot can happen...

Except for thermal IR, where you need to be a couple of million km at L2 or x-ray ground based telescopes are now better.

We are building 30m mirrors, compared to hubble's 2.3m or JWST 6.5m, adaptive optics can beat hubble's resolution and you can build new instruments every year. Building on the ground will always be much cheaper, so you get much more data for your money

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: >> removed one of the scientific instruments and installed the corrective device

>why not go the other direction and keep it going

For how long? Just boosting the orbit would need continuing amounts of fuel, eventually that will run out and you have to deorbit anyway.

Operating it means replacement components, generally gyros but batteries, data recorders and computers all die. It also involves a lot of expensive ground support to schedule time, upload missions, collect and store data and pay for people to work on the data.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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It's a much nicer neighbourhood - Hubble has some huge limitations because of the need to put it somewhere that the Shuttle could get to.

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Surveillance, broadband, zero hours: Tech policy in a UK hung Parliament

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Balanced, detailed election coverage?!

for ( x : [parties] )

Party X claims that they will increase public spending, reduce taxes, make life easier for decent working people, fight terrorism, invest in Britain.....

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: What about skills?

>We've got 1.9m officially unemployed, 0.9m not in education, employment or training, and about >1.5m disability benefit claimants not in work

And the number of those with physics degrees and 10years software development experience is ...?

So a company in the city needing to expand it's trading system can either:

Take somebody unemployed and totally failed by the education system, educate them to post grad level and teach them software engineering and have staff ready in 10years - unless they leave.

Up the paycheck to persuade somebody to leave an identical job down the road. So if every company simply doubled salaries there would be no unemployment.

Not care about the skin colour or accent and hire from whereever in the world they can.

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Licence to chill: Ex-CIA spyboss Petraeus gets probation for leaking US secrets to his mistress

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: SMH.... His sentence was expected.

That's one of those irregular verbs, isn't it?

I give confidential security briefings.

You leak.

He has been charged under section 2a of the Official Secrets Act.

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The huge flaw in Moore’s Law? It's NOT a law after all

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Exponential growth has happened before

Actually with 28nm -> 14nm you get 4x as many devices.

And if you have a single point flaw which destroys a single device on a wafer, you now have 4x as many devices per wafer so the cost/defect drops to 25%, you then get another few % win because with smaller devices you can get closer to the edges of a circular wafer so don't waste space.

But with more devices you waste more space to allow for the saw cuts between chips (kerf loss)

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Exponential growth has happened before

Moore's law wasn't that there would be exponential growth in computer chip power.

It was that the MOST COST EFFECTIVE feature size would decrease exponentially (or transistor count would increase exp)

So although a new smaller fab process would be more expensive to build and operate all the advantages, more chips/wafer, defects/chip, edge losses, kerff loses, all decrease with the square of the feature size.

With the new 14nm fab it isn't clear that it will ever be cheaper/chip than 22nm and it is even less certain for <10nm. There may be other advantages in power usage and fitting more features into a small phone - but that's not what Moore originally claimed

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FBI alert: Get these motherf'king hackers off this motherf'king plane

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Either

Boeing's definetly isn't isolated, the FAA statement says that they rely "on firewalls and other software devices". But is typical US/UK government fashion, you don't have them fix it - you just threaten anyone who points out the flaw.

In fact the NTSB are probably terrorists for pointing out why planes crashed - we should arrest them.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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But then you would need a separate GPS receiver to feed the moving map display on the seat back. These things could cost $10 - it's much easier and cheaper to just have the map display connect to the aircrafts navigation system

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Either

They arrested a drunk guy for trying to open a door inflight - with about 5ton of air pressure on the door that is somewhat impossible.

So presumably if you stick pins in airfix models of a plane you can be charged with terrorist attempts to destroy it with voodoo.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Either

You know they can be compromised - in which case pull their airworthiness certificate now and ground them all. Or they probably can't in which case why arrest the guy for suggesting they can?

Unless of course your intention was to stop people discussing the question - but the FBI would never engage in that sort of behaviour.

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Fed-up Colorado man takes 9mm PISTOL to vexing Dell PC

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: I think that may invalidate his warranty...

Lucky it was a Dell.

If it was an HP the bullets would have $99 each - although the gun would only have cost $39.99

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Republicans in sneaky bid to reauthorize Patriot Act spying until 2020

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Where are those dictatorships again?

I think this is the obvious solution. If the law is going to lapse in 2015 - you just turn the year back half a century or so.

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Something's missing in our universe: Boffins look into the SUPERVOID

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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A more detailed image shows the text "this space deliberately left blank"

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Japan showcases really, really fast … whoa, WTF was that?!

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: It would be great...

Fortunately in America the government is completely immune to interference from corporate lobbyists and the aircraft/defense industry has no real power

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Lawyer: Cops dropped robbery case rather than detail FBI's StingRay phone snoop gizmo

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Unwarranted Search

>So if operational details are not the issue, what might the problem be?

The system may allow them to generate fake calls or a fake handset location on the network.

So if the evidence in a totally unrelated case is that your cell phone was recorded at the scene you might get it thrown out if you can show that the police routinely fake cell phone locations using this piece of kit.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Protect pedophiles in the name of fighting terrorists -> treating everyone like a terrorists in the name of fighting pedophiles.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Couldn't happen over here, of course ;-)

We can however allow evidence obtained illegally to be used in court - at the judges discretion.

There is no 'fruit of the poisoned tree' rule as in the USA.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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If you are a freedom fighter/terrorist/cultural organisation involved in a civil war against a Nato level military and you don't assume your phone is bugged you are an idiot who deserves everything you get.

If you are a peaceful democratic political party with nearly enough support to get your home rule referendum passed - you should probably also assume the same thing.

ditto for union leaders, journalists, anti-war protestors etc etc

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: This made me laugh

Plea bargains are very common in the US, it's how public prosecutors manage to get 1000s of convictions without having to waste time in court.

Plead guilty to possessing this small amount of drugs, otherwise we will claim you are a major dealer and we will arrange for a 25year sentence.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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There was case in the UK in the 80s when a school girl was kidnapped and the police were appearing on TV appealing for help where they claimed they couldn't track the phone calls because BT's new all digital system-X didn't allow calls to be traced.

This raised a few eyebrows on the computer security sites.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Most people didn't know about it so when offered evidence they were persuaded to plead guilty or the public defender didn't want to bother making a fuss.

It can also be used to get other evidence which you do present in court - so you never have to mention the illegally gathered bit

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Ad-blocking is LEGAL: German court says Ja to browser filters

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: It's my computer

But watching TV without watching the ads is stealing - according to Ted Turner

Remember - "If you put the kettle on between programmes, then the terrorists have won".

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Yay, we're all European (Irish) now on Twitter (except Americans)

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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An Eu based employee can't be ordered to break eu law - but a US employee at head office can be ordered to remote in and copy the data.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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>If there's a conflict of demand between the US and a country like Ireland

i think we can rely on Ireland to stand upto the US - even if it means US corporations being forced to move out of Ireland.

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So why exactly does almost ALL tech live in Silicon Valley?

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: A Zombie concept?

I was commenting on the difficulty of solving the remote recruiting reputation problem.

If I have a very simple easily packaged bit of work that I can send out to a remote dev and be able to see if they have done it correctly - then I can probably have it done cheaply by somebody on elancer.

Otherwise unless somebody has an international reputation it is very difficult to pick somebody from the web to risk person-year projects on.

Accountants are not only easier to judge but their differences matter less. A great dev can be 10x more effective than somebody picked at random, and if I was George Soros and needed to hide a few $Bn I would be careful in picking the best. But if I simply need form X submitted by a State Certified Y then I don't. The same with lawyers, if I'm Hans Reiser I need Alan Dershowitz, if I need a stock NDA I don't.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: I'm sorry, but some assumptions are wrong

Selling advertising is just as much about technology as building a rocket that can land on a barge.

And it gets harder every day, you are competing with other companies also selling advertising and with people becoming immune to advertising. Elon Musk just has to make a control loop faster, he doesn't have to deal with gravity becoming stronger every month.

I would say SV is one of the areas least guilty of pay disparity between bosses and engineers. You can hire a dozen CFOs on any street corner but I have to pay software devs more than Google will pay (in $ or by promising that their shares will be worth more).

Layers of incompetent middle managers who got where they are by playing golf with the right people (US) or having gone to the right school (UK) are a lot rarer in a startup than they are in almost any other industry.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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> a highly specific branch of history.

Worse, it's a highly specific branch of politics or philosophy.

"I think this is a supply side classical recession and we should introduce austerity" - because I'm a right winger who wants to cut taxes / "I think this is a demand led Keynsian recession and we should introduce stimulus spending" - because I'm a bleeding heart liberal who doesn't like to see poor people.

Engineers might argue about the best solution - but they don't normally choose the alloy based on whether their surname was originally Norman or Saxon.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Question:

But all those grew for exactly the same reason and in the same way as silicon valley - or were a government program to replicate SV. They don't prove that you can do distributed innovation. They prove the exact opposite, that if you want a silicon valley you replicate silicon valley.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: A Zombie concept?

In theory yes, in practice no.

I can hire developers anywhere in the world, but I have to find them. How do I know that somebody in ToadSuck Ak is any good? Unless they are the inventor of Python/Ruby/etc then I am comparing them to somebody in India charging $1/hour on Elancer. By coming to work in the valley they have proven to me they are good because they were hired by %BIG NAME%, or simply have proved that they can earn enough to pay rent here.

Similarly the person in ToadSuck Ak who wants to be paid $100/hour can do that by coming to the valley, or by inventing their own language and hope it becomes wildly popular 10years later.

Once they have a reputation they can move back to ToadSuck and get $250/hour rates because everyone knows them.

I can (and do) have lawyers, patent agents, accountants completely online. They are a commodity, all accountants are equally good-enough, or I can judge how good they are easily.

But I need to raise money - so I have to meet VCs - the VCs are here. I could fly to SF every week to see them but at some point they are going to want to meet the team, see a prototype, get "a feel for the company". This is difficult to do if I have to fly a bunch of consultants in from around the world who have themselves never met before - to instantly bond in a motel conference room.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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They produce more finished specialist steel than before, but their expertise is in adding all the exotic ingredients - the steel comes from outside. So it's reasonable to say they are in the molybdenum business rather than the iron business

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America was founded on a dislike of taxes, so how did it get the IRS?

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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"Good" from the point of view of extracting more profit from you.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: House prices

There are big versions of Thomas the Tank engine. I know people from York that commute into London and the government wants to spend a gazillion quid on making Birmingham a London suburb

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: House prices

One of the problems with SF is that there is a desire to keep the place low rise and low density. So high demand and low supply = prices rise (the policy is set by voters = property owners)

In Houston there is 300mi of empty land between Houston and San Antonio which is being filled with suburbs as fast as the concrete can set, prices are low but you have to sit in movie grade traffic jams.

And distances are bigger, you can commute to London from Yorkshire. You can't commute to SF from Detroit. I'm guessing that >50% of the UK population live in comutting distances to London?

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: re: Here you have condo-fees if you live in a flat or townhouse

Leasehold always used to be pretty cheap though, I paid £100/year ground rent and a few quid for external lighting/etc in the UK.

Here even ordinary flats come with hefty fees and I get the impression that the property developer regards these as the profit margin. If the place has a gym or outside pool then the fees can end up being 50% on top of the rent/mortgage. It's enough that the mortgage companies take it into account when working out how much they will lend you.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Taxes etc

You generally end up doping a tax return for the year after you leave - but probably end up getting some money back! US citizens have to file every year even if they have never lived in the country.

The problem is that US politicians reward their sort of people with specific rules/loopholes. So if you just fill in the boxes you pay a lot more tax. Even regular working people end up getting a big chunk off (mortgage interest is deductable, so is any money borrowed for investing). For people on software developer salaries you need accountants to start doing "MP expenses" level of tax-avoidance.

ps. Remember we conscripted a bunch of people for WWII and then told them they weren't citizens - like Spike Miligan. Not to mention the millions of Indian soldiers forced to fight for their "mother country"

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Buying houses

The whole process here is much faster.

Make an offer (in writing and binding with a big penalty) then typically complete in less than a week. It's a bit of a rush to get inspections booked and paper work faxed to the bank but it means you don't have months long process that falls apart because somebody in the chain drops out and no gazumping.

Some places have a rule that all contracts exchange on the first of the month (as do all rental contracts) which makes getting a mover or even a uhaul van tricky.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Don't expect this to work for "the world's global bank" - fscking HSBC

Also expect banking to be at least 20years behind europe. You will pay fees for being in credit, you will pay for cheques (which they can't spell) and you will use them a lot, debit cards are being heavily pushed as the "next big thing"....

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Another big difference, in the UK your home is your castle. Here you have condo-fees if you live in a flat or townhouse (block of houses/maisonette) which can be $3-500/month to pay for the general building stuff and you can be hit for massive $50-100K bills if they discover something major wrong with the building.

Even if you have your own home in the suburbs there will be a Home Owners Association who can set rules on how your house looks and fine you if you don't comply. Surprisingly for such an ethnic melting pot it is often used to make sure that the wrong sort of people don't get to stay long in your neighbourhood.

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Anonymous unleashes online petition against US info-sharing bills

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: /append to list

But we need C-51 to protect us from the terrorists lapping at our shores.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Tortilla de patatas

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Tried it - couldn't get it to stick together enough to flip.

Ended up with basically scrambled egg on chips.

Still ate it though - delicous.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Food can be divided into 2 groups - stuff that should have garlic in it and stuff that should have chocolate on it.

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Don't shoot the Messenger: NASA's suicide probe to punch hole in Mercury

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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At least Beagle 2 hit the correct planet. This is the American government - can Venus expect an example of "friendly fire" ?

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BOFH: Explain? All we need is this kay-sh with DDR3 Cortexiphan ...

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: "Is there another internet?"

>Though it's mostly for educational stuff.

Lots of the stuff on the normal internet is educational - or at least I had never seen it done like that before.

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Makerbot axes 'scores of staff' – 3D printing just doesn't pay the bills

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Business model

For home/hobby 3d printers the main use is printing parts for making your own 3d printer - not really a sustainable business.

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Lack of secure protocol puts US whistleblowers at risk, says ACLU

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: The point?

So having https to communicate the data directly to the same government you are trying to whistle-blow against is totally irrelevant.

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UK now part of another Euro data-spaff scheme

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Hmmm 42 years after joining the Common Market

>'Her Majestys' servants don't really care if we leave.

The police can however just ask a local magistrate for a banning order and confiscate your passport if they "suspect" you plan to do something naughty abroad. Of course the legislation was only intended for football hooligans - it just came in really useful for stopping anti-G8 protesters going to Paris.

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