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* Posts by Yet Another Anonymous coward

4484 posts • joined 31 Dec 2009

Moneybags pour shower of gold on new mega-precise GPS system

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: this sounds a lot like Differential GPS..

RTK isn't really even GPS, it uses GPS as a convenient high precision signal and tracks the phase difference between the base station and rover.

It has been around for years but the normal customer is high end surveying so the units are rare and expensive.

There has been an open source system for a few $100 that runs on a beagle board and a cheap SIRTF GPS chipset. You just need a GPS chip that gives you phase information, a cheap linux box and a comms link between the base and rover.

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US Department of Defense throws lifeline to beleaguered BlackBerry

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Does this mean that they are a certified PRISM provider?

Probably the only people you can trust to not give in to the NSA is the DoD - they are natural enemies

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Snowden's secure email provider Lavabit shuts down under gag order

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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That's why we now have secret courts, secret prisons, extra-ordinary rendition and if all that fails - just legal political assassination.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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It's ironic that this happens in the land of the free.

Scotland ?

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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But an industry that makes very little in the way of political donations - they need to learn from private prisons, defense and farming how to get Washington to do "the right thing"

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Webcam stripper strikes back at vicious 4Chan trolls after year of bullying

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Go girl ......

>fight back against their attempts at censorship.

However under new government rules you will have to register as an official pervert to watch her performances online

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E-reader barons file FCC plea to opt out of disabled-friendly regs

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Here we go

But that isn't accessible to people without fingers so wouldn't be allowed

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Not just ebooks

On the news today, the Canadian Aviation authorities decided that an allergy to dogs is a disability and the airlines must accommodate it by banning dogs from the flight.

After a women had an allergic reaction on a flight which had a guide dog on a seat near her.

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Obama cancels meeting Putin in Russia, says Snowden 'a factor'

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: My British Buddy

How is California doing ?

Its credit rating better than Kazakhstan's yet?

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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He could always invade Russia

Winters is coming - why not give it a try?

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'Look, give us Snowden' - this Friday's top US-Russia talks revealed

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Syria's nuclear programme?

Yes the Americans have evidence that there are atoms in Syria

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Bah!

Ob Yes minister quote:

That's another of those irregular verbs, isn't it?

I give confidential press briefings;

you leak;

he's being charged under section 2A of the Official Secrets Act.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Show of hands please?

All the US has to do is return all the soviet pilots that defected along with their aircraft and arrange for anyone who jumped the Berlin wall to be rounded up and returned to Moscow.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: take him out

>How do you know they haven't tried?

Because a mountain in N Wales hasn't been bombed by mistake

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Curiosity sings 'Happy Birthday' to itself on Martian anniversary

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Don't tell the RIAA!

Does the Record Industry Association of America cover Mars?

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See a young Brit's mobe? 55% chance it has nekkid selfies on it, claims poll

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: @ The Big Yin - So...

While here, IIRC, the young lady's selfie got here on both the sex offenders register and the children at risk register

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Report: NSA spying deals billion dollar knockout to US cloud prospects

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: I usually don't buy socialist arguments about America being a "corporateocracy"

>sorry iraq

Give it a few months ....

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Encryption

>Sorry to burst your bubble there but the person that created it knows how to break it.

If you believe that - I've got a bridge to sell you

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Solution

Fine for storage, but what if you want your cloud company to do email/database/sharepoint etc

It's hard to do processing on encrypted data without giving them the keys (yes it's theoretically possible but not really)

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US feds: 'Let's make streaming copyrighted content a FELONY'

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Sad

Why not just make downloading a movie terrorism?

Two birds - one stone !

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Sergey Brin's 'test-tube burger' cooked, eaten, declared meat-like

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Take your dirty hands off of me you damn, stinking ...

>1.4 billion people in the world are overweight and obese,.... one billion people worldwide go to bed hungry

An obvious solution suggests itself and it doesn't require testubes

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Xerox copier flaw changes numbers in scanned docs

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Not just copiers

A CFO stood up at a board meeting once and congratulated us on a 320,000 quid sale

We had to point out that this was "A3 20,000" where A3 is how the email had decided to print the GBP sign

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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They are held in memory

When you copy a 200page doc it scans it, copies it into RAM then does any 2-up, half side, 2 sided reshuffling, then sends it to the laser printer - which is what a modern copier is

Some copiers also let you select extra copies of earlier docs.

there is normally a security scare story every week about how to access old copies - which is why most companies keep a separate machine for HR/ Financials etc

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Horrific moment curvy mum-of-none Mail Online spills everyone's data

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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the world's most read online newspaper,

Even stretching the definition of newspaper, how does a paper whose audience is - the wives of people who read the times and people who want to read the sun but don't want to be seen reading the sun - get to be the most popular online paper?

(admittadly most popular in the same sense that Malaria is the most popular parasitic disease)

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Apple will swap fanbois' killer phoney phone chargers for legit adapters

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: A good opportunity to sell stock at cost and look big'n'caring

>This has nothing to do with the connector used on the device being charged.

Yes it does.

If Apple stuck to the rules you could use any USB socket to charge them. But because they ignore the rules and use a proprietry convector your choice is a $100 iCharger from iApple or a $2 knock off

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Ground

The problem in these units is that the isolation between the 380V DC output of the switcher and the 5V USB socket is wishfull thinking. Putting it in a grounded metal case would do bugger-all to help

The real solution is for the world to use proper BS plugs so that there is room for a proper 6inch isolation gap, rather than these tiny little American things.

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BONG goes HYPER as default.gov POWERS the FUTURE

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Used to be better

when it actually satirized e-government. Now that it just prints their press releases verbatim it's gone a bit stale

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Tor servers vanish as FBI swoops on kiddie-smut suspect

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Is Tor really secure?

Tor isn't meant to be secure - it's meant to be anonymous.

of course if all the exit nodes are FBI then it isn't even that

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NASA's cloud strategy panned by NASA auditors

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Translated from management waffle ..

Safeguard the data doesn't mean stop people getting access to it - it means ensuring that people CAN get access to it. in astronomy that means in 50, 100, 1000 years time.

We use >100 year old photographic plates and 60 year old sky surveys to study how stars move, and 3000year old clay tablets to measure the Earth's rotation - we need guarantees slightly better than "we get raided by the feds and all your data was deleted"

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SAP boss cops jail time plea after Lego barcode bust

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: It's a pity for SAP

It's certainly smarter more inventive, more innovative and more profitable than anything any of their other VPs have done

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: "dish liquid"?.....

>Fairy liquid

i don't think thats very politicaly correct anymore

it's "alternate lifestyle choice" liquid

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Hundreds of UK CSC staff face chop, told to train Indian replacements

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: I thought it worked like this...

Not if "your" company is in the Cayman islands and is being paid to do this and only pays you in loans - then just like these guys you pay no tax at all!

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Isn't this illegal?

>perhaps it would be better to reduce the cost of hiring people in the UK.

All you have to do is reduce the cost of lining in the UK (housing, food, etc) to that of a chinese prison camp and the plan would work

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Win XP alive and kicking despite 2014 kill switch (Don't ask about Win 8)

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: @Mephistro - Yeah, but why should he have to?

Hyperterm was bought in from an outside company.

MSFT didn't want to pay for an app that was a decider for 1 in a million customers.

Although they could have had an intern knock up a good-enough replacement in a day

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Why are we throwing this away?

Because that's how IT in large organisation, especially government works.

I just bought a used Dell optiplex for my parents to do email - it's a nice 17in LCD with a tiny PC mounted on the back - it runs Vista

It has a sticker from a local higher education college, and from what I paid they obviously sold them all for the price of a new keyboard to upgrade to Windows 7 or 8.

These machines were being used for web browsing/email, they weren't running protein folding or hydrodynamics simulations - they were perfectly adequate. But were dumped because you HAVE to upgrade

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: More likely its the survey is trying to provide too many decimal places

> They do not connect to the internet in any way.

In an ideal world, but then managers started asking why they were paying so much more for ISDN than they were for internet when the branch already had fibre.

So a few gateways and they were able to save a lot of money and the gateways are secure because the maker said so

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FBI spooks use MALWARE to spy on suspects' Android mobes - report

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: "bad guys"?

Remember their entire country was founded by a bunch of terrorists - so they don't want it happening again.

Try throwing some tea into Boston harbo**U**r today and see how far you get

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Happy 20th birthday, Windows NT 3.1: Microsoft's server outrider

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Stability

>NT was not as stable as VMS by quite a long way

To be fair, Stonehenge wasn't as stable as VMS.

The only way to stop a VMS machine was to put a stake through its CPU and bury it at a crossroads at midnight. And even that didn't work if it was part of a Vaxcluster

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Security

Trouble with NT was that you could do bugger-all as an ordinary user.

You had to be admin to open the network settings dialog to find your own IP address

And with no "sudo" the only way was to log off and back on as admin

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Big blue Avatar movie spawns THREE SEQUELS

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Great

"Messuh blue"

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Buy a household 3D printer, it'll pay for itself in MONTHS!

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: I wanted one for years.

The formlabs 3d printer looks like it could be the first affordable (well if you don't have a wife to explain it to) one with decent quality

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: You're all missing the obvious!

Tolerance and material strength are nothing like good enough for lego bricks.

Google the engineerign tests on them - amazing

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: 20 ways to save even more money

How dare you sir - this is el' reg

If we stopped buying shiny toys we didn't need where would the IT industry be?

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Tick-tock, Apple: Obama has just days to stop US iPhone iPad sales ban

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Wouldn't it be better

>but he's a lawyer by profession

No he's a politician by profession - which means he just has to decide whether Apple or Samsung contributed most to his campaign

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Gmail, Outlook.com and e-voting 'pwned' on stage in crypto-dodge hack

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Not safe to use roaming data - they could spoof the cell.

If you go abroad it's safest to unspool your own fibre - and don't drink the water

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HALF of air passengers leave phones on ... yet STILL no DEATH PLUNGE

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Phones off during taxiing??

British airports obviosuly use an amazingly volatile version of jet-a which can be ignited by a cell phone inside a plane taxiing 1/2 a mile away

Every other airport uses the normal kerosene based Jet-a which wouldn't burn if you drop a match in it.

Quite how these planes manage to run on these two different fuels is a mystery

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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SO why are we allowed them at all?

I assume the risk from 2.1Oz of liquid is similarly miniscule

A couple of other questions:

How does the government manage to cover up all the crashes due to phones?

How come an airline that fits a pico cell (so it gets a cut of the calls) can suddenly certify every phone as safe?

It costs us about $50k to do EMC testing for CE on a single device and suddenly virgin have managed to test every phone on the market?

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