* Posts by Yet Another Anonymous coward

7695 posts • joined 31 Dec 2009

CPS fined £200k over theft of laptops holding 'sensitive interviews'

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Now if the ICO was able, as they would like, to impose a jail term for serious data losses

Wouldn't the CPS be the ones deciding if they should press criminal charges against the CPS ?

7
0

GCHQ 'smart collection' would protect MPs from spies, says NSA expert

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Obviously

If GCHQ collect all the communications and keep them locked in a big safe - the terrorist won't be able to get their hands on them.

0
0

PM wheels out snoop overseer minutes before latest snoops' charter bid lands

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: @ Richard Jones 1 - nice to see

All he needs to understand is that he was appointed by the prime minister to do what his boss says

1
0

I survived a head-on crash with driverless cars – and dummies

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Pavement Testing Facility - ignored?

If the contract to build the road and then the contract to maintain it went to the same company - that might affect your choice of road surface.

0
0

Chrome OS is not dead, insists Google veep in charge of Chrome OS

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Reading this on my Acer C720

Even better on the Samsung. How many ARM executable viruses are there ?

1
0

E-mail crypto is as usable as it ever was, say boffins

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

So where can I get your public key? How do I know it's really you? And what procedures do you have for securely informing me if it has been compromised?

18
1

Think Fortran, assembly language programming is boring and useless? Tell that to the NASA Voyager team

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Which fortran?

>Fortran-I, Fortran-II, Fortran-III, and Fortran-IV are different beasties.

At least with Fortran77 you didn't have to use roman numerals for all the calculations

3
0

UK watchdog offers 'safe harbor' advice on US data transfers

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Model contracts would be great

If they were reciprocal.

Getting FDA approval is horribly long, complicated and expensive. If I could just have a model contract for doctors saying that we intend to obey the law in some other country - and that was acceptable to the FDA it would be fantastic.

4
0

The only GOOD DRONE is a DEAD DRONE. Y'hear me, scumbags?!

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: You're too easy on French hunters, Mr Dabbs.

Hence the famous American declaration of the need to "arm the bears"

10
0

Post-pub nosh neckfiller special: The WHO bacon sarnie of death

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: +1 only for your name, Mr. Cupid Stunts.

Even more bizarre, according to Barry Cryer who wrote the scripts, she was originally called Mary Hinge but the BBC decided that was too rude and so they changed it to cupid ...

8
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

It's worse over here in Murika. We have the "this facility contains a substance known to the state of Ca to cause cancer" warnings on our office door. Because it applies to so many things (printer toner, floor cleaner, nail varnish remover) that it's impossible not to have it.

But our anodizing plant - full of really nasty chemicals - has the same warning message.

14
0

Top cops demand access to the UK's entire web browsing history

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

The city of London is the best place in the world to commit a crime - that's why so many institutions have their HQ there.

Compared to the finacial regulators in New York, Frankfurt or Singapore you can be pretty sure that the City of London police will take very little interest in your activities

4
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

They would also see if somebody went to "random warez site" and it had a 1x1 pixel link to a tracker on dodgy_porn site. Except they only see a request to "dodgy_porn_site/"

13
0

VMware vs German kernel dev: Filings flung in Linux-lifting lawsuit

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: GPL enforcement is really difficult

That's the beauty of copyright.

You have the copyright on every single line of code you write - even after it goes into the kernel.

So if you misuse it by breaking the GPL, every single author of every single line of code can sue you. In this case vmware are specifically using (allegedly) a module written by this guy

0
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Break out the popcorn

It is going to be a lot less entertaining having the case heard by a judge that understands the facts

1
3

'Profoundly stupid' Dubliner's hoax call lost Intel 6,000 hours of production

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Phoning it in

Because it's more effective to shut down an airport/train station/shopping center with a call rather than an actual bomb.

An actual bomb risks you getting caught or accidentally blowing up a photogenic disabled child which would look bad on the news. The official terrorists have code words registered with the police so that both sides know it's a real call.

4
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Probably the production line wasn't shut down but continued happily on its automated way.

3000 managers didn't do any powerpoint or hold meetings for an hour - leading to $$$ in increased productivity.

9
0

Northrop wins $55bn contract for next-gen bomber – as America says bye-bye to B-52

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Crew

>but having the ability to crew them is a requirement for missions like nuclear strikes

We salute the brave pilots of our ICBMs

2
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: B52s/B2s...

1) Airpower can suppress opposition but

The opposition comes from your own voters.

Stealth aircraft look cool and you don't get many dead pilots if you stay high enough.

2) ground forces are needed to drive them out and

Why would you want to drvie them out, good enemies are hard to find these days.

3) political will is needed to keep them out.

Commies are funny now and since we have fracking we don't even want to keep them out of countries that have oil

4) You can't indefinitely occupy a country whose inhabitants don't _want_ to be occupied and (Soviets in Afghanistan?)

That's why the Brits always split the country and let them fight each other - works for centuries.

5) you don't win hearts and minds by dropping bombs on some bystander's family

Only hearts and minds of congress matter. As long as you build the bomber in their constituency they will support you.

6) (on the other hand, doing so is one of the best recruiting tools for terrorists that exists) case in point: ISIS

ISIS mostly kill other people that we would be killing. We will get round to re-doing the terrorist league tables next year.

1
0

Cops use terror powers to lift BBC man's laptop after ISIS interview

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Give me liberty or...

"Give me liberty or... give me cheezeburgers" ?

1
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Enemy combatant

As does the Queen and Prince Charles for meeting Mr Adams

10
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Snowden?

They don't abuse their own laws. They do exactly what the laws were designed to do - keep journalists afraid and compliant.

1
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

I hope you aren't in the UK - that sounds like you are supporting the words of a known terrorist.

1
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: So What? @Dan Paul

And in the eyes of the UK and USA government.

1
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: So what?

I think it's disgusting that the state security apparatus has to go through all this pointless bureaucracy to access data from the state broadcaster.

To improve efficiency we need all depts of government to work together so all information from the state health service, state broadcaster is immediately available to the police and cabinet office.

13
55

'Govt will not pass laws to ban encryption' – Baroness Shields

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Great idea!!

No you just require all locks to be opened by a special master key that only The Security Administration have, and just hope that all their 100,000 employees are perfectly honest and that nobody ever loses a key

2
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

The same bill that required you to hand over your password also applied to steganography. The wording was something like "any document that contained a hidden or secret message" so if you had a copy of anything by James Joyce or pretty much any religous book in the house you were in trouble.

It's a bit tough to get 5years if you can't explain Paradise Lost

4
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Where are we getting "banning encryption" from?

"The penalty for non-disclosure might be significantly less onerous than that for any crime revealed to have been committed if the key is disclosed. "

Not that now the penalties for displeasing her majesty's intelligence services include being extraordinarily renditioned to some -istan to be tortured and then chained to a floor to freeze to death.

1
0

Safe Harbor 2.0: Judges to keep NSA spying in check – EU justice boss

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: And??

We have top people looking into it. Who? Top people.....

10
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Hmm...

Sadly it doesn't even need to go that far.

Hey judge sign this, "it's for Murika and against tourists"

10
0

Xiaomi preps Linux laptops for the post Christmas sales rush

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Portent

Xiaomi phones have customer service that make Apple look crap.

If they do this right (assuming there is any market for laptops anymore) it could be nice

1
0

UK.gov launches roadmap for Quantum of Something or other

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: oh good

It's not a question of experts predict - it's that this money comes out of physics budget and goes to which ever bandwagon is flavour of the month.

So it's nano-tech this, quantum that, cyber-thingy - most of it goes on new buildings and marketing but the studentships, post-docs and staff positions are all cut.

1
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

oh good

Because government are so much better at spotting the area of physics where the next breakthrough will come than physicists are and can so much more efficiently target resources.

That' why we have all these high temperature superconductor research centers founded, and funded, in the 80s which have produced so much

3
3

RBS promises 'safe, secure, confidential' info-sharing on Facebook at Work

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

e) circulating memos about covers for TPS reports

3
0

Court to Wikimedia: Your NSA spying evidence is inadmissable, so you can't prove NSA spying

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: A lawsuit isn't the answer to every problem.

That people aren't reading or editing certain pages because of a fear that the visit will be monitored and you will go on some government list ?

If the secret police were photographing everyone entering a store and making a list of what they bought - would the store have to prove that some people had stayed away ?

7
1

Silicon Valley freeze-out: EU watchdog tells firms clock is ticking to limit data transfers

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

On Facebook or Linkedin and have contacts in the USA - how are you planning to manage that without copying data ?

0
0

Snowden, Schrems, safe harbor ... it's time to rethink privacy policies, says FTC commish

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Safe harbour is only about commercial protection of data. If it was about protecting your data from the US government then the Eu wouldn't allow data to be processed in the UK where it will be handed over to our 5eyes partners.

It is about not having your medical records sold to an insurance company, or your banking information sold to advertisers.

1
3

Bacon as deadly as cigarettes and asbestos

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Sea change in "allowed" foods

The restriction is probably that the banned animals all eat grain. So the rich could have luxury meat by feeding them stuff that people can eat - which would drive up the price of food.

Obviously Jehovah is a commie and that explains the Daily Mail's dislike of his chosen people.

3
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: re-reporting the daily mail?

Least likely Daily Mail headline: "Pork gives you cancer, Muslims and Jews were right all along"

29
0

Fully working U-Boat Enigma machine sells for $365,000

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

> But a diesel engine is a diesel engine, a valve is a valve and so on

But none of our nuts and bolts fitted, and we had to file down all the bolt heads until they fit proper spanners

2
0

R&D money for science – from your taxes?

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: So... how DO we get more of public good things?

Arguably the Born-Haber process to make ammonia has allowed many more people to be born than died in WWI.

3
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: So... how DO we get more of public good things?

>In that case, how does economics suggest we proceed in order to maximise the amount of science done by the human race in toto?

Traditionally having a decent world war

>Has anyone tried it? If so, what were the results, compared with other alternative approaches?

Last time, we got computers, radar, jet engines, nuclear power, rockets, sonar, proper weather forecasting, ocean floor mapping, discover of the jet stream.

Although there were a certain level of inconvenience for many people and quite a lot of mess.

5
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: pointless arguments...

Perhaps they did have a space program?

Suppose when we first land on Kepler 452 we discover it's populated by billions of Tyrannosaurus (sauri?) Rexes with normal arms who explain that they left all the handicapped short armed ones behind.

... before eating us ...

5
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Patents

No - lack of training stuff that up.

A kid in Somalia can read Einstein's papers online. So there is no need for Somalia to invest in higher education, they obviously have all the info they need to build a nuclear power station.

So Britain can wait for Japanese/Korean/Chinese researches to make a discovery and publish the theory and then British industry can go and hire some school leavers and immediately begin manufacturing room temperature super-conductors? All we need is a single national subscription to Phys Rev Letters ?

The point of public science is to train scientists. So they go and work in industry and make things.

After a wasted PhD in nuclear physics (thanks to the cowardly USSR throwing the towel in) I now work on making a new kind of 3d surgery robot. It's not that I found a paper saying how to build this - but that I had years of training in research and solving problems.

25
0
Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: one large logical fallacy (pr phallacy?) in most large programs and government ideas

The BoM for a collider or a space telescope isn't an investment in science - it's a WTO avoiding subsidy to your country's aerospace industry. That's why most of the staff at CERN or ESA are devoted to making sure that Belgian companies get 2.73% of the contracts to match their contribution.

Diverting that money from student place, staff posts, and university depts is what does the damage.

5
2

FBI, US g-men tried to snatch DNA results from blood-testing biz. What a time to be alive

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

While in the UK they can just arrest you, take your DNA and then release you without charge - sorry mistaken identity. But keep the data for ever.

13
1

Microsoft's top lawyer: I have a cunning plan ... to rescue sunk safe harbor agreement

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: Internet faces 'digital dark ages' if nothing is done

You have heard of the european union and the free movement of goods and services?

Try writing the same thing with "cars being made"

2
0

GCHQ to pore over blueprints of Chinese built Brit nuke plants

Yet Another Anonymous coward
Silver badge

Re: About time too

>Generously rewarding PV ... must go down as one of the most stupid ideas ever conceived by a British government

Not if you think of it as MIRAS with a new greener coating.

Giving homeowners money for nothing, paid for by charging OAPs and poor renters more for leccy is frankly brilliant.

1
0

Forums