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* Posts by Yet Another Anonymous coward

4871 posts • joined 31 Dec 2009

Margaret Hodge, PAC are scaring off new biz: Treasury source

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Zero tax is the answer

Making the UK the tax haven center for the HQ of global companies will be a great boost to the British Brass Plaque industry

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: The staff at the Treasury et-al should grow a pair..

I thought all the companies had been scared off from the UK by the equal pay act, the minimum wage, maternity leave, health and safety, banning chimney sweeps, the abolition of slavery.

Everytime there is a law to improve the rights/pay/healthy+safety of workers for the last 200 years - the Tories have claimed it will drive companies away and destroy jobs.

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Facebook will LOSE 80% of its users by 2017 – epidemiological study

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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@monkeyfish: May I humbly suggest that gold badge members of el-reg are not the typical sheep audience that advertisers dream of.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: It's true but the time is probably off

>a)You need something to move TO

Not a difficult market to enter, a kid in a Harvard dorm room could manage it.

>b)Since when do we believe such theories?

When do we believe epidemiological models of disease spread and network effects?

Since they correctly started predicting diseases, growth in traffic, best places to build a mall, etc etc

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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>There is also the case for many of the "Yoof" that if your parents are on FB its no longer cool any longer and you'll move on...

Which could - long term - be its saving.

Yoof are a good market, but they don't buy many white-goods/cars/mortgages.

At the moment magazine and TV ads are still the best way to reach these people, if Facebook reaches critical mass in the 30-40 somethings rather than Yoof and hipsters they could own a very profitable and much less fickle market.

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US govt watchdog slams NSA snooping as illegal, useless against terrorism

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: The big issue in a nut shell

> "we want privacy, we want privacy / "we want security, we want security".

Assumes that the way to get security is more spying on obviously non-terrorist citizens.

Its the old, we have to keep sprinkling magic dust on the roads because people won't forgive us if there is a tiger attack on a pre-school.

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UK.gov recruiting 400 crack CompSci experts to go into teaching

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: What about the kids who have no aptitude for programming?

And so some of them will discover they have no aptitude/interest and do something else - how else where you going to get the first lot to go to university to do CS if they had never heard of it?

It's the reason we do lots of subjects in school rather than just classify children at birth into a suitable job (Tory cabinet ministers excepted)

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: There is no quick fix!

>What about bringing in a tutor who teaches just the programming content of the course?

Of course, so long as they have a PGCE - you need to be properly qualified, you can't just have a maths PhD and 20years experience at a top public school and be allowed to teach.

And a background check - and you don't mind being dragged out of school by a swat team if it later turns out you had been fishing with an expired licence

And you have to be paid less than a classroom assistant - because the union will insist you don't compete with real teachers.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Obviously 64bits have wrapped around to 8bits

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Amazon's 'schizophrenic' open source selfishness scares off potential talent, say insiders

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Not a good citizen

>It *is* legally correct - and that's all that really matters.

That's all that matters to the lawyers - not to developers

It may be completely legal to outsource manufacture of a toy to be made by slave labour in a North Korean prison camp - but it might not be good business sense if your market is Gruniad readers.

It's upto Amazon to decide if the losses they would suffer from a competitor using fixes they made to a FOSS library outweigh the losses they suffer from not being able to hire the best people. It's the same calculation companies make with free soda, good office location or any other perk.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Not a good citizen

The GPL requires that source is released for all software delivered to a customer.

Amazon claim that since the software is never delivered - only used as a service - they don't need to distribute the source.

This is legally correct, but not playing nicely. The programmers they are trying to hire are more interested in playing nicely than a lawyers definition of "delivered"

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: A pattern of non-contribution

A company that uses lots of opensource code but hides behind a loophole in the GPL to avoid sharing that code - can't hire good programmers who don't approve of this sort of thing

Companies that make lots of money but hide behind loopholes to avoid paying tax - presumably can't hire good accountants who also don't approve of this sort of thing ?

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Korean credit card bosses offer to RESIGN over huge data breach

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Right response - wrong target ?

The banks presumably have to give the credit agency access to their data

So whether the banks had it encrypted or not seems irrelevant - it was the credit agency that didn't protect it.

Unless of course the response now is for the banks to give the credit agency access to their customer's data but not the encryption key !

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UK IT supplier placed on ASA naughty step over 'misleading' HDD ad

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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We sell special ultra-test versions which we guarantee to have run for 42,000 hours continuously.

They cost a lot more but what are the chances of it failing in the next year if it worked for the last 5?

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China forces users to upload videos under their real names

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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In china?

A Mr Zhang has uploaded a video critical to the government - go and arrest him.

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'We don't use UPS. If we did we'd have huge UPSs and tiny computers'

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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The is the el-reg - we don't allow these sort of clearly explained well reasoned comments here.

Can you add something bashing apple fanbois and Microsoft's purchase of Nokia?

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Coolers on the roof?

Alternatively don't build your supercomputer in a country famous for being so XXXXing hot

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ESA rejoices as comet-chasing Rosetta probe wakes from 3-year nap

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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In deed, why throw money at keeping european scientist and engineers employed and new ones trained when we could use the money to pay bonusses to bankers in the Cayman islands

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Good news: 'password' is no longer the #1 sesame opener, now it's '123456'

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: When you do not want to create an account

For sites that you don't care about - having to create an account to download an update - surely it's more secure to use "password" or "1234567" than anything more secure which might also be used in a similar form on sites that matter.

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VCs drop cash on DropBox, bestow $10 BEELLLION valuation

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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re: it just works

But it's vulnerable to Google/Apple blocking it on their mobile devices in favour of their home grown solutions

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Almost everyone read the Verizon v FCC net neutrality verdict WRONG

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Nice straw man

The monopoly cable internet provider here in the Frozen North was charging customers who used other suppliers VOIP services a $10/month "quality of service" fee - to ensure the VOIP packets got through.

Nice little data packet you got here squire - be a shame if anything happened to it !

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MANIC MINERS: Ten Bitcoin generating machines

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: This isn't money

They are mined in exactly the same sense. The limiting value of metals is how much it costs to get it out of the ground, this varies around the world with concentration of ore, distance from markets and the cost of workers. Bitcoins depend on the cost of electricity which follows exactly the same rules as the cost of mining.

Bitcoin's real competitor is aluminium - if it's more profitable to use your electricity to mine bitcoins than smelt bauxite - you "mine" numbers

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: @DougS RE:@Andy Kay

Ironically I'm spending more than £100/month in electricity to heat this place using a stupid electrical central heating - and it's not even doing any mining. And the furnace cost more than some of these mining boxes

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Do that with 8bit home micros and you get knighted

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Volatility

>Those professors who started this had an easy time mining in the beginning, yes? Then sold the suckers >the get rich quick scheme.

The original "investors" who bought Manhattan for a few beads did rather well - it doesn't mean that a plot on 5th avenue is worthless today.

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Google cleared to land in private terminal at Silicon Valley airport

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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>If Google as a company need to shuffle hundreds of people over long distances each year

Google One - Larry's 767 - has 15 seats

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Mystery...

>Why don't they just use Hangouts?

More people have corporate jets than have Google+ accounts?

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Those NSA 'reforms' in full: El Reg translates US Prez Obama's pledges

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Lies and the lying liars who tell them

At least with organised crime they make a profit and you get to ask a favour when the Boss's daughter gets married

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: "...three step protocol..."

Simple - first step is "you->phone company", other step is "terrorist->phone company", since you are both linked by a single step to the phone company then everyone can be spied on!

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: T.F.M. Reader Brief summary of the (very good) summary

>However we, the public, do assume that the spying is targetted at the nations' enemies and those that could potentially be enemies.

That was always the role of MI5. The NUM, CND, Greenpeace, John Lennon, Jack Straw, Ricky Tomlinson.

In Britain anyone who wasn't at Eton was suspected by MI5.

Ironically since the KGB only seemed to have recruited people who were at Eton and Cambridge

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: More presidential lip service.

Specifically it was based on the Netherlands - independent states with an elected but relatively powerless stadtholder as head of the committee.

However in the Netherlands it worked - must be something to do with the beer and drugs.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Different needs

Same reason for having a Queen - you need somebody to wave and distract the proles.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Best intentions != right

"Granted I would rather the US have these capabilities than the North Koreans, but I would much rather no one had them."

Actually I would much rather it WAS the North Korean's spying on all my communications - they can't do anything with it.

Instead i have to wonder if everything I store on sharepoint or Office365 is immediately being copied to my US competitors, if visits to US customers or collaborators are tracked.

Do I have to worry that my cell phone walking past the mosque on the way to the lab or my holiday visits to Egypt or Cuba are going to get me stopped from attending the next US held conference.

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Do cops need a warrant to search your phone? US Supreme Court will rule

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: broad implications

Same apparently applies if you are within 100miles of the coast of the Mexican/Canadian borders

The constitution still counts in small section of Montana and Utah apparently

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Obama reveals tiny NSA reforms ... aka reforming your view of the NSA

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: If you're not a terrorist, you have nothing to worry about

5. Person who unrolls a banner lettered with glitter outside an Oil company

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: "Having faced down the totalitarian dangers of fascism and communism"

If it weren't for the involvement of the USSR in WW II, most of Europe might be speaking German today,

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Intel confirms it will axe 5,400 workers in 2014

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Merger

Intel, HP, Dell merge and share their core competency in reducing headcount

Eventually they reduce it to only 3 - all joint CEOs - and still aren't profitable

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Intel treads water despite drowning PC biz clinging to Chipzilla's legs

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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That suggests some "imaginative accounting" - chip fabs do not make 60% profit margins

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Signs of stabilization in the PC segment

There is also stabilization in the Pyramid building and Flint Axe making sectors.

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NSA: It's TRUE, we grab 200 MILLION of your text messages A DAY globally

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Neat trick!

1, Country A and B have laws against torturing suspects

2, So you ship them to country C and have them apply the electrodes

2, You stand outside the door asking the questions.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Or don't know enough Clash lyrics (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/06/03/text_punk/)

I suppose back in 2004 they could eavesdrop on ALL messages

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Clink! Terrorist jailed for refusing to tell police his encryption password

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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>is this another "incite idiots to talk stupid, then arrest them under terrorist offences"

After the pub you don't want to say "EEh I could murder an Indian" if you don't want to become a terrorist suspect

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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re: gofsckyourselfmate

That's why the same law was ruled unconstitutional in the US

If you had a password of "IwantToKillThePresident" then revealing the password would be self-incrimination.

But they have a constitution and a supreme court and all sorts of weird stuff in the Land of the Free.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: and another thing ...

We asked this when the police computer guy gave a talk to our high energy physics group.

How can we prove that background noise in the LHC data isn't an encrypted message?

Do we have to keep the data in Switzerland, if we access it remotely does that come under UK law ?

We were told not to worry because the laws were only for terrorists - so that's a relief then !

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: If loose lips, sink ships ......

> if you "can't remember" who was driving when the car got flashed

Unless you are a chief constable, then you can claim that all records of who was driving have been destroyed - and get off

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: IronKey

But calling up Ironkey and asking for the backdoor password does

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Microsoft buries Sinofsky Era... then jumps on the coffin lid

Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: Henry Ford

But Ford did at least improve on the horse.

Microsoft have ignored the "faster horse" request and instead replaced it with a slower zebra where you have to press all the stripes to find the one to make the horse go.

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Yet Another Anonymous coward
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Re: A common API is definitely a must.

But it's hard for Microsoft to do this.

It's not like they 10,000s programmers, complete control over the critical app and server infrastructure and a common language runtime that insulates the apps from the details of the machine

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