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* Posts by heyrick

2467 posts • joined 20 Dec 2009

Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch

heyrick
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Re: Says it is for right handers only

"Do lefties wear girls blouses too?" - some might. I don't.

"I really hope they don't play a piano, all the keys being in the wrong place for lefties." - well, as far as I know, nobody has produced a backwards piano so it is hard to tell if it would be more appropriate. Don't you kind of need both hands to play a piano?

I did string up my guitar back to front, but, well, I suck either way.

"Do they insist on driving a lefthand drive car on the other side of the road?" - I live in France so, that's already been sorted.

More realistically, some things are extremely difficult for left handed people. Not because they should be, but because objects designed to ergonomically favour right handed people has a tendency to make the device correspondingly less useful for us lefties. By way of example, consider a pair of scissors. Try imagining those ones with the nice shaped handles that fit perfectly into your hand. Now think of how awful it would be to hold them with your left hand. You will find that "We have two hands, use them." does not apply for the majority of people, just as we can write with one hand but scrawl (just) with the other. Likewise for scissors. It is certainly possible to cut with either hand, but if you want accuracy and care, most people will need to use their dominant hand. When I buy scissors, I buy ones with basic rounded handles that everybody can use.

Now consider a tin opener. After years of what feels like an incredibly awkward action, I gave in and bought an electric tin opener.

"Yes, I'm left handed" - please tell me you're not one of those people that turns a page 90 degrees and writes towards yourself. I mostly taught myself to write (having missed the early fundamentals for reasons too long/boring to explain here) and so, thankfully, I was saved from being taught to write in what appears to be the most ass-backward way imaginable. I simply rotate my entire hand about ten degrees counter-clockwise (so as not to drag my hand through what I have written) and then I write across a page.

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heyrick
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" But at least the iPhone won't feel cheap and have a battery that goes to pot after a year like Android phones " - what a load of bollocks. My phone is an Xperia U, a phone so inexpensive that it came with my two year contact. I will replace it when I renew in January. But, well, I make this phone to be a year and nine months old. Battery works fine. My previous (Xperia Mini Pro) is a year older and is now doing service acting as a modem for my iPad on another network (because I'm paying a lot of money to Orange yet this isn't enough to allow tethering). Battery fine, and that is a phone that I used to listen to MP3s and streaming radio until the battery ran out...

Given some Android phones cost as much as an iPhone, they aren't all plastic and sadness - and there are also special ruggedised phones that would leave an iPhone (and its owner) broken. But, hey, you have already proven you know not of what you speak...

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Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC

heyrick
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It is reasonable for ISPs to be placed under an obligation to identify user behaviour that is ‘suspicious’" - the same ISPs that are required to be gagged when officials engage in behaviour that is even more suspicious?

"The determination of what an ‘illegitimate’ use of such tools is, and the threshold of what would be considered a ‘high’ download volume over a period of time, would need to take into account legitimate explanations in order to avoid false positives and to safeguard the fundamental rights of consumers — such matters would be open to further industry discussion and agreement." - the problem here is that this is a can of worms you don't really want to touch. If you start searching for "suspected" pirated content using VPN channels (and how, if the link is encrypted, do you PROVE this? or is pointing an accusing finger evidence enough these days?), various pressure groups will soon get the idea that an ISP can equally determine other sorts of unlawful content, which will obviously require an examination of data passing through the system, and from there, a smart user will begin to look to systems such as VPN and Tor to safeguard what is left of basic privacy.

It is important that consumers have a right of review or appeal in the event their rights are affected under any new scheme." - like we have rights regarding rampant snooping and overseas data mining? Don't make me laugh...

"Consumers should have an available mechanism to challenge what are perceived to be unfair, or incorrect, ‘warnings’ issued by an ISP if a consumer is identified as having infringed copyright." - back to an earlier point - if VPN data is encrypted, then the only thing that can be proven is "this user has transferred a lot of data using VPN". Is this to become sufficient grounds for accusing somebody of copyright infringement, issuing "warnings", and perhaps (via feature creep) other sanctions?

Let's begin with something obvious that is, sadly, missing from a fair few implementations: a warning notice shall be deemed to be invalid and itself unlawful if it does not clearly state the IP address, the time and date, exactly what was transferred unlawfully (item by item, if more than one) who owns the rights to it, and the full contact details of the organisation that is acting as an agent on behalf of the copyright holder.

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Straight to video: Facebook to add 'view counts' to autoplay newsfeed vids

heyrick
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Uhhh...

If I look at a news feed and eight people have set videos, doesn't this mean the end result will be bollocks as everything starts playing at the same time?

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What could possibly go wrong? Banks could provide ID assurance for Gov.UK – report

heyrick
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Stop

No, banks, we do NOT "trust" you

You have put yourself in a position where if we do not accept your terms, daily life is increasingly difficult. Where I live, it is no longer legal to pay cash for purchases over €300, so banks are implicated in everything. Our choice of bank is dictated not by who we trust most, but rather who we hate the least.

As for security - can you explain why the first response to account errors are that it is our fault? Can you explain why you contact us from withheld phone numbers and email addresses that reject replies? Can you explain why unknown random phone callers claiming to be from the bank ask a bunch of security questions and get very shirty when I ask them to name three direct debits? Why an I expected to know phone numbers, but a bank card PIN is a crappy four digits? Why do card readers asking for a PIN not provide a personal message registered with the bank? Look at the equipment in supermarkets, who knows what the hell that could be connected to. Can you explain why there are so many fundamental lapses of basic trust with chip and pin? Can you explain why I get letters telling me about phishing and then emails from you that do half the things you say you don't do? And finally, as has been noted, if you need ID to hold a bank account and banks hold ID, how does one even enter into the equation?

Oh, and if you have a bunch of info on me, are you willing to vouch that I am me? Are you sure?

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Sex is great in books, lousy in apps, says Apple

heyrick
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Re: Enforcement?

Can you point me to a free telnet app that can handle ANSI colours? I have found numerous rubbish ones, and a VNC client that "just about" worked. And that is looking for actual useful apps and not the weird and wonderful.

There is a LOT of junk in the app store. That isn't to say there isn't crap for android, but your position is weak if the best response is " no, the other platform is more rubbisherer".

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heyrick
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Enforcement?

Given there are already plenty of crap apps, and given that it is a closed ecosystem so people just starting out coding may find it difficult to catch up with the big players, and given that there are already plenty of apps with unrestricted (and unrestrictable) internet access to send who knows what information back every time you start that app...

...how do they intend to enforce these rules? An app may not data mine? What if one does? What then?

Or is it just smoke and mirrors?

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Don't buy that phone! It ATTRACTS CRIMINALS, UK.gov will tell people

heyrick
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Re: Mobile Phone Theft Ratio

A downvote? I think somebody must have latent budgie-induced-trauma issues from their childhood.

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heyrick
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WTF?

And there have been reports that they could even use "malware" to commandeer vehicle systems via satellites

Seriously?

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iOS phone phlaw can UNMASK anonymous users on social media

heyrick
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Re: Nothing new

...but if you don't have multiple dialers, it'll just go right ahead and place the call. Indeed there was a "pl

problem" not so long ago with specially crafted numbers.

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Virgin Media blocks 'wankers' from permissible passwords

heyrick
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Ummm...

If it is the client side scripting doing this, doesn't that imply that those with friendlier browsers can easily rewrite some of the rules and use whatever damn password that they want without this dumb nannying? Passwords should be known to the one using them and nobody else.

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Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything

heyrick
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They used to do this with hardware

Video recorders - when they stopped being boards piled full of analogue circuitry and became a single board with a handful of ICs, you could sometimes "upgrade" it by altering links on the board. After looking at the number of heads on my drum, and finding a service manual, I was able to upgrade a cheap VHS deck to Nicam stereo and SP/LP. Seems it was cheaper to build "a video deck" and make the model differences by wire links on the board, than the expense of designing and building several completely different models.

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Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws

heyrick
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Re: Just don't do it

"Which bank is that ?"

Crédit Mutuel de Bretagne (bet you weren't expecting that!). I would imagine it is likely the same for any of the regional versions of the Crédit Mutuel family.

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heyrick
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Re: Just don't do it

My bank is okay. The code might be utter crap, but the app permits me to check my balance, review a screenful of account activity, order a chequebook, transfer money from one of my accounts to the other. Err... Err... Maybe I can auto-phone my branch too. Or something.

But, then, this is the same bank that requires me to generate a virtual credit card for online use as the real card is blocked from use in any situation where I am not physically present. Can't even use it to pay the electricity bill!

Certainly, I get that this is ultimately about reducing the bank's exposure to risks, but I'm okay with that if it means my account is that much less likely to get screwed over as a result of this. The hassle that would cause doesn't bear thinking about.

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heyrick
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Re: Not surprising

"1. The C language and its derivatives. Biggest mistake in the history of computers. Every time you hear about a buffer overflow error in software, realize that it's due to a fundamental design flaw in the C language that leads to the same error repeated over and over."

I would certainly advocate a compiler option to include bounds checking, however...

Screwing up buffers and pointers is not uniquely a C problem. You could make the same mistake on the BBC Micro with code like pointer%!0=blahblah% which might go badly wrong if pointer% wasn't actually pointing at the bit of memory you wanted to write to.

That said, aren't apps written in a bastardised Java (Android) or some sort of distantly-C-like (iOS) both of which are capable of trapping buffer overruns?

"If civil engineers had used building techniques as flawed as the C language, our civilization would lie in ruins today." - we don't (usually) make buildings with faults because even by a process of trial and error we'd learn pretty quickly how to correct these issues. On the other hand, we seem quite content to build entire societies with hokey specifications that make the C standard look a paragon of perfection. Turn on the TV news and count how many seconds elapse before there is a story regarding a bunch of people dying or killed as a result of theologies with holes big enough to fly an Airbus through.

"2. The preferred modern software development method of "code and test incrementally until it doesn't crash any more"."

Yup. Life was much nicer in the era of software supplied on ROM. If it came on EPROM, you knew to expect some quirks. But if it came on a ROM, well, a faulty ROM set could sink a company so there was none of this "push out what we have and fix whatever develops in the field later" idea.

Now we can have software that checks for updates daily. Sure, it can give you an improving user experience and more and more features, but this is only because the product was a rush-job pile of loosely interacting bugs to begin with. When you start with manure, most things are an improvement...

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Get ready: The top-bracket young coders of the 2020s will be mostly GIRLS

heyrick
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Your point is?

Wow, this is almost too easy.

Quote from yearofcode.org : It is really simple to learn and anyone can do it It's right there on the front page.

She, the woman heading up the project, cannot code. What does that say about something apparently so simple anybody can do it?

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RealVNC distances itself from factories, power plants, PCs hooked up to password-less VNC

heyrick
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Re: Legality ?

" It is therefore available to the general public in exactly the same way that a public website is. "

Just because you CAN access something doesn't imply you have the right TO access it.

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Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?

heyrick
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Re: Ask a policeman

"They 'execute' orders and instructions from the Home Office and courts etc"

And once in a while take the "execute" part a little too literally.

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heyrick
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Re: Manufactured story

"However, a pattern that see you viewing several such video nasties,"

Depends upon the exact definition of "video nasty". A while back I looked up earthquake videos. Watched a few of those (and decided being in an earthquake would freak the hell out of me). This led on to TV bloopers, with somehow led on to an apartment block (Philippines?) falling over, which lead on to other building fails, and then a few spectacularly dumb crashes, the epitome of which must have been a B52 doing what looked to be a barrel roll without understanding that the wings were quite a bit longer than the space between the cockpit and the ground. To cap it off, I watched the Russian Tsar bomb. <big><big><big><big>Boom.</big></big></big></big>

Wasting time on mindless stuff is what happened. Sick sad curiosity, mostly. But I reckon a disgruntled cop with an issue could make a lot out of: collapsing buildings, crashes, plane crashes, nuclear-frikkin-weapons. You see I'm going with this?

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heyrick
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Coat

I'm not convinced most people would know what sedition even is.

That green gooey gunk you get at the bottom of a fish tank?

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UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones

heyrick
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Re: we need the public to become educated in the tools they are using and what can be installed

" So that issue still needs to be addressed, which means those 'normal's need to start giving at least half-a-fuck and making the effort to understand some of the tech. "

This is the main thing, to explain why phones are passworded and why they shouldn't make their first request "turn this off".

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e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

heyrick
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Must be nice to fail to deliver and then sue to get paid.

Maybe Govt could counter sue for failure to deliver, for beeeeelions for leaving the country in an insecure state, blah blah?

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Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA

heyrick
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If you don't trust the NSA to collect data, why would you ever trust Google?

Who says we trust Google? Or the NSA? Or News Corp? Or Murdoch himself?

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heyrick
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Oh, the old coot is just pissed...

...'cos we're giving attention to Assange today.

Or something.

Like I care. I cannot value anything to do with integrity and the like spoken by that guy.

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Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy

heyrick
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Uhhh...

What kind of nut job actually brags about how much "evidence" has been gathered against him?

And how does he know how much anyway, unless the Feds get a kick out of reporting to his lawyer ever increasing numbers because they know he'll fall for it . . . 40,000 pages is no big deal but if we hit 45,000 then we're screwed! Julian, it's not an oil change!

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Giving your old Tesco Hudl to Auntie June? READ THIS FIRST

heyrick
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WTF?

Started off a logical enough article...

...after all, a factory reset that doesn't is pretty poor, especially if there is no obvious (non-geek) way to wipe important data from the machine.

Then Mr. Munro makes the illogical leap from a badly wiped tablet sold on eBay to providing information for weirdos to stalk your children (the obvious question is that this only means a damn if the purchaser is a kiddie stalker, has the knowledge of how to get into the device, and most importantly of all, lives nearby). As if this wasn't bad enough, somehow having end user information on a cheap supermarket tablet will automagically help a stalker avoid a police sting? How is this? Will it start playing the theme tune from The Bill whenever a cop car drives by?

Mr. Munro, you might have had a good and convincing argument if you warned adults about their login details, credit card information, etc being potentially accessible by the person the tablet is sold on to. But this half-assed "think of the children"? That's an even more desperate attempt than one would expect to see in The Daily Mail. So go away. Very far away. Preferably in a coffin. Thank you.

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Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'

heyrick
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Re: No detracting from the evidence but.............

If the phone hadn't been switched off (and maybe if it has?), there seems to be something akin to dmsg that records all sorts of events and their status. I would imagine "flashlight app started" followed by something about "hardware led active" would be among the entries.

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Password manager LastPass goes titsup: Users LOCKED OUT

heyrick
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Hang on...

Am I missing something here?

How are your passwords safe hosted on a third party server?

Why does a password manager need to have any information leave your system?

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Hollywood star Robin Williams dies of 'suspected suicide' at 63

heyrick
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Re: Why are so many celebrities depressed and/or suicidal??

I think it is the expectations, the way everybody is always expecting you to be a certain way, a certain type of person... I guess in this respect Robin Williams was lucky in that he established a body of serious work alongside his Mork-style rapid delivery comedy, and showed he could do both.

Then, then when you make it huge, everybody expects your next role to be greater, better, more impressive. And if you aren't, if the movie isn't good, if you didn't capture the essence of the character in some arbitrary way a critic interprets the character as, you are panned, you are useless, you totally ruined everything, blah blah.

Bugger that for a game of soldiers. The celebrity world isn't even remotely real and there's no amount of money you could pay me to get involved in that.

An earlier poster said he was single, in a bedsit, and pretty much a useless <bleep>. Well, I'm not depressed (I don't think?) but otherwise the story is similar. But you know what? I'm okay with it. Nobody has expectations of me, I don't have expectations of anybody else. I just pass through life quietly in the shadows and enjoy things at my own pace.

The tragedy, I suppose, is that today we are reminiscing about a great talent. Yet, for every famous person in this situation, how many others that we never know?

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US 911 service needs emergency upgrade and some basic security against scumbags

heyrick
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What hasn't been mentioned...

Wouldn't the local police probably know the addresses of local celebrities? Before dispatching SWAT to those locations (especially Kutcher, who pranked punkd a lot of people), they might want to get a confirmation?

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HTTP-Yes! Google boosts SSL-encrypted sites in search results

heyrick
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Field day for MITM attacks on open wifi

Several French hospitals, and KFC (France). Hook up to their WiFi and try to go to an https site, Safari pops up a request for an SSL certificate that is completely different to the one you expected to see. So while Google is pushing us towards greater security, some hotspot providers (no doubt in the guise of "protecting" us/children/profits) are intentionally smashing down said security.

http://i.imgur.com/nDt8id4.jpg

[kudos to McDonalds (France) and Buffalo Grill, who not only leave https alone, but also permit a VPN to be used so you can fetch mail and stuff without other people snooping....which is supposed to be why ssl on an open AP is a good thing, right?]

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CIA infosec guru: US govt must buy all zero-days and set them free

heyrick
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Happy

Re: This will begin computing as IT should be? Or as the Few can Phorm IT? :-)

"or anyone who hasn't done a minefield of crash testing, heyrick"

amanfromMars 1 name dropped me! Whoo-hoo!

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heyrick
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Re: this will end computing as we know it

" proprietary and properly tested "

You must be talking about Microsoft.

No? Maybe you are talking about Flash?

Adobe Reader?

Or...? Ubuntu? Android? iOS? Everything has patches and updates to correct errors (and sometimes, to introduce new ones!).

If the big companies have to provide regular patches for the same sorts of flaws (buffer overrun and failing to sanitise inputs), isn't it a bit rich to expect a non-pro part time coder to turn out something better? If in doubt, refer to OpenSSL for an example of the supposed specialists getting it wrong, and to WPS for an example of a protocol broken from the outset. Software is a very complex thing with zero tolerance for mistakes, created by creatures who are imperfect and make mistakes. I disagree that we the populace should serve as an army of beta testers, but likewise I think expecting absolute perfection is a dream...

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heyrick
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this will end computing as we know it

Somebody should tell this guy that there is something between big commerce and open source.

How about the army of bedroom coders who release their software for free, but don't want to make it open source? There's quite a few of them around, and applying the same legal liabilities for something given away for free would most likely make them think "sod it", especially if they don't feel (for whatever reason) that they want to make the source available.

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Simian selfie stupidity: Macaque snap sparks Wikipedia copyright row

heyrick
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Re: Good article.

" if a human doesn't take the picture that it's not theirs to hold copyright "

On the other hand, if a monkey cannot hold copyright, then surely it should be taken down as nobody rightfully holds copyright? The rules are that something is not public domain unless the creator says otherwise.... Well? Who said otherwise, Jimmy?

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Surfing the web from Android? We KNEW it – sorry, iOS fanbois

heyrick
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Re: Yeah but...

"As far as I can see, not one Android owner has a mobile data plan with the word "GB" in the name of the plan. It's all ZERO MB here and 100MB there."

Mine's 500MB. I could pay a little more and get 3GB, but given that I finish the month with over 100MB remaining (unless I'm in a belligerent look-at-kittens-on-YouTube-to-use-up-my-allocation mood), there doesn't really seem much point in going for more. http://open.orange.fr/forfaits/forfaits-internet-plus-mobile.aspx

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Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network

heyrick
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Coat

e and e

Downloading a movie? Economic terrorism. Funding terrorism by dodgy adverts on dodgy sites. And, um, unspecified we'll-think-of-something-later terrorism.

IP = complicated internet stuff. Using the internet? Well, surely that's some sort of terrorism as well, and if not, we'll just redefine what "terrorism" is.

Therefore, guilty as hell, burn forever you horrid little terrorist you!

Mine's the one with the Daily Mail folded and tucked into a large pocket.

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heyrick
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Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

"However I am guessing they get the same internet facing IP. Can't test it just at the moment tho."

Orange France has a public WiFi network running on the back of home internet connections, using APs called "orange" instead of the usual "Livebox-XXXX" (last four digits of Mac). You need to log in using your credentials - orange email name and password IIRC. It is done in the manner that if you offer a public access point, you have the right to use other public access points, but if you turn off the public AP, you lose the right. As I live in the back of beyond and you can barely get access through the stone walls, it doesn't bother me to leave it switched on.

Aaaanyway, I did some tests and the public AP gives you a completely different public IP address from the private one. I didn't bother testing QoS as my downstream is only 2mbit so it doesn't take much to knock that on the head. I might try it sometime and see how the Livebox allocates bandwidth if only the public AP is running, and if the private one then starts a download...

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Edward Snowden's not a one-off: US.gov hunts new secret doc leaker

heyrick
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"it is impossible to tell a good guy from a bad guy; that person can take their time to siphon off large amounts of data without being detected."

To be fair, one could say exactly the same thing about entire governments.

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What's the point of the Internet of Things?

heyrick
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Disagree

To answer the last point first, I try to see people as people regardless of any perceived disability or the usual other differentiators. Frankly, I don't see how a smarter house is going to make a damned bit of difference there. Indeed, since you mention those with mental afflictions, autism for example, don't you think that these people are the ones most likely to end up being abused by their IoT equipment? Ultimately, the businesses behind IoT don't care about whether or not our fridge can suggest meals for us. It is more interested in the brands of milk we buy, the way we shop, the sort of things we eat. All information for profiling for selling to advertisers. I also fear that any sort of display device will default to "advertising" when not specifically in use. While I don't have any antipathy regarding a microwave touchscreen informing me how great <product> is, I am wondering how much electricity (that I would be paying for) would be consumed in the process, for all of the IoT devices over the course of a year.

Next, this site itself is rife with stories of the abysmal levels of security in many embedded devices, which seem to be put together with the idea that "it's safe, nobody is looking". In the process of trying to figure out how to extract some information from my Livebox (damn hard!), I noticed that the login process in the new crap firmware was an HTTP POST with this URI: http://192.168.1.1/authenticate?username=admin&password=xxxxxxxxxx I actually spat my drink on the floor when I realised that the box was passing the information around "in the clear". Good God, if a big service provider makes basic mistakes like this, what hope do we have of believing that the majority of IoT devices will be in any way "secure"? I also worry that when IPv6 rolls around, everything will have its own public facing address and at least hiding stuff behind a NAT will get that much more complicated.

I remember the home computer boom in the eighties, following by the office computer boom in the nineties. Are we still chasing the dream of the paperless office, or have we put that to rest?

Finally, you present the interesting idea that so much sleep entitles us to so many decisions, roughly we have a finite amount of thinking ours brains can do at any given time. Well, once upon a time coming home from shopping used to involve the boring bit where you'd take the stuff out of the various bags and boxes and put it into a location that sort of resembles a logical pattern - for instance you wouldn't put sugar under the sink with cleaning fluids and cat kibble into the fridge. You might also dedicate certain parts of the fridge to specific things, so you don't have raw meat and lettuce squashed in beside each other. Now what? The thing that people seem to forget is that if a fridge needs to know what is in it, it needs to be told. How? Barcode scanner? Are you expected to scan in every single thing? What about fresh goods that are given a scan-code that is unique to the shop? What about your shelves? Are you going to be obligated to scan everything? It might be logical to assume that the shop could inform your house, but this is making the assumption that you are always buying things for your own use, you will always take everything home (instead of, say, something to eat on the way or a ready meal to eat at work), you will always shop in the same shop, and also that you want your house (and/or it's occupants) to be aware of every single thing you purchase. Let's just say you are badly constipated and your doctor makes a prescription for this little bottle of stuff you squirt into your backside to get things moving again, and since you have never done it before you buy a bag of adult sized nappies "just in case". Bingo! Your house knows. Your family knows. Your service provider knows. And the advertisers that this information is shared with knows. You might never actually need the nappies, but by damn, everybody knows, just like that Leonard Cohen song. So much for anything even remotely resembling privacy.

On the scale of things, I think actually I would prefer to have my life a little less smart. Sure, it is sometimes difficult to think of meals that I can make given the assortment of stuff in the fridge, and to say I'm any good as a cook is a dangerous exaggeration, however what is the alternative? To become a drooling zombie dependent upon the technology around me? I guess you'd better pass me those nappies lest I forget how to pee if a cute little animation on the toilet doesn't remind me how...

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Apple wins patent on charging iThings THROUGH THIN AIR

heyrick
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will be charged using magnetic resonance from up to a meter away from the source

Whoo, imagine the Ts&Cs on that product, to wiggle around health issues and the huge amounts of interference that it is likely to cause.

I used to have a magnetic resonator that had a range of about a metre. It was a "wand" for degaussing cathode ray tubes...

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Google on Gmail child abuse trawl: We're NOT looking for other crimes

heyrick
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Re: slippery slope or lawsuit magnet?

"Google is legally required to report suspected child abuse" - from my understanding, based upon a hash and the original file then deleted.

While the person in question did turn out to have other material in his possession, surely it should be unlawful to have done any of this if the original content that kicked it all off could not be produced? Otherwise isn't it a bit like "we think you're guilty of something so we'll come up with a reason to shake you down"?

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Windows Registry-infecting malware has no files, survives reboots

heyrick
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Re: "a tool Microsoft uses to hide its source code from being copied"

"It appears that you are asserting that the registry is a good option because file systems are shit at handling small files..."

Nope, that's your assertion. I'm just trying to imagine what would happen to the file system of a regular Windows PC if it had to deal with its configuration as a billion tiny files instead of the big hulking mess that the registry is. Neither option seems satisfactory, but since Windows is extremely limited in what it understands as a file system, the registry is probably the better option there, for now at least. This doesn't mean it is a good option, and great file systems on other platforms are not particularly relevant if they're on other platforms and not where they're needed...

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heyrick
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Re: "a tool Microsoft uses to hide its source code from being copied"

"How is the registry (which looks a lot like a directory tree) more "scalable" than a filesystem ?"

LFAU? I wouldn't appreciate losing gigabytes of storage to handle a few tens of megabytes, maybe a hundred megabytes, of configuration data.

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heyrick
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Re: "a tool Microsoft uses to hide its source code from being copied"

"It doesn't get cleaned up properly unless you use 3rd party tools so it bloats." - my experience is to just let it bloat. Registry tidying tools seem to break a lot more than they fix.

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Ad biz now has one less excuse to sponsor freetards and filth

heyrick
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Re: I DON'T like filth

Dull is good. Dull is how it was before Web 2.0, and it was perfectly fine that way.

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heyrick
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and returns 96 data points every time an ad is served,

Yet more scripting to block? Yet another entity tracing our activities across the web?

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Crumbs! Holiday phish based on genuine hotel booking surfaces

heyrick
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just go to your bank and send a wire transfer to our account below

...and it doesn't seem strange to buy a holiday in Spain and pay to Poland?

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It's official: You can now legally carrier-unlock your mobile in the US

heyrick
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Bizarre...

Over here in France, it is possible to unlock a subsidised phone after about three months. Used to be complicated, but now (Orange & Bouygues, assume SFR is similar) it is just a web form and the code is sent by mail or SMS.

I unlock my phones the moment the period expires so if my mother needs a phone and her one is acting up (it is ancient), I can swap SIMs. As far as Orange is concerned, it is no loss to them. All of my calls are included within my contact, and I'm still tied to my XX month contract, with a pretty hefty penalty payment is I want to quit early.

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What's that? A PHP SPECIFICATION? Surely you're joking, Facebook

heyrick
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Wow.

With an actual spec to pretend to follow, we'll no longer have new improved versions that break things written for older versions in annoyingly subtle ways.

Oh, wait... Since this spec wasn't written by the PHP developers themselves, what relevance (if any) would it really have?

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