Feeds

* Posts by heyrick

2438 posts • joined 20 Dec 2009

Samaritans 'suicide Twitter-sniffer' backfires over privacy concerns

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Twitter Joke

What Cynic_999 said.

If you read a post by somebody, it is up to you to decide whether or not that person is expected to be taken seriously. For example, not so long ago somebody made a threat to blow up an airport. They were angry, it was hyperbole, you could follow the sequence of events and determine that for yourself. Likewise, when I mess up, I put my hand to my head as if it was a gun to blow my brains out. This, again, is sarcasm and not a serious desire to off myself.

The problem, and the possibility to create serious harm, arises when you have a piece of software instructed to pick up on specific "phrases" with no understanding of context. To take these isolated nuggets of information and generate a report to provide to somebody else. That's swinging firmly into creepy-territory, and one wonders if it isn't a form of libel - after all, if I read some of your posts (you, dear reader, you) and decided that you had a probability of being a paedo, and then told other people about it...well, there are laws being broken...

From personal experience, I knew a person who was always going on about how their life sucked and the easy way out was a more and more attractive idea. This person then went and married and started a family. Meanwhile the smiley girl that was always happy and bouncy and talked to everybody about everything...hung herself. It seems to me that the people who say the least about their problems are the ones that need the most attention.

1
0

BIGGEST THREAT to Europe’s cybersecurity? Hint: not hackers

heyrick
Silver badge

But will this be of much use?

It is all very well testing your defences when you know there is a test and everybody is on board. It's likely to be a very different scenario if the real thing should come to pass.

To give you an example from a place I used to work, we had fire drills every so often. They were not announced to the workers but you could get a clue if you spot management standing by the doors with clipboards in hand just beforehand. And the sirens would sound and we'd all trot out. Ho hum.

One time the fire brigade got involved and a "repairman" (actually a fireman out of uniform) did something to make a bang and some smoke. The result? Chaos. It turns out that people behave differently when they think the building is about to blow up. Whoodathunkit?

0
0

PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY

heyrick
Silver badge
Megaphone

Re: Regrets

What is it with Apple? "Wipe it" to make iOS8 work again. Delete and reinstall apps to free up lots of megabytes of "zombie" space. Deleting old sent emails and the bloody mailbox keeps getting larger anyway... (and there's no way to offload any of it onto the PC using iTunes).

This isn't 1995 guys. Must try harder.

2
0

Microsoft has Windows Server running on ARM: report

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Real Windows 9 and servers on a phone?

Funny, I can write stuff using Google Docs on the iPad and sync it via my mobile acting as a hotspot, then pick it up and continue working on the document at home on the PC.

A sync solution and compatible software is what is needed. The underlying OS/tech is less important.

1
1

Reg hacks see the woods or the trees In the Forest of the Night

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: I think the American broadcast was edited...

"You do know that humans have cameras, like fucking everywhere, yeah?" - images of anything we don't understand or believe is explained easily. PhotoShop.

"I sure made a lot of crazy Twitter posts with #overnight-forest-WTF?!' and we'll all just push delete and go about our business?" - insane Tweets? That's hardly a rarity.

"Or ignore the fact that some kid didn't mass-call every phone on the planet? 'Say, did you get a weird phone call from some British kid about not hurting trees?" - clever Greenpeace social advertising.

"Or will people just think it was some crazy Arbor day stunt?" - no idea what Arbor Day is.

"And furthermore, wouldn't extra oxygen just make *everything* burn worse?" - I asked this above.

"Shouldn't it have been the reverse, pumping as much CO2 into the sky as we can?" - we either burn or we suffocate. Nice choices. I'd opt for the fireball. More dramatic.

"because teaching your children to fear something that is actively trying to kill them is entirely appropriate." - interesting you raise this point. You call bull on the idea that we'd simply be unable to forget a global forest, yet we're quite capable of slaughtering each other in the name of ancient mythology. In God's name (other deities applicable) we teach our children to fear anything that is different.

0
0
heyrick
Silver badge
Mushroom

Tree oxygen blanket

So lots of oxygen is supposed to protect us from a massive solar fart? Wouldn't the end result be that depicted by the icon?

2
0

CATACLYSMIC Sun BELCH causes hour-long RADIO BLACKOUT in SPAAACE

heyrick
Silver badge

Ooh eck!

That's a pretty big tear on the surface of the sun, and it somewhat resembles the "cracks in the universe" from the previous series of Dr. Who - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Story_arcs_in_Doctor_Who#Cracks_in_the_universe

2
0

France to draft blacklist banning alleged piracy websites – what could POSSIBLY go wrong?

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Theft/Piracy

"lost their jobs because of piracy" - who would that be? Because piracy works by ripping off the final product, once everybody's work is complete and people have been paid. It may mean fewer royalties for the big name actors and the funding studio, but most of the names scrolling up the screen get paid and that's it for them. You could perhaps argue that piracy may make studios less likely to invest in new projects, though with the price of DVDs these days I wonder if the real losses (and not the inflated "we'll sue for beeeelions" bull) isn't already factored into the pricing. Certainly the main studios are still producing movies, and once in a while (but all too rarely), there is even something worth watching.

0
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Competencies of Hadopi?

Remind me again, what have you managed to actually achieve with that budget? Remind me again why I am paying taxes to fund a government agency to do the copyright holder's enforcement for them? Remind me why spending this sort of money hassling "pirates" is better than, say, providing more textbooks for schools, or libraries with actual books in them (instead of throwing the books away and replacing them with rows of computers)? Remind me why schools are closing out here in the countryside, and it is ever harder to find a doctor or dentist.... oh, I know, lack of money and incentive.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not supporting copyright piracy. Instead I'm pointing out that in the current and woeful economic situation, there are many better things that could be done with that money than this shit.

Oh, and Fleur? Your boss? He's like the most disliked President ever in the history of France. If he keeps this up, we might end up with bloody Sarko back again...

13
1

Revealed: The amazing magical innovation in the iPad Mini 3 – a lick of paint

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Thinness.

"Newsflash - keyboard breaks on my laptop and it's not as easy to service as my desktop."

My netbook's keyboard - three spring loaded clips at the back. Lever it up, rotate keyboard on front edge until vertical, there is a ribbon cable at the back/underneath clipped into an edge connector via a small slot in the netbook's body. Nudge the connector crimp and the ribbon just falls out. Keyboard is now disconnected. Reverse the process to install.

Okay, it is a little harder than swapping a USB plug, but it is not exactly a challenge.

6
1

FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on

heyrick
Silver badge

"The FTDI drivers are only licensed for use on genuine FTDI products."

There is a world of difference between legitimately refusing to work with clone parts (something FTDI has a history of) and intentionally destroying said clone parts.

I put "destroying" in bold above because it is worth asking yourself how many average Windows users are going to even understand what EPROM VID reprogramming means, never mind how to fix it.

Oh, and for industrial process control stuff, the maintenance guys where I work are not geeks. They know how to fix machines, they know how to use software. Anything in between the two is a rip-out-and-replace job. None of them know what JTAG is (yes, I asked), as that level of interaction is not a part of their job. Hence, for them too, if they were using Windows with clone chips, that recent update would have "bricked" their hardware. [thankfully they don't use Windows, it is all PLC devices; otherwise the fallout of losing all of the device comms would cost serious amounts of money per day plus make utter havoc with the production scheduling and order completion]

7
3

Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Pretty nasty

"It's an EEPROM setting that is totally reversible."

I rather suspect that the Windows users that can understand that sentence is likely to be a rather small subset, and the Windows users that can understand it and do something about it, smaller still.

Therefore, while technically reversible, the original statement still holds true. The driver is intentionally bricking people's hardware.

0
0

Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Invitation-only, for now...

Priority inbox? How does this differ from a mailer that highlights messages from people in your address book, coupled with a function that people you reply to are added automatically to your address book? Mail software has been doing that sort of thing for decades.

One of the things that bugs me with GMail is that they have taken the basic email interface, removed half the functionality, and renamed what was left. Instead of mailboxes or folders or something, we have "labels". It's the same thing, only with a confusingly different name.

Why, when I send a message, does my sent message not appear in the thread until some (random?) later time? That bugs me too.

0
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Bloody hell!

36 megabytes for an "inbox"? Entire functional operating systems run to less than that.

37
0

Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data

heyrick
Silver badge

Isn't using a US based cloud provider as your backend already a direct contravention of EU data protection rules because of this and the Patriot Act?

4
0

Computer misuse: Brits could face LIFE IN PRISON for serious hacking offences

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Needed

"Govt figures put the cost to the UK economy at £27bn per year." - and proof of that is where? Remember the "cost" supposedly incurred by the actions of the Scottish bloke (whose name I don't remember).

"That's people's pensions and savings." - the current government is wanting to remove the Winter Fuel Allowance from pensioners living overseas (and some places are colder) saving something in the region of 5m. How much was pissed away on the latest failed IT contract?

"Are those things only worth a metaphorical slap on the wrist?" - when I could find one of these hard done by pensioners and bludgeon them to death with a frozen salmon, and only get a few years with a possibility of early release if I'm "good", then the logical answer can only be Yes.

14
0

MARS NEEDS WOMEN, claims NASA pseudo 'naut: They eat less

heyrick
Silver badge

"but they can’t know what they don’t know"

I don't think gender, size, sexuality, or any other thing really addresses that. If you don't know something, you don't know something. As an individual or as a group.

Unless, perhaps, you are called Donald Rumsfeld.

0
0

Apple flings iOS 8.1 at world+dog: Our AMAZEBALLS 9-step installation guide

heyrick
Silver badge
Meh

Meh.

Slightly better than 8.0 in that it is only asking for 4.9GB instead of 5.3GB. But that's many many times more than iOS7 required and, frankly, not do-able without throwing off a lot of stuff to make space. Space for what? A photo app that can do panoramas (like Android has managed for ages?), a keyboard that can support external keyboard handlers to provide something akin to Swype (ditto Android->ages)? Desirable, yes. Must-haves? Not really. I'm kind of struggling to see much "OMFG-WOW!" benefit to most of the other new features in iOS8. Health kit? <shrugs>

I'll stick with iOS7 for now, thanks.

1
6

Whisper tracks its users. So we tracked down its LA office. This is what happened next

heyrick
Silver badge
Thumb Up

That's how to do it

Maybe round up a couple of friends to be outside their door on shifts. Then they'll never be able to come out.

36
0

Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz

heyrick
Silver badge

Sixty per cent? If there's even a hint of Ebola here at Vulture South, we're all OUTTA HERE!

Maybe what is not being directly mentioned is that your 60% workers are the ones still alive.

The other 40%? They became zombies, thanks to the magical zombie flu that turns people into zombies.

1
0

Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots

heyrick
Silver badge

A joy and a fear

This episode was a joy. Clara finally being able to go back to ass-kicking goodness instead of that slushy love puppy crap. I also enjoy the Reg reviews - a billion year old regenerating time lord in a sixties style police box, no problems. Weird 2D/3D aliens? Nah, we're not buying that...

The thing is, I have a great fear that the underlying storyline with Missy is going to turn out to be a great big misfire. If this is ultimately Clara's goodbye, then we really need to have Clannad-style feels going on, instead it will be some hokey rushed alien-induced soap opera like Rory/Amy and the Angels. A brief "wah!" and it is all but forgotten. Clara deserves better.

On the whole, obvious plot rubbish aside, this was one of the better episodes because Capaldi wasn't being gloomy and pushing the plot in the wrong way, and also because it didn't try to be anything it wasn't. [oh the epicness of a train in space that is really a lab to try to .... mummified soldier? seriously? omfg what a wasted opportunity]

8
1

French 'terror law' declares WAR on the INTERNET itself, say digi-rights folks

heyrick
Silver badge

Definitions needed

Who or what defines "terrorism"? Depending on who you ask, Israeli and American sites should be blocked and their citizens watched. If you're going instead to define terrorism as the Western enemy du jour, that's a somewhat blinkered view (dig around, there are implications that a certain country helped train both Taliban and ISIS).

So, I repeat again, who or what defines terrorism?

4
1

The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Speaking as a fanboi

"Time to don the latex Stephen Fry mask and make like happy."

Oh my. That can be so misinterpreted.

4
0
heyrick
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Sad thing is...

Wow. That was... actually bloody brilliant. I don't think I could stand to watch it twice, it's charm was in the first viewing, like all of the worst bits of Eurovision crammed into a mere seven minutes.

Thanks. I was depressed that it isn't the weekend yet. This cheered me up.

1
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Sad thing is...

Having found U2's album (need to go to settings and Music -> "Show all music" if nothing shows up), I think I'd rather listen to Nickelback. Hell, give me Katy Perry or that dark-haired girl that sang the world's most ridiculed song or... Wheatus... or classical played by primary school children... or... anything. I'd even listen to The Corrs attempting to cover Eminem tracks (actually, that could be amusing).

[PS: Dear Bono - in the 80s you rocked. WTF happened?]

2
0

Bad news, fandroids: He who controls the IPC tool, controls the DROID

heyrick
Silver badge
Megaphone

Check Point advocates multi-layered security as a defence against Binder-based exploits.

They might advocate that.

Me? I'd advocate a complete rethink of the Android infrastructure to understand that it is an operating system and as such requires updates and patches just like all the other operating systems. This to happen as and when necessary. Without the need for carrier intervention because we know sure as hell that such a thing just won't happen. My phone is running Android 2.3.something. That was "old" when I bought the phone new (but Sony took its merry time making ICS available and Orange France totally ignored that). They still seem to be stuck in the mindset of the feature phone where what is shipped is what you get. Couple this with an insistence on having locked bootloaders and an updater that can't handle running on anything under 2GHz (what, to push some data down a USB link?) and only works on Windows anyway, you have so many fail points it isn't even funny.

Since rooting the phone and flashing something third-party is outside of the skill set of most users, Android needs to be capable of self-patching.

11
0

Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods

heyrick
Silver badge

FOAD, please. Thank you..

A person whole data has been pilfered should be informed. No exceptions. The encryption angle can be used to explain why this isn't a crisis.

I can only imagine companies have lobbied hard for the "it isn't our fault we have shit security" defence.

I notice the actual form of encryption is unspecified. Let's talk about...WEP. How about WPS? Or maybe we should consider unsalted hashes. Or, the best argument last, you'd have thought a big spook organisation like the NSA would keep all their secrets with the best protection money can buy. Look how well that turned out.

5
0

EE TV brings French broadband price war to the UK

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Atrocious copy

"Orange's DSL boxes are also woeful."

The Livebox (2, square one with cut off corner) is underpowered. I bought a spare one with the original firmware, it makes a reasonable DNLA streamer (so I can watch stuff on the tablet). It was intended to be a spare in case the rented Livebox had problems, but I'm too scared to connect it to the phone line as it will upgrade to the current firmware. You want woeful? Talk to me about a box that can no longer quite handle streaming 480P at high bitrate, or 720P at any bitrate (it used to). Talk to me about a box with a fancy web front end that isn't capable of correctly telling me what is connected. Orange tell me that resetting the configuration will cure this but I have not done this as I have several devices on a DHCP with fixed IP addresses, and guess what, that part of the settings doesn't work either.

Thanks Orange, but I didn't sign up to be an unpaid beta tester. I really wish there was a "notify, don't install" option on firmware updates.

0
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Price war in France?

Standard Orange internet+tel+mobile (unbundled) is €60/month for what I have. I guess when you have prices like that, it is easy to have a price war. Might be time to investigate Sosh (which is Orange's cheaper incarnation).

2
0

Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express

heyrick
Silver badge

And this got downvotes? Maybe we should just dress Clara in a pinafore and blow up stuff while the Doctor makes random pronouncements that turn out to be correct? <sigh>

[need a "Huh?" icon]

0
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Assistants

"A Donna-like character would have had a field day arguing with the Doctor over them." - but are the current scriptwriters capable of writing that sort of dialogue? Remember, this series began with what might be the most cringeworthy phone call in recent TV history.

3
2
heyrick
Silver badge

...

I'm wondering, are the stories bad or is Capaldi just not suited to the role? He does a great job of "sarcastic slightly-bonkers irritated bloke", but... look back at previous Doctors. Isn't this going, well, wrong?

As for Clara. Oh my God. She was so great as The Impossible Girl. But now, she's just so....<searches for adjective; can't find one: Abort, Retry, Ignore?>

13
2

Greedy datagrabs, crap security will KILL the Internet of Thingies

heyrick
Silver badge

Sorry, no.

I'm not enticed by fridges that can tell me if I'm getting fat; I'm not enticed by devices that devices that connect to some external service for rating my greenness or dietary status; I'm not enticed by devices that exchange credits and coupons with external devices; and I'm not enticed by the ability to control the heating, shutters, and lights from my phone.

Here's what I see: a fridge that will nag and probably won't have the firmware capable of coping with multiple people with different tastes and/or dietary restrictions/allergies, meaning ultimately you will be expected to conform to the fridge, not the logical other way around; make it sound as awesome as you like, the truth is that such sites would not exist if devices didn't regurgitate large amounts of data to them, it's none of their damn business if I make a hot chocolate at 3am; more data spewage built into the design; and the last one - yes, great idea, the closest a domestic house would get the "mission critical" able to accept commands from the outside world, what could possibly go wrong?

It might be nice to tweak the heating from my chair, get the TV to switch itself on when a programme I want to see begins, programme the washer to do its thing at midnight from a browser interface, and see if the lasagne is cooked yet by pinging the microwave. But this is all from my desk to other parts of the house. Anything outside of that scope is not a risk worth taking.

9
0

Kmart apologizes to customers after month-long security breach

heyrick
Silver badge

state customers do not have liability for unauthorised charges

Ah, but there in the warm promise is the ugly truth. Define "unauthorised". If a transaction was made using your credentials, then that was surely you unless you have a cast iron defence, like not being able to access cash machines on two continents five minutes apart...

0
2

I've got a new Linux box, how does it work... WOAH, only asking :-/

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: It's gotten better.

"So it fixed itself, then? Excellent!"

Too far beyond the realms of possibility that I have more than one computer?

1
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Re: It's gotten better.

"Same type of problem in Windows (Yes Windows goes tits up too) means a reinstall. You can repair Linux problems far easier then you can the equivalent Windows problem."

Nope. Seen that problem on numerous XP boxes in years gone by. Pop Hirren's BootCD into the caddy, start the computer on that. Load up the DOS-with-NTFS and run chkdsk (it's all on the CD distro). Problem is sorted in about five minutes. Dunno why the hell Windows couldn't do that for itself instead of blue-screening. Maybe later versions can?

I gave Ubuntu 9 (10? the brown/orange one) a whirl a few years ago, but it steadfastly refused to acknowledge my printer/scanner existed. I found a document on the web explaining how to resolve this. It ran to nearly twelve pages (printed from the browser) and half of that was command-line gibberish that made no sense to me (so yay for the chance to mistype something). I went back to Windows... I'm not really bothered what OS I use, so long as it does what I want it to do without starting an argument first.

5
7

Take CTRL! Shallow minds ponder the DEEP spectre of DARK CACHE

heyrick
Silver badge

If in doubt, right-click.

In a certain operating system that grew up with the knowledge of three mouse buttons, you will find the context menus hanging off the middle mouse button as the right button does useful actions related to the left button (so you don't need to bugger around with the keyboard to do simple actions like "unselect several of a selected group").

Just sayin'.

9
1

Be Your Own Big Brother: Peeking at pussy

heyrick
Silver badge

I hope the automatic feeder has a slow lid

We had a little IR beam feeder that detected the presence of the cat. Whoosh, up went the lid. Cat wasn't amused but saw the food. The fail was the cat, parked to eat, was not a moving object so the feeder tried to close the lid. Whoosh, smack. Slammed down with cat head in the way. Cat wasn't hurt, but never went near the feeder again.

2
0

Jonny Ive: Flattered by rivals' designs? Nah, its 'theft'

heyrick
Silver badge

Copying or improving?

I wonder which came first - the god-awful plain white-is-good layout of YouTube, or iOS7's white-is-good plainness?

Isn't the function partially dictated by the available technology? For example, while feature phones from way back could run Java applets, a true smartphone needed sufficient processing and memory available to make it functional, plus a touch based interface so we aren't saddled with trying to do stuff using a phone keypad (remember "T9" predictive text?). Plus, of course, displays with resolutions akin to early laptops (and better) because 128x128 is about suitable for WAP and not much else.

Please, for the love of God, Apple, copy Android and make your keyboard display lower case when not in caps. Or, as this might be too shocking for iFans, make it an option.

Actually, iOS is really crying out for a skinnable interface (OMFG - user options! nooo!). Bright light hurts my eyes so I prefer to work in a low-light environment. I would like the keyboard to be black/grey like it is when you go to search, but most of the time everything is WHITE. Thankfully there is, at least, a workaround, you can set a treble-press of the home button to invert the display.

Thing is, very few things are complete innovations. Most things are improvements on what has come before. Now Ives might see Samsung as ripping off iThingies, but maybe they see it as improving upon them? What is Apple going to do to raise the bar? And the bar needs to be raised, as resting on laurels has killed companies in the past. You're the market leader only until somebody builds a better mousetrap, then it is up to you to one-up that. That's how it works.

16
2

Software gurus: Only developers can defeat mass surveillance

heyrick
Silver badge

Money talks and....

User privacy vs embedded adverts. We know which will win.

Safe for children vs in-app purchases. We know which will win.

1
0

Hey, non-US websites – FBI don't have to show you any stinkin' warrant

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: So the FBI's position is that it is legal for governments to hack US servers?

"generally apply to those under US jurisdiction - citizens anywhere and legal US residents in the US."

Are you sure about that? While consular protections can be offered to Americans in other countries, for the duration of the stay those people must abide by the laws of the host country, not America.

Example? The right to bear arms. One wouldn't get far walking around carrying a gun.

2
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Re: If you aren't human you don't get human rights

Corporations are people. People are not people. Err, something like that.

5
0
heyrick
Silver badge
FAIL

Bollocks about "we can examine servers anywhere", bollocks about the standard admin console (like, gee, we haven't seen that before have we? are we all satellites of Silk Road?), bollocks, bollocks, and more bollocks.

Frankly, the icon just doesn't do it justice.

26
0

Sir Tim Berners-Lee defends decision not to bake security into www

heyrick
Silver badge

Baked-in security would have been bad

I have a little internet box from around turn-of-the-millennium. It supports 40 bit SSL. Only.

What came before? Nothing - it was a day when various governments freaked out over private citizens being able to encrypt stuff and they called such software "munitions".

Any secure protocol from back then would perhaps have had to work well on late-Z80, early x86 machines. An algorithm that runs fast enough not to be an impediment on an dual-digit MHz box would likely be something that a modern CPU+GPU combo can crack near realtime. (HTTP 0.9 dates from 1991, the then-current x86 chip was the i486DX clocking 25, 33, or 50MHz)

Look at WiFi. WEP? Compromised (easily). WPA/TKIP? Compromised. WPS? So laughably piss-poor that I wonder how it ever got accepted. WPA2/AES is our current "secure", but I wonder for how long that would remain true.

2
0

Adobe spies on readers: 'EVERY page you turn, EVERY book you own' leaked back to base

heyrick
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Legal Blackhole

"I'm not a lawyer but the terms and conditions paragraph provides plenty of wriggle room."

I seriously doubt that.

You could argue that the page turning is for reader use profiling, and you could argue that recording books read is for device use profiling. But this part - "but was also scanning the host computer for all ebooks and sending back information on those as well" - if substantiated, kicks it straight into deliberate unlawful activity.

And no, it doesn't matter what you put in the terms and conditions, those do not override the law. For example, I could provide you with some of my software which carries a term written in tiny print down at the end where nobody bothers to read giving myself rights over your daughter (if you have one). That is simply neither enforceable nor moral if she is adult, and if she is a child...let's not even go there. Just because it is written doesn't automatically mean they have the right.

0
0

Revealed: Malware that forces weak ATMs to spit out 'ALL THE CASH'

heyrick
Silver badge

Facepalm?

I agree with previous posts - sensitive machines handling transactions of this nature need to have the firmware burned into ROM with no USB or CD or otherwise interfaces and a system that can be compromised so easily.

0
0

Windows 10's 'built-in keylogger'? Ha ha, says Microsoft – no, it just monitors your typing

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Key Strikes Yes - Letters NO

"but I do not see the need to store or collect the individual letter keys."

Didn't it say it was for autocomplete?

As for passwords, this might depend upon what level of the UI is involved in the data collection, and how much access the OS has to parts of the UI - specifically if the input is being directed to an icon that is masking what is being typed, as much password icons do.

3
0

Doctor Who becomes an illogical, unscientific, silly soap opera in Kill The Moon

heyrick
Silver badge

Re: Weird

Oh such political correctness... It was the line that I found funny, not the implied threat of violence (which is poor considering tidal waves probably killed millions and the characters got within a fraction of a second of nuking a huge monster in the moon, and several characters were killed onscreen by giant germs).

Would it be funny if it was male to male? Yes.

Would it be funny if it was male to female? I would like to hope that a female doctor would have handled the situation ENTIRELY differently. I rather suspect the previous dozen Doctors would be spinning in their graves, if they had them, at how this went down.

2
0
heyrick
Silver badge

Weird

Previous Doctors liked humans, thought they were special and worth looking after. This Doctor seems to have some disdain for them, as if saving humanity from things they don't know about is a boring chore, like taking out the rubbish on a Thursday evening. Clara was The Impossible Girl who turns up in all sorts of places and ways and now the has been demoted to tag-along teacher.

Best bit of the episode: Tell me, or I'll smack you so hard you'll regenerate.

Worst bit of the episode: pretty much everything else.

6
0

UK reforms on private copying and parody come into force

heyrick
Silver badge

I had a video recording (made by a mobile) containing a few seconds of a movie playing on a RaspberryPi, without audio. It was "Rejected" and I didn't see any "Argue about Fair Use" link. So I don't really expect YouTube will change, either.

On the other hand, to correctly identify the clip from an off-centre and mosaic-y (screen focus issues) clip was rather impressive, though I wonder how many false positives it might trigger?

1
0