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* Posts by heyrick

2465 posts • joined 20 Dec 2009

Musicians sue UK.gov over 'zero pay' copyright fix

heyrick
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"Perhaps IPO officials, keen to “stick it to the man”, were hoping people will blame the music industry rather than their own mean-spirited interpretation of European copyright law."

What evidence is there that the IPO officials were "keen to 'stick it to the man'"? The music industry would like us to buy the same thing numerous times in different formats which is as ridiculous today (CD->MP3) as it was when I was young (LP->tape). If you buy a copy for yourself, why should you pay per playback device? Could making a copy for your own use not be considered fair use?

I live in a country where blank media has a built-in levy. Oddly enough, most of the blank media I buy is for backups and such of my data, source codes, blah blah, but mostly my own video recordings (which, encoded 'live' are a lot larger in size than a codec that has the luxury of running at 10fps). Most of my MP3s live on a USB harddisc with a copy on an SD card and a DVD-R. That's one active copy and two backups, which might represent a decimal point in the blank media that I have bought. I'm not complaining, I'm just pointing out that a media levy is not necessarily the logical solution.

Finally, consider downloaded music. You have to put those somewhere, so you may end up in the interesting situation of buying a media (SD card, harddisc, etc) with a built-in levy applied, in order to use to store music that you have lawfully purchased. Not a copy for your convenience, the original copy.

Essentially - it seems that "the man" is complaining to be recompensed for his ability to sell the same thing multiple times; something that never should have been required in the first place.

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Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU

heyrick
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Re: Oh wah.

Come visit the place I work sometime...

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heyrick
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Oh wah.

That looks like the standard posture of assembly line workers...

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Right to be forgotten should apply to Google.com too: EU

heyrick
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Wait, what?

So if there was something on my website that somebody objected to and requested it to be "forgotten", this can take place and the person hosting the material is no longer to be informed?

I can understand this is perhaps to stop the website owner from changing the link or bringing it to everybody's attention; but the flip side of the coin is that without any sensible form of due process (person makes a request, search engine evaluates and decides (or something like that)), it would make it piss-easy to fire off requests to silence legitimate criticism and concerns.

It's nice to see the morons making these decisions have no grasp on how "that there internet thingy" actually works. There's no reason to approach Google at all (other than that they are big, American, slightly evil), if the problem is dealt with at source (the offending web page) then the Google problem takes care of itself. No page, nothing to index.

But, gee, that's all complicated and involves lawyers and stuff. It's much easier to fill out an online form and click a button, right?

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Yes, UK. Johnny Foreigner has better mobe services than you

heyrick
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I have good coverage in France, can get 3G in the middle of nowhere...

...but for my internet/phone/mobile combo, I pay €60/month. You do the maths...

[there are cheaper options, Sosh vs Orange; Free, etc etc]

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Two driverless cars stuffed with passengers are ABOUT TO CRASH - who should take the hit?

heyrick
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Interesting example, the motorbike one

As it implies that the motorbike (however bizarre the concept of a driverless bike is) is aware that it's rider is not wearing a helmet. Both science AND ethics ought to say that the motorbike never should have started its journey in that condition...

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Countdown contestant pays homage to IT Crowd's Moss

heyrick
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Re: "Not available in your country. Sorry."

"Did you notice the ".co.uk" in your address bar?"

What, as in TheRegister.co.uk? (accessible everywhere) As in my own site, a .co.uk? (can be accessed anywhere) As in Amazon.co.uk? (can be used to order stuff to a French address)

Just because something says .co.uk doesn't automatically imply "Britain Only".

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Bang! You're dead. Who gets your email, iTunes and Facebook?

heyrick
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Already done this.

A little notebook with passwords and brief instructions of how to delete content and whether or not deletion of the account is feasible. I don't have anything worth preserving that isn't also kept on USB harddisc backups, so there's no point wasting time recovering stuff.

As for the Ts&Cs and whether or not they permit this sort of thing...the agreement was with me. I'll be dead. Good luck suing a corpse.

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Blackpool hotel 'fines' couple £100 for crap TripAdvisor review

heyrick
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Re: Free Speech has not been censored

I believe the correct phrase is "chilling effect". Go look it up.

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Are MPs smarter than 5-year-olds? We'll soon find out at coding school – Berners-Lee

heyrick
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they have got to understand how powerful a weapon it is

Jesus - absolutely do NOT give them ideas!

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VXers Shellshocking embedded BusyBox boxen

heyrick
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Re: Bash + Busybox

@ Flocke: How does one tell easily if the command processor is bash?

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Japanese boffins build rounders-playing ROBOT SCHOOLGIRL

heyrick
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Happy

Impressive stuff (I liked it being able to hit the ball into a basket), but that only resembles a schoolgirl in the sense of the Terminator's post-apocalyptic nightmare world. Still, put these mechanics into the DER2 Actroid (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3tcSlWLS_g) and then we'll be getting somewhere interesting!

Edit: this as well - http://youtu.be/V7TKBFJMbi0

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Jony Ive: Apple isn't here to make money. And students shouldn't use computers so much

heyrick
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Bad design offends him?

Then why don't you fix your own products? I live in the country (so no passing iPhone is going to scan my AP), my iPad is WiFi only. So why over successive versions of iOS is Location Services fundamentally broken? I cannot instruct iOS as to my location, the WiFi AP is not "known", and several discussions with so-called support failed to come up with any sort of resolution. It seems impossible for me (or Apple support staff) to associate an AP with a location. It needs an iOS device with GPS.

There are other flaws, but that is the one that really bugs me. Bad design, pure and simple.

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'Yes, yes... YES!' Philae lands on COMET 67P

heyrick
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?

"The ESA has succeeded in humanity’s first ever attempt to land a man-made probe on a comet"

...so what was Hayabusa?

(took off a decade ago, landed on a remote lump of rock, got lost in space, found, and managed to bring back a sample which arrived in 2010)

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What kind of generation doesn't stick it to the Man, but to Taylor Swift instead?

heyrick
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Re: If you want to make a million from playing music...

That's it, isn't it? Perform to people. Meet those people. Sell them your CDs (directly). List your music on places like Amazon for others to find (and existing fans to keep up to date if you aren't playing near them). And play. Lots. Being a musician is a job. A career even. For every sold out venue (and I'm not talking stadium size), there's a massive amount of work that has gone to make it possible.

Personally, I think the X-Factor/PopIdol way makes a mess of things. Sure, it might "discover" some talent, but it is a discovery made by the industrial treadmill. Some artists carve out a niche for themselves, others? Long forgotten.

So, basically, what Vinyl-Junkie says.

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heyrick
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I asked the audience if they really wanted to live in a country that does this to its fellow citizens to benefit a few very wealthy corporations.

Isn't that pretty much how a capitalist country rolls?

Why not remove all of the DoJ stuff and ask about the rich and the people with money (and the job-for-life public service employees) if they feel right about having to pay for those who are poor and don't have money (re. ObamaCare). It is a rather different set of responses, to the point where I strongly believe that if a Republican wins the next election (as they are likely to do), one of the first changes will be to get rid of ObamaCare. Do you really want to live in a country that does this to its fellow poorer citizens to benefit the wealthier ones?

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Are open Wi-Fi network bods liable for users' copyright badness?

heyrick
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Mushroom

Please don't fuck this up

At the moment, the only safe public WiFi that I can use is in McDonalds (here in France). It is reasonably unrestricted, enough that I can connect up and then set a VPN connection running so my comms will be encrypted even over a public AP. Useful for stuff using older send-password-in-the-clear protocols like POP3.

The alternative? Go to a KFC. Not only is their WiFi AP so locked down that only the common protocols work , any attempt to visit an SSL site throws an error on my iPad because KFC are trying to pass off a fake certificate. Always the same one, no matter what https address I go to. It is an active, deliberate, MITM which completely undermines any end-user security whatsoever. Essentially my communications would go to KFC's box, be decrypted, then re-encrypted for the journey out. But what happens in the middle? Oh, sure, they'll probably give some spin about piracy and paedos, while glossing over the part where they would have full access to all data passing. Online banking? Cheers, thanks for your full login details. Checking your Amazon or eBay sales? Thanks for the username and password.[1]

I fear that if public providers are made to be liable for what passes through their network (as dumb as this is, refer to the hyperbole examples above), then we will see less openness, less willingness to permit VPN and the like, and more attempts to pass off fake certificates. One must already assume that any communication on a public AP is available to be read by anybody else in the room; therefore if opportunities to privacy are removed in order to satisfy liability, it will make public APs less and less useful, possibly to the point where they aren't useful at all.[1]

1 - while at KFC, I switch on my Bouygues phone. They permit tethering on a pay-as-you-go card, so I go online via Bouygues. Can't VPN, but at least my mail password is not available to everybody in the room and SSL is not messed with.

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Does Father Christmas expect a happy ending with Clara in Doctor Who?

heyrick
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Here's betting...

...that in an attempt to create a workable episode of Dr. Who, Moffat and Co. will destroy Santa for millions of children.

"Santa, which everybody knows is an anagram of Satan, is really a Dalek encased in a Cyberman body, with glue-on facial hair and oversized red clothing. Etc. Etc. The huggy-feely-cryy Doctor is rendered useless by its very presence. Well, then, it's lucky we have Strax, who doesn't give a toss about fairy tales but would rather just blow something up. BANG! Bits of red cloth fall through the sky (and, look, it isn't Total Eclipse Of The Heart), it is SatanSanta, now very dead. Merry Christmas you little bastards, now do what your parents tell you and shut it."

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Doctor Who trashing the TARDIS, Clara alone, useless UNIT – Death in Heaven

heyrick
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Re: Clara as The Doctor...

"If you don't like it, don't watch it then." - I watch in the hope that it will surprise me and come up with some stories akin to the Dr Who of my childhood instead of this touchy-feely-timey-wimey rubbish. There are some good moments, enough to keep me from entirely walking away, but ... for goodness sake, just pick an angle for the Doctor and go with it, don't keep yoyoing around. Here's a hint. Watch him-with-the-boggle-eyes-and-the-scarf or him-with-the-poncey-cricket-outfit. The stories were kinda cheesy, the effects hammy, and a certain charming innocence (Romana in Paris, anyone?) but above all the stories were (usually) watchable. They made sense. They could exist with a zany half-sci-fi and half comedy blend but didn't depend upon big friendly reset buttons or retconning entire swathes of backstory for this week's plot development...

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heyrick
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Clara as The Doctor...

I was like "OH HELL YES!", but - oh - what a let-down. Oh well.

As for the episode, bizarre. The best character (Osgood) is cruelly slaughtered, the plot is about as insane as Missy, and there are some Big Speeches and Special Moments shoehorned in, as if this is supposed to be some sort of emotional rollercoaster, but... I'm wondering if the payoff was really there. I mean, the ending. As said, Clara is broken, the Doctor is broken, Danny is dead, and Earthlings have to recover from the dead rising in cyberman form. It's no surprise that the Tardis can vanish from a city centre and nobody notices. All of humanity is broken. Great going, Moffat.

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If you're suing the UK govt, Brit spies will snoop on your briefs

heyrick
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Re: It is not despicable - it is Soviet Standard

" From there on the only right we the plebs have remaining is the right to shut up. "

I thought they took that one away from us too.

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Hide your Macs, iPhones and iPads: WireLurker nasty 'heralds new era'

heyrick
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Re: Ah but......

" Its one reason they are happy with the walled garden, its totally safe from the worlds nasties....." - if you read the article, it isn't an iOS virus. It is a Trojan in apps for OSX (a big Mac) that then compromises the big computer to look for tablets and such being connected, and they in turn are compromised by abusing, I presume, the update protocols. Clever stuff, but totally bypasses iOS, the walled garden, everything.

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Not even 60,000 of you want an ethically-sourced smartphone

heyrick
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It might be created ethically, but it still runs Android

So doesn't that sort of defeat the purpose?

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Pop starlet Taylor Swift DUMPS Spotify: It’s not me, it’s you

heyrick
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Ethical business?

Look for some more obscure stuff, you'll quickly find that Amazon has a different selection of MP3s in each country's store. Oh, but wait, this isn't like buying a CD. This stuff is "licenced", so places where you aren't? They don't wanna know.

Take my goddamn money and give me my goddamn MP3. Until that can happen without "country" or "region" crap, talk of ethics is worthless. I get to pick what supermarket I buy things from, why should this be any different?

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France KICKS UK into THIRD PLACE for public Wi-Fi hotspots

heyrick
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WiFi in France

From my experience - if you want open and useful public WiFi, find a McDonald's or a Buffalo Grill. The ones I have visited offer open WiFi that will let you connect simply by clicking the "I accept the terms" button and they'll (usually, not always) permit VPN.

Avoid KFC. Any attempt to access an https site will throw weird certificates at you. I'm sure there's a canned excuse there, but basically it is a MITM that utterly compromises any semblance of security. VPN is blocked, as is, well, pretty much everything.

More or less ALL Liveboxes of the v2 or later have the ability to act as a hotspot. The basis of how this works is that in order to have the right to connect to hotspots, you must provide a hotspot yourself. As a subscriber, you can sign in (provided you, yourself, provide a hotspot). Other networks? I think the hassles with the credits and such are so that if you email whitehouse.gov with a death threat to Obama, the telco can say "yeah, it was him wot did it", although given his approval ratings, maybe the Democrats would actually want somebody to conveniently deal with the issue. ;-) From some brief tests, the public AP provides a completely different IP address. It appears to be segregated from the home AP traffic (though, both use the same frequency). I have not conducted any tests on speed and quality of service. Orange assure me that public AP use won't impact my internet use, which I find hard to believe given that it is a 2mbit line, so anything over maybe 20-30K/sec when I'm downloading will be noticed. I have no problem with providing a public AP. I can barely receive WiFi in the next room because of the metre-plus-wide (!) stone walls, and the neighbours are, like, a mile away. The road is private and comes here only. So, hey, it's an access point for the bunnies and owls.

That said, my Livebox runs at 2mbit down, about 700kbit up. If I walk outside and stand in the middle of a muddy field and wait for my phone to sync to 3G+, the result on SpeedTest is approx. 2.5mbit both ways. Well, maybe only one way at a time, but it can outpace the wired network however you look at it. EDGE, on the other hand, is supposed to run at an exciting 17K/sec (ish), but I don't know if my phone is crappy or if Orange is crappy, because when my phone reverts to EDGE, it frequently can't handle any sort of transmission unless I can practically see the mobile tower (and by then it will have kicked up to 3G+). Go figure.

Anyway, this "you must be a public AP to have the right to use public APs" coupled with slipping this into a firmware update a year or two back and switching it on by default....this might explain why there are so many access points. I've seen Free and Neuf boxes offering logins to their subscribers upon connecting to them, so perhaps those companies do the same sort of thing?

Just looked at the login page for my public AP - you can buy a WiFi pass if you are a non-subscriber, and this might be useful to some - BT Openzone customers can now use French Orange public APs - you need your Openzone username and password (same as in the UK). I've dropped a screenshot here (imgur).

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Samaritans 'suicide Twitter-sniffer' BACKFIRES over privacy concerns

heyrick
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FAIL

Re: @Martin-73 -- With all due respect

@ Someone Else: Your downvotes may be because...

"Who the bloody fuck are the Samaratans?" - would have been quicker to Google than to type that.

"Well lah-dee-fuckin-dah! A bunch of fucking busybodies," - and now you're making judgements without even knowing anything about the organisation. <slow clap>

"probably driven by some charismatic fundamentalist "leader"" - your lack of knowledge here is actually painful.

"'cuz their website is blocked here" - what are you, at some weirdo American school that censors anything that might be controversial such as the word "suicide"? Go look up the words to the theme song of M*A*S*H, if you can, that is.

"But it is pointedly not the business of some self-appointed group of goody-two-shoes" - it is a charity with trained volunteers. Perhaps something of an indictment of our times, that they may be the only people that somebody with issues can turn to. Thanks to the Internet, trolls, and the way daily life works, it can be hard to find somebody to open up to. If you have a mental health issue (or think you might), the last thing many people would want is to talk to family, friends, or coworkers. If you are feeling suicidal, you never ever mention it on the internet or you'd get a chorus of "hurry up and kill yourself you sad bastard" messages. So who does a person talk to, huh?

""Samaratans"? Really?!? How pompously self-serving!" - actually, the name was coined by a newspaper reporting on the, then unnamed, organisation. This was back in the '50s.

"to intervene unasked and unannounced into what is clearly a very private and personal issue" - it certainly is private and personal, and too many people take it to their graves. When you get depressed, it is all to easy to believe that telling anybody will just make things worse, and in many situations, they're right. We're all bastards. But if somebody somewhere makes an effort, maybe the affected person will realise that, yeah, life can be shitty, but it's something they are far from alone in experiencing. So if the right person intervenes, even unannounced, it could be a better outcome than eternal silence.

"And more importantly, it is not their business to cut a wide swath through the Twittersphere" - true, this was a bit misguided. Not to mention the potential numbers of false positives. Moreso given that this news has broken so I reckon some trolls will be out to game the app.

"My business is not your business until/unless I say it is. Kindly keep that straight." - err, yeah, your business kind of is my business if you blab it all over Twitter and I'm reading. If you have those sorts of ideas regarding privacy, social media isn't for you...

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heyrick
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Re: Twitter Joke

What Cynic_999 said.

If you read a post by somebody, it is up to you to decide whether or not that person is expected to be taken seriously. For example, not so long ago somebody made a threat to blow up an airport. They were angry, it was hyperbole, you could follow the sequence of events and determine that for yourself. Likewise, when I mess up, I put my hand to my head as if it was a gun to blow my brains out. This, again, is sarcasm and not a serious desire to off myself.

The problem, and the possibility to create serious harm, arises when you have a piece of software instructed to pick up on specific "phrases" with no understanding of context. To take these isolated nuggets of information and generate a report to provide to somebody else. That's swinging firmly into creepy-territory, and one wonders if it isn't a form of libel - after all, if I read some of your posts (you, dear reader, you) and decided that you had a probability of being a paedo, and then told other people about it...well, there are laws being broken...

From personal experience, I knew a person who was always going on about how their life sucked and the easy way out was a more and more attractive idea. This person then went and married and started a family. Meanwhile the smiley girl that was always happy and bouncy and talked to everybody about everything...hung herself. It seems to me that the people who say the least about their problems are the ones that need the most attention.

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Virgin Galactic vows to continue space program after 'serious anomaly'

heyrick
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Alternative propulsion?

Ever since we have been going "up", we have done so by attaching a craft of some sort to a bloody great rocket. What rockets are and what they do mean that they are significantly less reliable than, say, aircraft engines. Just the other day (after the other rocket failure), people there were trying to downplay the problem by suggesting that a one in twenty failure rate was not unexpected. As we have seen in both cases this week, when they fail they fail dramatically.

This makes me wonder - are there any up and coming forms of propulsion that are likely to be powerful enough to defeat gravity, that don't depend upon an atmosphere, and aren't an attempt to control an explosion?

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BIGGEST THREAT to Europe’s cybersecurity? Hint: not hackers

heyrick
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But will this be of much use?

It is all very well testing your defences when you know there is a test and everybody is on board. It's likely to be a very different scenario if the real thing should come to pass.

To give you an example from a place I used to work, we had fire drills every so often. They were not announced to the workers but you could get a clue if you spot management standing by the doors with clipboards in hand just beforehand. And the sirens would sound and we'd all trot out. Ho hum.

One time the fire brigade got involved and a "repairman" (actually a fireman out of uniform) did something to make a bang and some smoke. The result? Chaos. It turns out that people behave differently when they think the building is about to blow up. Whoodathunkit?

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PEAK APPLE: iOS 8 is least popular Cupertino mobile OS in all of HUMAN HISTORY

heyrick
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Megaphone

Re: Regrets

What is it with Apple? "Wipe it" to make iOS8 work again. Delete and reinstall apps to free up lots of megabytes of "zombie" space. Deleting old sent emails and the bloody mailbox keeps getting larger anyway... (and there's no way to offload any of it onto the PC using iTunes).

This isn't 1995 guys. Must try harder.

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Microsoft has Windows Server running on ARM: report

heyrick
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Re: Real Windows 9 and servers on a phone?

Funny, I can write stuff using Google Docs on the iPad and sync it via my mobile acting as a hotspot, then pick it up and continue working on the document at home on the PC.

A sync solution and compatible software is what is needed. The underlying OS/tech is less important.

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Reg hacks see the woods or the trees In the Forest of the Night

heyrick
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Re: I think the American broadcast was edited...

"You do know that humans have cameras, like fucking everywhere, yeah?" - images of anything we don't understand or believe is explained easily. PhotoShop.

"I sure made a lot of crazy Twitter posts with #overnight-forest-WTF?!' and we'll all just push delete and go about our business?" - insane Tweets? That's hardly a rarity.

"Or ignore the fact that some kid didn't mass-call every phone on the planet? 'Say, did you get a weird phone call from some British kid about not hurting trees?" - clever Greenpeace social advertising.

"Or will people just think it was some crazy Arbor day stunt?" - no idea what Arbor Day is.

"And furthermore, wouldn't extra oxygen just make *everything* burn worse?" - I asked this above.

"Shouldn't it have been the reverse, pumping as much CO2 into the sky as we can?" - we either burn or we suffocate. Nice choices. I'd opt for the fireball. More dramatic.

"because teaching your children to fear something that is actively trying to kill them is entirely appropriate." - interesting you raise this point. You call bull on the idea that we'd simply be unable to forget a global forest, yet we're quite capable of slaughtering each other in the name of ancient mythology. In God's name (other deities applicable) we teach our children to fear anything that is different.

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heyrick
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Mushroom

Tree oxygen blanket

So lots of oxygen is supposed to protect us from a massive solar fart? Wouldn't the end result be that depicted by the icon?

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CATACLYSMIC Sun BELCH causes hour-long RADIO BLACKOUT in SPAAACE

heyrick
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Ooh eck!

That's a pretty big tear on the surface of the sun, and it somewhat resembles the "cracks in the universe" from the previous series of Dr. Who - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Story_arcs_in_Doctor_Who#Cracks_in_the_universe

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France to draft blacklist banning alleged piracy websites – what could POSSIBLY go wrong?

heyrick
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Re: Theft/Piracy

"lost their jobs because of piracy" - who would that be? Because piracy works by ripping off the final product, once everybody's work is complete and people have been paid. It may mean fewer royalties for the big name actors and the funding studio, but most of the names scrolling up the screen get paid and that's it for them. You could perhaps argue that piracy may make studios less likely to invest in new projects, though with the price of DVDs these days I wonder if the real losses (and not the inflated "we'll sue for beeeelions" bull) isn't already factored into the pricing. Certainly the main studios are still producing movies, and once in a while (but all too rarely), there is even something worth watching.

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heyrick
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Competencies of Hadopi?

Remind me again, what have you managed to actually achieve with that budget? Remind me again why I am paying taxes to fund a government agency to do the copyright holder's enforcement for them? Remind me why spending this sort of money hassling "pirates" is better than, say, providing more textbooks for schools, or libraries with actual books in them (instead of throwing the books away and replacing them with rows of computers)? Remind me why schools are closing out here in the countryside, and it is ever harder to find a doctor or dentist.... oh, I know, lack of money and incentive.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not supporting copyright piracy. Instead I'm pointing out that in the current and woeful economic situation, there are many better things that could be done with that money than this shit.

Oh, and Fleur? Your boss? He's like the most disliked President ever in the history of France. If he keeps this up, we might end up with bloody Sarko back again...

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Revealed: The amazing magical innovation in the iPad Mini 3 – a lick of paint

heyrick
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Re: Thinness.

"Newsflash - keyboard breaks on my laptop and it's not as easy to service as my desktop."

My netbook's keyboard - three spring loaded clips at the back. Lever it up, rotate keyboard on front edge until vertical, there is a ribbon cable at the back/underneath clipped into an edge connector via a small slot in the netbook's body. Nudge the connector crimp and the ribbon just falls out. Keyboard is now disconnected. Reverse the process to install.

Okay, it is a little harder than swapping a USB plug, but it is not exactly a challenge.

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FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on

heyrick
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"The FTDI drivers are only licensed for use on genuine FTDI products."

There is a world of difference between legitimately refusing to work with clone parts (something FTDI has a history of) and intentionally destroying said clone parts.

I put "destroying" in bold above because it is worth asking yourself how many average Windows users are going to even understand what EPROM VID reprogramming means, never mind how to fix it.

Oh, and for industrial process control stuff, the maintenance guys where I work are not geeks. They know how to fix machines, they know how to use software. Anything in between the two is a rip-out-and-replace job. None of them know what JTAG is (yes, I asked), as that level of interaction is not a part of their job. Hence, for them too, if they were using Windows with clone chips, that recent update would have "bricked" their hardware. [thankfully they don't use Windows, it is all PLC devices; otherwise the fallout of losing all of the device comms would cost serious amounts of money per day plus make utter havoc with the production scheduling and order completion]

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Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit

heyrick
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Re: Pretty nasty

"It's an EEPROM setting that is totally reversible."

I rather suspect that the Windows users that can understand that sentence is likely to be a rather small subset, and the Windows users that can understand it and do something about it, smaller still.

Therefore, while technically reversible, the original statement still holds true. The driver is intentionally bricking people's hardware.

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Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email

heyrick
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Re: Invitation-only, for now...

Priority inbox? How does this differ from a mailer that highlights messages from people in your address book, coupled with a function that people you reply to are added automatically to your address book? Mail software has been doing that sort of thing for decades.

One of the things that bugs me with GMail is that they have taken the basic email interface, removed half the functionality, and renamed what was left. Instead of mailboxes or folders or something, we have "labels". It's the same thing, only with a confusingly different name.

Why, when I send a message, does my sent message not appear in the thread until some (random?) later time? That bugs me too.

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heyrick
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Bloody hell!

36 megabytes for an "inbox"? Entire functional operating systems run to less than that.

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Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data

heyrick
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Isn't using a US based cloud provider as your backend already a direct contravention of EU data protection rules because of this and the Patriot Act?

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Computer misuse: Brits could face LIFE IN PRISON for serious hacking offences

heyrick
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Re: Needed

"Govt figures put the cost to the UK economy at £27bn per year." - and proof of that is where? Remember the "cost" supposedly incurred by the actions of the Scottish bloke (whose name I don't remember).

"That's people's pensions and savings." - the current government is wanting to remove the Winter Fuel Allowance from pensioners living overseas (and some places are colder) saving something in the region of 5m. How much was pissed away on the latest failed IT contract?

"Are those things only worth a metaphorical slap on the wrist?" - when I could find one of these hard done by pensioners and bludgeon them to death with a frozen salmon, and only get a few years with a possibility of early release if I'm "good", then the logical answer can only be Yes.

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MARS NEEDS WOMEN, claims NASA pseudo 'naut: They eat less

heyrick
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"but they can’t know what they don’t know"

I don't think gender, size, sexuality, or any other thing really addresses that. If you don't know something, you don't know something. As an individual or as a group.

Unless, perhaps, you are called Donald Rumsfeld.

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Apple flings iOS 8.1 at world+dog: Our AMAZEBALLS 9-step installation guide

heyrick
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Meh

Meh.

Slightly better than 8.0 in that it is only asking for 4.9GB instead of 5.3GB. But that's many many times more than iOS7 required and, frankly, not do-able without throwing off a lot of stuff to make space. Space for what? A photo app that can do panoramas (like Android has managed for ages?), a keyboard that can support external keyboard handlers to provide something akin to Swype (ditto Android->ages)? Desirable, yes. Must-haves? Not really. I'm kind of struggling to see much "OMFG-WOW!" benefit to most of the other new features in iOS8. Health kit? <shrugs>

I'll stick with iOS7 for now, thanks.

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Whisper tracks its users. So we tracked down its LA office. This is what happened next

heyrick
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That's how to do it

Maybe round up a couple of friends to be outside their door on shifts. Then they'll never be able to come out.

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Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz

heyrick
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Sixty per cent? If there's even a hint of Ebola here at Vulture South, we're all OUTTA HERE!

Maybe what is not being directly mentioned is that your 60% workers are the ones still alive.

The other 40%? They became zombies, thanks to the magical zombie flu that turns people into zombies.

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Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots

heyrick
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A joy and a fear

This episode was a joy. Clara finally being able to go back to ass-kicking goodness instead of that slushy love puppy crap. I also enjoy the Reg reviews - a billion year old regenerating time lord in a sixties style police box, no problems. Weird 2D/3D aliens? Nah, we're not buying that...

The thing is, I have a great fear that the underlying storyline with Missy is going to turn out to be a great big misfire. If this is ultimately Clara's goodbye, then we really need to have Clannad-style feels going on, instead it will be some hokey rushed alien-induced soap opera like Rory/Amy and the Angels. A brief "wah!" and it is all but forgotten. Clara deserves better.

On the whole, obvious plot rubbish aside, this was one of the better episodes because Capaldi wasn't being gloomy and pushing the plot in the wrong way, and also because it didn't try to be anything it wasn't. [oh the epicness of a train in space that is really a lab to try to .... mummified soldier? seriously? omfg what a wasted opportunity]

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French 'terror law' declares WAR on the INTERNET itself, say digi-rights folks

heyrick
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Definitions needed

Who or what defines "terrorism"? Depending on who you ask, Israeli and American sites should be blocked and their citizens watched. If you're going instead to define terrorism as the Western enemy du jour, that's a somewhat blinkered view (dig around, there are implications that a certain country helped train both Taliban and ISIS).

So, I repeat again, who or what defines terrorism?

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The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters

heyrick
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Re: Speaking as a fanboi

"Time to don the latex Stephen Fry mask and make like happy."

Oh my. That can be so misinterpreted.

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