* Posts by Jan 0

677 posts • joined 14 Dec 2009

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IETF boffins design a DNS for digital money

Jan 0
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Thanks to BBC Radio 4 this morning...

I now understand why governments and banks are so keen on digital currency. When interest rates go negative, sensible people will keep their money as cash under the mattress/<name your favourite hiding place>. If money becomes entirely digital, alternatives such as gold under the mattress will be used but don't have a fixed relationship with money.

iPlayer: BBC Radio 4 Thursday the 21st of July: "How Low Can Rates Go?"

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Nitwit has fit over twit hit: Troll takes timeless termination terribly

Jan 0
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His words:

"netting me more adoring fans"

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An anniversary to remember: The world's only air-to-air nuke was fired on 19 July, 1957

Jan 0
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> "Vacuum tubes are not entirely resistant to EMP."

But they don't matter once the EMP has fused the coils (inductors) and condensers (capacitors).

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Reader needs Aircon help

Jan 0
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"windowless room" suggests that it's deep in a building. Are there ducts, or can you drill through to the outside? Without an external heat exchanger, you won't achieve very much.

As an aside, to Jake, I'd call an air conditioning company to avoid having embarassing conversations with High Voltage or High Vacuum engineers. The FLA "HVAC" is Highly Ambiguous.

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Ad blockers responsible for rise in upfront TV ad sales, claims report

Jan 0
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Re: Easy way to avoid TV ads

Recording the show, then editing out the adverts before you watch is the way to go.

Even skipping the adverts diverts your attention too much when you're watching something interesting.

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The History Boys: Object storage ... from the beginning

Jan 0
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Thanks for the chart and history. However I wonder what, in the meantime, has happened to its complement: Content Addressable Memory? Back in the 80s, I remember it being used in support of some CPU operations. There was also academic research into its use in bulk. What's the state of the art today? (Yes I've just had a squiz at Wikipedia, but I doubt that it represents the current status.)

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If we can't find a working SCSI cable, the company will close tomorrow

Jan 0
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Re: Backups underwriters and overpriced household furniture

@Walter Bishop

You don't for a moment think that an accountant might exaggerate to pile the pressure on? Oh wait, are _you_ an accountant?

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Jan 0
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Full marks for extra experience!

I imagine that Jean has prospered. I too have found myself unbending pins in the middle of the night while the administrators with no hardware nous were reading logs and rerunning diagnostics. Understanding how the kit works from mechanical, optical and electrical viewpoints will always give you an edge. Nowadays, for example: scratched faces on fibre interconnects? Been there, because I used to work, in the 90s, in a company where they used to cut and terminate their own fibres for ATM and Fibre Channel. Do you have a microscope and polishing kit to hand?

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Kids’ shoes seller Start-rite suspends sales following breach

Jan 0
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Pint

Norwich Based?

They may have started in Norwich, they may still have an office just outside Norwich, but surely a manufacturing company that does all its manufacturing in India has to be called "India Based" (c.f .Dyson.)

I won't deny that they make excellent children's shoes.

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Free concert! Against TPP?

Jan 0
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Debatable?

> which they fear will give corporations too much power (debatable).

You may debate that this will give corporations too much power, but it's not debatable that there are groups that fear this. Their fear is beyond debate.

It's heartening to hear that there's an anti-TPP movement in the USA, is there any reason why the concerts/movement aren't also anti-TTIP?

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Next big thing after containers? Amazon CTO talks up serverless computing

Jan 0
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Was Vogel built by Frankenstein?

Well he seems to have a spanner in his hand and a poorly disguised bolt in his neck.

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175-year-old in storage deal

Jan 0
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Re: Is this an article...

> ...or an advert?

It's clearly an advert. Can anyone recommend a better adblocker?

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When is a refurbished server not refurbished? Ask this Dell reseller

Jan 0
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> xByte puts out Dell quality systems and support and helps Dell maintain their brand image

Surely, when you are seen as the Gerald Ratner of computer manufacturers, you don't have a brand image to maintain. "Cheap and nasty", or "Well, it copes" is hardly a brand image.

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Teen faces trial for telling suicidal boyfriend to kill himself via text

Jan 0
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Boffin

> that brief time when the stupid people hadn't worked out how to access the internet.

It was quite a few years actually and they never did work it out. Clever people made it is easy, hoping that stupid people would pay to use the appliances that the clever people created.

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New DNA 'hard drive' could keep files intact for millions of years

Jan 0
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Headmaster

Could you sort out your prepositions please?

The data is not written onto DNA. It is written in DNA. That is, only DNA is used for the writting by assembling it from four types of nucleotide bases.

(Compare this with a computer writing data onto words. No! It writes data in words by assembling them from two kinds of bits. That's not a perfect analogy, because we can create bits in many ways: discrete electric charges, discrete magnetic domains, holes in paper tape, etc.)

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Obi Worldphone MV1: It's striking, it's solid. Aaaand... we've run out of nice things to say

Jan 0
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As usual, you've forgotten that it's a phone!

I assume it's not got dual SIMs, but what's the call quality/reception/microphone/AGC like?

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Lightning strikes: Britain's first F-35B supersonic fighter lands

Jan 0
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Re: The supersonic Lightning II, as it will be known in RAF service,

It is a sad day that sees the official name of the English Electric P1a hijacked so thoroughly. This is an insult to the great British designers and engineers that emerged after World War II. I am wrenched by the contempt I feel for the politicians and financiers who have conspired so thoroughly to destroy British engineering and trade.

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Gun-jumping French pols demand rapid end to English in EU

Jan 0
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Re: Lingua Franca

Vous connaissez les vieillards en Indochine?

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LinkedIn denies WWDC stunt

Jan 0
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Coincidence?

Are you sure that it wasn't the other way 'round? Maybe Linkedin was hoping that Apple would divert our attention?

What happened to Skype after Microsoft bought it? I don't need to know or care, because I moved to WhatsApp. So, what's the up and coming rival to Linkedin? Xing maybe?

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Spam King sent down for 30 months

Jan 0
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Flame

If only this could have happened to Canter and Seigel

Then the online world could have been a much nicer place.

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Cygnus spacecraft on fire

Jan 0
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Headmaster

Mangled English?

AIUI you could:

set a Cygnus spacecraft afire - a bit archaic.

or

set a Cygnus spacecraft on fire

or

set fire to a Cygnus spacecraft.

However, if they have "set a fire inside a Cygnus spacecraft" that seems to mean either that they have taken a fire and moved it into the spacecraft, or that they have put the ingredients for a fire in place - ready to be lit later. Disclaimer: other verbs describing the starting of fires are available).

Did an AI write this phrase?

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Apple GPU screen rumors

Jan 0
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Never mind 4K or GPUs!

When is Apple going to move out of the '90s and give us a decent sized monitor? 27" is just pathetic.

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Systemd kills Deb processes

Jan 0
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Re: Broken expectations

System Vile or not, you'd 'nohup' them to keep them running when you logged out

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NASA's stadium-sized sandwich bag overflies Oz

Jan 0
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No need to fear?

Whether 2.5 tons free falls or parachutes gently onto my house, I still don't expect to have an abode after the event.

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Google hits Uber, Lyft

Jan 0
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Is Waze still alive?

Is this just an attempt to re-employ the Waze team? In southern England, outside of London, it doesn't have enough users to make it useful. (I.e it's unaware of road closures and delays nowadays.) I went back to using TomTom when the userbase started shrinking. (I would probably just use Google maps if I hadn't bought TomTom years ago.) Without frequent and timely feedback, Waze is doomed. How's it doing in the rest of the world?

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Lauri Love: 'Britain's FBI' loses court attempt to evade decryption laws

Jan 0
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Re: Extradition to a Police State where slavery for black people still exists

@AC who says "THERE IS NO SLAVERY IN THE USA"

But, I hear, Chain Gangs are still OK.

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PayPal probed over Venmo cash-flinging app

Jan 0
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Joke

That's a lot of profit for Braintree

Does that mean that Braintree residents won't need to pay any Council Tax for a year or two?

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Dyson hair dryer

Jan 0
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Why only 20 times a second?

My "analogue" old school hairdryer does it continuously and probably cost less than a fiver. (Too long ago to be precise). The only hairs it has ever singed have been free floating ones that found their way to the intake.

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Galileo in spaaace: France's 'equivalence principle' satellite

Jan 0
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Re: apparently

> you would be arrested on terrorism charges.

Thankfully, Italy isn't americanized* to that extent yet.

*(<pedant>US americanized</pedant>.)

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Slack login leak shame

Jan 0
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WTF?

Why?

Aren't colleagues with verbal diarrhoea enough of a challenge? Why add 'bots to the flood? Wouldn't 'bot moderators that weed out valueless communications be more productive?

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US intercepts Bermuda Triangle bubble podule

Jan 0
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Alert

"hydro pod bubble"

Is that an internationally recognised boat class?

I'm not surprised if he had no food on board. Once he encountered some moderate waves he'd be in the hydrological equivalent of a Vomit Comet.

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So you’d sod off to China to escape the EU, Google? Really?

Jan 0
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EU Backward?

So what does that say about the U.S. of A? Even more backward?

Get behind the Great Wall Mr. Brittin. We probably won't miss you.

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Ames boffins mix metals to boost electron velocity

Jan 0
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Re: Many moons ago

> 'thermionic' valves on silicon.

Errm, aren't they called "FETs"? (Field Effect Transistors). I can't see the relevance here.

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Huawei's P9 flagship: There's a lot to Leica

Jan 0
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You neglected to mention that this is a dual-SIM 'phone.

Now that sparked my interest a little more than the Summarit lenses. Apple please take note!

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Facebook censors Scunthorpe band

Jan 0
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Steady now, there may be a "police thingstable" monitoring this conversation.

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Nest's bricking of Revolv serves as wake-up call to industry

Jan 0
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Re: That's useful information

> Philips actually sold of their badges

Wot?

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Jan 0
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Re: Nest

Is your furnace in Port Talbot perchance? Nest may not be your biggest problem. TTFN.

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You can't dust-proof a PC with kitchen-grade plastic food wrap

Jan 0
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Re: Positive Air Pressure

>canola (sic)

It may not make a good lube for fans, but it surely makes a two-stroke motorbike or scooter run well and smell good.

(Ah, Castrol R! - from the non-PC world that calls it Rape Seed Oil.)

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Blighty starts pumping out 12-sided quids

Jan 0
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Re: Threepenny Bit?

>purchasing power

Back in the late '50s and early 60s a threepenny bit would always buy you a Mars bar. However, you could track inflation by weighing the Mars bar!

I have no idea how much a Mars bar costs nowadays, because I've developed a liking for chocolate.

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Swede builds steam-powered Raspberry Pi. Nowhere to plug in micro-USB, then?

Jan 0
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Boffin

Re: Voltage Drop

From the article:

> the Pi's greater demand for juice when it boots causes a voltage drop big enough to force the mini computer to reboot.

I'm amazed that such a small steam engine can produce enough power to run a minicomputer as well as a microcomputer. Is the minicomputer lurking in his dad's attic?

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Flying Scotsman attacked by drone

Jan 0
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Re: Yorkshire Post Video

Full marks to Yorkshire Post. You don't have to toggle temporary permissions for dozens of scripts on the web page in order to watch the video. Just allow yorkshirepost.co.uk!

I wish my local rag would do the same, I've given up trying to work out which combination of third party scripts needs enabling in order to watch their videos.

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Hand in hand, TSMC, ARM head to 7nm server chip land

Jan 0
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Re: understatement

X-ray lithography has been renamed EUV. (Is this to avoid scaring the uneducated, like renaming NMR to MRI?)

There is another great white hope: multi electron beam lithoghraphy.

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Swedish publishers plan summer ‘Block Party’ to thwart ad blockers

Jan 0
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Pint

Time to hit kickstarter?

All Hail the Proxomitron! We need you!

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Nutanix: Yo, we heard you liked convergence, so we converged files in your hyper-converge kit

Jan 0
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Devil

Oi! That TLA is taken!

Andrew File System, 'nuff said?

Disrespect CMU, heard of Hubris?

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Hackers turn to angr for automated exploit discovery and patching

Jan 0
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Shellfish logo

I hope that this team are paying tribute to J Walkden Fisher by knocking off his signature. (Eagle Comic afficionados, owners of "Britain's Wonderful Fighting Forces" and collectors of vintage motoring magazines should recognise that logo instantly.)

Celestial Barman, please pass a beer to that (cutaway) artist.

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A typo stopped hackers siphoning nearly $1bn out of Bangladesh

Jan 0
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Re: I just checked my account

@Stevie

Ruddles has been badge engineering since Watneys bought it. Now if you could get a pint of Green Jack's "Baltic Trader" for 7 quid in America, I'd be impressed.

This is not off topic, Green Jack has probably brought the GDP of Lowestoft close to that of Bangladesh. Did this exploit do more to harm the Bangladesh economy than our recent ban on Alphonso mangoes?

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'You've been hacked, pay up' ... Ransomware forces your PC to read out a hostage note

Jan 0
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Re: Bah!

I don't know either. It's all Greek to me.

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Blah Blah blah ... I don't care! To hell with your tech marketing bull

Jan 0
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You have a good grievance.

Trevor, I'm sorry that you're upset but that was just a small personal tragedy. There is a global human tragedy being perpetrated by 'marketing'. It has very little to do with exchanging goods and instead concentrates on deceit and manipulation. Anyone who has worked in production or development will have been sickened by what 'marketing' did to their honest toil. The whole human race is in peril from marketing. Let's imagine how H G Wells would have written "The Shape of Things to Come"* if he'd started writing today.

*the book of course, not the film.

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Wakey wakey, app developers. Mobile ad blocking will kill you all

Jan 0
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Pint

>"users still prefer seeing ads to paying."

The link says it's 58% who prefer. That means that there are a lot of people who don't. The problem is that no one seems to know how much the sea of adverts that we swim in costs us. What proportion of the cost of goods and services makes up the price that we pay? If people know, what would the proportion who prefer ads be then? I'm happy to pay for apps that I use. When I want to buy a new good or service, I ask friends what they're using and why and read reviews - by people whose opinion I respect. Thus I give no credence to Guardian reviews of bicycles*, pay some attention to road.cc, read Cycling Weekly attentively and talk to cycling friends.

* because they are just thinly disguised, bland, advertisements.

Beers all round to the people hacking blocker code, from one of the thousands who'd happily pay to read El Reg.

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