* Posts by Jan 0

507 posts • joined 14 Dec 2009

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Adjustments will be needed to manage the Macs piling up in your business

Jan 0
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Casper

Why's nobody mentioning Casper?

Take a look at JAMFsoftware.

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Mad Max: Fury Road – two hours of nonstop, utterly insane fantasy action

Jan 0
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Re: Insane waste?

Excuse me, s/co-worker/cow-orker/

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Self-STOPPING cars are A Good Thing, say motor safety bods

Jan 0
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Re: Transitional period

> "Power steering - if that fails, you're back to heavy steering of old but still maintain control."

Sorry, no. Most old cars had light steering. Lorries gave you big biceps, but cars could be steered with a light touch. For example, when the power steering on my Panda fails, it makes my Series II Landrover feel agile.

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Acer: 'We will be the last man standing in the PC industry'

Jan 0
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Re: Dust accumulating

> Is there any truth to the idea that fast flowing air can cause enough static to fry components?

Maybe. I used to have a powerful LG vacuum cleaner. When I held the steel suction tube and hoovered the polypropylene carpet, I could shoot half inch sparks from my knuckles to the radiators. (Ouch). However, it's replacement (an aluminium tube Dyson) never did the same. Perhaps there's an earth path in the Dyson. I know that just walking over synthetic carpets, with the wrong shoes, can have a similar effect, but I've never seen sparks that big without an LG in my hand.

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Debian ships new 'Jessie' release with systemd AND sysvinit

Jan 0
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Boffin

Re: "needrestart"??

@TuxIsOnFire

You must be one of those whippersnappers who's never patched a running kernel!

Nowadays you can do it with ksplice/kpatch, we greybeards just used a debugger, for example adb* with a SunOS kernel.

*adb - the one started by Stephen Bourne, not the TLA now recycled by Android.

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US Navy robot war-jet refuels in air: But Mav and Iceman are going down fighting

Jan 0
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Aircraft carrier?

Just how long will an aircraft carrier survive in a automated war?

Large warships are already vulnerable to attack by small boats.

What chance will they have against swarms of high speed autonomous surface or submarine craft?

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Go for a spin on Record Store Day: Lifting the lid on vinyl, CD and tape

Jan 0
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Re: Re the record players.

Somewhere in my singles store I've got a 9" single (from Nine Inch Nails, of course) that would fool it. I've only got a few 12" singles that are 33 rpm.

I'm fairly sure I've got an 8" 45 as well, but I really can't summon the energy to go on a dedicated search at this hour*.

Anyway, I jealously salute your Dansette!

* I'd like an automated disc library that would pop out and return any 7, 8, 9, 10 or 12 inch record and index them using OCR. Bonus if it could handle flexi-singles and handle the record sleeves!

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Tortilla de patatas

Jan 0
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Re: Yum!

Well actually "x 7", Re: "Victorian spelling"

There's nothing Victorian about the long 's'.

I learned to write them when I copied from Arrighi's 1524 "La Operina" ("da imparare di scriuere littera cancellarescha") in the V & A as a schoolboy. Wikipedia suggests that they originate with the Romans.

Mind you, it seems that Vincent Ballard used an 'f' with a full crossbar rather than an "ſ" (HTML not working for me in preview). (If used, the crossbar should not protrude on the right hand side of the riser.)

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Google drives a tenth of news traffic? That's bull-doodie, to use the technical term

Jan 0
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Suddenly I see why el Reg doesn't think it needs a subscription model

I'd always thought that el Reg readers were like me. They'd have el Reg bookmarked and visit it when they had some spare time, or needed to search it directy. However, this article says: "At The Register, looking over the past 30 days, Google brought in about 47 per cent of our readers, with Google News making up a further 12 per cent; more than half, in other words." If 59% arrive from Google, presumably a lot of other traffic comes indirectly too.

Gone is the hope of a truly advertisement free el Reg by subscription. We regulars truly can't be that important. The fact that we use ad. blockers is doubly unimportant. The Google driven masses don't know about blockers.

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'Chinese hackers' were sniffing SE Asian drawers for YEARS

Jan 0
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Pint

Nice inuendo!

Thank you, you lovely el Reg subs.

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IBM claims new areal density record with 220TB tape tech

Jan 0
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15 years?

Why do we have to wait for 15 years from demonstration to product? Instead of tinkering away and producing tiny improvements in mass manufacture, why not concentrate on introducing LTO12 in 2 or 3 years time? I want a 220TB tape cartridge and I want it now! Is everything held back by marketing departments? How about a drive using 8 x 16 Gb/s heads to fill the tape in about 2 hours? Many of us could go back to feeding the drive every day instead of using a tape library. Even better, let's have a longer tape in a bigger cartridge, which we change weekly or monthly.

To put it another way, what makes "Moore's law" perform so badly?

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Netflix fail proves copper NBN leaves Australia utterly 4Ked

Jan 0
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Flame

3D TV

Errm, it's not lack of content that killed 3D TV. It's cheesy content, clumsy eyewear, headaches and stereo != 3D.

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Drill, baby, drill: HIDDEN glaciers ON MARS hold 150bn cubic metres of precious frozen WATER

Jan 0
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Pint

I want to be self-sufficient amanfrommars2!

Spirit has already discovered high purity silica. I see a future for agriculture in locally made glass houses on Mars. The carbon dioxide atmosphere should keep the plants happy. The ambient pressure in the glass houses would need to be boosted with argon and nitrogen from the atmosphere. Glass houses will have the advantage of absorbing ultraviolet light before it kills the plants. The lack of atmosphere means that a similar amount of solar energy would be available, to the plants, as is available at our surface. Plenty of solar energy to bootstrap the production of silicon substrate for photovoltaic panels too. Solar furnaces ...

Hey, I've got my bag of seeds, where do I sign up? Beer, from Martian barley, of course.

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Video: Dyson unveils ROBOTIC TANK that hoovers while you're out

Jan 0
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Re: I'm a slob...

Carpet Zamboni? Well, Zamboni was famous for his pile*.

*an extra high tension battery. I first came upon one in a WWII, Government Surplus, Image Intensifier.

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The coming of DAB+: Stereo eluded the radio star

Jan 0
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Freeview

> Just as the extra HD channels on Freeview are intended to encourage take-up of kit that has T2 and H.264, eventually allowing the DVB-T and MPEG2 muxes to be converted or switched off in the name of efficiency.

C'mon Elgato, how long are we going to wait before you bring out a DVB-T2 tuner??? JFDI!

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Nuclear waste spill: How a pro-organic push sparked $240m blunder

Jan 0
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Mushroom

Re: Wood Flour explosions

Oh noes! Now we'll all be arrested for carrying plans for making fuel/air exposives in our brains.

With a little more carelessness you could have blown up the house in the same way that many flour mills have been self demolished.

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Jan 0
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Re: Why not organic kitty litter?

> "Organic cat litter I get can be flushed down the loo"

> The local sewerage people absolutely HATE people who do that.

> Seriously, if you can put it in a bin then do so.

It seems that organic cat litter is equivalent to powerline ethernet. Just say no!

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Jan 0
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Mushroom

Re: Why not organic kitty litter?

JetSetJim typed > Organic cat litter I get can be flushed down the loo

Can some cat* lover explain to us all why they don't fit pet karzies in their houses? Why not cut out the middleman^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hcat litter and go directly into the sewerage?

*also apples to dog lovers. Why interpose a pavement beween the dog's arse and the drains?

Flame, for obvious reasons.

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Apple's 13-incher will STILL cost you a bomb: MacBook Air 2015

Jan 0
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Re: Apple Macbooks are basically pointless to steal.

> However there are no third party upgrades as of yet.

Curious - I must have dreamed that I installed 1 TB of storage in my 11" Air. Do you mean that I have to give up my other dream of putting new batteries in it?

To be fair, I know of no simple way to add memory or upgrade the CPU, let alone improve the graphics processor. So the answer is to buy an AIr with maximum memory and best CPU power in the first place. Let's face it, we've long left those heady times when CPU speeds leapt ahead every year. I expect I'll be able to install 2 or more TB of storage next year.

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Appeal court bombshell: Google must face British justice for 'Safari spying'

Jan 0
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I'm in,

but how do we arrange to sue Google at low cost to ourselves, given that we're only each going to get a few pence or a couple of quid out of Google?

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Helium-filled drive tech floats to top of HGST heap

Jan 0
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Re: So..

It so does leave a vacuum* behind!

A sealed, air filled, hard disc drive will always have approximately the same pressure as the ambient air because the rate of inward diffusion matches the outward rate.

In the case of a sealed, helium filled, drive there is almost no helium outside, but the helium atoms inside will move at a velocity determined by the ambient temperature and their random walks will lead some helium atoms outside. (See: Kinetic Theory of Gases). Far more Helium atoms will move out, than air molecules move in, because the air molecules are larger and are less likely to 'find' paths through the seal. I wouldn't expect a spectacular drop in pressure in 5 years, but I bet you could measure it with an unsophisticated manometer.

*partial vacuum - to be precise. It's never going to reach a high vacuum!

Mine's the one with the 'diffusion pump' in the long pocket.

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Dutch companies try warming homes with cloud servers

Jan 0
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Re: This is laughable

I presume that you don't live in a Passivhaus, or anything close.

BTW, s/math/arithmetic/ it's all you need.

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Jan 0
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Nothing to see here, ...

Ah, I knew this wasn't the first time I'd seen this idea. Why didn't el Reg report this: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/this-company-will-heat-your-house-for-free-if-you-have-room-for-its-servers-9859054.html last year? Is it because we could find even earlier examples? Well there's Microsoft's 2011(?) paper: http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/150265/heating.pdf can anyone top this?

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Want that awesome new Apple TrackPad? Don't get a MacBook Pro

Jan 0
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Nothing new about unrepairable electronics.

Suricou Raven wrote: "As electronics enthusiasts have been increasingly grumbling every year for the last two decades, modern electronics just aren't made to be repaired."

Oh, no, not just two decades, at least six. In the days before transistor radios, there was always a mysterious block of pitch with several wires snaking out to the posts on the baseboard above it. Who knew what was in the block of pitch? All the other components were standard resistors, condensers, coils, valves, lamps, transformers and switches that you could pick up in Lisle Street/<your local radio shop>, but where could you get the proprietary pitch block from? To this day, I still don't know what was in there.

<nostalgia>Where have all the mains energised loudspeakers gone?</nostalgia>

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Price slashed on Reg-branded Swiss Army Knife

Jan 0
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Re: Leatherman

@ OrientalHero

Phew! Just checked and the Micra isn't discontinued. I still have the one I was given at a SANE conference. To stop it rubbing holes in your pocket or dangling keys interfering with delicate tasks, you can get a nice leather, keyring case for it from DavidsonLeather on Etsy.

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Would YOU touch-type on this chunk-tastic keyboard?

Jan 0
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Eternal problem

It's an excellent idea, but I won't buy this for the same reasons I never bought a Microwriter. It needs to be able to work with all the devices I use. I need to be confident that I'll still be able to use it, or a replacement, for the rest of my life. Until then I'll stick with the crummy keyboards that I can connect with all my devices. (Yes I need wireless and wired keyboards, but at least they all have, more or less, the same key layout.)

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OK, they're not ROBOT BUTLERS, but Internet of Home 'Things' are getting smarter

Jan 0
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"Why anyone would ever want 22 different wash cycles or more is another matter."

Well, for example, as anyone who's ever owned a Zanussi washing machine will attest, they're well made and long lasting. However, Italian water must have magical powers, because Zanussis fail to rinse thoroughly in the UK. Nowadays they come with a "super rinse" button to add extra rinse cycles, but it's hardly fine tuning. I want a fully consumer programmable washing machine, so that I choose exactly which stages are run and for how long. I want far more than 22 wash programs, I want an infinitely variable wash program. I'd like to discover for myself whether it's possible to devise a washing program for mucky cycle shoes that doesn't wreck them.

Dyeing fabrics would become much more convenient with a programmable washing machine. Although you can dye some items in a washing machine, the cycle lengths aren't suitable for many combinations of dye and fabric types. (If you've ever done home dyeing in open containers, you'll appreciate having the whole process confined in a self cleaning apparatus.)

Other fabric treatments, such as "wash in" water repellent treatments could also be improved - the treatment manufacturer might provide a downloadable program.

With the ability to turn off churning and precise temperature selection, you might even use your washing machine for water bath cooking.

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Canadian bloke refuses to hand over phone password, gets cuffed

Jan 0
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Canada?

So you tell us about a Canadian, being stopped on entry to Canada, by Canadian Border Agency personnel. Why then is the bulk of the article about USA law? I know the poor Kanadyjczycy have to put up with living next to the USA, but they still have their own laws don't they?

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NetApp’s effort to feed big data beast through NFS makes no sense

Jan 0
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Errm

Recent ONTAP releases support NFS 4.1 with pNFS, which works nicely with Hadoop, although I agree that the 100TB volume limit is a bit puny.

Your comments would be spot on for NFS3.

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'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross

Jan 0
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Re: Content and Style

>Change tracking by use of diff? Or is that just too complicated?

Well it worked for the House of Lords back in the '80s. (They bought a Sun 4 purely to use 'diff'. I prefer 'sdiff' - it's designed for humans.)

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: El Reg eggs Benedict

Jan 0
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Headmaster

Re: Just for clarification?

> "Semolina is the hard bit"

Errm, not quite. In the UK, semolina is just a stage on the way to flour. The first, wide spaced, rollers generate a coarse product which is screened to separate the semolina from the bran. Semolina is milled again to produce flour. It's the particle size that distinguishes semolina from flour.

Where's the pedant's pedant icon when you need it?

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Hacker catches Apple's Lightning in a jailbroken bottle

Jan 0
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Re: "If the cables *eventuate* - ffs !

Re: "my new word of the day": AH, so you want to be a manager?

Oh, you don't? You think you're human being? Then 'appear' or 'happen' will do nicely.

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Jan 0
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Re: I wonder why Apple customers don't sue for such things

@nematoad

It's probably someone who thinks they can cook on a barbeque.*

Mind you, some of us wonder about the spelling of your name. Since nemato- is the prefix, what does the -ad signify?

*Why don't the spelling simpletons just use 'cue' everywhere?

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Vint Cerf: Everything we do will be ERASED! You can't even find last 2 times I said this

Jan 0
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Re: As soon as I get home ...

Just make sure the paper is kept in an ULT freezer to stop it all going black. Personally, I'd use a daisy wheel printer.

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Jan 0
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Re: Turtles all the way down?

> "This basically means that we not only need to keep all your .doc files on a reliable storage medium"

Is there any useful data in .doc files?

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Back seat drivers fear lead-footed autonomous cars, say boffins

Jan 0
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Re: Nothing to see here....

Hear, hear!

Besides, I hope that I'll be able to face backwards in my driverless car, just as I do in trains. Also I'm not sure that I want any permanently clear windows in my driverless car. I may want to watch a film or pleasure my passenger(s) without distractions.

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Internet of Thieves: All that shiny home security gear is crap, warns HP

Jan 0
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Marooons?

Launch the IPv6 Lifeboats now!

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Keyless vehicle theft suspects cuffed after key Met Police, er, 'lockdown'

Jan 0
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Re Alarms and "tow trucks"

> "It wouldn't stop someone with a tow truck from being able to just pick it up and drive away if it had no alarm."

I see you've never been to East London, where you'll hear plenty of alarms from vehicles being towed or on low loaders. Nobody takes any notice.

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UK boffins DOUBLE distance of fiber data: London to New York WITHOUT a repeater

Jan 0
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Boffin

Kerr

I have a vague memory of using* or maybe seeing a demonstration of the use of Kerr Cells to measure the speed of light when Iwas a sixth former. (So long ago that it wasn't clear that the 'speed of light' was a constant regardless of frequency.)

*Well, we did alll kinds of things in school science labs back then that today's students will only see as a video, if they're lucky.

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Zoinks! Is that Mystery Machine Apple's SELF-DRIVING FAMILY WAGON? You decide

Jan 0
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I'm confused.

I thought that estate cars were called station wagons in the USA.

I admit that this one is hovering somewhere between being an estate car and a People Carrier, but if van is the USA term for an MPV, what would they call a UK style van? I'm guessing mintruck, but preparing to be flabbergasted.

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Helium HDD prices rise way above air-filled spinning rust

Jan 0
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When the helium runs out, we could use hydrogen instead. Probably a bit harder to contain than helium - I remember that it diffuses through steel at a much higher rate. Embrittlement is probably not a problem. Viscosity is still going to be much lower than air. Hydrogen only gets scarce near to the heat death of the universe, so our grandchildren won't run short of it.

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Twin Adam Sandlers shake El Reg's movie unwatchablathon team

Jan 0
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Coat

Pearl Harbor

If it's unwatchable, would that have allowed Mitsubishi Group* to sponsor it without anybody clocking the product placement?

*Warning: May contain MHI (the manufacturer of a very capable long range fighter 'plane).

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Living with a Renault Twizy: Pah! Bring out the HOVERCRAFT

Jan 0
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Re: Why would you get one of these?

That Carver may look nicer, but what happened to the tall, slim, four wheeled, electric leaner that I saw a few years ago? A slim leaning car with four wheels, or at least two at the front, becomes a vehicle with the advantages of both cars and motorcycles, but it needs to be short and tall to be a city vehicle. ("City" as understood outside most of the USA.)

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Boffin finds formula for four-year-five-nines disk arrays

Jan 0
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Re: what about enclosure failure?

This is the proposal that DougS made in the first post. I don't understand why it's accumulating down votes.

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The firm that swallowed the Sun: Is Oracle happy as Larry with hardware and systems?

Jan 0
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@lowly programmer

Don't lowly programmers pine for DTrace?

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Jan 0
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@ex-Sun UK Solaris/SPARC support engineer

The support from Poland was fine, considering the pitiful access they had to Sun hardware. They had some good brains out there with creative solutions to problems.

Sun's demise was an example of the triumph of marketing over product quality. it's a bit ironic that another marketing driven company* bought them and heartening that the marketing company have finally realised that they have a have high quality products to sell.

*I will grudgingly admit that they gradually turned a technically inferior database into something that was at least rock solid.

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Chunky Swedish ice maiden: Volvo XC60 D4 Manual EE Lux Nav

Jan 0
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Clarification please

"Peter Horbury was in charge of design, but he’s since been kicked upstairs to run design for Volvo’s Chinese parent Geely’s" <what>? What's the missing word or phrase? Bus Division? Wallpaper Department? Motorcycles? (Ok, I know that Geely doesn't make wallpaper.)

Also, who needs front (or rear) sensors? Haven't impact resistant bumpers been mandatory all over the world since the 1970s? When parking, my senses tell me when I've touched the car (or bollard/wall) in front/behind. I don't want to know when I'm near them, because to park in a restricted space I need to use all of it.

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Snowden SLAMS iPhone, claims 'special software' tracks users

Jan 0
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Maybe it's because he can't afford a smartphone.

Is Snowden doing any paid work in Russia or just getting by with a little help from friends?

He's done a great job for us all, but how's he earning a crust nowadays? Russian minimum wage is only 5,554 Rubles pcm, which is about 77 Euros - that won't leave a lot of disposable income for shiny toys.

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SCREW you, GLASSHOLES! Microsoft unveils HoloLens

Jan 0
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Holographic?

This article doesn't give the slightest hint about how these might be holographic. It seems that Microsoft doesn't either. Can the user really focus at different depths in a 3-D image, or is this just another stereoscopic display? Holography captures a whole light field, does this display generate a light field?

The shape is nice and reminds me of my Casco Speedster, but I don't think I'd like too much augmentation when I'm out on the treadly.

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FERTILISER DOOM warning! PESKY humans set to WIPE selves out AGAIN

Jan 0
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Re: There is plenty of both.... we just have to get over the..

Re: "nitrogen laundering".

At least it helps to maintain nitrogen levels in the soil, so there doesn't need to be as much nitrogen fixing going on.

Animals don't fix nitrogen, neither do they return more than a small fraction to the atmosphere. (Plenty to chew on here: http://www.bmb.leeds.ac.uk/illingworth/bioc1010/ )

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