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* Posts by Jan 0

347 posts • joined 14 Dec 2009

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Seagate brings out 6TB HDD, did not need NO STEENKIN' SHINGLES

Jan 0

Re: The Bigfoot was an abomination!

We don't need no steenkin' Quanta, just revive the Seagate Wren 5

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Crashed NORKS drones discovered by South Korea

Jan 0
Coat

Re: Auntie Bee has pictures of the drone

The Paju drone looks like a control line model aircraft. Just how wide is the DMZ?

Does N Korean 'Health and Safety' let them use nitrobenzene in the fuel mix?

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Ancient telly, check. Sonos sound system, check. OMG WOAH

Jan 0

Re: Audio reviewing is not what it used to be

Spot on. Has the Register ever had an objective review of audio equipment? Compare this with the reviews of computer hardware. Subjective?

While we're complaining, when are you going to get Catherine Monfils to review the Olympus OM-Ds? (I'm aware that her reviews are subjective, but she is a talented photographer and the results are all available for us to inspect, whereas we can't hear what the audio reviewers heard.)

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Stop fiddling with your VMAX knobs or I'll chop your fingers off

Jan 0

That acronym is already taken.

Can you fettle something that isn't a motorbike?

I wanted an article about the Yamaha VMAX. Lots of people fettle them to try and make them rideable.

Why can't EMC make up a new name (EMC? Oh wait, I understand.)

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Blighty goes retro with 12-sided pound coin

Jan 0

Re: Brings back memories

Somewhere I've got a Guernsey thruppenny bit, but unlike either the Jersey or mainland one it was silver and had a curved edge with 12 high points.

When I was a kid I dreamed of owning one of those 5 pound notes, that seemed as big as a tea towel and needed folding to fit into a wallet. (5 pounds was the price of the Government Surplus R1155 receiver that I used to drool over in the window of the radio shop.)

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Jan 0
Pint

Re: ... and a fitting tribute this is.

Back in the '50s, 3d was the price of a Mars bar. Thanks to "Mr. Rising Price" Mars bars got proportionally smaller as the years passed. Sometime around 1960, Mars finally restored the size, but upped the price to 4d. Using the Mars bar standard suggests that the present day pound is a bit more valuable than 3d in 1953. (A normal (58 g) Mars bar is now about 60p.)

Foreign readers please note that there are no nuts in a Limey Mars Bar, d=denarius, the standard abbreviation for the old penny that was 1/240th of a pound:) and 3d was, of course, pronounced "thruppence".

Beer: A nice pint of Massey's, with a proper head, to toast those pre-Grotney years when you could buy a round with a ten bob note and still have change for fish and chips.

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Neil Young touts MP3 player that's no Piece of Crap

Jan 0
Pint

We don't need no steenkin' PonoPlayers

You can already store music files in lossless formats on smartphones. All the tracks on my iPhone are AIFFs ripped from CDs. Android audio players can use WAV, FLAC and AIFF

All that Neil needs to do is to persuade music download sites and app stores to supply uncompressed audio. We don't need another gizmo to carry around.

Beer for Neil, because his heart is in the right place as far as music quality is concerned, but he needs to get out on tour more often and do what's important.

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Facebook pays $19bn for WhatsApp. Yep. $45 for YOUR phone book

Jan 0
Pint

@Ironpaunch Re:What do you mean we Tonto?

"Tonto"?? I think you mean "paleface" or "ke-mo sah-bee."/"kemo sabe".

Beer for the Ojibwa

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Jan 0
Headmaster

Re: Speak for yourself...

Are you sure they're not ageing stripers?

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Jan 0

Healthier for longer?

The new (expensive) drugs may prolong our lives, but we won't be any healthier. We'll be sick, but just postponing death. Big Pharma isn't interested in making us healthy - that requires prevention - they just want to milk our wallets while we take longer to die.

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CCTV warning notices NOT compliant with data protection laws – ICO

Jan 0

@Grease Monkey Re: mobile parking "enforcement" cameras

I have seen such signs, but I think you're pissing in the wind. If agencies enforcing laws had a backbone, then they would already be fining the mobile parking "enforcement" cameras for parking illegally.

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Baby's got the bends: LG's D958 G Flex Android smartie

Jan 0
Pint

@Alun Taylor

Three cheers for not breaking the article up into multiple pages. I've got a scroll bar and I want to use it!

The beers are on me.

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Rosetta comet chaser due to wake up for final rendezvous on Monday

Jan 0

@robertHECTOR

Stop hectoring us Robert. Also note that the 'Western World' was cultured long before there were Christians and continues to be so in spite of Christians. The 'Orient' also did fine without Christians. Disclaimer: other parts of the world are also cultured and may or may not contain satellite production and launch facilities.

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Open source project gives cars the Ikea treatment

Jan 0

Re: Old hat

By "modern", do you mean the 1930s? How old is Ron Champion's book?

Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion car was one of the first spaceframe vehicles. Lotus was using spaceframes in the 50s and by the 70s even Ford was using them. IIRC Hannu Mikkola's Escort had a space frame hidden under the bodywork - unlike the Ford Marketing Department's design sold as the "Escort Mexico".

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Cicada 3301: The web's toughest and most creepy crypto-puzzle is BACK

Jan 0

Re: Massachusetts when it's late at night?

I had the radio on. <> <> Radio On!

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Haters of lurid supershow CES: The consumer tech market is still SHRINKING

Jan 0
FAIL

CES?

Why do journalists fawn over CES? CeBIT is where it's at.

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Italian woman stunned by exploding artichoke

Jan 0

Wrong kind of Artichoke?

When I saw the headline, my thoughts went to Jerusalem Artichokes - eat too many and the result is internally and painfully explosive.

However the article mentions "leaves", implying that these were Globe Artichokes. This begs the question - how were fresh artichokes available in winter* (I know that in the USA and UK, they'd be flown in from the Southern Hemisphere, but Italy respects its food.)

*or have El Reg hacks pulled a very old story off the spike?

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California OLDSTER in WILD golf course SKATEBOARDING spree

Jan 0

Re: Can't see it catching on. (Snow Crash?)

> The point about snowboarding is that with both feet strapped together...

Why do snowboarders do that? If you don't need straps on a surfboard why do you need them on a snowboard?

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Is it a NAS? Is it a SAN? No. It's Synology's Rackstation 'NASSAN'

Jan 0
Stop

Re: Where's...

> Snapshots and backups still need to take place.

Precisely! So when is Synolgy going to introduce NDMP (or roll their own equivalent?).

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When the lights went out: My 'leccy-induced, bog floor crawling HORROR

Jan 0

@Peter Simpson

Downvoted for not realising that Duracells and rechargeable Eneloops have an impressive shelf life.

The Chinese don't have to make excellent copies. They just make excellent torches. Where do Cree LEDs come from in the first place?

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Jan 0

Re: Welcome to the pretty countryside

> Drax*

> It's the name of the nearest village.

Blimey, I would have thought that the nearest village called Drax would be in the Pyrenees! An evil organisation seems much more plausible.

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EMC on XtremIO SSD brickup ballsup: Its LIFETIME downtime is under 3 minutes

Jan 0

XtremIO

I sincerely hope that this name rhymes with Billly-O!

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On the matter of shooting down Amazon delivery drones with shotguns

Jan 0
Windows

Re: Guns won't work, so let's look at alternatives...

Ahem, "dental-floss like filaments'

<youth of today>does nobody remember "string"?</youth of today> Some people need a clew.

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New exploding whale vid once again shows true porpoise of internet

Jan 0
Pint

Cool for cats

20 years ago, back when the Shamen were webcasting, the cat-scan people put up a website for people who put their cats on scanners. Keeping cats may be cruel, but their owners were internet pioneers.

Nowadays, you'd think it was for Computer Aided Tomography. To the barricades, cat lovers! Where's the nostalgia icon?

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You DON'T need a new MacBook! Reg man fiddles with Fusion, pimps out vintage Pro

Jan 0
Headmaster

Re: So...

Errm, Frankenstein* was the builder, not the product. Easily fixed:

For the price of a new laptop, fiddlefucked around, wasted time trying to be a 'Frankenstein'. Awesome.

Agreed, splendid article!

* Read the book, see the films, get the T-shirts - it's always Frankenstein's monster.

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VIOLENT video games make KIDS SMARTER – more violent the BETTER

Jan 0
Coat

Re: re: meta studies

No! You cannot improve levels of confidence by pooling data from different trials. 'Different' trials' are different! Both the experimental conditions and the controls will differ subtly. If you need results from a large sample, then you must do a new trial with a large sample size.

At best a meta study may suggest that it's worth doing a larger trial.

The meta-study approach is for lazy thinkers who can't be bothered to say or write "Analysis of Variance".

Mine's the one with a dog eared "Design of Experiments" in the pocket.

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HEADS UP, text-flinging drivers! A cop in a huge SUV is snooping on you

Jan 0

Re: 4,000,000 Motorcycles and counting - and many drivers are ambidextrous ...

Hey, Buon Ma Tout - home of great coffee beans! I've still got some green Buon Ma Thout beans in my freezer. Have you still got that tank on a roundabout that I cycled past 20 years ago?

I could make voice calls via the microphone and speakers in my helmet, but I like to concentrate on the road, so I've detached the microphone and only listen to Digital Doris (GPS). I don't want to die yet. A little 'darn' of silver thread on the finger tips of gloves makes it possible to interact with a capacitive screen, but I still don't send txts while riding. Refrain: I don't want to die yet!

English pedant sez: you ride or pilot a motorbike. Drivers drive cars, cows, geese, etc.

When are we going to get a biker icon? Ogri FTW!

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Twitter fires up stronger, anti-snooping encryption for its millions of twits

Jan 0
Pirate

Re: People minding your own business.

Never forget: "We are the people our parents warned us against."

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Google patent: THROAT TATTOO with lie-detecting mobe microphone built-in

Jan 0
Big Brother

AE van Vogt got this right.

Why have a throat tatoo, when you can just have the circuit sprayed through your skull?

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Unsung DEAD WHALE EXPLODER hero, who gave the early internet a purpose, passes away

Jan 0
Coat

Re: A sad day

ObUsenet: Why was an Ambridge policeman writing about whales?

ObArchers: Bring back Dave Barry and put some passion back into Cathy's life.

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Adobe users' purloined passwords were PATHETIC

Jan 0

Lonely tigger

How come wol, roo, kanga, etc aren't also in the top 100?

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New US Apple factory will make INVINCIBLE sapphire glass for SHINY iThings

Jan 0

Re: Never send a computer guy to do a material scientists job

Is it possible to create vitreous aluminium oxide in suitable sizes? That could solve the problem if it's properties are like those of thin films of glass. (0.1mm glass is supposed to be amazingly flexible and very hard to break*. I'm still waiting for helmet visors with 0.1 mm glass glued to the outer surface:(

*New Scientist, nineteen ninety mumble IIRC

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Robo-drones learn to land by going bug-eyed

Jan 0
Coat

Re: Bees are a bad example

> a project in the 50's for homing pigeons to used for ballistic missile guidance

See B. F. Skinner the 'operant conditioning' psychologist.

I'll get me coat, 'coz that's what I'm conditioned for when I've finished a post.

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Brit bloke busted over backdoor blagging of US troops' data

Jan 0

That time has passed.

We should have waved them goodbye soon after 1945.

Instead they've continued to occupy bases all over Europe.

That's why we can't look them squarely in the eye.

We are still client states or 'satellites' of the USA.

Some ex-Soviet satellites may now be more free than we are.

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Seagate: Fibre Channel? RAID? SATA? File System? All RUBBISH

Jan 0
Flame

Re: Not totally convinced @ Alan Brown

> That only works until some twat types "rm -rf /" on a replicated system

Yes, but that sort of twit doesn't usually know how to remove the snapshots and probably doesn't know they exist. Snapshots will save you from the twits and data corruption, but not fire, flood or anything that trashes your hardware, so I agree wholeheartedly with:

> There is NO substiute for offline backups when it comes to disaster recovery.

ZFS + LTO FTW

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'Spotify for TV' Magine terrifies Euro players with smart TV deals

Jan 0
Holmes

OTT

The phrase "Over The Top" just doesn't seem to parse correctly in this article.

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Ex-Valve engineers raise begging bowl for 3D holographic-like goggles

Jan 0
Boffin

Re: What about those of us already wearing glasses?

Errm, why wouldn't you put lenses ground to your prescription in the castAR frames?

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MS Word deserves DEATH says Brit SciFi author Charles Stross

Jan 0

Re: Perhaps

Well perhaps because there is simply no need for three 'releases' since 2007! The change from .doc to .docx is the version change we notice. Most of us would be quite happy if Microsoft just fixed all the bugs in, say, version 4.1 and let people continue to use that.

At the end of the day 'catdoc' makes all Word documents easy to read, easy to search and easy to compare.

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NASA's Jupiter probe wakes up after unexpected snooze

Jan 0
Headmaster

Far from nominally

"The spacecraft is currently operating nominally and all systems are fully functional."

I hope you mean normally! It was operating nominally (in name alone) as a spacecraft.

Now it's a fully functional spacecraft again - I think that counts as normal for a space probe.

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NASA Juno probe HOWLS past Earth - and goes into HIBERNATION

Jan 0
Trollface

US dates

Does anybody else use middle-endian numbers for anything?

In mitigation it's good to know that the US military uses little endian dates. It's not often that you can see some sanity in military decisions, even though they should of course be using big-endian dates!

Posted 20131010012341

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Wanna run someone over in your next Ford? No dice, it won't let you

Jan 0
Big Brother

Assisted parking

Back in the late '50s the Daily Express had a competition in which I remember an interesting (prizewinning?) idea. A pair of gizmos allowed your car to swing sideways into a parking space. The gizmos were pivoting rubberised cones. When pressed against the driven tyres they would raise the tyres off the road and rotate to move the car sideways. This could be modernised, using compact electric motors and small retractable wheels to achieve the same effect but using modern sensors and electronics to choose and move a car sideways into a parking space.

Ah, it seems that someone down under had a similar idea in 1937: http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1301&dat=19370209&id=6OVaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=DZIDAAAAIBAJ&pg=1627,1301272

Icon, for the contemporary moustache.

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Boffins have constructed a new LIGHT SABRE. Their skills are complete

Jan 0
Headmaster

Re: So all one needs.......

but, I haven't got a "good to go save the universe".

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Disk-pushers, get reel: Even GOOGLE relies on tape

Jan 0

A fine article,

apart from the spurious introduction of "gun pr0n". Do you, by any chance, aspire to be a Hollywood movie director?

ObTape: If the areal density of tape is so ridiculously low and we have the technology to write discs at very high density, what's stopping us from having PetaByte tapes today rather than in 10 years time?

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Tracking the history of magnetic tape: A game of noughts and crosses

Jan 0

Re: 1996 data storage on video cassette

Back in 1996 I remember using an awful device called a Metrum that stored prodigious volumes of data on VHS cartridges. However, they made Exabyte tapes look reliable, if puny. For reliable, high volume data storage we used a Sony D1 (119 GB on a 6 lb 3/4 inch tape cartridge!)

In the analogue domain, there was a nifty Pulse Code Modulator from Sony that would record audio in high fidelity, digitally, on VHS tape. The PCM unit was about the same size as a VHS VCR! By 1996 DAT recorders has made it obsolete.

I still keep a TEAC X000R reel-to-reel recoreder that I bought secondhand in 1996 for those occasions when I want to listen to 1980s and '90s Peel programmes.

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First rigid airship since the Hindenburg cleared for outdoor flight trials

Jan 0

Re: Where will the test flights happen?

Eh? Why is a Ukranian company doing its first flight tests in the USA? Do they have money to burn?

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Google Nexus 7 2013: Fondledroids, THE 7-inch slab has arrived

Jan 0

This wonderful screen

Every review praises the increased pixel density. However I'm underwhelmed by the brightdarkness of my Nexus 7Mk 1. Is the New Nexus 7 any brighter? Has anybody actually compared the two? Please let us know.

Where's the Peter Mandelson icon when you need one?

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Smartwatch craze is all just ONE OFF THE WRIST

Jan 0

Re: "If it requires you to pull up a huge telescopic aerial, all the better."

Too right Alistair. This is not the technology we are looking for.

I don't need a better watch when the one I have works fine. My 'phone/pocket computer works fine without a watchlike extension.

Perhaps I could be tempted by a wearable nanofactory (with a huge pull out aerial, of course:).

Actually the hitech gizmo that I'd really heap spondulics on would be autofocusing spectacles. How hard would that be Panasonic/Sony/Apple/Google/etc?

I'm also still waiting for the micro gas turbine powered alternator so that I can run my <insert gizmo of choice> for days with a squirt of methanol, instead of hours spent tethered to chargers.

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Fancy some BEER ON TOAST? Italy invents spreadable booze

Jan 0
Facepalm

Re: This is new?

> Marmite and vegemite in the fridge? WHY?

Errm, presumably to make it so viscous that it's unspreadable. This is even more pointless than keeping butter in a 'fridge!

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3D printed guns are for wimps. Meet NASA's 3D printed ROCKET ENGINE

Jan 0

Re: Errm, how hot?

> key part of the sentence: at 1400psi

That's a trivial pressure increase. Even if it was 1400 'Atmospheres/Bar' I doubt that it would double the melting point. I suspect that there's a journalists' conversion error involved.

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Jan 0
Boffin

Errm, how hot?

> "So far, NASA says, the 3D-printed part seems to have worked "flawlessly," despite being subjected to 1,400 pounds per square inch of pressure at nearly 6,000° Fahrenheit (3,316° C)

Just which Nickel/Chromium alloy has a melting point over 2,000 C? The rocket exhaust may reach 3,316 C, but it isn't in contact with the injectors or the cooled walls of the combustion chamber. Where did you get these figures from?

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