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* Posts by JP19

489 posts • joined 2 Dec 2009

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Internet of Stuff my Pockets: Investors plough 1 BEELLION dollars into IoT

JP19
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the one thing holding back the development of the IoT...

I would say that the main thing holding back development is that for the most part no one can think of anything useful a thing can do by being connected to the internet.

If humans had no reason to talk to each other we wouldn't have any languages either.

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Tesla, Nissan, BMW mull all-for-plug, plug-for-all electrocar charger plan

JP19
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Re: Electric car batteries don't "swap"

http://www.teslamotors.com/batteryswap

Yes but it was only 'designed' to have battery swaps with a single staged demonstration hiding every detail. The reality is it isn't happening and likely never will.

The claim and staged demonstration let them screw more zero emission vehicle credits out of the California Air Resources Board - mission accomplished....

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US citizens want stricter CO2 regulations by two to one – Yale poll

JP19
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CO2 regulation?

You burn X amount of fossil fuel you get Y amount of CO2. There is no changing that - simple chemistry.

There are fanciful schemes for trying to grab the resulting CO2 and bury it in a hole or something.

Couldn't be bothered to read all the crap but from what I did it isn't CO2 regulation it is generating plant efficiency regulation. All generators strive for greater efficiency within the limits of it being economical anyway. All the regulation can do is push those limits the wrong side of economical, especially for older plant. You will get more electricity from your fossil fuel and less electricity from your $.

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Poll: Climate change now more divisive than abortion, gun control

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Obama tells us

"Ninety-seven per cent of scientists agree: #climate change is real, manmade and dangerous."

Not even close http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/article/global-warming-the-97-fallacy/15069

This is the kind of shit that leads anyone with a clue to be hugely sceptical about anything they hear on the subject.

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Windows XP is finally DEAD, right? Er, not quite. Here's what to do if you're stuck with it

JP19
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"As of now, if a new vulnerability is written"

WTF?

You mean a new exploit of a vulnerability Microsoft wrote.

I really don't know how Microsoft can get away with this (but then I never bother reading all the small print). They supplied defective product and should be liable for rectifying the defects forever, regardless of how long it took to discover them.

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British trolls to face 'tougher penalties' over online abuse

JP19
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"Are there more votes in this particular bandwagon?"

Those playing the politically correct game think so. Perhaps it is time for the spectators to tell them they are wrong.

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Battery vendors push ultracapacitor wrappers to give Li-ions more bite

JP19
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"Would it not be essentially the same to put the ultra capacitor on the PCB"

Yes. If there were significant advantages having a super capacitor in parallel with an Li battery it would already be done. A battery containing a super capacitor must also contain less battery.

There may be small $/volume/weight savings integrating a super capacitor in a battery but are those savings enough to make the difference between the advantage of a parallel super capacitor worthwhile or not? I doubt it.

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Satisfy my scroll: El Reg gets claws on Windows 8.1 spring update

JP19
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Re: Windows 9?

"Microsoft are between rock and hard place, and they need to make some hard choices to retain their position on desktop and in the server farm"

Retain their position on desktop? They almost have a monopoly on the desktop. The desktop is a shrinking market.

Win 8 was not about retaining desktop position it was about how much they dare piss off desktop customers and risk loosing desktop position in order to gain in the fondleslab and phone market.

I don't see much indication that it is working or feel it is likely to work in the future but Microsoft having already done most of the damage will probably keep trying.

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Neil Young touts MP3 player that's no Piece of Crap

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Re: Audiophiles...

"I often found that people using that mantra were in fact just jealous of others and fearful that they themselves might like it if they tried but it might prove too expensive. So they would talk it down to give themselves an ideological excuse for why they use a ghetto-blaster and not a decent system."

You often found? Do you inject people with truth serum or something to know what they think?

I suspect audiophools are much more fearful of discovering they can't really tell the difference between a ghetto-blaster and the 'decent system' they spent $thousands on which is why ABX seems to be a swear word for them.

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PM Cameron leaps aboard Internet of Thingies

JP19
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Internet of things - mostly bollocks

Certainly not an industrial revolution.

Popular and hyped by those who see provision of cloud services to the things as an on going revenue stream and a source of large amounts of data which must be valuable somehow.

Government research funding will be mostly pissed away as usual - at least it is only 74 million.

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Pine trees' scent 'could prevent climate change really being a problem'

JP19
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Re: Physics, Chemistry, Biology

"You forgot economy... THE most important factor in climate change..."

No that would be politically correct twats using it as a windmill to tilt against.

Anyone else see PMQs the other day when Milliband attempts to discredit Cameron by trying to get him to acknowledge that there are some AWG sceptical Tory MPs? Of course he called them deniers.

PMQs generally makes me want to puke, but, boy, that one was scraping the bottom of the barrel. Of course Cameron being an almost equally slimey twat could only be evasive.

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China's web giants unite to defuse Windows XP bombshell

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Re: Maybe

"I suppose it depends if they have access to the source code as well"

I keep saying that patching with the owners consent a newly discovered vulnerability in Windows is lot easier than coming up with a scheme to exploit it without the owners consent. The people exploiting the vulnerability don't have source code either (except maybe the NSA :)).

Well done China's web giants for understanding and organizing a cheap solution to the problem.

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Climate change will 'CAUSE huge increase in MURDER, ROBBERY and RAPE'

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"Lead pollution is the cause of quite a lot of crime, and we have the USA to thank for proving this."

You don't know that and it hasn't been proved.

Claiming correlation is causal with no evidence or pulling numbers out of your arse to make predictions like the subject of this article - don't know which is worse.

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US Senate bill would mandate 'kill switch' on all smartphones

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$30 billion eh?

So smart phone theft is costing every man woman and child in America about $100 a year?

I smell made up bullshit

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So cool it 2.4 gigahertz: BATTERY-FREE comms for international band

JP19
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"produces between 120 and 140 microjoules"

So a 50p coin cell can provide as much energy as 18 million button presses. The button would likely fall to bits before you managed to press it 18 million times and likely costs more than 50p.

Unless battery changing is really difficult and so expensive these micro power harvesting schemes are pretty much pointless.

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Whitehall and Microsoft negotiate NHS Windows XP hacker survival plan

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Re: How about

"I've only just got over the shock of my Star dot matrix printer not having any drivers released for Windows Me."

You don't quite seem to have grasped that there is a difference between adding new features to a product you bought and fixing defects.

A vulnerability in XP which leaves it open to attack is a defect which should be fixed free of charge regardless of how long it took to discover. That the NHS is even considering paying Microsoft $1200 per machine to do this for 3 years is ridiculous.

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Friends don't do tech support for friends running Windows XP

JP19
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Re: But a big trusted partner like Microsoft....

"Expecting that products will be supported forever is stupid, especially in a fast moving sector like IT."

What is this support crap? If no one discovers a bug in x years the bug becomes the owners problem not the suppliers?

I expect suppliers to fix bugs forever and if they are not prepared to fix bugs in old products to offer free upgrades to products which have the bugs fixed.

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Mozilla takes a page from Google with sync-friendly Firefox Accounts

JP19
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A page from Google they can keep

So no more pesky code thing to sync other devices which I suppose means no more local encryption.

If I wanted to give some company all my bookmarks, browsing history/whatever I can just use chrome.

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Google invades videoconferencing market with Chromebox for Meetings

JP19
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How many advert breaks will the meetings have

?

p.s. The post is required, and must contain letters.

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Boffin dreams up smart battery gizmo for Raspberry Pi fiddlers

JP19
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Re: Where's the incentive

For campaigns like this you are not backing or investing anything you are just pre-ordering something which will only happen if enough others pre-order.

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Oi, Android devs! Facebook wants your apps to be more secure

JP19
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Re: Oi, Andrios devs, Facebook wants Google to get less personal information.

"Facebook, at this point, almost seems to totally redeem itself in my eyes and heart."

I can't see anything altruistic in this. The less personal data Google gets the more valuable the personal data Facebook gets.

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JP19
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Oi, Andrios devs, Facebook wants Google to get less personal information.

You are almost supposed to back up your entire andriod device and sync anything that can be synced unencrypted to Google servers.

Offering encryption services on android would seem to be a good way to reduce the amount of information android users give to Google.

I am appalled that Google does not provide optional encryption for their android backup and sync services. How hard can it be and what possibly reason could there be for not providing it other than they want to read and analyse your backup and sync data?

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Windows 8.1 becomes world's fourth-most-popular desktop OS

JP19
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Re: Which is more secure? REALLY?

"why should they continue providing free support"

Because 'support' is fixing the bugs they sold you in the first place.

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US feds want cars conversing by 2017

JP19
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I can't see this being very practical

For things like planes or ships which tend to travel in straight lines and normally pass each other with large separation collision prediction is practical.

Roads are not straight, the difference between normal passing and a collision is sometimes only a few feet. I can't see how it can give valid warnings sufficiently early without also giving lots of false warnings.

Also it can't be reliable till everything on the road is fitted with it and drivers relying on it before it is reliable will probably do more damage than is saves.

Looks like an expensive technological non-solution to the problem. The biggest benefit will be to those making money from it directly and from back handers.

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Cupertino copied processor pipelining claims Wisconsin U

JP19
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Re: History of Pipelining ..

My memory is hazy but I worked on IBM mainframes in the late 70's and they pre-fetched, decoded, and pre-fetched operands for three possible execution paths and guessed at the outcome of branches to select the most likely paths. There was crap load of hardware to detect if stores invalidated any of the pre-fetched information.

I can't help but think that by 1998 any wrinkle on pipe-lining and branch prediction should have been considered obvious to those skilled in the art.

Looks like another example of the patent system making the world a worse rather than better place.

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Google Glassholes, GET OFF our ROADS, thunder lawmakers in seven US states

JP19
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Re: "I don't see the problem..."

"You can't discount the possibility of stupidity in some people."

Yes and equally you can't legislate stupidity out of people.

A fool holding a phone is still a fool when you take it away.

So yes I do see the problem. I don't see simple banning legislation as a good solution to that problem.

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Cameron: UK public is fine with domestic spying

JP19
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"My sense is that"

He doesn't have any sense...

I know he would like to think that we think he and his minions are doing a really good job saving us from those awful terrorist.

The reality is the terrorist threat barely exists, if it were more significant he still wouldn't be able to save us from it and overall he is just pissing away vast amounts of our money, privacy, and liberty to support those lies.

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NatWest 'spam' email cockup got me slapped with late payment fee, says angry Reg reader

JP19
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Another lesson

Receiving spam email is annoying. Not receiving email which isn't spam can be expensive.

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US govt watchdog slams NSA snooping as illegal, useless against terrorism

JP19
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Re: The big issue in a nut shell

"we had intelligence data on several of the perpetrators before hand"

It didn't require much intelligence to figure out 3 or 4 suicidal loons armed with small knives could hijack an airliner and crash it into a building - a handful of suicidal loons figured it out and it is not like aircraft hijacking hadn't happened before.

Oh how different the world could have been for the sake of a few cabin doors with locks.

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JP19
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Re: The big issue in a nut shell

"caught between a rock and a hard place on this one"

A position they happily placed themselves in. By definition you can not effectively combat terrorism - that is why it is terrifying. Politicians lie telling you they can and the dumber section of the population believes it and thanks them for it. The enormous army fighting the war against terror with their snouts in a $ trillion trough are quite pleased about it as well.

Thankfully there are hardly any terrorists and almost no competent and equipped ones. They haven't foiled any terrorist plots worth worrying about because there were none. Basically it has been an enormous waste of money, privacy, and liberty the blame for which lies with dishonest scumbag politicians (and the dummies who believe them).

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A BBC-by-subscription 'would be richer', MPs told

JP19
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Bollocks

"Roughly 80% of people say they would keep paying for the BBC if the cost was no different to the licence fee"

With only 80% paying they equivalent of the license fee they would have 80% of their income so the cost would have to be different or have to be less or lower quality output. Less than 80% would keep paying for a worse service and it just spirals down.

Also what people say they will do and what they will actually do are different especially when it comes to spending money.

I don't think there is a snowball in hell's chance the BBC would take more money as a subscription service.

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Your squirty insecticides make bumblebees SHRINK, warn boffins

JP19
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could be shrinking

Could eh? More speculation which gets press coverage because in a self flagellating way some people would like it to be true,

If being big is so great why did normal bees evolve to be the size they are?

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Clink! Terrorist jailed for refusing to tell police his encryption password

JP19
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"I'm just shocked that an anti-terrorist law was actually used against an actual terrorist."

"to use a remote-control toy car to plant a homemade bomb at the TA centre"

Actual terrorist or bumbling fool that got his ideas from watching movies and

"were arrested before any preparations for an attack were put together"

hadn't actually done anything?

I would say the chances of them implementing this cunning plan were slim, the chances of it working slim again, and the chances of it doing significant harm or damage if it worked at all also slim.

Forgive me for not feeling terrorised.

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Google gobbles Wi-Fi thermostat maker Nest for $3.2 BEEELLION IN CASH

JP19
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Re: Why is this coming as a surprise to anyone?

"Google was funding Nest throughout its various rounds of raising venture capital"

So Google actually paid 3.5 billion to themselves? (or a proportion of it)? I smell tax avoidance.

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JP19
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More not being evil coming up

I guess the thermostats will soon have microphones for voice control and cameras so they can see if people are there and if they look hot or cold.

They are already web connected so Google can get to see and hear what you do in your homes as well as your computers, fondleslabs, and phones.

And 3.2 billion for a bloody thermostat company? Maybe they see it is another route into people's homes after the flopped powermeter attempt and will be able to use it as a lever to force utilities to cooperate with them on smart metering and smart appliances.

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Faster, more private, easier to read: My 2014 browser wishlist

JP19
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Re: Block by default

"Only because so many browsers allow JS by default"

I remember complimenting Amazon years and years ago for providing a web site which wasn't riddled with javascript.

Didn't last.

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Why 2014 might just be the year of the Google Chromebook

JP19
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Re: Dear Google

"so that you have access to all my documents as well as my emails and entire browsing history"

Yep and your downvoters are the dicks that already give google all their personal information and would feel better about it if everyone else did as well.

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Virgin Galactic's supersonic space ship in 71,000-ft record smash

JP19
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Marvelous

They can fly to the edge of space at supersonic speeds but still haven't figured out how to answer a customer services call in less than 50 minutes.

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Thought sales were in the toilet before? Behold the agony: 2013 was a PC market BLOODBATH

JP19
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Re: What's the point of upgrading

"how PC performance has increased dramatically in the last few Years"

It hasn't really. Performance for the money has gone up a lot at the low end. I would have to spend a pile of money to just about double the performance of the 4 year old machine I am using and I didn't spend a pile of money on it 4 years ago.

I spend a lot of time in CAD applications and am prepared to pay more than most for processor performance and 4 years on the available performance increase isn't really tempting me.

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Two guilty over 'menacing' tweets to feminist campaigner

JP19
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Re: We are the knights who recently said "ne", but now say...

"We live in different times now"

Only because some people are dick heads and various factions prefer times to be different. Like politicians who like the idea that pretending to save us from terrorists will make us think they are a little less of a waste of space and the huge army that is being paid to fight a war against almost non-existent terror.

In terms of life lost and property damage 9/11 was equivalent to a 2 week blip in business as usual. 2 weeks after 9/11 as many Americans again had died from accidents, homicides, and suicides. The Mumbia terror attacks of 208 killed 166, during the 3 day attack around 1500 Indians were killed on their roads.

If you want to spend money to save lives fighting terror with it is piss poor value.

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Android will ship more than ONE BILLION mobes+slabs in 2014

JP19
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and

Google gets a billion more sets of personal information to 'not be evil' with - lol.

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How to kill trolls and influence Apple people: A patent solution

JP19
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Re: The problem with patents

"Where a simple and ingenious solution is found to a product -- something that nobody had seen before, but is obvious once you see it."

I don't see that as a problem. The number of ideas which no one has ever thought of before and isn't likely to in the near future are almost zero and that is much more the case than it was a century ago. People are going to have simple ideas anyway - the lack of possibility of making a pile of money from a simple idea isn't going to stop people thinking them or cause them to forget or keep them secret.

I don't mind the assessment of claimed values being generous and reflecting effort and costs put into other bad ideas.

People seem to think if they have one good idea they deserve to get rich from it, like having ideas is some kind of lottery with a jackpot - they don't it is the flawed patent system which has produced that kind of thinking.

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JP19
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The problem with patents

The problem with patents is their value is based on how useful the 'invention' is.

The aim of the patent system is to encourage invention and sharing of the resulting knowledge. To adequately encourage invention the reward needs to reflect the amount of effort and expense that went into invention not how much money can be made by exploiting it.

I suggest patents should be filed with a claimed value representing the effort and expense that went into the invention and that value may be challenged. The holder would be required to give full and transferable rights to anyone paying the claimed value.

That would get rid of silly round corner patents which couldn't claim more than a few hundred $ value while the likes of big pharma investing millions in R&D could easily claim million $ values.

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Antarctic ice shelf melt 'lowest EVER recorded, global warming is NOT eroding it'

JP19
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Re: Point 3

"We also have a domestic 6kw turbine and it's making ~£6000 p.a."

What you really mean is it is making about £1500 a year and adding £4500 a year to other people's electricity bills?

"So turbines aren't all bad."

Yeah good for stealing other people's money, piss poor otherwise but still not as bad as PV installations.

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JP19
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Re: Lewis isn't evil

"sceptical about climate change there is a scientist that believes that the change is due to humans."

Scientists do not believe. Belief is for fools and their religion.

Scientist have theories which have failed to be disproved to varying degrees. Skepticism is at the heart of science. Just goes to show how twisted the debate over climate change has become.

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WikiLeaks Party meets Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad

JP19
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"giving positive PR to regimes that use nerve gas on their own people."

Sure, killing a few civilians with nerve gas because it was a bit quicker than shells and bullets was worth a publicity own goal of enormous proportions which brought down the wrath of every right thinking nation in the world (until they found they couldn't actually pin it on the Syrian regime).

At worst it was a mistake or rouge faction within the Syrian regime, far more likely it was some of the murderous rabble in the opposition deciding martyring some of the people they were supposed to be fighting for was worth the publicity.

I am quite sure we in the west get an extremely one sided view and speculation of what is going on in Syria. I applaud the Wikileaks party for trying to find out for themselves and in their position I would want to talk to the 'other' side first.

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Britain's costliest mistake? Lord Stern defends his climate maths

JP19
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Re: An even costlier mistake?

"The root cause must be the inability of so many (all?) of our law-makers, governors and policy makers to have a grasp of basic arithmetic (not even maths)"

Politicians don't deal with truth or accuracy. In almost all areas they sprout utter bullshit made up numbers to justify their policies or opinions. From binge drinking, knife crime, obesity to HS2 justification and Scottish devolution it is just made up shit.

What matters to politicians is not that something is true or accurate, what matters is how many voters they think will or can be convinced to believe it. I think most of them spending all day lying to us and each other just don't understand the difference between truth and lie any more.

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JP19
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"the government would make such a huge decision based on what report without sourcing a few different ones or peer reviewing"

You seem to have the impression that politicians are vaguely competent and care about anything more than looking good and getting elected.

They wanted a huge windmill so they could look good tilting at it. They commissioned a report that gave them one, why would they look further?

I remember at the time thinking it was a huge international willy waving competition to see who could wear the hairiest vest, except it was us that had to wear the vest not them. Nu-Lab being the biggest pack of wankers in the world found winning easy.

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British Second World War codebreaker Alan Turing receives Royal pardon

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"is a wonderful Christmas gift to the world"

Excuse me while I barf. The only one it would be a gift to has been dead for 60 years.

It is vacuous gesturing driven entirely by political self promotion. Look how much more caring, thoughtful, and sexual orientation tolerant we are than our predecessors 60 years ago were, don't you just have to love (and vote for) us?

Any politician who claims this is a good or worthwhile idea is a dishonest slimeball - so that's probably all of them.

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Click here to BEAT OFF David Cameron's web SMUT ban

JP19
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WTF

So it is a proxy server invoked when BT or whoever return a 'no porn for you' page.

How long will that last with everyone streaming 1080p porn through it? About 2 minutes but you can pay 2 quid a month to get 'super fast speeds'.

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