* Posts by big_D

1877 posts • joined 27 Nov 2009

Multiple fondling on the MIGHTY 12-INCH iOS 9 SLAB — so, so close now

big_D
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Re: Wow...

Anything Microsoft can do and we ridicule, we can do too... And it's cool.

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Celebrating 20 years of juicy Java. Just don’t mention Android

big_D
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Re: Alternatives?

Ingram Micro as well. We have to have Java installed in order to use their B2B ordering portal.

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big_D
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Re: RE: Just in his mind I think

A lot of our B2B partners still have Java portals. Glad the purchasing role has been removed from my job description, I could de-install Java.

We still use it for server side on a lot of platforms.

My Surface Pro 3 has been a lot quieter since I de-installed Java and Flash.

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Why does Uber keep its drivers' pay so low? Ex-CFO: 'Cos we can'

big_D
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Re: Ah, yes. "Capitalism"

why should the passenger care if their taxi is insured or not?

Because it is a legal requirement in most countries in order for the vehicle to even be on the road!

As to the driver, if they are caught without insurance or with invalid insurance (i.e. private insurance whilst plying for hire), then they will usually lose their licence for a year or more, they can have the vehicle confiscated (depending on country), they can face jail time and they face heavy fines.

That is the positive side, assuming they are caught by a spot-check. On the negative side, if they are involved in an accident, then they are liable for paying for all damage, for personal injury, compensation etc. for all parties!

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Re: Ah, yes. "Capitalism"

@Montreal Sean and add to that that a normal commuter car probably has no passengers 99% of the time, whereas a taxi is likely to have one or more passengers for most of the time it is on the road (depending on how far they have to drive for pickups).

The biggest problem in Germany is that without a professional driving licence you cannot get commercial insurance for carrying passengers. I'm pretty sure most Uber drivers aren't willing to pay out for the extra training, exams and tests. That means that, currently, most of Ubers cars in Germany are driving illegally - they are driving on private insurance, which is null and void if you carry paying passengers.

At least with a registered taxi, if he isn't insured, he will lose his taxi plate and his registration plate, until he gets the insurance. With Uber, they can continue driving, until the insurance company or the police get suspicious and check the driver out - or the driver has an accident and is personally liable for all damages, injuries and compensation.

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Get off the phone!! Seven out of ten US drivers put theirs and your lives at risk

big_D
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Re: Statistics

An awful lot of people "get away with it". That is the problem. They are on a lonely stretch of road and wandering across 3 lanes doesn't cause an accident... This time.

I was in a car with a friend, her 4 children and her nanny. She was writing SMS as we were barrelling down the Autobahn. She drifted from the right lane onto the hard shoulder and back across all three lanes to almost hit the central reservation, before wandering back to the left lane. When she looked up, she was in the lane where she had started from! So no worries!

Since then I have refused to set foot in a car when she is driving.

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big_D
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Re: equivalent

Using my phone's sat nav = $250 fine

Using a window mounted after market sat nav = illegal in the next state over

Using a new cars integrated sat nav = ok

The satnav in my last Ford disables input once the vehicle is in motion - with the exception of zooming, hitting the diversion button or selecting from the last 5 destinations. Everything else is locked, even if there is a passenger in the vehicle.

Additionally, the satnav in the window "could" fall off and cause a distraction or block certain controls, the built-in one can't.

I don't have a satnav in my current car; that said in the last 4 years I've probably used a satnav 3 times.

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Choose Deutsche Telekom for all your bargain spying needs

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I know why it is so cheap, they tried to stiff this month for a contract we never signed up to... After 4 years of the non-existent contract not running, they sent us a bill for nearly 6K...

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I'm surprised, Deutsche Telekom are normally rip-off merchants!

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Well YES, Silicon Valley VCs do think you're a CRETIN

big_D
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Re: Well,

Living in Germany it is difficult to get hold of Marmite. It is something I stock up on when I come back to Blighty to visit the family.

We generally eat fresh bread, which doesn't need toasting - or turns into tasteless cardboard when toasted.

We do also have "toast bread", but that is about 60% smaller than a normal slice of bread...

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big_D
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Coat

Re: Well,

5 minutes every day? Our toaster lies in the cupboard for over 25 days a month, it is taken out every now and then and plugged in for a couple of minutes to make some toast, before it is packed away in the cupboard again. I'm not sure how much bitcoin it will earn at less than a quarter of an hour of "on" time every month - then you'll have to deduct the boot times from those 15 minutes - I'm guessing probably less than 5 minutes of processing a month...

And a replacement cycle of around 20 years...

I think I'll stick with my dumb toaster, thanks all the same.

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Last flying Avro Vulcan, XH558, prepares for her swan song

big_D
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Re: Part of the UKs unique aviation heritage

I used to drool over the Lightning as a kid every time I went to Hendon. A fantastic aircraft, it isn't pretty, just brutish and functional.

The Sunderland was another great aircraft. My father flew the one that was in Hendon, ISTR that it went to India after Coastal Command were finished with it and my father was part of the crew that delivered it*.

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Re: What a shame

A friend of mine was a stewardess on the London - New York run of the Concorde. I saw it a few times, even went on board, but I never got to fly in it.

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big_D
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Re: What a shame

I saw it when I was still living in Fareham, the did a fly-past at the Lee on Solent Air Show.

My father was a technician on the Vs during his sting in the RAF in the late 50s, early 60s.

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Apple patches FREAK-ed out Watch

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Re: As Always ....

@Sebby I agree that the patch not being available on release day is shameful for the older, known bugs. But if the hardware had been in the manufacturing pipeline since before the bugs were known, then it is understandable that they are released unpatched.

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Please no non-consensual BACKDOOR SNIFFING, Mr Obama

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Re: WTF Richard Head

It sounds like Cameron is either a Luddite or he doesn't understand encryption and its uses.

If he gets his way, then all commerce on the Internet will be compromised and all communications as well. He will push commerce back to the High Street and cash on the barrel head. No more credit cards, no more cash points, because without secure communications they will be compromised and not save for any transactions.

He will push the UK back into the early to middle 20th Century, in terms of commerce and communications.

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The USA seems not to realise that the use of solid encryption is the one thing their citizens need in their fight against crime.

Yes, the bad guys can use it as well, but if the normal citizens can't use it, they are open to the whims of the bad guys and, well, the bad guys ignore the laws anyway, so they will just continue to use strong, non-US sanctioned encryption.

It is a lose-lose situation for the USA.

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Microsoft's Surface 3 is sweet – but I wouldn't tickle my nads with it

big_D
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Re: Why Why I always asked myself for Surface

My Surface works fine as a laptop on my lap... It doesn't fall over.

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Californians get first chance to be RUN OVER by a GOOGLE ROBOT

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Re: 'capped at 25mph'

@Roger 10 these are designed for local trips, the commute into the centre of town to work, going to the shops etc.

Around here that is all sub 30mph.

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In many parts of Europe there are cars limited to under 25mph. Scooters and mopeds, some cars, like a throttled Fiat Pandas, Ligier and other microcars, which are often restricted to 25 or 40km/h and can be driven on a moped licence (Germany, Spain, France Austria etc.).

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Blocking pirate sites doesn't weaken pirates say Euroboffins

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Re: Am I the only one

Pretty much. I found out about it when the press in Germany were talking about visitors getting invoices from lawyers and threats of court action. I then did a bit of research and blacklisted all of the "well known" sites at home... The next day my daughter was complaining that she couldn't access the site any more.

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LOHAN's final test flight moniker: The people must decide

big_D
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Headmaster

Lube and Harlot?

That seems a bit OTT. In conjunction with LOHAN, somebody might get the wrong idea about lube, but it is an abbreviation of lubricant, which covers a great range of products for different purposes and different industries.

Likewise, I find Harlot isn't so family unfriendly. It was certainly a word I grew up with as a kid.

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Heartbleed, eat your heart out: VENOM vuln poisons countless VMs

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Re: A "new vulnerability" that has been there for 10+ years?

Lazy wording, it should be "a newly discovered vulnerability," but the headline doesn't sound as good.

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More oompa loompas needed to push Google's EU agenda

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First two laws

I still like the Frank Herbert concept.

1st most grievous offence, punishable by death: corruption by a public servant

2nd most grievous offence, punishable by death: attempting to corrupt a public servant.

Make lobbying by companies illegal and maybe, just maybe, the politicians and public servants will actually look out for those that they are supposed to look out for - the little people.

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Time to get your babble on: Microsoft opens Skype Translator Preview to all comers

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Working in Germany and having to do a lot of translations to and from English, I am a regular user of Bing Translator (50% usable) and Google Translate (30% usable). Both are very poor - and interestingly the more formal the English, the less accurate they are! Google's biggest failing point is the word "not", it just leaves it out! "Do not" translates to the German equivalent of "do", don't translates correctly.

If Skype works similarly, then it could lead to some embarrassing problems...

"Do not shoot the hostages!"

BANG!

"Er, what just happened?"

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Re: Shouldnt that be

Shouldn't they have lodged that complaint 20 years or so ago?

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Gaze upon the desirable Son of Alpha: Samsung Galaxy A5

big_D
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It depends on how much you use it... I get between 4 hours and 72 hours out of my Galaxy S3.

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Delphix hires anti-PR bloke Silicon Valley Watcher as head of PR

big_D
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Well, is it a press release, if they publish it on their own site and their own, controlled media streams, such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter etc.

They will probably publish their "high quality" stuff there and push a mini press release with a link at the press... So instead of being spoon-fed a press release that has been pushed to them, the journos will now have to pull the press release down. It is a new paradigm...

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Microsoft points PowerShell at Penguinistas

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It depends which way you are going. Linux admins who also administrer one or two Windows servers probably wouldn't be interested.

If you have a server farm with dozens of Windows machines and a growing number of Linux boxes, you might be interested, because you are moving from a PowerShell environment to a heterogeneous environment and if you can do that without having to re-invent the wheel, then that saves time and money.

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Get ready: 'Critical' Adobe Reader patches coming on Tuesday 12 May

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Yeah, I've given up on Flash and de-installed / disabled it in all browsers. I rarely use the Adobe Reader these days. The built-in reader in Firefox is okay for most things and I like the Windows 8 Reader app, making annotations is useful, but the full-screen mode is a bit of a pain when I'm working on the SP3 without an external display.

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Almost EVERY SAP install hackable, researchers say

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Re: and that's how we do it in Austfailia

My previous employer had outsourced their IT and I was their first in-house admin, back in 2010... Their PCs were all from 2003/2004 and none had had any updates since then. The PCs only had 256MB RAM, so the AV software (which was current) was set to never scan and not do real-time checks.

In addition the support company had reset all passwords to 12345 and had told users that they could not change their passwords!

Add to that the fact that the Exchange Server was configured to allow every user OWA / moile access (and the employee with mobile devices were all running Blackberrys over a BES server) from the Internet and the whole thing was a nightmare!

The first things I did were to force password changes and disable OWA / mobile access. I then set about updating the hardware - I did make the mistake of trying to run a virus scan on the PCs, they were practically unusable for about 3 days!

It turned out the sites were infected with Conficker and dozens of other viruses and nobody was aware of it. I was a real pain to clean up - especially as they were running 24/7 production and with Conficker you needed to keep the machines isolated, until the network was cleaned up. Try telling the production manager you need to take their machines offline for a day, because the controlling PCs need cleaning up.

The best laugh was the PC in the sulphuric acid store, the motherboard was completely corroded. The user had been backing up - to a second partition on his local drive, because the network was unreliable (the network port was corroded).

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Tough admin forces hacker to STRIP to PANTS, LEAP to his DEATH

big_D
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Re: Client server

The client is (or should be) only responsible for showing the user where the server says the character is (and those around it). It then sends back movements and actions as instructions for the server to react to. The server then collects the movements and actions for those in a certain position and calculates the results (E.g. combat, movement, collission with other objects / characters etc.) and send the new position, health changes, equipment changes, scene changes, special effects etc. that the client then needs to display to the user.

For some movements the client will initiate the recalculation locally, instead of waiting for a response from the server (in order to reduce "lag effects"). That is why you often get rubber-banding, where your character will charge off into the distance, then spring back to a position much nearer the point of origin.

Most games have in the T&Cs that any attempt to manipulate the client or the communications with the server will result in bans, account deletion etc.

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Phablet for the biz fleet with easy typing: Microsoft Lumia 640 XL

big_D
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Re: Good idea

Because.

The longer answer is, whilst each individual model has a relatively small array of components, they are complex and often custom built.

An ARM processor is not an ARM processor, most have custom extensions. Likewise there are different modem chips etc.

Until the S6, the Galaxy used a Xeneos processor in most of the world, but had to use a Snapdragon in the USA, because the LTE chipset for the Xeneos wasn't compatible with the LTE implementation in the USA. If you used an international Galaxy in the USA, it wouldn't get 4G - the same is true of the Lumia 930, it is an LTE device, yet all the reviews on American sites claim it is only 3G; because it suffers from the same problem, the Lumia Icon works with Verizon LTE, but the 930 is stuck on UMTS in the USA.

Different memory controllers, different cameras, different sensor packages, different fingerprint sensors etc. All "common" features on many modern phones, but all different, so they need their own drivers. That means the manufacturers need to create custom driver packages - and test that everything works together.

The AOSP based ROMs then need to reverse engineer many of those drivers in order to get them working.

That is why you need a custom ROM.

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Volkswagen Passat GT 2.0-litre TDI SCR 190 PS 6spd DSG

big_D
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Re: 35k?

And an ex-demo Passat would be a lot less than 35K...

An ex-demo anything is going to be a lot cheaper than "new".

Here we have "Tageszulassung" or pre-registered, which will also save you a bundle of cash - I think I saved around 6K on my Toyota Verso.

My Citroen C3 was a "Jahreswagen" (nearly-new, often factory employee pre-owned). That saved me a bundle as well - nearly 2 years old, but less than 10K kilometres, 12K€ saving.

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Re: Heated steering wheel???

Driving to work in -20°C conditions, a heated wheel is nice for the first few minutes - especially if you've just frozen your fingers through your gloves clearing the snow and ice from the vehicle...

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Folding mirrors

Come from a class above?

So my 2012 Citroen C3 is a class above the Passat? :-O

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Spooks BUSTED: 27,000 profiles reveal new intel ops, home addresses

big_D
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Re: Utter Stupidity

Probably a good job they didn't look at FourSquare as well. Probably:

CIA_Superspy : checked into CIA

CIA_Superspy: checked into coffee shop

CIA_Superspy: checked into undercover surveillance

...

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PEAK PC: 'Most' Google web searches 'come from mobiles' in US

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Re: Big display

Give me a real keyboard with Cherry Blue MX keys over a poxy smartphone keyboard any day of the week.

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Re: Commissions are for closers

@Mark 85 exactly, I wouldn't walk into such a situation unprepared and rely on my smartphone.

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Big display

I'll do a mobile search if I need information immediately when I'm out and about, but generally I'll wait until I can get to a decent display and a proper keyboard, before I do a search.

I find search on mobile devices to be too frustrating.

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Windows 10 bombshell: Microsoft to KILL OFF Patch Tuesday

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Re: Microsoft taking a swipe at another company

There are probably ways to exploit WP7 and the browser, but with such a small market now, would anyone bother?

My daughter is still using her WP7 Lumia, although she is looking for something newer - she would take an iPhone 6, but isn't willing to splash out nearly a grand on it.

I currently have a WP8 Lumia and am very happy with it - and it has had numerous updates over the last year, both new OS versions and updates.

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Re: Just like Windows Phone

@RoninRodent one of the reasons why I never by a carrier branded phone.

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Re: Microsoft taking a swipe at another company

@returnmyjedi I'm comparing like for like... Both are operating systems that are connected to the Internet. I don't care that one runs on a smartphone and tablets and the other runs on tablets and PCs, they are both connected to the Internet, so both need long term security.

Yes, the Windows Phone 7 is a blight on Microsoft in this regard.

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Re: Just like Windows Phone

You would have thought, but the last web browser exploit they didn't bother patching older versions, just said that people should move to 4.4.4 or later. Great, when you phone supports that, but if you are stuck on 4.1 or 4.2 you are SOL.

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Re: Remember when...

With WSUS and Enterprise, you can plan the updates as you do now - the article specifically says that corporates will get their updates monthly, as now, but private machines will get updates as needed.

The corporate tools also allow for the separate testing and staggered release of patches, nothing here will change.

For private machines, the update cycle will be faster - but generally those machines are also not as well protected as corporate machines. They probably don't have much in the way of AV software - probably a 3 month trial of McAfee that ran out 3 years ago, they are probably, at best, behind a compromisable home router and the average user has no idea about the dangers.

On SUSE, I'd get daily updates, but it was up to me to decide which updates to install and when. This will probably be the same with Windows 10. Either you can go full auto or you can manually install as you want.

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Re: Microsoft taking a swipe at another company

@DasBub not really, my 2002 Windows XP machine stopped getting updates last year, my current machines will get updates going into the next decade.

My Android smartphone? 2.5 years old and not even security updates within the last year! Patches for well known security exploits for unpatched Android 4.3? Forget it. Although, I suppose I should consider myself lucky that Samsung at least upgraded it from 4.1 to 4.3.

This isn't purely Google's fault, but it is their ecosystem and they don't seem to be doing anything about keeping their customers patched. The hardware has been delivered, live with the defects or buy a newer device...

To be honest, I prefer the Microsoft attitude.

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Mozilla to whack HTTP sites with feature-ban stick

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Re: Action. Counteraction.

@streaky yes, they will change them, but they haven't yet, even though they are flagging non-Google properties already as insecure.

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Re: why, why, why... what is the point?

@Mycho

Before the days when you were legally required to keep a record of who has driven your motor vehicle in the last 14 days, I take it?

Try that today and you're legally liable for any and all speeding tickets.

No such requirement here, and if you cannot be clearly identified on the photo (assuming it wasn't an actual pullover), then you can generally not be prosecuted. Companies have to have a log book for all company vehicles that aren't driven by one person.

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Re: Action. Counteraction.

This is just copy-catting, Google are trying to push sites to do this with Chrome as well... And Google are flagging up valid Certs using SHA1 as insecure - unless they come from Google...

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Old, forgotten, lonely? SQL Server 2016 will sling you into Azure

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Re: Haha!

It sounds like a modern take on the old practice of moving stale data to tape, keeping the local performance higher by not having to index low access data. If the data can't be found locally, you can then load up the relevant tape - or in this case the SQL Server will "stretch" out to the off-site store to pull down that data.

For those queries, it will be slower, but for the rest, it should keep performance in the acceptable range. If it is working dynamically, then if the data starts to be regularly used again, then I would guess that it moves it back locally.

I used to work for an oil exploration company, the current surveys were held online, the older data, which wasn't needed very often was held in a huge warehouse with hundreds of thousands of tapes and transferred by van back to the data center as needed.

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