* Posts by RIBrsiq

341 posts • joined 15 Nov 2009

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It’s Brexploitation! Microsoft punishes UK for Brexit with cloud price-gouging

RIBrsiq
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>> "For new Office or Azure cloud customers in the UK, no exchange rate can justify any price rise at all".

You are aware that data centres, no matter where they are located, require quite a lot of gear not made in the UK and mostly priced in, or at least with prices based on, USD, yes...?

The price increase percentage being well-above the GBP price collapse is arguable, but it's probably just indicative of what Microsoft expects the future will bring.

Anyway, price increases from foreign service providers is a boon to local service providers, no? Think of it as an opportunity for domestic IT services!

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Sysadmin figures out dating agency worker lied in his profile

RIBrsiq
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Re: Well...

It's the same, BTW, when entering credentials on a Windows command line, just FYI.

The story is referring to entering them using what sounds like a GUI of some sort, where the SOP has been "tab to move to next field" for as far as I can recall. It also sounds that some form of error was thrown but not noticed. So I cannot really blame the UI designer(s), based on what's reported here.

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SHIFT + F10, Linux gets you Windows 10's cleartext BitLocker key

RIBrsiq
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Re: And this is why I prefer OpenBSD's approach to Disk Encryption

There's a lot to recommend stand-alone FDE with no backdoors or recovery options whatsoever. But it's not appropriate for a corporate environment where multiple entities may have legitimate claim to the data. There needs to be a way to recover even if the day-to-day key is "lost".

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RIBrsiq
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Re: "dns claim my server is updates.microsoft.com"

>> "Yup, the OS will only trust updates that have been signed using the same key as the kernel and base libraries were signed with".

I thought of this, and I'm not sure it will save the day, really.

I don't know the details of the link to Windows update itself -- I always figured the digital signatures on the updates themselves are enough, so I didn't bother to dig any deeper. But certainly the link to local WSUS is not usually HTTPS; though it can be.

You see, the update itself can be perfectly legit! Just so long as it will trigger this behaviour, it can be used to effectively remove BitLocker.

I mean, it doesn't affect me, so far as I can determine, because I'm a paranoid basterd. But this one is an Epic Fail worthy of the great Bloody Stupid Johnson himself!

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RIBrsiq
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Re: What's wrong with that, Microsoft...?

"[T]ens of thousands of Windows desktops" with BitLocker deployed?

Are you sure that's a real scenario?

Even if it is, shouldn't something be worked out using AD instead of storing cleartext decryption keys on the local machine...? Or, if that's impossible, for whatever reason, shouldn't enabling this "feature" require an admin flipping something in a GPO or something? Some sort of opt-in? If all of that is impossible, shouldn't this be well-documented by Microsoft, to let people know that there's this tiny security hole they should consider?

This is not a bug. This is a "feature" of a security system that completely and totally obliterates it, in certain scenarios. It didn't happen by accident. Someone sat down and engineered this. And any number of other people signed off on it.

I, personally, would be very happy to see all of them fired.

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RIBrsiq
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Facepalm

Security is a trade-off. Usually with convenience.

I would appreciate it if Microsoft didn't decide to not inconvenience me when I have clearly elected to be inconvenienced. Please assume that I know what I am doing, and have good reason to do it when I use things like BitLocker, etc.

I mean, just ask for the bloody key on boot time, same as you would in any other case the machine is rebooted. What's wrong with that, Microsoft...? What's wrong with that?

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SQL Server on Linux: Runs well in spite of internal quirks. Why?

RIBrsiq
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Re: Interesting

I doubt Microsoft are planning to go out of the OS business any time soon...

Look: if someone is not willing to run Windows, but wants to run SQL; why should Microsoft refuse to sell to them?

I wouldn't be surprised if the main reason they didn't do this earlier were that the overhead due to the virtualization required was too much, until very recently.

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NASA sets fire to stuff in SPAAACE. On purpose. Because science

RIBrsiq
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Go

"If you're going to have crime, it might as well be organized crime"

As we spend more time in space, we are going to find out how things burn in space. So it might as well be in controlled circumstances!

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AI is all trendy and fun – but it's still a long way from true intelligence, Facebook boffins admit

RIBrsiq
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Holmes

There's still a long way to go, of course, but I don't keep track of every stimulus, either.

And, doubtless, had I had a different upbringing, I would have different priorities as to what is worth tracking.

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Microsoft kindly offers VMware-to-Azure backup

RIBrsiq
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Coat

First you backup, then you restore.

But not, necessarily, to the same place...

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User needed 40-minute lesson in turning it off and turning it on again

RIBrsiq
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Trollface

Don't knock it! I do this professionally, and it's often just "turning it off and on again"...!!

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Microsoft ❤️ Linux? Microsoft ❤️ running its Windows' SQL Server software on Linux

RIBrsiq
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Go

"Can it run Crysis?"

You joke -- I think -- but I am quite certain that several people are trying to ascertain that right now, even if it weren't an original design goal.

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'Pavement power' - The bad idea that never seems to die

RIBrsiq
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>> But in the context of the UK energy system that doesn't help.

Well, that's not a failure of solar technology, is it? It's a failure of whoever is trying to implement it.

Nothing is a one-size-fits-all.

I mean, if we tried to use, say, tidal generation in this practically-land-locked-desert right here, how well would you expect it to work? And would it not working be at all an indication of how well it would work if properly implemented off of the shores of an island?

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RIBrsiq
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>> How big was the grant (subsidy) you got to install it?

Nothing. Fully funded by a bank loan that's being paid back by the savings on the electricity bills.

>> What value is the feedin tarriff you're getting?

About half of what we pay. But that's practically irrelevant as it's an on-grid setup such that the theoretical maximum we can get is to pay nothing, averaged over a year. As they say; in theory, there's no difference between theory and practice. But in practice, we still pay!

>> And if you honestly expect to get 25 years out of a solar PV installation I have a couple of bridges I'd like to sell you. It'll be down to 50% capacity in 8-9 and half that again by year 16, if the inverters haven't blown by then or some other silicon failure knocked it out.

Well, I'm a simple physics major who does IT for a living, so what do I know...? But the contractual warranty on the inverters and panels is 10 years. And the warranty on the panels includes an efficiency of 80% after 10 years; so I guess we get new panels, if what you're saying is true! In any case, everything breaks down, and I cannot see the fundamental difference that will make solar tech fail more than fossil fuel; or nuclear, for that matter. If anything, I would think that having fewer moving parts will make solar last longer, all things being equal.

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RIBrsiq
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Boffin

>> they all require government subsidies to even look as if they are economically viable.

I was not talking theory, you know.

We have a PV system running, at work. No subsidies whatsoever. It cut down the electricity bill by about 90%, so accounting are purring like kittens. And it's very economically viable, considering that a system with a projected lifespan of 25 years should have paid for itself in 3, even taking into account expected drops in efficiency.

I guess it all depends on who is trying to achieve what and where they're doing it.

That said, it is important to be sane and conservative about things and not promise undeliverable miracles to people who do not know, nor care about the details.

It's clear that a sustainable overall solution would have to be based primarily on nuclear and augmented, where possible, with renewables as the specific environment where the deployment is taking place allows -- I live in a place that's much sunnier than the UK and most of the EU, for example; hence, PV works great, here. So selling a dream of a system that's primarily based on renewable energy while simultaneously feeding the unreasonable fear of nuclear is, IMO, almost criminal.

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RIBrsiq
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>> To be fair, wind and solar are gimmicks too.

It's not possible to run an economy based solely on them, yes. But that's a far cry from it not being possible to run anything useful based on them.

So, no; you're not being fair.

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Fake election news meltdown vortex sucks in Google

RIBrsiq
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Holmes

I personally hate this apparent need everyone seems to have to create a false equivalence and impartiality where none is justified.

We should be partial to the truth. At least the truth in its most basic and uncontroversial form(s); say, if someone denies they said something that they verifiably did say, etc.

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FBI's Clinton email comedown confirms it could have killed the story in a canter

RIBrsiq
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Facepalm

You seem to be unable to use a search engine. Let me help you with that (on a related note: Clippy icon, please?):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarbanes%E2%80%93Oxley_Act

Read. Just the first paragraph will suffice, really.

Do you see anything applicable?

On a more serious note, and as has already been pointed out by many others here and elsewhere, Hillary has been investigated so much that it is by now clear to anyone reasonable that there's nothing to find. Unreasonable people cannot be helped.

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RIBrsiq
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So... emails no older than 7 years were not found on a decade-old laptop. I am completely shocked by that revelation!

I wonder where this "presumption of innocence" stuff I keep hearing about went, in this case?

"Non-partisan" my behind, is all I have to say!!

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Zerg rush! Now Google DeepMind, Blizzard train AIs with StarCraft battles

RIBrsiq
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Terminator

I don't think APM will cut it anymore. APS will very soon be needed, maybe even APμS.

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Build your Type 26 warships next year? Sure, MoD – now, about that contract...

RIBrsiq
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Trollface

I wonder what currency will be specified for payment.

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VMware stubs its toe again: NSX has another VM-flattening bug

RIBrsiq
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FAIL

Paying customer? Unpaid beta tester...?

What's the difference?

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Will AI spell the end of humanity? The tech industry wants you to think so

RIBrsiq
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Re: Eh...?

>> I think you're confusing the objective of the game with one method of achieving that objective.

I think you're confusing me with the article's author.

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RIBrsiq
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Eh...?

"[I]t’s easy to specify the objective function" in Go? A game where the top human players say that they play by intuition...?

"Moving the goal posts", much?

While we're by no means about to develop super-human AI, I think, that's no cause to over-compensate in the other direction and discount what are huge advances in the field.

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AMD is a rounding error on Intel's spreadsheet and that sucks for us all

RIBrsiq
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Pint

I quite fondly remember the days of Athlon, Athlon XP and Athlon 64.

Here's hoping something like them comes back: US$1500+ desktop CPUs I really don't like and can do without, thank you very much!

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Juno probe has tech trouble, cancels orbital re-adjustment

RIBrsiq
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Re: "...so it could concentrate..."

Thanks for the succinct explanation, I enjoyed reading it.

That said, I suspect JeffyPoooh's objection was to the anthropomorphising of a non-sentient space probe, and not questioning the need of shutting down the science instruments for the manoeuvre. But I could be mistaken.

Also: please forgive me, Juno! I don't mean to hurt your feelings you beautiful, beautiful probe, you!

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'There may be no hackers' says Trump in Presidential Debate II

RIBrsiq
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Trollface

"The hacker may be 400lb, or 0lb. Somewhere in that range, certainly! Please feel free to profusely thank me for narrowing that down for you..."

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US govt straight up accuses Russia of hacking prez election

RIBrsiq
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@Marketing Hack

I mostly agree. Except to say that some of the affairs in question are in fact private and thus belong on private servers. Also, government servers and networks are not necessarily any more secure: recall the hack of the Office of Personnel Management systems, a while back.

What's needed is an emphasise on security across the board. Security should always be a corner stone and never an afterthought, I think. But then again, I might be biased.

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RIBrsiq
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Holmes

Re: USA: We be incomptent, yo!

>> Many have noted that paper ballots can not be hacked.

I don't think there's a fear that anyone would directly tamper with the election itself.

What seems to be happening is an attempt to influence the election. IE, through strategic leaking of selected information someone seems to be doing their best to make the US electorate vote a certain way. In which case the specific technology used to vote will hardly matter, obviously.

For what it's worth, I think it's a fool's errand, as the US electorate are so polarized and entrenched that facts no longer seem to matter for a very large percentage. They will vote for whoever their party nominated, regardless of absolutely anything. It's crazy and it's scary.

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'Please label things so I can tell the difference between a mouse and a microphone'

RIBrsiq
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Joke

Re: Engineers!

>> To fix his problem I changed the message from "Press a key to continue" to "Press any key to continue".

So did the keyboard have multiple "any" keys, then...?

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'My REPLACEMENT Samsung Galaxy Note 7 blew up on plane'

RIBrsiq
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Joke

Coupled with the recent report of similar incidents with Samsung washing machines, this makes me think that maybe a senior engineer was transferred from the munitions to the electronics arm of Samsung and she didn't like it. at. all.

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Stingy sapphire lens in Apple's iPhone 7 is as scratchy as glass

RIBrsiq
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Joke

Re: further details?

>> But the "liquid cooling"? At what temperature?

At a high enough temperature, everything is liquid. "Cooling" is, of course, a relative term...

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Google may just have silently snuffed the tablet computer

RIBrsiq
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Windows

I must be getting old: I remember a time when tablets were supposed to kill the PC.

Of course, I also remember a time when PowerPC was supposed to be the future.

Really old...

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ZX Spectrum Vega+ will ship on time, developer claims amid doubts

RIBrsiq
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Go

I may buy one -- while it wasn't a Sinclair, my first serious computing was done on a Z80-based machine; oh, the endless fun POKEing assembly! It sometimes even worked!! -- but I will wait until there's actual HW out there being poked (see what I did, there?) by actual users, if it's all the same to you.

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City of Moscow to ditch 600k Exchange and Outlook licences

RIBrsiq
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WTF?

"starting with an untried-at-scale e-mail system".

Should be fun to watch, that. If one doesn't have to support it. Where's the popcorn...?

But seriously, why weren't they using their own variant of Linux already? I guess no one would grease the proper palms to get that happening, so who cares if it makes sense!

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Elon Musk: I'm gonna turn Mars into a $10bn death-dealing interplanetary gas station

RIBrsiq
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Happy

So... surely they'll have need of a versatile sysadmin with a physics degree who's fluent in several languages, no?

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Victoria Police warn of malware-laden USB sticks in letterboxes

RIBrsiq
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Re: What size?

While I do not think this particular incident depends on it, keep BadUSB in mind.

Linux, I believe, is vulnerable. Indeed, a Windows machine with an AV package that's aware of this is probably in a better position than the typical Linux installation with no AV at all.

No, it's best to only use UFDs you personally depackaged after getting them through a reliable chain of supply from a reputable manufacturer. $deity-knows they're chap enough!

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Post-Brexit UK.gov must keep EU scientists coming, say boffins

RIBrsiq
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Re: @RIBrsiq

>> So perhaps it's more quality than quantity to begin with?

>> Or maybe it's being open and welcoming to foreign talent.

My main argument in a nutshell is that it's mostly the latter -- being open and welcoming -- that's the more significant factor in the long run as other countries put in enough resources in fixing their education and so on, as time goes by.

Obviously the quality of the infrastructure available is a factor. As is the momentum of where on the planet the best people in a given field reside at any given moment in time. That's why a lot of early modern physics is written in German. That's why many of the heavier synthetic elements in the periodic table have US-centric names, while most of the named celestial objects have Arabic names. Etc.

More pertinently, that's why talented individuals will willingly jump through some hoops to go to a place that gives them the best chance to pursue their particular thing most effectively. But the number of hoops they're willing to jump through will go down as their native countries make available to them more and more resources. And many major economies are increasingly doing just this -- look at what the UAE and KSA are doing, for example, to name a couple of non-usual suspects.

Ultimately, in the specific case of BrExit, if the UK makes it harder for EU nationals to work in a stable environment in the UK, then many of them will ask themselves why they should bother and decide to go elsewhere. Coupled with loss of EU funding for research in the UK -- or more accurately redirection of said funding to other places in the EU -- this could be disastrous, from a UK PoV.

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RIBrsiq
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Boffin

@AC

While every country on the planet should invest in better education, more STEM and so on, it's not strictly a money problem.

The fundamental problem is the scarcity of the required calibre of brains -- the basic fool-to-genius ratio of the human race, if you will.

You see (or I hope you do; or would, if it's pointed out), it stands to reason that the distribution of such raw talent is random and uniform over the entire human population on the planet. And the percentage that would be born in any given country is more-or-less the same as said country's population of the human race.

The UK's is not a particularly-large population, obviously.

You can of course do your best to enhance the likelihood that any such talent in your country has a better chance to be discovered, nurtured and developed to its full potential -- that's what all the investment in education and so on is about, essentially. But in an increasingly competitive "market" where other countries are also pouring resources into similar efforts of their own, this does not alleviate the need to try and... attract such people from other countries -- the exact opposite of making them jump through hoops for the privilege of working for you.

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Israeli Pentagon DDoSers explain their work, get busted by FBI

RIBrsiq
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Coat

"There's not much more than fine print between stress testing and DDoS-as-a-service".

The main difference, I believe, is who is ordering the service for whom.

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Florida Man's prized jeep cremated by exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7

RIBrsiq
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Re: Always carry a fire extinguisher under the passenger seat

Excellent idea. Indeed, having an extinguisher in the car at all times is a legal requirement, around these parts.

But would not have helped in this specific case, as it sounds like the car was unattended at the time. Of course, it could be argued that leaving your expensive and combustible S7 to charge in an attended car is courting disaster in and of itself.

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RIBrsiq
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Exactly my thoughts, indeed.

I wonder what the legal situation is, in this case. Are Samsung liable, even after a well-publicized recall?

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Brave idea: Ex Mozilla man punts Bitcoin adblocking browser

RIBrsiq
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Facepalm

Re: @RIBrsiq : VISA doesn't mean credit card details

>> Call me when the US has caught up with current technology.

The US...?

You realize that the world is a bit larger than just the US and wherever you live, right?

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RIBrsiq
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Re: Why Bitcoin ?

You may not see the benefit in being anonymous, as a paying customer. But I hope you will see the benefit of less people having access to your credit card details...

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Google 'Solitaire' ... Just do it

RIBrsiq
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Re: Warning!

>> are we sure this guy was a leet developer back in the 80's

It was a different time...

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Nuclear fallout shelter becomes cloud storage bunker

RIBrsiq
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Facepalm

@Calleb

See icon. For both the original and this post, in fact.

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RIBrsiq
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Trollface

“Our storage algorithm allows us to regenerate any corrupted or lost data.”

Yes, but what if the entire site is lost...?

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New UK trade deals would not compensate for loss of single market membership

RIBrsiq
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Joke

Re: Trade deficits also need to be taken into account

What's a "losse"? How do you "loose" one? And is such action likely to negatively impact any parties it's done at...?

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RIBrsiq
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Boffin

@Tom7

>> "Wait, what, the FTSE100's up?", etc.

Now, I'm not a financial expert -- though maybe that gives my opinion, such as it is, more weight in your eyes, come to think of it -- but it seems to me that if GBP goes down against the rest of the world's major currencies then the total valuation of UK stock as measured in GBP will go up even if their absolute value as measured in "real money" goes down, assuming the drop in stock value is not as steep as the drop in currency value; which it stands to reason would be the case. At least in the short term.

But I like your attitude! I mean, what do experts know about their field of expertise anyway? Amirite...?

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#Shadowbrokers hack could be Russia's DNC counter-threat to NSA

RIBrsiq
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>> [Deniability] for what?

Suppose someone the NSA are not supposed to mess with was messed with using one of these tools/vulnerabilities during the period this compromise of their systems is supposed to have taken place. Further, suppose that this messing is about to be exposed -- or even has already been exposed, in less public circles. Do you still not see the deniability this #Shadowbrokers business creates?

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