* Posts by JaitcH

3595 posts • joined 12 Oct 2009

Luxe cable crimper

JaitcH
Silver badge
Meh

And the big question ...

the price!

Better still, shoot the guy who designed the cable layout in the first place that makes termination such a pain.

AMP will be coming out with their Rolls version, soon. I am still using a AMP tool for terminating cables that is 30 years old!

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Google plots cop detection for auto autos

JaitcH
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Meh

Re: This is NOT a patent.

So what? Google is simply doing an 'Apple'.

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HSBC: How will we verify business banking customers? Selfies!

JaitcH
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Unhappy

What could go wrong? Remember it's HSBC ...

Unfortunately my drivers licence doesn't have a photograph apart from the fact it has a high-gloss surface that resists attempts at copying it - by design.

I don't trust HSBC so count me out.

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Height of stupidity: Heathrow airliner buzzed by drone at 7,000ft

JaitcH
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Unhappy

Re: why now?

Commercial pilots are trying to protect their turf and their jobs!

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JaitcH
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WTF?

Flying Liars? If Commercial Pilots Can Miss Seeing Small Passenger Aircraft, How Come ...

they can spot these even smaller flying objects?

I suggest some of these pilots suffer from more than extreme visual acuity, like wild imaginations.

I was a technician with the Met Office years ago attached to one of their busier weather balloon launch sites. The radiosonde and battery weighed a pound (lb) or two and the balloons were a creamy white.

No pilot ever complained about these aerial objects and they flew tens of thousands of feet in height.

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Ankers away! USB-C cables recalled over freakin' fried phone fears

JaitcH
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WTF?

What other names do ANKER sell under?

Given that many products come off the same production lines in China, with only a label being different, WHAT OTHER CABLES ARE DEFECTIVE?

P.S. Samsung USB C cables are crap - they use HARD PLASTIC sheathing that invariably cracks and then the internal cables break.

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Newest Royal Navy warship weighs as much as 120 London buses

JaitcH
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WTF?

Speaking of Meaningless Comparison Measures ...

If these boats weigh as much as 120 London buses, how many OLYMPIC SIZE POOLS of water will it take to float them clear of the dock floor?

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Sex ban IT man loses appeal – but judge labels order 'unpoliceable'

JaitcH
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WTF?

Way, way, Back in Time, British Justice Was the Benchmark ... then bLIAR Came Along

bLIAR and Blunkett started this sort of 'justice' with their 4 Years Or Your Password legislation. And bLIAR demonstrated PMs can lie to the public and escape retribution ... even make millions of Pounds from it.

What's next - THOUGHT CRIME?

And the UN says privacy is a Human Right! (A sick joke)

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Thailand waters down alien-tracking plan

JaitcH
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FAIL

Another Brain Dead Idea from the Military

Cambodia and Thailand have previously had restrictions on SIM purchases.

The solution was simple. Drop the hotel concierge $5 plus the cost of a SIM and in a few minutes you will have that magic chip. I do this every time I go to BKK to purchase specialised electronic supplies from Western distributors located in Thailand.

Some hotel workers must have thousands of SIMs attached to their names.

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Idiot flies drone alongside Flybe jet landing at Newquay Airport

JaitcH
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Meh

Yet More Pilot Ado About Nothing - Unnecessary Scaremongering

The ATR 72 is one of a family of twin turboprop passenger/freighter aircraft manufactured by Avions de Transport Regional (ATR). ATR, of Toulouse, a joint venture between EADS and Finmeccanica / Alenia Aeronautica (Italy).There are around 1000 flying.

They are popular in 'developing' such as Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and VietNam because they are tough and easily maintained, VietNam Airlines does maintenance for itself as well as Cambodia and Laos. Laos is notorious for increasing seating capacity by adding plastic chairs in the aisles, along with caged pigs, etc.

I have seen one of these ATR72s land, and overrun the runway, and end up mowing the bush at the end of a runway. A simple wipe down of the propellers, along with a touchy-feely gloved hand and the machine was ready to continue.

So for some pilots to complain is stupid as these aeronautical bush whackers would make short shrift of a drone. I suspect, given the speed of the ART72, the size of a drone, and the inability of pilots to focus on distant objects.

Besides, it was THE ATR72 that flew ALONGSIDE the DRONE - the ATR72 being the faster winged object. If this was a road, a faster vehicle approaching from the rear would have to accommodate the slower vehicle by driving to one side and passing.

The fastest quad-drone is around 70-80 K(ilometres)PH and the ATR72 can easily top 300 Knots.

In the States you can fly a weather balloon, with a 12 lbs (5.4 kg) total payload without a permit - and how many of these balloons (popular with students) are reported by aircraft?

As I said, unnecessary scaremongering. Just civil servants trying to make work for themselves.

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London's Met Police has missed the Windows XP escape deadline

JaitcH
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Happy

Scotland Yard not alone - most of VietNam's Governments, too

The Cong An, aka Peoples Police, is responsible for doing Copyright Checks - an annual fiasco where they announce the checks are coming, even posting a schedule of victims. These companies immediately arrange for sets of genuine MS product to be motorcycled from one enterprise to another , so that when the boys in khaki arrive, a pile of CDs awaits inspection.

Funny thing is, the biggest consumer of hot Windows products is ... the Cong An!

Their crappy computers can't run anything better - in fact the Cong An stations I visit to renew business permits have resorted to employees bringing in their own laptops.

Paper is a killer in VietNam, and the government must have the biggest repository of Red Ink, too.

Every household has an Occupancy Book in which is inscribed the names and ID Card numbers of the registered occupants. The local Cong An station has an exact duplicate of the book, along with thousands of others. This replication extends for all the numerous forms the Cong An administers.

They only use computers to print yet more forms ... and watch the InterNet. They are also big in FAX (more paper). Google Translate is the main medium through which they communicate with Foreigners. Google Translate has a 'few' shortcomings when translating in to Vietnamese which either produces laughs or looks of shock.

Long Live XP!

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Hello, Barclays? Why hello, John Smith. We meet again

JaitcH
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FAIL

HSBC had it in place years ago, and they still think my P.A. is me

Like all good techs, and university professors, they like to toot their horn and praise their technical prowess.

So it was with HSBC when they started pulling e-mail addresses and pushing voice calls. I chatted with one of their operators and she said they were experimenting with 'voice id' instead of the lists of questions.

Anyone who has used Nuance Dragon software are very familiar with what can go wrong.

It is possible to emulate another persons voice, borrowing from the Moog synthesiser crowd, and now my PA, a female, is able to impersonate me very well, electronically. On one test we started off with my voice and over a period of 2-3 minutes we slowly morphed from my simulated voice to her natural voice.

Eventually something clicked at the HSBC end and she said "But you are not ..." at which point we flicked back to the simulation. The woman said there is something very wrong because "our equipment is 'infallible'!"

Voice ID suffers from all the usual imperfections of distortion, phase distortion, clicks, etc. You name it.

The real danger is the banks will start saying their equipment is PERFECT and the person who sucked your account dry was YOU! And then they will try to stick you with the losses.

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Crypto Daddy Phil Zimmerman says surveillance society is DOOMED

JaitcH
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FAIL

"... it turned out that they wanted to discuss volume pricing so they could equip their agents."

I guess this is yet further confirmation that the FBI, et al, have NO CONFIDENCE whatsoever in the extremely expensive Motorola designed, US coast-to-US coast clear-channel P25 system.

But Mattel proved that long ago.

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F-35 targeting system laser will be 'almost impossible' to use in UK

JaitcH
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FAIL

F35? Oh, the Dud from Lockheed Martin Aeronautics: over budget, late delivery, under performing

This is most likely a Pentagon ploy to keep politicians critical of the whole scheme from getting to know the truth.

This aircraft barely meets specifications ... so they re-write the specifications!

Did they fix the pilots flying suit problems yet? Or the helmet? (F-35 helmet costs ISD$400,000 - 4 times that of predecessor) How about pilots under 136 pounds aren't allowed to fly any F-35 variant because they may die?

Another 'design by committee' that fails.

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The return of (drone) robot wars: Beware of low-flying freezers

JaitcH
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Happy

Re: Waiting around for home deliveries?

VietNam Post insists on delivery to the recipients hand (bunch of thieves in the streets makes this imperative).

Our local P.O. will send you an SMS if the addressees Cell Number is appended to their name. This is really great for all parties involved.

My unofficial arrangement with the local P.O. Sorting Office, which serves 7,000,000+ people, is that they will leave me a SMS message and I can collect it at the Sorting Office Sunday through Friday!

Better than the (new) Royal Mail.

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JaitcH
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Happy

Re: Street Cameras on every corner? BEAT THEM!

Many of these cameras use Infra-Red - especially the number plate readers/loggers.

The solution to this Big Brother problem lies in the ubiquitous Infra-Red 3 watt LED.

Surrounding your number plate with several of these 3-watt LEDs, with a couple placed in the centre of the plate as 'dummy' mounting screws, effectively 'blinds' IR cameras. Modulating them at 4-10 Hz increases their effectiveness.

Wearing a US-style baseball cap with 5mm IR LEDs scattered around the top of the 'peak' blinds cameras effectively, too. And, being IR, emit no visible light for Plod to see (unless they use a smartphone camera to view you).

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Don't use a VPN in United Arab Emirates – unless you wanna risk jail and a $545,000 fine

JaitcH
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Dubai ... beginning to look like Blighty

with it's bLIAR/Blunkett '4 years or your password' legislation.

The obvious bypass is to use a Satphone.

In days of yore, satellite handsets required large, external antennae. One of my units is a Inmarsat Isatphone pro and, like the Globalstar GSP-1700, has a fold-away antennae which makes it less obtrusive when not in use.

Gets past Chinese customs who have hawk-eyes for satphones.

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Avoiding Liverpool was the aim: All aboard the world's ONLY moving aqueduct

JaitcH
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Happy

Peterborough? Trent-Severn? Peterborough is on the Nene!

The DP's (Delayed Pioneers) from the UK simply named villages/town/objects after places/things in the UK.

Ontario has a City of London with the Thames River (in that order) flowing through it, too.

Back in the day, the term "Taronto" referred to a channel of water between Lake Simcoe and Lake Couchiching, but in time the name passed southward, and was eventually applied to a new fort at the mouth of the Humber River. Simcoe was named after a British governor.

My favourite town in Northern Ontario, Kapuskasing, is located on the Kapuskasing River, 493 km northwest of North Bay. The name derives from a CREE term meaning "branch" (the Kapuskasing R being a branch of the Mattagami) or "place where the river bends."

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JaitcH
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Ontario, Canada Has Some Odd 'Bridges', Too

There is the Burlington Canal Lift Bridge <http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ontario/burlingtoncanalliftbridge/>. Nothing too exciting.

Peterborough Lift Lock on the Trent-Severn Waterway. It is a Hydraulic type built in 1904 and upgraded in the1980s. Length 43 metres (141 ft); Width 10 metres (33 ft); Fall19.8 metres (65 ft 0 in)

Coordinates 44°18′27″N 78°18′03″W.

The lock has two identical bathtub-like ship caissons in which vessels ascend and descend. Both caissons are enclosed at each end by pivoting gates, and there are pivoting gates at the upper and lower reaches of the canal at the junctions with the caissons. The gates on the caissons fit into slots on the gates on the reaches, so that they open in unison.

Each caisson sits on a ram, the shafts for which are sunk into the ground, are filled with water, and are connected with a pipe that has a crossover control valve. The caissons are guided up and down on either side by rails affixed to concrete towers. See Wikipedia: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peterborough_Lift_Lock>

Kirkfield Lift Lock, Trent-Severn Waterway. Operation-Hydraulic. First built 1907 and upgraded in 1969.

Length 42.4 m; Width 10.1 m; Fall 14.9 m. Coordinates 44.58973°N 78.98981°W. See Wikipedia: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirkfield_Lift_Lock>

BUT OUR MOST UNUSUAL ONE is:

Big Chute Marine Railway

During WW1 the government decided improve the Trent-Severn river system. Located on south-east Georgian Bay there was a bloody great around which the river flowed. It had been decided to bypass the rick and they even built the beginnings of a canal and lock.

Then the war concluded.

So they ran railway lines over the rock. Boats were floated on to the carriages, which were submerged, and then inched up and the next boat was secured. Eventually the train was hauled over the rock and the baits released.

Big Chute Marine Railway is a boat lift at lock 44 of the Trent-Severn Waterway in Ontario. It works on an inclined plane to carry boats in individual cradles over a rock of about 60 feet (18 m). See Wikipedia: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Chute_Marine_Railway>.

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Airbus doesn't just make aircraft – now it designs drone killers

JaitcH
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FAIL

They Are Only Effective If The Operating Frequency Is Standard

My employer manufactures military items that are sold, through our government, to 'non-aligned' countries.

Few of our systems comply with international frequency assignments, we are talking war, even 'civilian' applications use 14, 27, 50, 72 and 75MHz, as well as the 'WiFi' bands. Spread Spectrum, such as used by Futuba and drone ground speeds of up to 70MPH - just going into production - make many interdiction strategies redundant

A work colleague us in the Battle Bot gaming hobby and his bot uses non-standard frequencies and signalling technologies and he often wins when he activates his bots WiFi jammers.

Still, with 380 sales dropping, I guess Airbus can use the money.

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Tesla autopilot driver 'was speeding' moments before death – prelim report

JaitcH
Silver badge
Unhappy

I remember that accident - only in 1967!

Jane Mansfield, who always carried an impressive load of melons, was a passenger in a car with three adults up front and children, sleeping, on the back seat. The three adults were Mansfield, driver Ronnie Harrison and lawyer Sam Brody.

They were decapitated.

Canadian Mansfield Bars are stronger than American units, by law, but none are really that good. The BEST are MANAC - dry van trailers in the U.S. under the name TRAILMOBILE. Their advantage is the supports of the Mansfield Bars are towards the outer end - where the worst damage occurs,

Angular hits suffer the greatest damage and deaths. Short nosed vehicles, even hitting at 90 degrees, are also heavy losers.

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MPs tell BT: Lay more fibre or face split with Openreach

JaitcH
Silver badge
WTF?

Is BT Over-Engineering, Again/Still?

Way, way, back in time, around the 1960's, the then version of BT was burying overhead POTS wiring with breakouts every hundred yards or so for a 'hub' telephone pole from which the house drops originated. I lived to one side on a fairly substantial 'dip' as the road crossed a narrow and reasonably deep valley.

This valley, only about 300 yards from ridge to ridge, took months to complete to meet telco's specs. The cable ducts were of vitreous china with 4 or 6 conduits for the cables. As you might expect there were four 'bends' - two where the ducts crossed from the level to the down grade and two in the bottom of the dip where the descending cable crossed the level valley floor.

Ducts were like sewer pipes - just plug a male end into a female end and cement.

Testing was simple. The P.O. Tel techs had standard wooden dowels which were dragged through each duct and if the bend was too extreme, the dowel would become stuck.

I now watch VietNam Post & Tel techs stringing fibre these days and wonder why BT is so slow. In HaNoi, a terrible city for infrastructure, the VNPT have erected regular wooden telephone poles outside many apartments - one each in the front and rear.

To these poles the techs run fibre optic drops from apartments, drop being the operative word for the cable motion, and then the drop is connected to a pole-mounted fibre junction box. They manage to do 2 to 4 apartment buildings per day.

Out in the boonies, where I live, they often use lamp posts and even trees as cable bearers. For my feeds I rented a small Bob-Cat and dragged in three 2" water main continuous pipes. The techs said it was overkill. The techs use motorcycles for all transportation needs!

So if fibre can be dropped in place in basic conditions, just what is holding up BT? Perhaps D-I-Y fibre installations should be considered?

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The problem with Canada? The price of broadband is too damn high

JaitcH
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WTF?

Why the confusion? Canuck Governments have never heard of conflict of interest.

The Canadian telecoms regulator - the CRTC - is stuffed with retired Telco types who no doubt have large share portfolios with their former employers.

As a result Canadians are screwed monthly when their cell and InterNet bills arrive.

Here in VietNam we pay $0.15 (yes, fifteen US cents - at cost) for a replacement SIM card - the originating card costs $10.00 with a $10 credit for airtime. In Canada you are charged CAD$50 for the very same card!

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Alleged Brit hacker Lauri Love bailed amid US extradition battle lull

JaitcH
Silver badge
WTF?

Why is it the UK always seems surrender it's citizems whereas France just says, ...

to quote the late Pierre Trudeau, Mange Là Merde!

Why is it if a crime is allegedly committed within the 12-mile (19.312128 kilometres) limit of Blighty, and the alleged victim is in the USA, Mad MAY ships them off instead of putting them on trial in the UK?

France has the trial in France!

Of course it was that allegedly pair of philanderers - Blunkett and bLIAR - who signed the deal deportation deal with the USA.

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Singapore Airlines 777 catches fire after engine alarm

JaitcH
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Unhappy

Does anyone want ...

a slightly used 777 which requires extensive cleaning?

Going cheap.

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Maplin Electronics demands cash with menaces

JaitcH
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Happy

When I shop I want a flat playing field. not a supermarket selling eye-space

Why do we need Maplins when we have www.aliexpress.com or Alababa?

When using these Chinese websites you see just how much of a rip-off Western websites are - with or without VAT.

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Chinese demand end to canine carvery festival

JaitcH
Silver badge
Unhappy

Think about cats, rats, monkeys and cute bugs as well as dogs!

Dogs are eaten in many parts of the world including South America and Indochina.

Chinese residents in the areas bordering VietNam love Vietnamese cats - in fact the illegal exports were so bad that heavy jail sentences were introduced for smugglers as the Vietnamese rat population rebounded in the absence of cats.

In the MeKong Delta, VietNam's rice bowl, rats are the meal de jour after the rice harvest has been gathered. The rats feast on the rice as it dries in the sun.

In ZhenZhen, China, a delicacy is to catch a live bug from a bowl, dip in chile sauce and munch on it, spitting out the shells.

In HongKong, in the classier restaurants, you might notice a round 'lid' in your table. If you glance at a nearby table you might notice that there is a leather harness hanging under the 'lid'. These harnesses hold scalped monkeys, with the bared brain held centrally under the 'lid'.

At the appropriate time in the multi-course meal, the wait staff will lift the lid off and lay a large spoon next to it. Then the guests will literally 'dig in', scooping the erstwhile live monkey's brain on to their plates! The monkey's feel nothing as the brain has no nerves - the monkey just get a mental 404.

Then there is the cooked, breathing, fish!

Back in the day, the powerful Empress Dowager Cixi - the one who built a stone boat - liked fresh fish, the fact attested to as the fish, with a well fried rear end was attached to it's real, breathing head. The cook would catch the fish from a tank outside the kitchen, wrap the head in a cloth - which served as a handle, then wok the hell out of the nether end then rush it in to the empress.

If the fish was not breathing when the fish was served, the cook would be executed!

You can still get this dish, even in London, but the cooking technique has changed (RSPCA). These days they take a gutted fish, i.e. definitely dead, and cook it. Just before serving, the cook pours some alcohol in the cooked fish's gills. The heat causes the alcohol to change to gas, and to push the gills open - creating an illusion that it is breathing. I have seen grown, adult, diners faint at seeing this!

Bon appetite!

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Man dies after UK police Taser shooting

JaitcH
Silver badge
Meh

Re: TASERS - More dangerous than the "average" current indicates

@Anonymous Coward

At the time of the acquisition of the 'abandoned' Taser, my friend, who is in the business of reverse engineering products for use in non-aligned countries, made readings with equipment typically found on a well financed electronics workbench.

As I said yesterday "Using only standard bench equipment the averaged 'shock' current was just under 2 milliamperes."

I checked back with my friend yesterday and, he reported, the service manual states: "Once the barbs establish a circuit, the gun generates a series of 100-microsecond pulses at a rate of 19 per second. Each pulse carries 100 microcoulombs** of charge, so the average current is 1.9 milliamperes.

Given that we usually are involved in reverse engineering infra-red and radio frequency equipment used by the military, I think the initial evaluation is pretty accurate. The Taser chip is presently in ShangHai being reverse engineered.

I subscribe to your thoughts on this type of equipment. Seemingly there are techniques to defeat this equipment - by twisting the body and breaking the wires. The fact that Taser hasn't used technology to restrain the duration of the charge or the repetition of 'shots' is indefensible. The video, < https://vimeo.com/169710819 >, is a completely inexcusable use and 4 years in jail seems to be a 'kiss'.

**A microcoulomb is a decimal fraction of the SI derived unit coulomb. A coulomb is defined as the charge transported by a steady current of one ampere in one second. The coulomb can also be defined in terms of capacitance.

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JaitcH
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FAIL

Re: TASERS - More dangerous than the "average" current indicates

Re: TASERS - More dangerous than the "average" current indicates

@Anonymous Coward

At the time of the acquisition of the 'abandoned' Taser, my friend, who is in the business of reverse engineering products for use in non-aligned countries, made readings with equipment typically found on a well financed electronics workbench.

As I said yesterday "Using only standard bench equipment the averaged 'shock' current was just under 2 milliamperes."

I checked back with my friend yesterday and, he reported, the service manual states: "Once the barbs establish a circuit, the gun generates a series of 100-microsecond pulses at a rate of 19 per second. Each pulse carries 100 microcoulombs** of charge, so the average current is 1.9 milliamperes.

Given that we usually are involved in reverse engineering infra-red and radio frequency equipment used by the military, I think the initial evaluation is pretty accurate. The Taser chip is presently in ShangHai being reverse engineered.

I subscribe to your thoughts on this type of equipment. Seemingly there are techniques to defeat this equipment - by twisting the body and breaking the wires. The fact that Taser hasn't used technology to restrain the duration of the charge or the repetition of 'shots' is indefensible. The video, < https://vimeo.com/169710819 >, is a completely inexcusable use and 4 years in jail seems to be a 'kiss'.

**A microcoulomb is a decimal fraction of the SI derived unit coulomb. A coulomb is defined as the charge transported by a steady current of one ampere in one second. The coulomb can also be defined in terms of capacitance.

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JaitcH
Silver badge
Unhappy

TASERS - Not As Dumb as you Think

A friend 'acquired' a Taser following a rumble between Plod and some miscreants - after all littering looks bad.

The later models of Taser are 'intelligent', although they can'y prevent unintelligent users from abusing them.

Pulling the trigger of a Taser gun, compressed nitrogen fires two barbed darts at 55 metres per second. Each dart is 9mm long and weighs 1.5 grams. They remain connected through two hair-thin wires. This length is supposed to penetrate clothing and the fat immediately under the skin.

Since many attempts result in clothing only contact, the custom microprocessor triggers a 45kV+ 'flash' that causes an arc and, like a lightning strike, ionizes the contact area making a more conductive path for the subsequent 'shocks'. This higher voltage is supposed to stop!

The 'sample' appears use resistance/current to determine when there is contact.

After the initial 45kV+, the output voltage drops and bursts of 1,000-1,200 volts in a square-wave of 100 microsecond pulses. He measured 19 of these bursts per second. Using only standard bench equipment the averaged 'shock' current was just under 2 milliamperes.

Notwithstanding it's 'smart' technology the 19 Hertz shocks continue so long as the trigger is squeezed. And therein lies the danger. If Plod gets his/her jollies from this, longer bursts can kill. Pity Taser Corp didn't include some sort of forced 'pause' between shots in their software.

Also, Plod is supposed to be trained to avoid the heart area as the effect can include stopping the heart.

The result 'overshocks' can be seen in < https://vimeo.com/169710819 >, < http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2515388/Family-sues-Texas-boy-17-coma-tasered-cop.html >.

Luckily there is anti-Taser clothing ("High Performance Silver Mesh Fabric" from Less EMF, Inc., Catalog #A1222), anti-Taser spray-on for clothing, or using aluminium foil! For the D-I-Y guys and girls < http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-carbon-tape-Taser-proof-jacket/?ALLSTEPS >.

Our sample can't be used again as we need nitrogen cannisters and a replacement barb head. So we are fairly safe.

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FBI expands code theft charges against Chinese national

JaitcH
Silver badge
FAIL

There we go again ... FBI captures it's second favourite racial group

How many times has a Chinese-heritage person been arrested, with great fanfare, involving alleged theft of technology, only to have the charges withdrawn?

Take Mo Yun. A federal judge dismissed charges against the wife of a Chinese billionaire who was accused of conspiring to steal trade secrets from U.S. seed companies.

The order signed instructs the government to return Mo Yun’s passport and immediately stop “all court-directed electronic monitoring,” meaning she can return to China.

Then there was Xiaoxing XI - interim chair of the physics department at Temple University in Philadelphia. The IS government charged him with four counts of wire fraud, for four emails sent to contacts in China about establishing labs and a collaboration involving a thin film deposition device.

Before a trial date had been set, the U.S. attorney’s office abruptly dropped the charges, noting that “additional information came to the attention of the government.”

There was the man from Los Alamos; The scientist was fired but never arrested due to a lack of hard evidence."

So any time the FBI toots their horn toss a very large bag over your shoulder - likely they are just looking for a bigger budget.

A less racist group issued a report that included: "High-profile Chinese spy cases in the U.S.,especially these later found falsely accused, raise concerns by civil-rights groups about potential racial profiling of Chinese Americans, Asian Americans and immigrants of Chinese origin, particularly after the collapse of the "Chinese espionage" case against Wen Ho Lee. A prominent Chinese American and a member of the Committee of 100, Dr. George Koo wrote an article in 2015 warning that "Chinese Americans continue to be victimized by racial profiling" after seeing the latest victim Sherry Chen, who was falsefully accused of spying for China."

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Oracle to sue cloud sales 'whistleblower' for 'malicious prosecution'

JaitcH
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Happy

Once Oracle always an Oracle staff

QUOTE: "Your humble hack here has a family member who was employed at Oracle for many years and he says that after the firm's HR department makes you jump through so many hoops to join, getting fired is very tricky indeed."

A niece of mine works for Oracle UK ... has a pretty good position, too.

She immigrated and rather than let her resign Oracle established her as an 'outside branch', using the InterNet and VPNs, where she has now been for going on 10 years with annual flights back home once a year to check in with her boss.

Larry Ellison might be a rear end but Oracle is way better than him.

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UK Home Office is creating mega database by stitching together ALL its gov records

JaitcH
Silver badge
WTF?

Mad MAY - Arse backwards ... as usual

We, in Canada, are extremely sensitive to governments of any level penetrating our lives too much.

Way back, when the UK government was likely still running on punched cards the Canadian government set up it's Data Bank Structure.

Compartmentalisation was key. The data banks contain information as varied as climate monitoring, geological surveys, securities law compliance, patent applications and grants, surveillance, national security, border control, law enforcement, public health, voter registration, vehicle registration, social security, and statistics.

We also have newer additions such as the National Homelessness Information System (NHIS) database system, Homeless Individuals and Families Information System (HIFIS) - whose data can be transferred to the NHIS system and the Government Electronic Directory Services (GEDS), a directory of Canadian federal public servants throughout the country.

Users are given specific rights and there are data guardians who control/limit access.

In Ontario some data banks share very limited data. For example, drivers licences, with photos, can be accessed by the Cops and the very same photos shared with the Ontario Health Insurance Plan - but users of one are denied access to the other - without judicial permission.

We also have a SIN - Social Insurance Number - that can only be used for five specific reasons and NOT as a universal identifier.

Mad MAY, of course, has a different client base and they want easy access to everything.

The neat thing is, it is extremely easy to screw up systems by messing up the input data. Did you know passport PIX are already available on a multi-user basis? And that the Passport Agency has an extreme interest on where you and your passport have travelled?

Prior to renewing my passports, I legally have three (and three citizenships), I take out the acetone (nail varnish remover) and carefully remove all my visa stickers. I also use another chemical which 'smudges' ink used by governments.

These days, when I get a new passport, I carefully coat the pages with a chemical that males visa removal a breeze and with a wipe of a complimentary chemical removes all those stamps - which means the passport will never get filled and upi get to use it until it's expiry date.

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Is a $14,000 phone really the price of privacy?

JaitcH
Silver badge
Happy

Silent Circle is good for me.

Phil Zimmermann, co-founder Silent Circle & inventor of PGP has a healthy reputation for secure communications. Except with the NSA and GCHQ who are still banging away on PGP.

And the Silent Circle handset is way cheaper than the Solarin handset.

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UK Home Sec makes concessions to please Snoopers' Charter opposition

JaitcH
Silver badge
FAIL

Why would anyone ...

trust this obnoxious woman from Hurst, Berkshire?

This legislation has been her wet dream for years.

1
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Winston Churchill glowers from Blighty's plastic fiver

JaitcH
Silver badge
Meh

Will offer "enhanced resilience" against counterfeiting, the Bank of England assures!!!

Vietnamese Dong notes are printed in Australia. They seem not to have mastered the techniques for making blue coloured notes retain their colour.

What amazes me is the way ATM technology can manage to handle these extremely thin notes.

As for counterfeiting, the B of E is dreaming.

In VietNam the penalty for counterfeiting is death. Even though the highest Dong note (VND500,000) is only worth GBP15.4387 there are many deceased Chinese buried outside Ha Noi attesting to the fact that counterfeiting is a likely crime opportunity with the new Pound notes.

2
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What's holding up Canada's internet?

JaitcH
Silver badge
Happy

Canada's Telecommunications - nowhere more incestuos

I am a Canadian who fortunately lives in VietNam.

Here a new prepaid SIM costs USD$10 which includes USD$10 worth of airtime - which is way cheaper than any Cellco in Canada. A replacement SIM costs USD$1. Coverage is almost 100% of the country and inter-operability/co-operation between Cellcos ensures great coverage.

To keep a prepaid service activated all I need do is to send one SMS message per month. All credit is carried over.

In Canada, I don't even bother with cell service from the large monopolies, I use regional suppliers like Wind - which still still are high compared to other countries.

Bell Canada has landline, cell and cable TV. BCE (Bell) through Bell Media Radio owns 106 radio stations across Canada, broadcasting in 45 markets, including most of Canada's largest radio markets, which counts 5 sports stations; the CTV network is theirs along with the Globe and Mail newspaper.

Rogers is cellular ditto PLUS they have radio (Rogers Radio - 52 radio stations [44 FM and 8 AM]) and the result is Ontarians get shafted.

The word incestuous doesn't even cover it - and they both 'censor' the news.

Meanwhile, back in the land of competition, VietNam, we have both government owned and privately owned cellular networks and InterNet providers - and the government owned ones are usually the better choice. One InterNet provider, FTP, owns a newspaper.

My SaiGon condominium building has SIX InterNet providers and the highest speed is 50 Mbs fibre optic - I have two 50 Mbs feeds from different suppliers at USD$30/month total. There are also FIVE cable TV suppliers (100+ HD channels @ USD$5/month) - I don't subscribe so the deals may be even greater

My SaiGon duplex apartment / workshop building, where I have my laser cutting operation and final electronic assembly, has FOUR fibre optic feeds passing the door on the street as well as FOUR cable TV feeds.

THAT is REAL competition - in a socialist country! Eat your hearts out, Canucks!

4
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Non-police orgs merrily accessed PNC without authority, says HMIC

JaitcH
Silver badge
FAIL

Yet another success story ...

in the unending serial story of Mad MAY of Hurst, Berkshire aka as the Home Secretary.

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Burger-slinger Wendy’s admits: Cash-till data breach hit 1 in 20 outlets

JaitcH
Silver badge
Alert

From Small Buildings Come Big Leaks

On the extreme Western city limit of the former North York, Toronto, sits a nondescript building, just south of the former Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Hospital campus.

One day, not so long ago, an open envelope was placed on the Receptionists Desk awaiting pick-up by a rep from a chip fabricating outfit. It had the code for the new range of POS terminals.

The contents were found to be missing and to avoid a hue and cry the R & D department quietly ran off another copy and nothing was said.

After the new terminals were introduced many were hacked, using the information in the envelope. The losses were 'minimal' - under $100-million - and it was decided by the customers the protocol would be re-written and resulted in new encryption chips being designed and the hack defeated.

How do I know? As an early attendee to the building each day one of my duties was to retrieve the re-issued manufacturing data each day.

Leaks can happen under the strangest circumstances!

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Lauri Love: 'Britain's FBI' loses court attempt to evade decryption laws

JaitcH
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Happy

British Justice - May Style

Here is another example of why the UK needs the EU Human Rights legislation for protection.

Good for the Judge, nice to know they are not all subservient to the Crown or it's pay cheques.

Now watch MAY add a clause to the legislation she's trying to ram through Parliament.

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Stop resetting your passwords, says UK govt's spy network

JaitcH
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Happy

SysOps Revenge

The president of a company that manufactured banking terminals issued a missive that required people to change their passwords monthly.

So the SysOp set it up for the management logins and left the rest of us 'as is'. Management was so impressed that they gave him a special mention in the company rag.

Bullsh*t really does baffle brains.

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Redback sinks fangs into Oz builder's todger

JaitcH
Silver badge
Happy

A large can of bug spray is as essential as toilet paper in ...

Johnny On The Spots in the wilder parts of the planet.

High way convenience stops in Canada suffer from hordes of mosquitoes and blackfly savouring the delights of the toilets. On my hotel build site out here in VietNam, we took the cans of perfume from the automatic dispensers and replaced them with cans of heavy duty bug spray from China - the stuff that's illegal in the West.

Problem solved.

Visitors to our country will find 'nerve sprays' (hoses with water spray on the end) which are intended to be used for bug elimination (we have tiled concrete floors with drains).

1
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Ex-Apple gurus' elusive Android phone coming to UK next month

JaitcH
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Happy

I hate ...

smartphones that position On/Off, and to a lesser extent Volume controls, precisely where many people grip the damn things. On/Off switches should be on the top, in a depression.

Another feature that is very handy are IR 'blasters', especially if you travel so you can load an App that allows you to off the sound or power. Four hours in Bangkok waiting for the Ho Chi Minh City connector being tortured by TVs that no one watches is a major pain.

Dual SIM is good but SD storage and battery swapping are essentials.

5
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UK cops trial £250k drone squadron

JaitcH
Silver badge
Meh

Frequency hopping / spread spectrum has lost it's charm

Frequency hopping / spread spectrum, be they Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) or Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS), benefits have long been overcome by SDR (Software Defined Radio).

A popular brand is the over-priced Futaba. Futaba and Airtronics use FHSS but only the Futaba FASST system has the best of both worlds because it is not only FHSS but also DSSS.

All are very susceptible to jamming which is why off-standard frequencies are more reliable.

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JaitcH
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: 1080p drone for 50,000 pounds each?

The full specs are here <www.dtwc.com/sites/default/files/datasheet/Datron_Unmanned-Solutions.pdf> and they are optimistic at best.

Up to 6.2 miles WiFi? But the specs will make most Plods feel warm and fuzzy.

Let's hope no one jams the GPS or WiFi - my employer's products, sold only in non-aligned countries (with the US)), use off-standard frequencies for control, as well as high-power (6 watt) ground laser beacons.

They would be better off with a £1,000 odd Phantom 4 with Two Extra Batteries and Phantom Backpack but the politics are not good as they are made in China.

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Watch: SpaceX finally lands Falcon rocket on robo-barge in one piece

JaitcH
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Thumb Up

Remember, John F. Kennedy and NASA had the faith to follow their dreams.

Just think how the Hubble Telescope was born in controversy, with mis-ground optics, and here we are some 25 years later, at a cost of USD$2,500,000,000, having provided the world with some of the most stunning photographs of the darkest corners of the universes.

And it's running on a 486 PC!

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Ultra-rare WWII Lorenz cipher machine goes on display at Bletchley Park

JaitcH
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Thumb Up

In these days of programmable circuitry, we forget ...

that the magnificent mechanical engineering that was involved in these encryption / decryption strategies. No whipping out a soldering iron, or tapping away on a keyboard, no it required a skilled machinist on a lathe to execute the next 'test' sample.

Even the 'simple' teleprinter (Teletype) was a mechanical marvel that was reproduced in their millions by skilled assembly workers - none of your mass produced PCBs around at that time.

The Western Teletypes were mass produced and had tolerances that proved it. The German manufactured equivalents were precision machines, as anyone viewing them will know.

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LG builds a DAB+ digital radio radio into a smartmobe

JaitcH
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Thumb Down

DAB+, you say? What a pity ...

only DAB in Blighty.

(See: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/04/01/breaking_fad_dab_plus_is_coming)

0
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Cops hacked the Police National Computer to unlawfully retain suspects' biometric data

JaitcH
Silver badge
Stop

The old saying goes ...

use a crook to catch a crook.

True these days, obviously, as ever it was.

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