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* Posts by Stoneshop

1592 posts • joined 8 Oct 2009

Official: Turing's Bombe BETTER than a Concorde plane

Stoneshop
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Thumb Up

Re: I can't think of Alan Turing without thinking of the radio series Hut 33!

Have you tried turning it off and on again Alan?

"The engineers who came to install it and switched it on, told me not to switch it off until after the war."

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Linux systemd dev says open source is 'SICK', kernel community 'awful'

Stoneshop
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@Andy Prough Re: Hostile leadership vs hostile software

When you're installing Gnome, you only get what you deserve.

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Stoneshop
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WTF?

Re: Bias

And he's playing this card because he, a white, middle-aged male, is feeling unjustly harrassed?

It may be a problem in the Linux communities, but it's not the problem he is confronted with.

Just stop writing bloated, buggy, boundary-violating code and maybe you won't have as many adversaries.

Better yet, stop writing code. Period.

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Meg Whitman: The lady IS for TURNING. HP to lob printers'n'PCs OVERBOARD

Stoneshop
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Re: A pondering...

With the split of eBay/Paypal we are well into the downward swing of the cycle.

And another one: the company that used to be referred to as "a large lightbulb manufacturer in the south of the Netherlands" is going to be two not all that large manufacturers, neither of which makes lightbulbs (or even its current equivalent: LED bulbs) anymore.

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Stoneshop
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Flame

Re: "But if almost no-one has an HP tablet"

Make one call

to India. And another one. And another one. And another one. And another one.

and everything IT is good and done.

Not been using their "Enterprise" services much, have you?

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Stoneshop
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FAIL

Re: All aboard the redundancy train...again

In the short term it should create jobs rather than make staff redundant.

This split is expected to create -55k jobs.

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What’s the KEYBOARD SHORTCUT for Delete?! Look in a contextual menu, fool!

Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: Mechanical typewriters

I've had someone, who apparently had never used a keyboard before, ask why the key arrangement wasn't simply "ABCDEetc".

In 1991.

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Stoneshop
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Devil

Re: Your shortcut gems?

I think a knowledge of short cut keys is on the decline but may be replaced with voice commands.

So we'll see, for instance, a lot of files, macros, command aliases etcetera, called [redacted expletive].

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Stoneshop
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Re: Text editting

You missed out 110 and - my favourite - 134.5 baud.

We've got a PDP8/f that's got its serial interface modified for 110 baud, by having a different crystal fitted, for use with an ASR33.

And if you have ever looked under the hood of an ASR33, you'll know why it can't do any speed but 110: its serialiser/deserialiser is a contactor disc driven by a synchronous motor.

Typically asynch terminals would do either hardware (X-on/X-off) or software (Control-S, Control-Q) flow controls.

Err, Xon/Xoff (Ctrl-S/Ctrl-Q) is software flow control. Hardware flow control requires at least RTS/CTS or DSR/DTR to be wired as well as Tx/Rx and Gnd,

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Stoneshop
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Devil

Re: It's the IT sixth sense

So the tab key is a couple of right-facing arrows

On my Cherry 3000, the tab key has left- and right-pointing arrows as well as the word "Tab". Backspace and shift also bear text as well as the somewhat appropriate arrows.

I'm not sure about the Model M, but those are only used by True Aficionados who know what each key means (even though they've probably remapped it), why it's called that and its keyscan code. Mere punters don't use them, especially since they don't have flag and menu keys, so explanatory text (which they won't read anyway) is irrelevant..

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Stoneshop
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Go

Re: Keyboard commands for select, copy, paste and find

"I've drunk a lot of free coffee and gained a (totally undeserved) reputation as a clever chap from showing people CTRL-A, CTRL-C click in the other windowAlt-TAB, CTRL-V."

FTFY

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Report: HP to SPLIT OFF PC, printer biz from enterprise wing

Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: Bound to be a success

Which will get the "Hewlett" name,

Keysight.

and which the "Packard" name?

Keysight

The new parts will have to fight over the names "Hopeless" and "Panic"

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SPECIAL iPHONE TROUSERS will ease Apple into the fashion world

Stoneshop
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Or a toolbelt

With room for the charger, the external battery packs[1] and a straightedge[2]

[1] so you can multiple or longer phone calls

[2] to check if you bent it back just right

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German data commish makes a Hamburger out of Google

Stoneshop
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Big Brother

Re: Idiots

Don't use Googles services.

And don't use online shops, newspapers, whatevers that use Google services. Because even if you don't use Google directly, there's a gazillion websites that use stuff provided by Google. And that is also collecting user data, but in a way much less directly visible to the average burger, in- and outside Ham-.

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George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests

Stoneshop
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Go

Re: Burner phones?

Meanwhile you sneak off for the real wedding the next day,

s/next/previous/

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CURSE YOU, 'streaming' music services! I want a bloody CD

Stoneshop
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Re: Streaming

living in the past.

An album by Jethro Tull

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Stoneshop
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@Diogenes: Re: have an upvote

On the whole I agree with you, but using the word "real" for pre-1900 music spoiled your upvote. There's a lot of "unreal"music I can appreciate that 's not X-FactorMTVTop40 junk.

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Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city

Stoneshop
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Pint

Next step

Single Malt Transfer Protocol.

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Stoneshop
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Pint

Re: it makes sense

The problem is that people have heard about these underground beer aquifers and misunderstood. This is why so many pubs connect the large plastic pipes they find underground directly to their lager pumps. Not realising that these pipes link to the outlet of their urinals. Fortunately no one has yet noticed...

Once every two weeks or so I see a beer tanker from a large brewery replenishing the cisterns of a conference centre near where I work. The pipe joint is under a manhole cover; there are three more in close proximity, but none of them is marked 'beer' or 'not beer', and anyway, he could just use one of the others to get rid of the beer, it won't make any difference. But then, why bother driving out from the brewery in the first place? Don't they have sewers?

Glass of locally-brewed and bottled stuff, instead.

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Stoneshop
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Pint

" Which is why the council don't want lorries full of heavy beer "

And indeed, Belgium is not known for brewing light beers.

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That glass of water you just drank? It was OLDER than the SUN

Stoneshop
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Boffin

"But we're still in the dark about how it rained down on us"

Evidently, England[1] already existed as a fully-formed entity[2] in the dust cloud out of which the solar system would form.

[1] rain and all

[2] but possibly excluding Scotland

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Heatmiser digital thermostat users: For pity's sake, DON'T SWITCH ON the WI-FI

Stoneshop
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FAIL

Not just once

The very minimum I want a thermostat to do is drop[1] the house temp a couple of degrees at night and when I'm out for more than an hour or two. And it appears I'm not the only one to operate them this way.

The first can be achieved by the humble clock thermostat, as developed at least as far back as 1960[2], although it's rather inflexible regarding what it considers 'night'.

W.r.t. the second requirement, with a simple thermostat it's a matter of twisting the dial a bit when you leave and when you return, but the less human intervention you want, the smarter the thermostat needs to be to detect absence/presence. And thermostat vendors appear to have decided that remote access is a feature that conveys smarts.

[1] on the condition that it does not require the house to be actively cooled to do so, as that option is unavailable.

[2] I have one from that year.

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'In... 15 feet... you will be HIT BY A TRAIN' Google patents the SPLAT-NAV

Stoneshop
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Devil

Google is helping survival of the dumbest.

Google is helping survival of the dumbest. its income.

Dead people don't click on ads much.

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US team claims PARIS paper plane launch crown

Stoneshop
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Re: Have any contacts at SpaceX?

An ever increasing rate

No.

At some point it will stop decelerating, ultimately when its speed reaches zero (which will happen when its height reaches zero), but also at some point earlier when drag and gravitational pull reach equilibrium. So the increase of deceleration will have stopped before that and turned into a decrease of rate of deceleration, and ditto the rate of increase of increase.

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Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Have any contacts at SpaceX?

Now I'm wondering, if you were to throw a model plane out of the ISS window, so to speak, would it survive descent though the atmosphere? Initially it'll have a speed of about 8km/s, so throwing it backwards, forwards or just letting it drop won't make a noticeable difference. But at some point it'll start encountering drag, and start dissipating its kinetic energy (64000kJ for every kg the craft weighs) as heat. The question is, at what rate will it decelerate, and, from that, can it shed the resulting heat fast enough to prevent its Playmonaut pilot getting roasted? What model shape (and material) would be best suited? Would it need Additional Stuff to help keep the craft cool?

And, given the land/water area ratio, the project will need more than just a car to retrieve the Playmonaut at the end of his journey, lest he join #1 in his watery grave

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Does this float your boat? Dead Steve Jobs to hijack yachts from BEYOND THE GRAVE

Stoneshop
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Re: Avast, there

I fail to see how anything novel could be introduced into this basic premise.

WiFI, tablet, application, Apple.

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SCREW YOU, Russia! NASA lobs $6.8bn at Boeing AND SpaceX to run space station taxis

Stoneshop
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Mushroom

Re: Indeed, and it gets worse (not really)

The USA never dug a hole for themselves

Rocket engineers don't dig holes. In their field of endeavour, holes tend to appear semi-spontaneously, accompanied by sudden loud noises and impressive pyrotechnics.

The root cause may well be human effort, like the desire to see whether some concoction with lots of double-bonded nitrogen and such makes a good propellant, or the way a control circuit is wired, but stating that rocket engineers are the ones digging holes there would be similar to saying Bomber Harris was digging holes all over Germany during WWII, i.e. only methaphorically.

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Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway

Stoneshop
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Re: Hollerith cards in the pocket

Paper tape can hold ten bytes per square inch, which at 0.1mm thickness would result in a data density of 100 bytes per 64.5 mm^3, or roughly 1478MB per m^3. So that's 709 m^3 for a terabyte, a cube a little under 9m each side.

And it's silverfish you need to guard against.

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Stoneshop
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Re: 1000 years?

If you didn't have to migrate your data because you can still easily read it, use it, have it supported with no special device or service, didn't take up power or cooling, why would you migrate? This is the media I'm talking about.

You forgot one thing: physical storage. Every storage location can only hold so much stuff (and stuff with data on it tends to require qualified storage locations), and if you're running low on space it may well be worth it to migrate if every box of storage media now can hold four times as much data as before.

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Stoneshop
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Re: 1000 years?

Please READ that article by StorageBod. He does know what he is talking about

Err, migrating a petabyte worth of tape data using only two single drives? I assume that's just for illustration porpoises, otherwise it'd just be daft. Which would then also hold for your statement that he knows what he's talking about, unless you left out a negative there.

If you have a tape collection that size (1000+ LTO3 cartridges of 3.58 million cat pics each) you don't have just a single tape drive; the very minimum is a two-drive multicartridge loader per technology. The problem that someone is blocked from retrieving data from a tape you're not currently handling also disappears as soon as you have multiple drives, although it will temporarily slow down the migration process.

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Stoneshop
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Re: M-Disk: 42,000 pictures of cats

or 42K pictures of your cats.

Elsewhere on their site it says:

Using estimates with average file sizes, each M-DISC™ DVD:

Holds up to 8,000 photos

Holds up to 1,200 songs

Holds up to 240 minutes of video

Holds up to 100,000 documents

So, it apparently takes just over 5 cat pictures to comprise a photo

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BitTorrent's peer-to-peer chat app Bleep goes live as public alpha

Stoneshop
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I need glasses

A good day for privacy as invisble.im also reveals its approach to untraceable chats

First read that as "untraceable cats".

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Got your NUDE SELFIES in the cloud? Two-factor auth's your best bet for securing them

Stoneshop
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WTF?

Re: Predictable authentication codes?

With the ones I have (different Dutch banks) you need to enter a device PIN to activate it, then the 6..8 digit number the bank presents to you. From which the device generates a response code which you need to enter into the web page.

Those apparently predictable codes look like someone's done a cheap version of an RSA token

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Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: Picking the nit...

Also, "world" in this case being limited to Europe, Northern Africa and those bits of Asia west of Moscow.

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Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen

Stoneshop
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Re: With such a low chance of success for a high cost mission

IMO, the better option would be not to send multiple craft, but have two or three landers aboard Rosetta. Getting a craft to some point in space, even if that's next to a moving object, is old hat; the tricky (and so far untried) bit is landing on the comet. With multiple landers you have a bigger chance of at least one succeeding, and if more than one lands successfully you can do science in multiple places.

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Stoneshop
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Go

Re: They need Neil Armstrong

In the general sense he's right. The thing about 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is that it has very little gravity, and one could just jump off a slowly passing spacecraft and more or less fall onto the comet without employing a landing craft. Though if you're pedantic, you might want to call this 'landing' as well. For getting off again there are various options, such as a Skyhook-like rig (you just have to throw or fire the line up as balloons tend not to work too well in space), a jetpack or even just a pair of tensioned springs under your shoes, depending on how high the craft will pass over the comet

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As bankruptcy looms for RadioShack, we ask its chief financial officer... oh. He's quit

Stoneshop
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FAIL

Re: Reminds me of Maplins

They shot themselves when they stopped selling in europe.

They never really started selling in Europe in the first place.

Where I lived, I had three electronics parts stores within cycling distance, fairly well stocked and with decent prices. RatShack tried to enter that market by having a shop full of tat, with prices as if every component was individually handled and sent first-class mail from wherever they were manufactured via their US HQ to the shop, which was in a prime shopping street. A shop which was staffed by at least twice the number of zit-faced shop assistants that the customer density warranted, but whose collective IQ still didn't exceed their smallest shoe size (in US units).

They went under within a year. Their bizarre selection of blister-packed components turned up at one of the electronics parts stores, but even in their clearance bin they didn't shift.

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Airbus developing inkjet printer for planes

Stoneshop
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Go

Re: Forget 'Hello Kitty'

Does it say "This side up" and "Insert coin to operate" ?

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Boffins: Behold the SILICON CHEAPNESS of our tiny, radio-signal-munching IoT sensor

Stoneshop
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Re: and best of all ...

Ant size is a bit vague.

We need a Register Standard Ant.

(3.904976e-05 brontosaurus?)

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Sun's MASSIVE solar storm belch to light up Earth's skies

Stoneshop
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Pint

Re: Climate Change

mankind's wonton release of CO2

Oh sure, it's all caused by Chinese soup.

Beer, because it goes well with Chinese food, and contains CO2 too.

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'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet

Stoneshop
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Re: Collision vs other explaination

Also, I think that comets that would collide at anything but the gentlest of bumps would result in a rather large number of rather small rocks, instead of a Space Duck.

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Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS

Stoneshop
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Weight

and is thought to have weighed as much as several adult elephants.

African or European Asian?

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Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: Was Gravity the same back then?

no, gravity isn't caused by the rotation of the Earth.

I know of someone who insists we're kept from floating away into space by the air pressing down on us. How the air stays put he's utterly unable to explain, but that's the beauty of being totally uncontaminated by logic thought, you can dismiss gravity as "it's just a theory" and handwave away any inconsistencies and open ends in your own "explanation".

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Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Was Gravity the same back then?

Gravitational pull is a function of the mass of the attracting body (see also the articles on Rosetta versus 67P/Chruyumov-Gerasimenko) and the distance from it, so unless the Earth was substantially lighter back then, or the whateversaurs were floating around in space then no, they would have gravity pull on them about as hard as it is pulling on us. The bit of mass that was added right at the end of their existence may have been large, but it was still inconsequential with regard to gravity.

Even if the Earth was smaller back then (how? did heavy elements break down into lighter, more voluminous elements) its mass would still have been roughly what it is now (modulo some influx of space debris), and, if anything, the whateversaurs would be closer to the centre of the Earth, and gravitational pull on them would be larger.

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City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: Apostrophe's ... seriously

Bad Grammar is the book you should read.

Now go away or I shall taunt you a second time.

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

Stoneshop
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Not surprising with those company names

The pioneers of the industry picked sexual innuendo-soaked names. Honeywell. Wang.

The latter once ran the marketing slogan "Wang Cares".

Very, very briefly.

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Not wishing to be pedantic

Octopi can see all the same without a blind spot, so I would indeed call ours a bug.

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CNN 'tech analyst' on NAKED CELEBS: WHO IS this mystery '4chan' PERSON?

Stoneshop
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Aha

I changed all my nudie pics passwords to "pissword"

Now we know your account name, officercrabtree

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Boiling point: Tech and the perfect cuppa

Stoneshop
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Mushroom

Error

Seasoned tea drinkers will also know that green tea should be brewed at 80°C, Oolong at 90°C and instant coffee at 95°C.

Instant coffee should not be brewed. It should be incinerated.

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Our Vulture 2 rocket spaceplane crammed with MORE POWER

Stoneshop
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Re: Battery clip springs...

but on the multiple jobs you have springs facing both ways.

There are also holders that can take 4 AA (or AAA) cells in a single row, so you can have all springs at the right end

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