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* Posts by Stoneshop

1567 posts • joined 8 Oct 2009

Does this float your boat? Dead Steve Jobs to hijack yachts from BEYOND THE GRAVE

Stoneshop
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Re: Avast, there

I fail to see how anything novel could be introduced into this basic premise.

WiFI, tablet, application, Apple.

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SCREW YOU, Russia! NASA lobs $6.8bn at Boeing AND SpaceX to run space station taxis

Stoneshop
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Mushroom

Re: Indeed, and it gets worse (not really)

The USA never dug a hole for themselves

Rocket engineers don't dig holes. In their field of endeavour, holes tend to appear semi-spontaneously, accompanied by sudden loud noises and impressive pyrotechnics.

The root cause may well be human effort, like the desire to see whether some concoction with lots of double-bonded nitrogen and such makes a good propellant, or the way a control circuit is wired, but stating that rocket engineers are the ones digging holes there would be similar to saying Bomber Harris was digging holes all over Germany during WWII, i.e. only methaphorically.

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Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway

Stoneshop
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Re: Hollerith cards in the pocket

Paper tape can hold ten bytes per square inch, which at 0.1mm thickness would result in a data density of 100 bytes per 64.5 mm^3, or roughly 1478MB per m^3. So that's 709 m^3 for a terabyte, a cube a little under 9m each side.

And it's silverfish you need to guard against.

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Stoneshop
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Re: 1000 years?

If you didn't have to migrate your data because you can still easily read it, use it, have it supported with no special device or service, didn't take up power or cooling, why would you migrate? This is the media I'm talking about.

You forgot one thing: physical storage. Every storage location can only hold so much stuff (and stuff with data on it tends to require qualified storage locations), and if you're running low on space it may well be worth it to migrate if every box of storage media now can hold four times as much data as before.

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Stoneshop
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Re: 1000 years?

Please READ that article by StorageBod. He does know what he is talking about

Err, migrating a petabyte worth of tape data using only two single drives? I assume that's just for illustration porpoises, otherwise it'd just be daft. Which would then also hold for your statement that he knows what he's talking about, unless you left out a negative there.

If you have a tape collection that size (1000+ LTO3 cartridges of 3.58 million cat pics each) you don't have just a single tape drive; the very minimum is a two-drive multicartridge loader per technology. The problem that someone is blocked from retrieving data from a tape you're not currently handling also disappears as soon as you have multiple drives, although it will temporarily slow down the migration process.

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Stoneshop
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Re: M-Disk: 42,000 pictures of cats

or 42K pictures of your cats.

Elsewhere on their site it says:

Using estimates with average file sizes, each M-DISC™ DVD:

Holds up to 8,000 photos

Holds up to 1,200 songs

Holds up to 240 minutes of video

Holds up to 100,000 documents

So, it apparently takes just over 5 cat pictures to comprise a photo

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BitTorrent's peer-to-peer chat app Bleep goes live as public alpha

Stoneshop
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I need glasses

A good day for privacy as invisble.im also reveals its approach to untraceable chats

First read that as "untraceable cats".

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Got your NUDE SELFIES in the cloud? Two-factor auth's your best bet for securing them

Stoneshop
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WTF?

Re: Predictable authentication codes?

With the ones I have (different Dutch banks) you need to enter a device PIN to activate it, then the 6..8 digit number the bank presents to you. From which the device generates a response code which you need to enter into the web page.

Those apparently predictable codes look like someone's done a cheap version of an RSA token

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Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: Picking the nit...

Also, "world" in this case being limited to Europe, Northern Africa and those bits of Asia west of Moscow.

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Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen

Stoneshop
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Re: With such a low chance of success for a high cost mission

IMO, the better option would be not to send multiple craft, but have two or three landers aboard Rosetta. Getting a craft to some point in space, even if that's next to a moving object, is old hat; the tricky (and so far untried) bit is landing on the comet. With multiple landers you have a bigger chance of at least one succeeding, and if more than one lands successfully you can do science in multiple places.

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Stoneshop
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Go

Re: They need Neil Armstrong

In the general sense he's right. The thing about 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is that it has very little gravity, and one could just jump off a slowly passing spacecraft and more or less fall onto the comet without employing a landing craft. Though if you're pedantic, you might want to call this 'landing' as well. For getting off again there are various options, such as a Skyhook-like rig (you just have to throw or fire the line up as balloons tend not to work too well in space), a jetpack or even just a pair of tensioned springs under your shoes, depending on how high the craft will pass over the comet

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As bankruptcy looms for RadioShack, we ask its chief financial officer... oh. He's quit

Stoneshop
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FAIL

Re: Reminds me of Maplins

They shot themselves when they stopped selling in europe.

They never really started selling in Europe in the first place.

Where I lived, I had three electronics parts stores within cycling distance, fairly well stocked and with decent prices. RatShack tried to enter that market by having a shop full of tat, with prices as if every component was individually handled and sent first-class mail from wherever they were manufactured via their US HQ to the shop, which was in a prime shopping street. A shop which was staffed by at least twice the number of zit-faced shop assistants that the customer density warranted, but whose collective IQ still didn't exceed their smallest shoe size (in US units).

They went under within a year. Their bizarre selection of blister-packed components turned up at one of the electronics parts stores, but even in their clearance bin they didn't shift.

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Airbus developing inkjet printer for planes

Stoneshop
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Go

Re: Forget 'Hello Kitty'

Does it say "This side up" and "Insert coin to operate" ?

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Boffins: Behold the SILICON CHEAPNESS of our tiny, radio-signal-munching IoT sensor

Stoneshop
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Re: and best of all ...

Ant size is a bit vague.

We need a Register Standard Ant.

(3.904976e-05 brontosaurus?)

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Sun's MASSIVE solar storm belch to light up Earth's skies

Stoneshop
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Pint

Re: Climate Change

mankind's wonton release of CO2

Oh sure, it's all caused by Chinese soup.

Beer, because it goes well with Chinese food, and contains CO2 too.

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'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet

Stoneshop
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Re: Collision vs other explaination

Also, I think that comets that would collide at anything but the gentlest of bumps would result in a rather large number of rather small rocks, instead of a Space Duck.

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Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS

Stoneshop
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Weight

and is thought to have weighed as much as several adult elephants.

African or European Asian?

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Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: Was Gravity the same back then?

no, gravity isn't caused by the rotation of the Earth.

I know of someone who insists we're kept from floating away into space by the air pressing down on us. How the air stays put he's utterly unable to explain, but that's the beauty of being totally uncontaminated by logic thought, you can dismiss gravity as "it's just a theory" and handwave away any inconsistencies and open ends in your own "explanation".

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Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Was Gravity the same back then?

Gravitational pull is a function of the mass of the attracting body (see also the articles on Rosetta versus 67P/Chruyumov-Gerasimenko) and the distance from it, so unless the Earth was substantially lighter back then, or the whateversaurs were floating around in space then no, they would have gravity pull on them about as hard as it is pulling on us. The bit of mass that was added right at the end of their existence may have been large, but it was still inconsequential with regard to gravity.

Even if the Earth was smaller back then (how? did heavy elements break down into lighter, more voluminous elements) its mass would still have been roughly what it is now (modulo some influx of space debris), and, if anything, the whateversaurs would be closer to the centre of the Earth, and gravitational pull on them would be larger.

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City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: Apostrophe's ... seriously

Bad Grammar is the book you should read.

Now go away or I shall taunt you a second time.

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

Stoneshop
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Coffee/keyboard

Re: Not surprising with those company names

The pioneers of the industry picked sexual innuendo-soaked names. Honeywell. Wang.

The latter once ran the marketing slogan "Wang Cares".

Very, very briefly.

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Not wishing to be pedantic

Octopi can see all the same without a blind spot, so I would indeed call ours a bug.

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CNN 'tech analyst' on NAKED CELEBS: WHO IS this mystery '4chan' PERSON?

Stoneshop
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Aha

I changed all my nudie pics passwords to "pissword"

Now we know your account name, officercrabtree

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Boiling point: Tech and the perfect cuppa

Stoneshop
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Mushroom

Error

Seasoned tea drinkers will also know that green tea should be brewed at 80°C, Oolong at 90°C and instant coffee at 95°C.

Instant coffee should not be brewed. It should be incinerated.

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Our Vulture 2 rocket spaceplane crammed with MORE POWER

Stoneshop
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Re: Battery clip springs...

but on the multiple jobs you have springs facing both ways.

There are also holders that can take 4 AA (or AAA) cells in a single row, so you can have all springs at the right end

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Stoneshop
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Re: Why not use a standard RC lipo ?

Three reasons: temperature, temperature and temperature.

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Cave scrawls prove Neanderthals were AT LEAST as talented as modern artists

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Crude scrawl?

It's evidently a spreadsheet to keep track of hunting kills.

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BOFH: The current value of our IT ASSets? Minus eleventy-seven...

Stoneshop
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Mushroom

The Asset that Came Back

I'm a bit hazy on the details, but a colleague related the following story.

Scene: military base, the electronics repair shop. The asset list disagrees with the actual content of the repair shop regarding a highly valuable and rather classified device. Of course the discrepancy is such that the list says there should be 1 (one), and reality says there's 0 (zero). A search is conducted to try and rectify this, but to no effect. Another search suffers the same fate: the device is simply not to be found. As the device is rather classified, several people are most unhappy.

There follows a multi-week period in which papers are shuffled, signed, counter-signed, sent off to be signed at a higher level, stamped, signed again, buried in soft peat, etcetera. This process manages to result in bringing the asset list in line with reality. And there was much rejoicing.

Several months pass. Then, miraculously, the device returns from its nowhere-to-be-found state, threatening to cause a discrepancy with the asset list once again, and potentially have even more people be even more unhappy. This, the repair shop's CO decides, should not happen. Oh, no. So, the small band of people who know of the existence of the rather classified device that officially doesn't exist anymore went to work. This involved an angle grinder, an oxyacetylene torch, a tracked vehicle, and finally two pits and a serious amount of thermite.

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Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: Not Always a Bad Thing - But Only if You Know in Advance

No! Make sure your supply contract specifies what you expect and require, BEFORE you sign up to the deal.

I've seen several cases of "this gear was exactly right for what we did when we bought it a year ago, but now that we're having more customers shoving more stuff at us to service/fix/tweak, it becomes increasingly limited unless we're able to add functions x, y and z. If the manufacturer can't add it, and it wasn't in the specs back then, we'll have to buy new kit"

Buying a crystal ball first to divine what your future requirements will be tends to go down badly with the average beancounter; buying overspecced gear tends to suffer the same fate.

Beancounter haruspicy is equally bad at predicting future developments, but has the advantage that the equipment budget can be better matched to the requirements as expected by the techies.

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Euro banks will rip out EVERYTHING and buy proper backend systems ... LOL, fooled ya

Stoneshop
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Coat

Re: Financial IT spending

It took millions and years of effort to replace, and there were operational hiccups on the way.

They should just have called ..... SuperJake

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Finally, a practical use for 3D printing: Helping surgeons rehearse

Stoneshop
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Thumb Up

Re: Goth friends

My own skull, topped and hollowed

And your brain casing replaced with a 3D printed copy?

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Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables

Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: yet more numpties

inductive heating.

Go calculate the inductance of a coiled power cord, the resulting reactance at 50 (or 60) Hz, then the resultant power loss at (being generous) 1 amp of current through that "coil". Take note of how that power loss only partially occurs in the actual power cable, the rest being induced in ferrometal parts happening to be close. Compare this to the amount of resistive warming due to weedy and non-copper cable cores.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Flat, 3 core, single insulated, vs round, 3 core, double insulated?

I've never seen anything like, and nor would I want anything like, the cable pictured.

I have. In datacenter racks configured by HP. Somewhat beefier, but still singly-insulated, cable with C13/C14 connectors.

(and presumably no fuse in the picture to protect the wires).

That's something you'll find only in BS 1363 plugs, which need them because of this "ring mains: thingy

.

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Experimental hypersonic SUPERMISSILE destroyed 4 SECONDS after US launched it

Stoneshop
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Re: Why?

'terrorist' attacks - the very thing it's supposed to defend against.

[citation needed]

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Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

Stoneshop
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At home I was using a Senseo for the first morning cuppa, until I noticed I usually wasn't that dead that I couldn't operate a normal drip filter.

The Bialetti is used mostly for camping: no problem using it on an open-fire stove.

There's a vacuum pot (a bit more lab glassware-like than the Cona), made in France, in the hackerspace, but it's not used very often.

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: The best brew: Melitta Coffee Maker, Single Cup Pour-Over Brewer with Travel Mug,

I had the Aerobie. DUMPED IT!! It was a pain in the arse.

I very much doubt that that is the right way to use it.

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BOFH: We CAN do that with a Raspberry Pi, but think of the BODIES

Stoneshop
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Re: If you're going to worry about their tech selection...

Yes, except that the 555 is realy not a good choice for longer duration delays. Too much drift on the R or the C.

You could sell it as an auto-adjusting delay (and auto-adjust the billed development and build cost) to the company's beancounters.

Seriously, 15 minutes is no problem with decent quality components and the 7555 (CMOS version)

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Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: If you're going to worry about their tech selection...

Sounds like they'd only need a handful of input lines, so to be REALLY pedantic

a 555 would be all they need. And a diode for each PIR sensor, as a discrete OR gate.

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Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years

Stoneshop
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Coat

Bunch of fanbois

stomping their feet after hearing of possible iPhone 6 delays?

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Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run

Stoneshop
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Re: Unideal

If the diode + capacitor solution turns out to be insufficient, I'd get a step-up converter to boost the battery voltage to 12..18V, then an large-ish cap (4700uF, 25V), then a step-down converter to feed the Pixhawk at its required voltage.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Unideal

Supercaps are not really capable of delivering large currents; they're meant as a buffer for stuff that draws little current (like RTCs and CMOS storage) for which you might not want to use a primary button cell (because of replacement issues) or rechargeable cells (additional charge circuitry, degradation).

Depending on the current drawn by the Pixhawk, slapping a reasonably large cap on its logic power supply line together with a series diode, so that when the servos cause the battery voltage to drop it won't propagate to the Pixhawk, would be my try to fix this.

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Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD

Stoneshop
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Re: anyone who puts other motorists at risk by slowing

which resulted in the death of two following motorcyclists

That's not solely her fault (and I am a motorcyclist). Following too close so that you don't have time to react to a vehicle suddenly stopping, then brake or swerve to avoid collision is noone else's fault but the person who's following too close. Sure, on a motorway it's usually a steady flow of traffic in more or less the same direction, but anything can happen to disrupt that, and it behooves anyone (not just motorcyclists, BTW) to be aware of that.

What, in any case, is the number of ducks you can safely mow down without stopping, and at what speed? Had one taken flight and hit the windscreen, chances are she would have slammed the brakes, with quite likely the same (or worse) outcome. What if it had been a goose or swan instead of a duck? The average driver would brake, doesn't matter if that's before or after hitting it. A deer? Moose? What if she'd had an engine failure? Or a truck slightly ahead suddenly blowing tyre shrapnel in the direction of her car? Just a number of reasons why not keeping distance can be rather unhealthy.

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Stoneshop
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Re: 20 foot high tower of feathers

Years ago on holiday, on a remote country road, my Dad's car hit a chicken just as we passed a small cottage

Mate of mine hit a chicken with his sidecar rig. Presenting it to the farmer's wife, uttering apologies, she replied laconically "Oh, that's chicken soup tonight then."

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Stoneshop
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Boffin

Re: What?!

I once hit a pigeon with 2 Class 37 locos

I take it you hit it with the first one, with the other and the rest of the train just supplying the necessary momentum to offset the pigeon's impact.

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Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report

Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: the day after....

And this hacker group managed to conceive the attack and launch it in that timeframe

Probably a matter of the payload being there already (probably in several variants), crafting a plausible-looking carrier pdf (a press release in this case), identifying who to send it to, selecting some compromised mail server and a receiving system (both available in abundance), then adding it all together, stir-frying it briefly and serving it up. Shouldn't take more than a couple of hours for a small group with the right level of organisation.

The one thing that's rather baffling, as has been mentioned already, is what they hoped to find after just one day.

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Stoneshop
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FAIL

Re: "An IP address in china"

I'd like to see the Received headers

That will tell you which mailservers it touched, and where it was injected. And then only if none of those machines was compromised. It won't tell you who injected it.

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Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable

Stoneshop
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WTF?

Re: No googling?

the good thing about RedHat certification is that you have to sit an all-day practical test to prove you can actually do stuff.

The bad thing is that they won't even tell you what you did wrong, even just globally, like "Questions i, j, k - OK, questions m, n - NOK, questions o, p - partially OK". I failed an RHCSA by an utterly surprising 50 points, given that I had all questions but one (and another one partially) answered and working correctly, unless I'd misinterpreted those questions and the required end situation.

That total lack of feedback didn't exactly spur me on to retake that exam.

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Take the shame: Microsofties ADMIT to playing Internet Explorer name-change game

Stoneshop
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Spyglass

Obviously

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Nuts to your poncey hipster coffees, I want a TESLA ELECTRO-CAFE

Stoneshop
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Megaphone

Re: I feel like I'm living in an alternative reality sometimes.

so far East you can clearly receive Belorussian radio.

You mean those broadcasts that you can listen to anywhere in the world, using only the fillings in your teeth?

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Stoneshop
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Re: If you want a proper coffee

Raw beans smell like lentils.

I wonder if how they'd be in a soup.

There's this image in my head now where Neil is tasting his "lentil" dish where Vyvyan has replaced them with raw coffee beans.

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