* Posts by Stoneshop

2503 posts • joined 8 Oct 2009

HPE promises users Itanium server refresh next year. In Dutch!

Stoneshop
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FAIL

Re: Christ, just put it out of its misery now

It's not Unix, it's DEC VMS.

Bollocks. OpenVMS is something different entirely than HPUX (which itself is something almost entirely but not quite unlike Unix*). The only thing they have in common is that they run on IA64.

* HPUX can best be described as a Unix that has been left on a dusty shelf for half a decade, then subjected to a superficial cleaning and having some odds and sods added.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Christ, just put it out of its misery now

HP-UX was at one time promised to get an infusion of VMS file system and cluster technology, but that never happened.

That would have been a clustering and file system infusion from Tru64, with the clustering technology being based more or less on VMS's clusters.

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Cats, dogs starve as web-connected chow chute PetNet plays dead

Stoneshop
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Joke

Re: Holy crap

jam in the feeding mechanism

Your pets eat jam?

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Stoneshop
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Re: More dead Birds:)

I've only hit a bird once in all my years of driving

Me too, and it was only a second-hand kill. It was a pheasant that was hit by an oncoming van, bouncing off its windshield, and landing right in the path of my front wheel, which duly squished it into a quantity of pheasant pate (augmented with crunchy bits) plus a cloud of feathers.

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Stoneshop
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Coat

Re: More dead cats :)

The only good mouse is a dead one

Oh, you prefer trackballs too?

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Stoneshop
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Devil

Re: Another negative for IoT

Hint, the vendor will have weasel words in their documentation

A large and/or fierce enough dog will have little problem with a weasel, and I know some cats who would manage likewise.

Hungry enough they will be sufficiently motivated to deal with the marketing twonks who deal in weasel words.

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Tesla autopilot driver 'was speeding' moments before death – prelim report

Stoneshop
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Re: Not an AI

that contain GPS information on position, speed and direction.

Sure, but that's not a "simple radio transmitter" any more. The receiver likewise has to be adapted to pass that data on to the anti-collision system so that it can be used that way. And while it'll cost just a few cents in hardware, if you want it to be traffic-certified it will be several hundred Euros/Pounds/Dollars

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Stoneshop
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Re: Not an AI

Small low powered radio transmitters are not that expensive and could be retro fitted to older vehicles and mandatory on new sending an 'I'm' here signal out.

Which will only tell a receiver "there's a vehicle somewhere in the vicinity". No indication of distance and direction, unless you have a directional scanning receiver and a calibrated transmitter, and even then there's no sufficiently exact way that the receiver can indicate a particular vehicle on a potential collision course.

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Ex-Citibank IT bloke wiped bank's core routers, will now spend 21 months in the clink

Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Lock out their accounts first...

IF you intend to fire the twat. Just a poor performance review would be insufficient cause for such a measure. "Poor performance warning" plus "tendency to go postal" probably would.

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Stoneshop
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Headmaster

reprimanded for poor performance.

Not to mention poor grammar.

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By 2040, computers will need more electricity than the world can generate

Stoneshop
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Re: Efficiency savings?

The software to turn a Raspberry Pi into a DIY multifunction thin client has existed for a while,

That's true, but I doubt it'll be feasible to get those running at work: the central system expects each workstation to have a single address (with, as said, up to 8 screens). Changing that to eight Raspi's each driving a single screen, so eight addresses, might be doable (at one time displays were driven by a Tektronix NC 900 per screen), but given that there's now some local computing being done on the PCs driving the screens, it'd probably be a no-go, or at the very least quite involved, to move to RasPi's.

At home, my computing resource is my laptop. There's a file server with modest power consumption, and occasionally I boot a big, dual-screen PC for serious stuff (which the file server with two Pi-driven displays won't cut). Apart from that I have no need for a remote-display-to-a-server at the moment.

Also, you and I (and most others here, I expect) can cobble together a Pi plus a screen plus the software, but it's not something Joe Q. User can buy at Curry's, with a bit of software that makes their PC into a server for these devices. Which was basically what I was trying to say.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Efficiency savings?

Perhaps there is the technology to wire a load of screens and keyboards together and run one PC as a true multi-user host but it isn't obvious.

The systems I manage at work serve at least half a dozen users, each with 5 to 8 screens. Now, the X display controllers are essentially full-blown Linux PCs themselves, but they're not doing any actual computation except for one particular subtask on a number of them.

Setting things up like that isn't particularly difficult but you're not gaining anything because the cheapest way to get a remote terminal for your central system is by getting a tablet, laptop or even a PC. I think that only if you have a totally 'dumb' terminal with a total energy requirement just a tick over that of the screen will the effort pay off.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Good thing world electricity production won't flatline until 2040

IOT is a waist of time...

A fat load of it is, indeed. Like the electric kettle I saw on a website, that you could control via BT, keeping the content at any selectable temperature for up to 12 hrs. Which I consider a serious distance into Whatthehellweretheythinking territory.

But I would like to keep being able to minimise my (external) energy usage, for instance by automatically opening windows for ventilation if the outside temperature is over a certain minimum, and it's higher inside and over a certain minimum (plus a few other conditions, like not being away). Or running the washing machine on solar if there's enough of that, else on off-peak. Shutting off the heating if there are windows open, and notching up the recovering ventilation system when they're not. Maybe even being able to send an SMS to the heating system that I'll be away for a few more hours, so it can adjust the heating accordingly.

But maybe that's not worthy of the (id)IoT moniker, because it does not involve other computers than those entirely my own.

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Crashed and alone in a remote location: When paid help is no help

Stoneshop
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SSD wasn't even heard of back then

Well, NAND flash SSD, maybe.

Basically, core memory is SSD too. And in the 1990's several manufacturers had a couple of solid state drives in their program DEC had one, physically the size of a HSC50 (can't recall the model number; ESE50?) which was essentially a backplane filled with 150MB worth of DRAM boards and a SDI interface, plus a MVAX board with an RD54 hooked up and an UPS. If the power went out, the UPS was to keep the lot running while the memory contents were transferred to disk. Later they had a drive with a 3.5" form factor, SCSI interface, static RAM and a rechargeable battery. Couple hundred MB, IIRC. No idea of the list price of either, but definitely well over that of their size in spinning rust.

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She wants it. She needs it. Shall I give it to her or keep doing it by myself?

Stoneshop
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Angel

Re: Drag and drop between windows

why does no FS by default keep all versions of all the files?

No FS does? I work with one that keeps any number of previous file versions I deem appropriate.

So nyah.

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BOFH: Free as in free beer or... Oh. 'Free Upgrade'

Stoneshop
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Devil

Re: Nepotism

I'm guessing Mannesmann-Tally

Took me slightly over two seconds*

* It's late and my brain is fried due to the current temperature and humidity..

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Forget your RTO*: Real world Disaster Recovery needs garbage bags and bubble wrap

Stoneshop
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Windows

Sunken beneath the waves

Everyone said I was daft to build a datacentre on a swamp, but I built in all the same, just to show them. It sank into the swamp. So I built a second one. That sank into the swamp. So I built a third. That burned down, fell over, then sank into the swamp. But the fourth one stayed up

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Africa's MeerKAT looks at the sky, surprises boffins with 1,300 galaxies

Stoneshop
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a Fanaroff-Riley Class 2, FR2, object

Don't they mean a 'Far enough-Really' object?

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If we can't find a working SCSI cable, the company will close tomorrow

Stoneshop
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Devil

Re: Pins in the cable?

a SCSI cable with male connectors

HD-50 and HD-68, and Apple's abomination (using a single ground pin for all those twisted pairs is such a good idea), the DB25.

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Stoneshop
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Bus mice

Most of the ones I saw back in the late 80's/early 90's were Microsoft InPort devices with round plugs, but I seem to recall some other brands used D plugs/sockets

Even the MS bus mouse card had room for a DB9 connector, but on all the ones I've seen it wasn't fitted, and no cutout in the slot bracket. There's a Siemens-branded Logitech bus mouse around that has a (male) DB9, but the matching card has gone missing. They probably switched from DB9 to mini-DIN because a bus mouse plugged into a CGA or Hercules card doesn't quite work like one would want.

And the first mouse I bought was a bus mouse with a mini-DIN plug, with a bus-to-DB25 converter block and a DB25 -DB9 pigtail.

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Stoneshop
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Devil

Re: Start with the basics...

I'll think you'll find it's carrier sense (multiple access with collision detection)

Nope. There's a lot of connections that aren't, and those can be way more requiring of dark rituals (goats, black candles and pentagrams in the case of SCSI, for instance)

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Stoneshop
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Re: Start with the basics...

Always start with the physical layer, in the absence of any other clues. It's common sense, innit?

Which, four times out of five, is a physical entity calling itself 'engineer' or 'technician'.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Full marks for extra experience!

It might be worth getting a list of what bits of kit people carry with them 'just in case'

Leatherman multitool (Charge TTi), PB Swiss tool roll, one of those nicely bright LED flashlights (single 18650 cell. And a headband LED light.

Got a DS25 going again, twice, and oodles of DS10's.

For PC's I have the Lowa Tibet size 46 (11)

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Brit Science Minister to probe Brexit bias against UK-based scientists

Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: FUD

Anything short term before article 50 is even invoked is pure FUD (Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt) based on pretty much nothing at all except "well something MIGHT happen"...

Nope. It's "well, something WILL happen". Even if you lot manage to postpone triggering A50 indefinitely, it's not business as usual any more. Because I doubt that businesses are willing to wait until A50 is invoked, then wait again to see what comes out of the negotiations. It simply won't be as good as being inside the single market, and businesses will want to pre-empt that degradation. So, legally there won't be a difference NOW* and not even until A50 is invoked and its negotiations finalised, but businesses tend to look ahead a number of years to prevent being caught out. Science projects, often being long-running, tend to take the same approach.

* Some people have been implementing their interpretation of the referendum rather prematurely.

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Google slammed over its 'free' school service

Stoneshop
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Re: And is anyone surprised?

Don't shoot the pope before you've sold the fur?

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Amazingly insecure industrial control systems + internet = Cupful of nope

Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: Where's the link?

You mean this one under the very last word in the very last sentence of the very last paragraph?

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Google aims to train two million Indian Android devs by 2018

Stoneshop
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Big Brother

Google aims to train two million Indian Android devs

Google aims to train two million Indian Androids, rather.

There, FTFY

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Tesla whacks guardrail in Montana, driver blames autopilot

Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: "A.I. is hard."

You mean like a broken down or stopped on traffic lights car stationary object ?

I expect the guidance system to have a hard time detecting narrow, non-metallic objects in the dark (no radar signature, little contrast from the background), and the restriction is based on that.

And if you're doing 60mph (100km/h) in an area with traffic lights, running into a statio9nary object will quite likely be the last thing you do. Ever.

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Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: No cell phone reception??

No cellphone reception -> GPS can't pull in the map for the area (pre-loaded maps are so very yesterday) -> no frigging idea where he is.

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Cycling paramedics in epic rush to save patient who ate stale sandwich

Stoneshop
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Re: Range of use

(I'm sure a motorcycle could use the pavement at a push too, but they're not so easy to get up the curbs).

Not sure about the first response bikes used in the UK, but over here they tend to be the large allroads: BMW R1200GS, Honda Varadero, Yamaha Tenere. A fairly usable combination of carrying capacity and agility. Add some Advanced Rider courses to that and London curbstones shrink to a minor nuisance.

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Rolls-Royce reckons robot cargo ships are the future of the seas

Stoneshop
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Pirate

Re: Internet of Ships

Physically the ships could be very secure, no need for windows, decks etc.

They need to be; the adage still applies that once you physically get hold of a computer, it's under your control.

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You can’t sit there, my IoT desk tells me

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

idiot IoT devices

Pleonasm detected.

(by the way, correct spelling is 'idIoT')

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Stoneshop
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LACK

The dimensions are just right to accommodate a 19" rackmount device between the legs. Unfortunately the current version has been cheaped down to a level that you can only screw a single 1U device in; just the top inch (0.18 linguine) and the bottom half inch (0.09 linguine) are from a material that can, with not too much stretching of the term, be called solid; the remaining parts of the legs are stiff paper on the outside with a stiff paper honeycomb filling, with the paint layer making a significant contribution to the load bearing properties. But it'll do for a rackmount network or KVM switch, or storage unit (may require an additional bracket on the rear, because of the weight)

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Loose wrists shake chips: Your wrist-job could be a PIN-snitch

Stoneshop
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Trollface

The next development

will be smart watches that have a '10 seconds of tremor' mode, which the next version of the infecting app will intercept and subtract from the movement data.

Then people who want to block this attack vector will be seen with a Rabbit strapped to their wrist.

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Stoneshop
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Re: Brute Force

My ATM card allows 3 tries

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Stoneshop
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Pint

by portable I mean I can put it in my pocket

Bring back the Psion 5MX, updated to today's requirements: colour screen, beefier processor, adequate RAM and storage, EPOC64 instead of Android, and built-in comms, but keeping the clamshell and the keyboard.

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Stoneshop
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Re: What's a Smart Watch?

Someone who's standing guard over a parking lot for those compact cars by Daimler AG

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Stoneshop
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Re: Pretty neat

That would also thwart the IR scan attack.

People who rely on their muscle memory would have to unlearn that if such measures are introduced.

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Remember those stupid hoverboards? 500,000+ recalled in the US after they started exploding

Stoneshop
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Re: Swagway

A lot of them appear to be Smegway.

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Microsoft's cringey 'Hey bae <3' recruiter email translated by El Reg

Stoneshop
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Flame

Re: I can tell them how it occurred

Please fire accordingly.

With a proper flamethrower, not some repurposed squirt gun

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Stoneshop
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Windows

Re: Ah...

... installed Windows 10 on their laptop.

At least this method is less dishonest

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

Stoneshop
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Headmaster

Re: "No, No, No. Let me resign..."

Your reading comprehension is beyond abominable.

Is it up to them? I thought we voted for MEP's, it was one of those claims of democracy.

Regardless of whether one's elected democratically into a council or parliament (and through whatever method, FPTP, PR or Preference Voting) anyone in that assemblage can have their personal opinion on whether to like or dislike a particular member, considering him or her worthy of a seat or not, and wanting that member to stay or leave. And I doubt there's much love lost between MEPs with BRemain leanings and Nigel Ravage. I do doubt that quite strongly.

The promised referendum which will be carried out once the result is in should be carried out.

You had your referendum already, and I gathered the BRexiters didn't want another one.

I dont know who your MP is.

I already mentioned that I am not directly affected by BRexit, but to help you grasp what I mean by that: I am neither an UK resident nor an UK citizen, and ergo I do not have a "my MP".

If he is a man of principle then he is right to wait there until we actually leave the EU

One may take that view, yes. Another is that he's involved in, and paid by, an organisation he despises, an attitude one may well call hypocritical and dishonest.

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Stoneshop
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Facepalm

Re: "No, No, No. Let me resign..."

So if we remain in the EU then the remain crowd want him (as well as all MEP's) to be employed there

Given his recent speech, do you really think his fellow UKMEPs still want him there? And I doubt that any BRemainer has had positive feelings about him anyway.

You want him out then tell your MP

Who would that be?

He shouldnt need to quit unless the democratic vote is being ignored.

Out of principle would be another reason. But that's a word that's apparently not in Ravage Farage's vocabulary.

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: "No, No, No. Let me resign..."

Out of interest what is the complaint against this?

Do look up the words "opportunist" and "hypocrite".

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Stoneshop
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Re: Result not significant

We didn't have a bloody 2/3 majority vote to get into the draconian shitpile attempted superstate

From the moment you got in up until two weeks ago you could have influenced (and did) how that "draconian shitpile attempted superstate" functioned. That, IMO, allows for a lower threshold on entry: because you can have a say in which way things are to develop. Furthermore, economic and social conditions have changed a bit over the 40 years you've been in; both within the UK and the EU as well as globally; it would behoove all of the involved to take that into account as well, and setting a different threshold for exit now might well be one of the consequences of that.

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Stoneshop
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Holmes

Re: This "Parliament" you speak of

"To summarise: it is a well known fact that those people who most want to rule people are, ipso facto, those least suited to do it."

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Stoneshop
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Re: From another angle...

nothing more than an opinion pole

How about an opinion spaniard, or an opinion greek, dutchman or estonian (as opposed to etonian, we've seen their opinions)?

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Stoneshop
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Windows

Re: "No, No, No. Let me resign..."

The tories are in power and Cameron is in charge so UKIP having an exit plan (fairly sure they do) is irrelevant especially as Nigel has been excluded from the leave talks. [...] Can you imagine any tory crowing about an exit plan, Osborne and Cameron would do anything to scupper it.

There's nothing to stop you from preparing an exit plan even if you expect not needing to use it, and equally, not being able to crow about it doesn't excuse you from preparing one. On the contrary, having one and presenting it once it's become necessary shows you as being prudently prepared (at least if the plan is halfway realistic, anyway). This holds for Farage too; even if he was excluded from the official campaign, there's nothing barring him from having a plan ready for the event of Brexit. Stating clearly and unequivocally beforehand that he won't be making one, instead considering a win to be all he wants and that's it would be fine too.

For quite a few of those involved, it has shown them for what they are.

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Down to Earth: NASA's kilo-kitty balloon lands after 46 days

Stoneshop
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Boffin

What condition were the cats in?

After more than eight weeks aloft, I suspect they were getting more than a little miffed with not being allowed to sharpen their claws.

By the way, how many Super Tigers rode that previous balloon? No mention of the weight of even one such tiger (a normal one is about 300kg, 71 jubs), nor of that balloon's lifting capacity. Inquiring minds want to know.

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fMRI bugs could upend years of research

Stoneshop
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Re: You can kick instruments

MRI, as a tool for looking inside your noggin while it's still more or less functioning*, is quite OK. Which can, and has been, calibrated by scanning corpses and cutting them up**.. What happens to be a problem is interpreting correlations in activity in different brain areas, for instance the physical stimuli as caused by consuming Coke (or coke), and the associated feelings.

* mine nearly wasn't, and MRI showed the cause, allowing the correct medical treatment. Guessing would have had well over 50% chance of being dead wrong.

** Or so I've been told by someone working at Philips Medical Systems.

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