* Posts by Robert Carnegie

2080 posts • joined 30 Sep 2009

Twitter will delete jokes after a DMCA takedown – but NOT my photos, fumes angry snapper

Robert Carnegie

Re: repeat after me

In one episode of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Studio_60_on_the_Sunset_Strip

- Aaron Sorkin's series set inside basically "Saturday Night Live" - a writer under pressure used a stolen joke and got hell for it. It turned out to have been stolen and stolen and stolen, ultimately from the "Studio 60" show. This is fiction.

Bob Monkhouse was perhaps unfairly called "The Thief of Bad Gags" - because that was Milton Berle - Bob collected them but may have not used them. And I've got an autobiographical book by Jasper Carrott where he remembers as a folk club MC going to watch circuit comedians and steal their lines. Including an especially fruitful occasion watching Bob Monkhouse.

But admitting it in print doesn't make it right.

Anything uttered in public can still be copyright, I think - but that doesn't mean that you will be able to stop infringement.

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EU graciously lets Dutch splurge €33m on 'leccy car charger network

Robert Carnegie

Re: Netherlands

You know what the Netherlands could do with then? Some windmills.

Oh? Really? WELL then.

Tide energy I expect is a sore point...

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Ireland loses entire airport amid new postcode chaos

Robert Carnegie

http://www.royalmail.com/find-a-postcode allows 50 UK postcode searches.

However the limit is done, it's in the terms of use of the service - so getting around it technically is not the point.

People should publish their own postcode with their address.

Welcome to the 20th century, Ireland.

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Microsoft boffins borrow smartmobe brains to give wearables 9x kick

Robert Carnegie

Just call it "Project Buzzkill".

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Thunder-faced Mozilla lifts Flash Firefox block after 0-days plugged

Robert Carnegie

Is this what they did?

My impression is that Firefox was blocking Flash - by default which presumably you could alter - using the Flash plugin version number, including the latest version out when Firefox was released. In that case, a newer updated Flash plugin was immediately allowed to run. But I may have misunderstood and it may not matter.

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Microsoft rains cash on OpenBSD Foundation, becomes top 2015 donor

Robert Carnegie

I remember an old BBC radio sketch

A loving couple were discussing whether they really were telling each other everything...

She says: 'Osmium is the heaviest metal known to man."

He says "But... I thought it was iridium..."

This leads to a terrible row...

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LG won't fix malware slinging bloatware update hole

Robert Carnegie

Surely possible

Distributing a fix shouldn't be a problem because surely the Update Centre can update itself.. surely? If it can't, then what is it even for?

Windows Update updates Windows Update without asking for the permission that I have to give for other updates.

The Goodroid Playstore can update software on my handset, except for updating Android itself. But it can update the Playstore. It wasn't called that when I got the phone. I don't remember what it was called, or what it is called now. The point is, it changes. It's like owning a TARDIS - a Type Forty that is locked into bulky rectangular exterior format.

Device-specific software also seems to be available in the Playstore, so, can't LG just use that for their software updates?

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Linux Mint 17.2: If only all penguinista desktops were done this way

Robert Carnegie

Re: Goodness.

I'm an IT professional, but when it comes to things like this on a personal computer, I am your wife. Except that I'm single so I'm on my own with this stuff. I want the computer to just work with a minimum of me thinking about it. I don't want to know about packages and go looking for ones that I haven't got. I don't want to have to root out foreign packages. And I don't want to rely on Mint being based on two-year-old Ubuntu and presumably inheriting necessary patches from Ubuntu, which in turn relies on the maintainers of Debian. If the people involved got along with each other then there wouldn't be separate products in the first place. I'm getting old and this is not fun any more.

I also am keyboard disabled and I rely on a touchscreen program that only runs on Windows anyway, so, that's that. I think the programmer who wrote it is dead.

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Hey, Sand Hill Exchange. Shouting 'blockchain!' won't stop the Feds

Robert Carnegie

Re: Who stands to gain from such an Exchange being created?

It seems that people who can bet on this exchange going bust benefit from its creation, but that may not be legal either.

Anyway, to most of us it seems that "information" within a stock market is mostly imaginary. Particularly day-traders who hope to read the economic future in the rather random previous daily fluctuation of a price, having been put there by collective activity of people who don't know any more than you do.

Also, does anyone else recall hearing about at least one small enterprise which was shorted to death or nearly so by a powerful speculator - an actual wealth creator crushed by the great money casino? I think it was either in the IT sector or maybe pool noodles or a new kind of table fork, I don't quite remember. But a boon to humanity nevertheless, wasted.

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Robert Carnegie

Property valuation

Of course a property valuer may believe that prices are let's say twice what they would be in a sane society, while expecting this to continue to be the case indefinitely. Furthermore, if prices do drop, home-owning voters start screaming.

A valuer really predicts what other people will offer for a property. Sanity doesn't come into it directly; how much you yourself like the property does, for instance, if it's near to your job. Bid low if you don't especially like it, and if you win, cheer yourself up with the money you saved. Bid high if you like it a lot.

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Feds count Cryptowall cost: $18 million says FBI

Robert Carnegie

Warning : post may contain nuts

Indeed, the money is about what $ANY_GOVERNMENT_AGENCY spends annually on peanuts.

Which, pedantically, aren't really nuts in fact, but are still liable to make some people extremely unwell.

And possibly that isn't the point. I mean, US.gov can't very well say "We'll give you $20 million a year * if you leave U.S. businesses alone."

* in used nuts. ** eww.

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Germany says no steamy ebooks until die Kinder have gone to bed

Robert Carnegie

Re: So, Herr Regulator

Kann the Kinder call cron?

At 10pm they should be performing the "sleep" command.

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Robert Carnegie

Hypothetical

Is there a German Project Gutenberg?

Or maybe a Project Venusberg - apparently not, but, this may be a good time to start one.

I don't read German although I did study it at school. That was a long time ago. Maybe if I'd known -

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Taylor Swift boycotts Apple Music over no-pay-for-plays shocker

Robert Carnegie

Big retailer / big producer greed

We know about loss leaders. But in the 21st century the clever trick is to pass retail and production costs on to your suppliers of agricultural produce and raw materials, so that what the supplier thought was a good deal for them is less so. Some of it sounds like simply demanding a bribe from your smaller commercial partner for continuing to do business with them, but presumably isn't exactly that because that would be illegal - probably?

Here's an allegation from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-30338663

""We will now require you to make an investment payment to support our growth."

As a consumer I have decided not t% support their growth for the time being.

And yes - having the free offer supplied free to shops by the small company that makes the stuff and doesn't have much choice about it, is considered a good wheeze by the retailer - and considered normal. And so is charging rent for space on the best shelves.

Capitalism is literally more horrible than you can imagine.

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FCC hosts Reagan-off as it enters 21st century

Robert Carnegie

So in 2008

there wasn't any traction, if that's the word, for the phrase "Bush telegraph"?

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Employees love their IT departments (almost very nearly true)

Robert Carnegie

About this IT satisfaction survey -

Was it, for instances, responses by e-mail?

Heh heh heh. Heh heh heh heh.

Responses personally passed by the resident Oneiric Overlord of Outlook, I think you'll find.

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Apple seeks fawning 'journalists' for in-house 'news' self pluggery

Robert Carnegie

Re: Mike Ash

I don't know if his blog is running on an Apple-owned server including one where Apple took the company over; if it is then he probably already consented to whatever they want to do with the data, and an opt-out option is a courtesy that is not legally necessary. I don't know that for a fact, but it's how many technology companies operate, and Apple especially. The United Kingdom's Data Protection law may be different, but most likely the data isn't held in the United Kingdom.

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Obama issues HTTPS-only order to US Federal sysadmins

Robert Carnegie

Re: Why?

You'd still prefer that the government doesn't know your business. Even your business with the government.

However, "Data Protection Act" type rules that limit how personal data can be held and used generally don't apply to the governments that make the rules. Because why would they limit their powers? To be topical, you need a Magna Carta type constitutional provision for that. A law that limits what even the government can do.

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Robert Carnegie

Re: Why?

"Basically, with all government communication in future over HTTPS, odds will be passing fair no one's listening in on the encrypted connection"

except the government of course... but that can't be helped, obs.

- well, unless you get your version of govt. information from Wikileaks. (Maybe faster + better interface, too?)

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Robert Carnegie

"NHS Choices"

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Impetigo/Pages/Introduction.aspx NSFW (maybe)

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If I get hit by a bus, Linux will go on just fine says Linus Torvalds

Robert Carnegie
Joke

Forked.

Ouch.

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YOU ARE THE DRONE in Amazon's rumoured new parcel delivery plan

Robert Carnegie

Re: Umm no

Your name and address aren't hugely private. They used to be printed in the phone book. They're also in the electoral roll. A web site claims to know names of 3 people living at my address, which isn't exactly what I expected. Maybe they're using the electoral roll and they don't know about children.

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A server apocalypse can come in different shapes and sizes. Be prepared

Robert Carnegie

Re: Generally a well written article - but I have one bug bearer

Good luck making purchases, even on eBay, when the server computer that your business runs on died, exploded, got stolen. (Company credit card? Really?) Also, good luck operating your business without it.

If you're just running a window cleaning round then you may not have a separate server at all, but then this article is not for you.

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Zionists stole my SHOE, claims Muslim campaigner

Robert Carnegie

Something similar happened

in [The Hound of the Baskervilles].

So, better forbear from crossing the moor in those dark hours when the powers of evil are exalted, then.

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Les unsporting gits! French spies BUGGED Concorde passengers

Robert Carnegie

Anyone else alarmed

about spies randomly loading secret packages of espionagey hardware into passenger aeroplanes as a matter of course? Just the weight! (And the number of spy agencies in the world...)

We probably should think again about actual responsibility for the sadly remembered crash landing of Flight Every Goddamned One Of Them, including Wertherwings.

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Microsoft spunks $500m to reinvent the wheel. Why?

Robert Carnegie

Seconded on patents.

I think they're buying patents that will allow them to close down anyone else making useful mobile devices and software. Including patents that shouldn't even be patents.

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Latest Snowden leak: NSA can snoop internet to catch 'hackers' – no warrants needed

Robert Carnegie

It's pretty sophisticated

presumably. I mean, if you had that budget and time, then you could probably do some highly reliable scanning of everyone's anything.

the problem is that it's equally available to be misused, as when apparently most members of the Democratic Party were put on the TSA no-fly list.

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Major London rail station reveals system passwords during TV documentary

Robert Carnegie

Re: Humans

The story that I read about in a computer magazine once was about the open-plan department that had a large-print wall poster saying "This month's password for the accounts system is: Tsirac64" "because the buggers keep changing it".

That password in fact was constructed from the first six unique letters in this post - usually I take a newspaper - and two unique digits constructed from looking at my digital watch, and it isn't as long as the specification you described. And, as I need to log in to more and more different services, scrupulously using different passwrods, I am considering having them written down in a more outrageously conspicuous form than I have already. Maybe set as my PC's wallpaper?

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Robots.txt tells hackers the places you don't want them to look

Robert Carnegie

"I've always thought that Google and the other search engines should require you to submit the pages instead of crawling them."

I think you sort of can do that if you want to. To get up-to-date stuff indexed.

robots.txt is more about keeping your dull stuff out of the index. Or stuff that Google may suspect of being illegitimate SEO work.

https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/35291?hl=en appears to Google's standard advice on the question of "Do you need an SEO?"

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Grand Theft Auto maker lobs sueball at BBC over biopic

Robert Carnegie

Re: Law fail

They appear to claim, perhaps reasonably enough, that they don't want their product logo and other trademarks swiped.

It is commonly understood that you have to defend trademarks, your product's public identity, proactively and without a sense of humour, or else you lose them and anyone can make, for instance (or not), an office machine whose function is to "xerox".

And they have not really done much more than send a letter which explains this.

I'd advise them to take care though; they can prevent their trademarks being appropriated - but not parodied, mocked, insulted. Put me down too for wanting to see the boorish elderly school bully Jeremy Clarkson (for I imagine that many people have never heard of him, and think that a Jeremy must be a bit of a sissy) cast in the role of the company boss or Grand Theft Auton Himself. Or make the in-show computer game about commercially managing a cadre of prostitutes which is called Ride My Pimp.

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EXT4 filesystem can EAT ALL YOUR DATA

Robert Carnegie

To me, the description looks corrupted

And the name "Lukas Czerner" doesn't look error-free. I can't tell what it's meant to be though.

Maybe I should not crassly mock the guy who, apparently, can eat all my data.

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ZX Spectrum 'Hobbit' revival sparks developer dispute

Robert Carnegie

THE ROOM IS TOO FULL FOR YOU TO COLLABORATE.

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South Korea mandates spyware installation on teenagers' smartphones

Robert Carnegie

Re: But what do they hope to find out?

I haven't been a teenager for a long time, but it seems that if today's generation can't view professionally produced pornography then they will make their own. Unintended consequences.

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Microsoft's Surface 3 is sweet – but I wouldn't tickle my nads with it

Robert Carnegie

Re: RT was essential.

Surely the purpose of RT was and is to be a cheaper "Windows" tablet that runs only the new "Windows Store" software where Microsoft gets 33 per cent of your software spending (and Microsoft Office). So you pay less first but more later when you install stuff. And old software doesn't run. And, yeah, people didn't fall for that - not yet, but Microsoft will try again.

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Feds: Bloke 'HACKED PLANE controls' – from his PASSENGER seat

Robert Carnegie

Dilbert

http://dilbert.com/strip/1997-09-10 yo.

Then the plane crashed on September 11th! 1997!

DO YOU SEE!

(see what, I have not yet worked out, but surely it means something... maybe that Scott Adams went back and switched the dates on some cartoons)

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Marvell: NO WAY should we have to pay jumbo $1.54bn patent judgment

Robert Carnegie

Re: Can't they just pay it...

But at my back I always hear

Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near;

And yonder all before us lie

Deserts of vast eternity.

Thy beauty shall no more be found,

Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound

My echoing song: then worms shall try

That long preserved virginity,

And your quaint honour turn to dust,

And into ashes all my lust:

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Manhattan drone pair cuffed for NYPD chopper near miss

Robert Carnegie

Re: Struck by "comparatively flimsy"

Birds also generally don't fly that high - why would they, there's nothing up there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549

is the plane that struck a flock of Canada Geese at 2818 feet over New York City and landed in the Hudson River. The "Aftermath" section of that article describes the genocide carried out against that race of evil migratory ground-avoiders. So, no, birds aren't tolerated.

Probably a single bird or a drone could be shot from the police helicopter, but then the people responsible wouldn't be caught.

By the way, here in Scotland: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_Glasgow_helicopter_crash

Helicopters crash a lot: in a city centre is particularly disagreeable. But, police vehicles crash a lot, too. If it wasn't that special vehicles are involved in the story then it wouldn't be presented as interesting. Like "Thunderbirds".

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Cryptome pulled OFFLINE due to malware infection: Founder cries foul

Robert Carnegie

Question

2015?

Are you anticipating next year's Cryptome takedown - or, just conceivably, publicity stunt? I'm just saying it's possible.

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Creepy battery-operated TEDDY BEAR SEX TOY. Sadly, this is for real

Robert Carnegie

You're probably only going to recognise Sex Teddy in public if you own your own Sex Teddy. So I'm sceptical about the embarrassment.

The main things that I see wrong with it are that it doesn't exist yet and is a venture capital project, and that it probably doesn't really do anything technologically wonderful I mean, a Furby talks to you.

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Move over, John Pilger, let us IT scandal-mongerers stick it to you

Robert Carnegie

I misread "learn how to look contrite" - advice to the person involved in a scandal - as "learn how to cook", which was distracting, suggesting a return to public attention via guest appearances on daytime television or getting a book out for Christmas.

But what if you are already mainly famous for cooking?

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Hacker claims PayPal loophole generates FREE MONEY

Robert Carnegie

What puzzles me is the description of it as "earning" money. It isn't your money, you don't deserve to get it, you didn't earn it. Unless ripping off PayPal is considered virtuous.

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How I poured a client's emails straight into the spam bin – with one Friday evening change

Robert Carnegie

Sharing blame

Should whoever had the idea of creagint a program that inserts the string "BAYES" into the X-SPAM-STATUS line in the first place be found and slapped?

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'Fan docks' are about to become a thing

Robert Carnegie

I'm a fan of fans

Fan docks already exist, inasmuch as you can get a combination of a fan-cooled rest for your notebook computer with USB hub. But I don't know if you can get that in USB 3 yet. (Meanwhile, an article in free newspaper Metro explained that Android tablets are all too thin to have proper USB ports in but that this will be possible "soon" with "USB 4", which is an announcement that many of us may have missed.)

The benefit of an external fan device, even if it's powered from the PC's own USB, is that the PC's internal fans have less work to do, are activated less often, and don't wear out so fast. Would you rather try to replace a fan inside a notebook or tablet - or replace an external fan all-in-one accessory? I had (have?) a tablet, Samsung Q1, that evidently I used much more than the designer intended. After the fan burned out, I could only use the PC at all for any length of time by sitting it on an external fan board to keep it cooled.

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Please be seated at your FOUR-LEGGED PC

Robert Carnegie

Re: "The desk itself is unremarkable:" ?

The keyboard itself has space to rest the heel of each hand on. However, I assume the keyboard isn't included since it's casually plugged into a front USB port. It's just there for the photograph. No, I expect you have to buy your own. Anyway, this isn't a computer to write a novel on. I'm not sure what it -is- for. Isn't the PC supposed to be dead? And even if it isn't, why do you want to be able to look at bits of it while you work?

Also concerned about the electrical safety for the owner.

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Tech that we want (but they never seem to give us)

Robert Carnegie

Flying car. http://dilbert.com/2014-05-24/

For a while, it looked like no one was going to make a Windows tablet with respectable processing power and memory - enough for speech recognition, which is power hungry but a necessity for input to a PC with no input deive, and which has been an option since XP and included standard since Vista.

Now, finally, there are some power tablets... and they run Windows 8. Goddamnit!

Can you install Windows 7 on a Microsoft Surface Pro?

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Microsoft boffins: Now even LAWYERS can grok Bing code's privacy compliance

Robert Carnegie

Re: Grok?

According to novel [Stranger In A Strange Land] (1961), "grok" is a Martian word. According to dictionary.reference.com it means "to understand thoroughly and intuitively", but in the book it isn't quite translatable. A word typically can't be copyrighted - maybe a really, really long one in German - but it can be a trademark, or several trademarks at once.

In comparison, "UPS" represents a particular courier company (trademark, I assume) and "uninterruptible power supply" for your computer.

Anyway, I was sort of assuming that this entire post is a joke, but a joke that exists in Microsoft's documentation. An easter-egg, as they're called.

On the other hand, it could be both that and Microsoft's lawyers really taking control of the word "grok". So that the Groklaw web site, which appears to still exist as an apocalyptic snapshot of when it stopped updating, and of everything that was exposed up to then, can be takedowned. While the lawyers laugh at the joke.

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Nintendo says sorry, but there will be NO gay marriage in Tomodachi Life ... EVER

Robert Carnegie

Re: allowing bestiality?

Isn't there already a game called "Animal Crossing"?

In the current case (and also in Animal Crossing), I do not see why there is any particular programming difficulty in just letting any two players marry. It's just deliberately excluded.

Polyamory might be a bit more difficult to implement. I gather that this is also the case in real life. It's a lot harder for three or more people to get along in a relationship, than for two. But I've never been there myself, so don't take my word for it.

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ZeniMax lobs sueball at Oculus, says space cowboy Carmack rustled its code

Robert Carnegie

Re: Ummm, ZeniMax actually...

What they're talking about is that Facebook has an expletiveload of money and any silly lawsuit could get a piece of that just to get someone to go away. It's already been tried. I should sue Facebook, I had a face before they started their business. I also had books.

On the other other other hand... if I write a program today, it may have structural resemblance to a program I wrote last week, or last year. I don't go further back than that; there is stuff that evidently I've written in the past that I don't recognise at all. Except for structural similarities that I've been using all the time since.

But I'm sceptical that you'd memorise a significant amount of copyrightable code.

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Microsoft's naughty Cortana NOT ALLOWED NEAR CHILDREN

Robert Carnegie

Oops

http://notalwaysright.com/grand-theft-innocence-part-3/18279 is one of 9 encounters recorded at that site with "Grand Theft Auto" and, mostly, disappointed younger players.

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Tooled-up Ryobi girl takes nine-inch grinder to Asus beach babe

Robert Carnegie

UN Special Rapporteur Rashida Manjoo says UK has 'sexist culture'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-27034117 initially sounded to me like news from the 1960s or early 70s. I thought that Britain had left behind that sort of thing. Exceptionally, in dear old "Personal Computer World" magazine, you'd see little adverts for computer hardware from the Far East, where a modem or a circuit board was being basically cuddled by a charming young woman who may or may not have had any idea what it was for, no reason why women wouldn't understand technology, but if you know about electronics and static electricity then you don't hold certain items in a certain way. And I don't think even Amstrad sank to that.

And now all of our computers are made in the Far East and we have "lads' mags" that I hadn't really been paying attention to. And this, but this possibly isn't Britain's fault.

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