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* Posts by Robert Carnegie

2045 posts • joined 30 Sep 2009

Marvell: NO WAY should we have to pay jumbo $1.54bn patent judgment

Robert Carnegie

Re: Can't they just pay it...

But at my back I always hear

Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near;

And yonder all before us lie

Deserts of vast eternity.

Thy beauty shall no more be found,

Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound

My echoing song: then worms shall try

That long preserved virginity,

And your quaint honour turn to dust,

And into ashes all my lust:

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Manhattan drone pair cuffed for NYPD chopper near miss

Robert Carnegie

Re: Struck by "comparatively flimsy"

Birds also generally don't fly that high - why would they, there's nothing up there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Airways_Flight_1549

is the plane that struck a flock of Canada Geese at 2818 feet over New York City and landed in the Hudson River. The "Aftermath" section of that article describes the genocide carried out against that race of evil migratory ground-avoiders. So, no, birds aren't tolerated.

Probably a single bird or a drone could be shot from the police helicopter, but then the people responsible wouldn't be caught.

By the way, here in Scotland: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_Glasgow_helicopter_crash

Helicopters crash a lot: in a city centre is particularly disagreeable. But, police vehicles crash a lot, too. If it wasn't that special vehicles are involved in the story then it wouldn't be presented as interesting. Like "Thunderbirds".

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Cryptome pulled OFFLINE due to malware infection: Founder cries foul

Robert Carnegie

Question

2015?

Are you anticipating next year's Cryptome takedown - or, just conceivably, publicity stunt? I'm just saying it's possible.

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Creepy battery-operated TEDDY BEAR SEX TOY. Sadly, this is for real

Robert Carnegie

You're probably only going to recognise Sex Teddy in public if you own your own Sex Teddy. So I'm sceptical about the embarrassment.

The main things that I see wrong with it are that it doesn't exist yet and is a venture capital project, and that it probably doesn't really do anything technologically wonderful I mean, a Furby talks to you.

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Move over, John Pilger, let us IT scandal-mongerers stick it to you

Robert Carnegie

I misread "learn how to look contrite" - advice to the person involved in a scandal - as "learn how to cook", which was distracting, suggesting a return to public attention via guest appearances on daytime television or getting a book out for Christmas.

But what if you are already mainly famous for cooking?

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Hacker claims PayPal loophole generates FREE MONEY

Robert Carnegie

What puzzles me is the description of it as "earning" money. It isn't your money, you don't deserve to get it, you didn't earn it. Unless ripping off PayPal is considered virtuous.

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How I poured a client's emails straight into the spam bin – with one Friday evening change

Robert Carnegie

Sharing blame

Should whoever had the idea of creagint a program that inserts the string "BAYES" into the X-SPAM-STATUS line in the first place be found and slapped?

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'Fan docks' are about to become a thing

Robert Carnegie

I'm a fan of fans

Fan docks already exist, inasmuch as you can get a combination of a fan-cooled rest for your notebook computer with USB hub. But I don't know if you can get that in USB 3 yet. (Meanwhile, an article in free newspaper Metro explained that Android tablets are all too thin to have proper USB ports in but that this will be possible "soon" with "USB 4", which is an announcement that many of us may have missed.)

The benefit of an external fan device, even if it's powered from the PC's own USB, is that the PC's internal fans have less work to do, are activated less often, and don't wear out so fast. Would you rather try to replace a fan inside a notebook or tablet - or replace an external fan all-in-one accessory? I had (have?) a tablet, Samsung Q1, that evidently I used much more than the designer intended. After the fan burned out, I could only use the PC at all for any length of time by sitting it on an external fan board to keep it cooled.

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Please be seated at your FOUR-LEGGED PC

Robert Carnegie

Re: "The desk itself is unremarkable:" ?

The keyboard itself has space to rest the heel of each hand on. However, I assume the keyboard isn't included since it's casually plugged into a front USB port. It's just there for the photograph. No, I expect you have to buy your own. Anyway, this isn't a computer to write a novel on. I'm not sure what it -is- for. Isn't the PC supposed to be dead? And even if it isn't, why do you want to be able to look at bits of it while you work?

Also concerned about the electrical safety for the owner.

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Tech that we want (but they never seem to give us)

Robert Carnegie

Flying car. http://dilbert.com/2014-05-24/

For a while, it looked like no one was going to make a Windows tablet with respectable processing power and memory - enough for speech recognition, which is power hungry but a necessity for input to a PC with no input deive, and which has been an option since XP and included standard since Vista.

Now, finally, there are some power tablets... and they run Windows 8. Goddamnit!

Can you install Windows 7 on a Microsoft Surface Pro?

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Microsoft boffins: Now even LAWYERS can grok Bing code's privacy compliance

Robert Carnegie

Re: Grok?

According to novel [Stranger In A Strange Land] (1961), "grok" is a Martian word. According to dictionary.reference.com it means "to understand thoroughly and intuitively", but in the book it isn't quite translatable. A word typically can't be copyrighted - maybe a really, really long one in German - but it can be a trademark, or several trademarks at once.

In comparison, "UPS" represents a particular courier company (trademark, I assume) and "uninterruptible power supply" for your computer.

Anyway, I was sort of assuming that this entire post is a joke, but a joke that exists in Microsoft's documentation. An easter-egg, as they're called.

On the other hand, it could be both that and Microsoft's lawyers really taking control of the word "grok". So that the Groklaw web site, which appears to still exist as an apocalyptic snapshot of when it stopped updating, and of everything that was exposed up to then, can be takedowned. While the lawyers laugh at the joke.

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Nintendo says sorry, but there will be NO gay marriage in Tomodachi Life ... EVER

Robert Carnegie

Re: allowing bestiality?

Isn't there already a game called "Animal Crossing"?

In the current case (and also in Animal Crossing), I do not see why there is any particular programming difficulty in just letting any two players marry. It's just deliberately excluded.

Polyamory might be a bit more difficult to implement. I gather that this is also the case in real life. It's a lot harder for three or more people to get along in a relationship, than for two. But I've never been there myself, so don't take my word for it.

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ZeniMax lobs sueball at Oculus, says space cowboy Carmack rustled its code

Robert Carnegie

Re: Ummm, ZeniMax actually...

What they're talking about is that Facebook has an expletiveload of money and any silly lawsuit could get a piece of that just to get someone to go away. It's already been tried. I should sue Facebook, I had a face before they started their business. I also had books.

On the other other other hand... if I write a program today, it may have structural resemblance to a program I wrote last week, or last year. I don't go further back than that; there is stuff that evidently I've written in the past that I don't recognise at all. Except for structural similarities that I've been using all the time since.

But I'm sceptical that you'd memorise a significant amount of copyrightable code.

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Microsoft's naughty Cortana NOT ALLOWED NEAR CHILDREN

Robert Carnegie

Oops

http://notalwaysright.com/grand-theft-innocence-part-3/18279 is one of 9 encounters recorded at that site with "Grand Theft Auto" and, mostly, disappointed younger players.

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Tooled-up Ryobi girl takes nine-inch grinder to Asus beach babe

Robert Carnegie

UN Special Rapporteur Rashida Manjoo says UK has 'sexist culture'

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-27034117 initially sounded to me like news from the 1960s or early 70s. I thought that Britain had left behind that sort of thing. Exceptionally, in dear old "Personal Computer World" magazine, you'd see little adverts for computer hardware from the Far East, where a modem or a circuit board was being basically cuddled by a charming young woman who may or may not have had any idea what it was for, no reason why women wouldn't understand technology, but if you know about electronics and static electricity then you don't hold certain items in a certain way. And I don't think even Amstrad sank to that.

And now all of our computers are made in the Far East and we have "lads' mags" that I hadn't really been paying attention to. And this, but this possibly isn't Britain's fault.

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Japan airport staff dash to replace passcodes after security cock-up

Robert Carnegie

And

Just when we hear that Sarah Palin has escaped from Azkaban...

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US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code

Robert Carnegie
Thumb Up

Psst: IMEI

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Mobile_Station_Equipment_Identity

since "EMEI" doesn't Google, or, rather, it Googles as other things instead.

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Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years

Robert Carnegie
Joke

"Metallic glass" bones eh?

I just had a hip replacement. It's lead crystal. Bugger.

PS: This is just a joke.

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Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker

Robert Carnegie

It is a natural necessity

Whoever the hacker is, I am sure that they have or they had a mother. But maybe not a father.

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NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS

Robert Carnegie

Maybe I'm naive,

but if the NSA had this, would they have needed to do all or any of the other bad things we recently learned they were doing?

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Not just websites hit by OpenSSL's Heartbleed – PCs, phones and more under threat

Robert Carnegie

Re: Even worse than I thought

http://www.eviloverlord.com/lists/overlord.html - (c) 1997 - offers a similar rule for prudent evil masterminds in those days: "99. Any data file of crucial importance will be padded to 1.45Mb in size." And therefore couldn't be copied by enemies on a 3½ inch floppy disk, remember those? 1.44 MB capacity.

Having said that, do private and public key have to be of similar size? It could take way long to log in then.

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'Monstrous' Apple kicked us off iAd, claimed we are its RIVAL – Brit music upstart

Robert Carnegie

Re: Wrong. @Neoc

I have no idea whether other advertising services run on iOS, but I'm not going to assume that you are saying correctly that they do, because, of course, such services would be in competition with Apple's own.

The last that I heard, even designing a better keyboard program isn't allowed, except perhaps to type text into the clipboard, to paste into another application. Or else not even that.

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'We’re not SNEAKY, we're DADS from the MIDWEST'

Robert Carnegie

Sell Hack: bear in mind I don't actually know what I'm talking about,

My impression of what "Sell Hack" does, or did, and how, is that it sends -your- LinkedIn personal details, when you use it, to its publishers. Then, users of Sell Hack can see the normally hidden details of other users of Sell Hack.

So, it's not magic, it's not -exactly- hacking in fact, but apparently it is still a breach of LinkedIn conditions, maybe, and it's gone away.

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Homeopathic remedies contaminated with REAL medicine get recalled

Robert Carnegie

N-acetyl-p-aminophenol

if you're fussy.

When I buy it, it is "paracetamol", and usually the acceptable supermarket brand. But a large proportion of Register readers only speak American, and the rest of us are surely smart enough to look it up, so I translated.

As for them putting this or other real drugs into "homeopathic" pills, that's only a theory - until now, apparently.

In any case, do not take more than one of these drugs together - they are the same stuff and it doesn't take a lot to make a deadly overdose, as your liver dies and rots inside you. I've also heard an argument that taking this stuff and caffeine could be a risk - including with tea or coffee - but that was based on a test tube trial. I suppose they can't very well do an experiment with people.

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Robert Carnegie

Of course

Of course they've put real medicine in their homeopathic slosh. It means that their stuff works. So you will get homeopathic headache cure with a proper does of acetaminophen in it, I bet. So everybody's happy, but it costs more than when it's called Tylenol. Still, if the customer's satisfied.

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FTC: Do SSL properly or we'll shove a microscope up you for decades

Robert Carnegie

Uh, yeah

I expect that it's not really allowed to use the FTC and their interest in your affairs when you advertise. But who knows. Any other companies got that history?

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Microsoft: Let's be clear, WE won't read your email – but the cops will

Robert Carnegie

Re: Shame

The story seems to be that they found Microsoft secret information (that Windows 8.1.1 is still making users cry?) by opening the Hotmail e-mail of the non-employee blogger that it was leaked TO.

To do this, presumably they went through every other Hotmail user's e-mail, as well.

In other news, using Linux is considered to be stealing from Microsoft. Anyone receiving e-mails that mention Linux will henceforth be billed for damages. Welcome to what always was a post-Snowden world, only now you know it. (Which is what post-Snowden really means.)

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Raised £350bn in crowdsourced funding? Tell me about it (not)

Robert Carnegie

Here is some verbal nonsense that I recently saw elsewhere.

"Hello everyone

"a new approach is necessary to imagine the righteousness of Jesus with

brand-new innovations when evaluating God

Prior to the debate about God , you should also try http://www.wwwwwwwwww.www

;-)"

Well, I haven't looked at the actual site and I don't intend to, but, when did the Jesus business get overrun with new-approach innovation gobbledygook? Doesn't it already have its own?

Then again, this may be randomly generated text, and also may be a malware site, and actually makes Jesus cry.

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Life support turned off: NHS Direct dies silent, undignified death

Robert Carnegie

Funny thing,

In the last week or so I've been getting noticeably more spam past the filter, including a lot from, or in honour of, one or more online pharmacies. Also they want to be my friend, which is flattering, unless they mean to "Like" them on Facebook.

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Windows 8 BREAKS ITSELF after system restores

Robert Carnegie

Re: Similar problem with W7?

I think there's an option of deleting the Windows Update history so that everything is re-evaluated. That might make your phantom update go away. But don't take my word for it, because this isn't it.

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Google flu-finding service diagnosed with 'big data hubris'

Robert Carnegie

I assumed that a TV documentary about flu would cause a rush of Google queries, without spreading any more flu.

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Every little helps: Dirty MOLE BANDITS clean out Tesco ATM from BELOW

Robert Carnegie

Re: Precedent and clue

Jeremy Brett was in that one on ITV3 the other week. I didn't recognise the red-headed victim, but Scottish actor Richard Wilson played the role of "The League", whose name I've also forgotten. And it was explicitly organised by Professor Moriarty, unlike anything in the canon except for "The Final Problem", which ought to be next week, I suppose. Richard Wilson wasn't Moriarty, he was very scared of Moriarty. That was for a bank vault full of gold. I don't think Moriarty would have approved the operation in 2014.

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Blighty goes retro with 12-sided pound coin

Robert Carnegie

The cost to industry

I don't see anyone pointing out on the question of compnaies making and operating coin processing machines that will have to be set for the new coin, that that is part of their bloody job. The currency is updated from time to time, partly because the metal in coins gets more valuable than the value of the coins, and coin detection machinery has to be updated to handle the new coins. Your digital home moneybox might not work, though.

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Google hit by Monday morning blues: Talk, Hangouts, Sheets crash

Robert Carnegie

Also Google Groups (for Usenet) -

Although Google Groups is showing "no issues", I assume that someone's noticed that we can't post into Usenet groups - which is what I use it for. I mean, I haven't reported it, but someone else would, right?

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Barnes & Noble's Nook freed from Windows, WinPhone apps pledge

Robert Carnegie

Re: sniff, sniff

How about brand name "Fahrenheit" for the new Microsoft reader? As in 451 (as in not accurate, but never mind).

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Taiwan Mobile unveils Granny-tracker smart bracelet

Robert Carnegie

What does it do?

I thought it was saying something else; if I find a distressed stranger wearing one of these bracelets, I touch it with MY phone and it contacts their relatives or a care agency. Then what? I dunno, they read my location, they phone me back, we discuss the ransom money...... (joking).

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Toshiba Encore: The Windows 8.1 tablet that might catch on

Robert Carnegie

....I think last year's Samsung Ativ Smart PC Pro 700T is a tablet with 64-bit Windows, on an Intel i5 CPU, with 4 GB RAM.

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Robert Carnegie

64 bit, why would you?

I think the spec sheet for the processor says that it's 64 bit capable and can address 4 GB RAM, but this tablet only has 2 GB. As far as I know, there was and is no point in installing 64-bit Windows unless you have at least 4 GB RAM: it won't do anything that the 32-bit version won't do. At least, not anything that you want to do on a personal computer or a tablet. So, if they can fit more RAM into this thing, then maybe 64-bit Windows is a reasonable option.

I mean: is there a more secure version of Flash Player for 64-bit?

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Robert Carnegie

Presumably SSD is a better grade than USB stick?

I assume that SSD is built more robustly than USB memory, and also has higher performance. For instance, "wear levelling" logic extends the useable life of your memory.

Also, the cost of a larger installed storage option to the end-user is liable to be more than the difference in cost of two storage devices. System builders make a profit.

However, your prices for USB memory seem to me too-good-to-be-true. Maybe that's wholesale and you get a truckload of them. Or maybe they're fakes; it happens.

I'm kind of puzzled that no one seems to be offering non-binary unit sizes on SSD. I've got a tablet with 64 GB, I don't need 128 but I could have used 96. (Of course you don't actually get a power of two as the capacity. I don't know all the details of why.) Now I guess they don't need to sell a 96 GB unit, I could just fit a 64 GB and a 32 GB side by side - if there's room in my device - and format them as one if I want to. But usually there isn't room.

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Spam, a lot of it: Bubble tea is the Seoul of wit

Robert Carnegie

Attract men with large breasts

I think I don't currently have and in fact don't quite correctly remember two spam messages whose title struck me as amusing, but my brain insists that that was one of them. But it may not have been.

The other one was or wasn't "Do you want lager breasts?"

Is it OK to find "Attract men with large breasts" funny? I know they're around.

http://www.cracked.com/article_17270_100-unintentionally-hilarious-spam-subject-lines.html actually covers sender name as well as subject line.

I recently got one that said "We are (heir-hunting investigating company), did you have a relative with the same surname as you?" As of this year, as far as I know I do not - it is a good name though, isn't it?

I decided to pass it on to its e-mail hosting company (MyNet.com in, I dunno, Turkey or somewhere), the apparently genuine British heir-hunting agency, and the large Russian finance house with a London office, whose names were being abused - although it may happen all the time.

http://www.snopes.com/fraud/advancefee/inherit.asp is the scam, although my version only had point 1, and I think that page turned up in Google with the three words phrase that struck me as characteristically odd in the e-mail text, beginning with the word "standard". I thought it might be the actual name of a process and I was curious, but it seems only to appear here. Which is handy for looking it up.

I think I got an abbreviated one because then it isn't immediately clear that this is what it is. Unless you look it up to see if it's a well known spam.

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Robert Carnegie

Re: Wot no Fan Death?

Maybe that's why the "Off" function gets a long description - it's talking about "Fan Death" and/or explaining that the device turns off itself and/or explaining the term "Dead Man's Switch" fantastically tactfully.

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One good thing from the Flappy Birds crapp flap: It's a handy 'tech' media rating system

Robert Carnegie

Ahem

How the bloody hell does the fact that a software author is no longer selling his work become incidental to a discussion of just ripping him off and copying it onto your device anyway?

I hope that he had the foresight to include a "trojan mode" into unlicensed copies that wipes the bootlegger's device to factory settings.

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Sony to close North American ebook store, punt customers to Kobo

Robert Carnegie

Correction

"Kobo will launch a new version of its online store in late May that will be accessible from Kobo devices directly" - presumably you mean "accessible from Sony Reader devices", or do I misunderstand?

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fWHoaR! Trick-cyclists crack eternal mystery of WHAT WOMEN WANT in a man

Robert Carnegie

Re: A few who immediately spring to mind

If we're talking about [Carry On Screaming], Oddbod's behaviour towards women was... I suppose that for him "unreconstructed" is not the right word. But in a Carry On film, that didn't stand out much.

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Robert Carnegie

According to the title of the latest movie, it's

"I, Frankenstein" - although it seems to say that Adam only takes the name in the last scene.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/feb/02/i-frankenstein-mark-kermode-review

"Not one for the critics", says mark Kermode, a critic.

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Bangable poster firm Novalia makes printed 'leccy keyboard

Robert Carnegie

It's like a touchscreen,

except that the picture doesn't change!

So...?

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Quivering, spine-tingling wearable tech: Strap it on and don't look back

Robert Carnegie

Hmm

Research 7 years ago that hasn't changed the orthodox view... I'm not sure whether to believe it.

My experience includes RSI - I'm tapping this on a touchscreen upright in front of me now, using FITALY - and a certain amount of pain from computing in various alternative postures before this arrangement.

Orienting the spine vertically isn't all that you have to do to achieve orthodox good posture. You also need to straighten your spine by basically lifting your head straight up vertically from your customary round-shouldered slouch, - according to a physiotherapist I knew.

So maybe they didn't do that.

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Candy Crush King went 'too far' when it candy crushed my app – dev

Robert Carnegie

Re: As for another King product -

Mr. Shakespeare's witches are acknowledged, but they are evil, basically uniform, mostly without cats as far as I remember, and originally played by male actors - which also is acknowledged. Their boy player analogues in the play in [Wyrd Sisters] are arrested by mistake, and Sir Terry's witches take their places on stage, with dramatic consequences.

The idea that spooky women may be maiden, mother, or crone and come in threes has precedents, but I considered that His Pratchettude had innovated by teaming up one of each type, and in other ways. But I'm not a lawyer.

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Robert Carnegie

As for another King product -

On Usenet newsgroup alt.fan.pratchett we were recently discussing whether the witches depicted in the "Bubble Witch Saga" game are a rip-off of the specific portrayal of three reasonably good witches in Terry Pratchett's comedy fantasy novels [Wyrd Sisters] and so forth.

I haven't played the game, but from the description, the witches don't really do anything. They just stand there looking in their cauldon. And all of them have cats, which Terry Pratchett's witches don't except for one - but the Bubble Witch that resembles Nanny Ogg has a cat that resembles Greebo. I take it that the cats don't do anything either.

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Canada says Google broke law by snooping health info to serve ads

Robert Carnegie

Re: I'm not sure about this

Evidently, Canada considers that it is inappropriate for Google to use your prior interest in a medical issue to send you ads, and I'm prepared to accept that that's right. I might want to show the computer screen to my mother. On the other hand, it might not be my own medical issue. Nevertheless, as their national anthem says, "Go, Canada!"

I suppose it doesn't help the rest of the world, though. Or at best "maybe".

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