* Posts by Robert Carnegie

2357 posts • joined 30 Sep 2009

The Naked Product Launch: 30 seconds to sell a robot

Robert Carnegie
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Re: wtf

Well, it's labelled "Radbot". By all means skip that.

Register readers' heating problem is to dispose of the thermal excess from the servers in the basement, so none of us use radiator heaters. Well, I do, but I have little interest in ever turning them off.

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Going shopping for a BSOD? We've found 'em in store at M&S

Robert Carnegie
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During the Windows Update installation process, your computer is not "working". It is twiddling its thumbs. So are you. "Work" ideally resumes once the update is updated and the computer is rebooted. Until the next time.

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KCL staff offered emotional support, clergy chat to help get over data loss

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Jesus Saves!

I wondered if I was going to see an update to USB of Angus Deayton's (was it he?) crucifix necklace when playing an Anglican priest on the "terrible TV station" show "KYTV" quite a few years ago. The long leg of the crucifix unclipped - it was a handy pen.

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Gone in 70 seconds: Holding Enter key can smash through defense

Robert Carnegie
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Re: @Homer ... Missing item in the series?

Shurely you only need access to the keyboard. And maybe the power off and on.

So this could crack a kiosk, a computer in a library, maybe an ATM...

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Dell EMC cranks Xeon servers into ludicrous mode with Tesla GPUs

Robert Carnegie
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Lobachevsky? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobachevsky_%28song%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Girls

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Lenovo intros monster disk box

Robert Carnegie
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Does it come with USB port for my laptop? :-)

Ideally USB 3 ...

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Post-outage King's College London orders staff to never make their own backups

Robert Carnegie
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Let them use 7-Zip

And an academically obscure password. Maybe written on Post-It note by a doctor. An unbreakable code.

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DirecTV Now to give Apple TV free for those who take 3-month deal

Robert Carnegie
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Re: was this written by a human?

It does help if you know or can guess what a roku" or a "vod" is. But I made it through. But I didn't get excited about this news.

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Fire alarm sparked data centre meltdown emergency

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Strange Coincidence

I think in UK old people's houses have the sort of "fuse box" that sometimes plays a part in black-and-white movies and they haven't replaced it. Modern installations do have "circuit breaker" safety. Well, mine does and it's about 20 years old - should I - ?

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Robert Carnegie
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Since the same thing didn't happen next week (unless that is the story to tell next week), it may be a reasonable guess that what went wrong is the relay itself - an electric-motor-operated electric switch, in which, if the wrong two parts touch, you could well have melty materials situation and trouble to come afterwards.

When an olden-times light bulb ceases to operate, you replace the light bulb and then test if the light comes on. From experience, if such a light is protected by a disposable 3 amps fuse at the wall socket then it often happens that the fuse also must be replaced, and that's what you test if the new light bulb doesn't light. You may also amuse yourself by studying the bulb carefully to see if the wire inside is broken, which it may be.

It could be in my example that you're getting higher-voltage surges in your supply that cause popping of fuse and bulb, but I think you'd notice other lights flashing, your TV set exploding, etc.

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What strange madness is this? Microsoft makes patch data RESTful

Robert Carnegie
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Interesting schedule.

I think there's too much of this already today, but these dates seem to align - coincidentally perhaps - with what someone tried to tell me was the "hundred days" between Donald Trump winning the election and actually becoming president. Since it was my boss I didn't insist that this was a mistake (it's around seventy days), but I did check whether Mr Trump is talking about this "hundred days". It appears not. I don't think anyone could correct him either.

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Hackers cook god-mode remote exploits against Edge, VMware in world-first

Robert Carnegie
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"Hacking expected to succeed"

Actually, real security experts do tell you to expect that a hacker will get into your network if they try hard enough, and so, to design your network so that having one or more machines in it controlled by bad guys doesn't mean that all is lost.

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Build your own IMSI slurping, phone-stalking Stingray-lite box – using bog-standard Wi-Fi

Robert Carnegie
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How dangerous -

If the result of location sniffing is "I'm on a train"?

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Any questions? No, not you again at the back, please God no

Robert Carnegie
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Why Safari?

because it's like Microsoft Internet Explorer, but obviously the name "Explorer" is taken. And I haven't counted all the problems with "Missionary".

And why a compass - because an explorer needs one.

Ah.

Obviously then the name was "Apple Internet Explorer" until quite late. (Maybe.)

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Get that trash out of your cache

Robert Carnegie
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Maybe it's a honeypot page, to catch out site hackers who post "comments" that are spam advertisements, and are liable to hit even a page of incomprehensible gibberish. Or maybe I'm getting too old.

That I remember this cartoon,

http://dilbert.com/strip/1993-03-08

which is over 20 years old, may be proof.

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Uncle Sam emits DNS email security guide – now speak your brains

Robert Carnegie
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President Clinton

hey said "we're betting" that will be the case, but they also may have meant the other President Clinton. Or Prime Minister George Clinton. Or Vice-President George Clinton. But some of these answers are unlikely.

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Ghost of DEC Alpha is why Windows is rubbish at file compression

Robert Carnegie
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Re: What's cheap

Spinning rust is cheap, network bandwidth may not be, SSD certainly isn't cheap.

One recent Windows clever idea is to supply the entire operating system pre-compressed. Much space saved.

Your monthly patches, however, aren't compressed. So the disk fills up with operating system files anyway.

Maybe they will get around that by reinstalling the entire operating system from time to time, but calling it an update. Or maybe they already have.

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If any idiot can do it, we're heading in the right direction

Robert Carnegie
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Joke

Re: Pornhub for cloud storage

Well, everyone can have access to the data, but they will deny having ever viewed it...

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Want to spy on the boss? Try this phone-mast-in-an-HP printer

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Whats The Deal?

"Capturing print jobs"

Sure, fit a camera.

Boss may wonder why the printer lights up inside and makes a "click whirr" camera noise though.

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HTML 5.1 signed off

Robert Carnegie
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HTML 5 Anniversary Edition, and if you haven't been nagged into upgrading from HTML 2 through 4 then it is now too late to do so.

Also it includes Adobe Flash for your compatibility needs.

Oh, what am I saying! That was Windows 5 To You Doubled.

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England expects... you to patch your apps and not just Windows

Robert Carnegie
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VLC

I've been putting off updating VLC as a previous update made it not get along with some of my video recordings. But I don't use it to download videos.

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Royal Horticultural Society's PC is rooted for all to see

Robert Carnegie
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"The Little Lost Child", or the presentation of the presentation.

I recently read about: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Little_Lost_Child

"The promoting innovation that made "The Little Lost Child" significant to cultural history was an idea in the mind of George H. Thomas. [...] Thomas's idea was to combine a series of images (using a stereopticon) to show a narrative while it was being sung. He approached Stern and Marks about illustrating "The Little Lost Child." Lyrics appeared toward the bottom of the images. The first performance went poorly due to upside-down images of inappropriate size and placement, but these technical difficulties were soon corrected." Although it may have not seemed soon if you were in the audience.

But in the end they sold a lot of sheet music.

Apparently "stereopticon" doesn't mean 3-D in this case but a projector that can hold two picture slides and gracefully fade from one to the other. This was not new technology at the time of "The Little Lost Child".

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Robert Carnegie
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Count me in "People who did pay the licence fee but the software arbitrarily says that they didn't".

I had a Norton security suite on my PC. Unknown to me, apparently they discontinued the product I had. The result was that my PC nagged me to buy a new key although my paid-for year hadn't run out.

At least that is what I think happened, although of course it looks a lot like a virus.

It was called something like Norton Internet Security or Norton Secure Internet or Norton-ette Insecure, and so was the suite that they released to replace it, which made it pretty difficult to tell what was happening.

While uninstalling, their tool invited me to visit their web site to explain why, and while doing so, the site crashed my web browser, so, guys, if you were still wondering, you know now.

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UK will retaliate against state-sponsored cyber attacks, Chancellor warns

Robert Carnegie
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Who do you want to get the retaliation?

In WarGames you "retaliate" against whichever target you prefer to attack, it doesn't have to be the enemy that actually hit you. Example: invading Iraq as retaliation for 9/11 when Iraq and the terrorists were each other's enemies. I expect this to be the same.

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Could Heather from EastEnders turn on Kettering if Lohan is no-show?

Robert Carnegie
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Daily Mail

It is the apparent source of reviving an old claim that Bill Clinton had an illegitimate son with a black lady - besides, also apparently, the young man in question not giving up, in spite of an alleged (possibly false) failed paternity test using published data about Bill Clinton's DNA that Bill, er, left on Monica Lewinsky's clothes.

From there to Drudge - I'm told - and WND (gasp!) as well.

My impression is that no one cared between the original fuss and October 2016, but it isn't something that I looked for.

I wonder how proficient he is at sax.

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KCL out(r)age continues: Two weeks TITSUP, two weeks to go

Robert Carnegie
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"Sponsored: How do you pick the right cloud for the right job?"

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NASA's asteroid orbit calculator spots a hot rock zipping past

Robert Carnegie
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I consulted a reference book (of a sort).

Advice: "run away… terribly fast."

That isn't advice specifically for a space rock impact, and of course it depends on it being possible to define "away" in the context of the incident. For a planet-buster rock there may be no "away", or, maybe just deep mines etc. to shelter in, like in some of the movies. But for a smaller rock, a continent cleanser or an urban redeveloper, mass effort may be worthwhile. Or at least to get a better view when it hits.

(In memoriam Adams, and Pratchett)

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Password1? You're so random. By which we mean not random at all - UK.gov

Robert Carnegie
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Edward Nygma

I'm not expert on this but would it be necessarily "fatal" to a code if a fiendish algorithm swapped each letter for any letter in the same half of the alphabet, A-M or N-Z, including the same letter, and then performed ROT13 on the output?

Now - Nazis were not without boneheaded giving and obeying of orders, so, "Make sure the output letter is always different from the input" sounds like a stupid management instruction that has to be obeyed, which is familiar to many.

My site password formulas include not repeating any letter because some services or web sites do forbid that, but it makes the password so much less random if e.g. you know that a 26 character password must use each letter only once.

For a password to give away for encrypted data, I generate several sets of 5 uppercase letters, used with space after each 5. This is intended to be passed in writing or spoken, instead of being e-mailed.

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Robert Carnegie
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My formula

Abcdef78

Random letters from words from a book (any book) with case as shown but excluding repeats, random digits usually from minutes units and seconds units on digital watch.

So far it works just about everywhere - though now I've told you what it is I'll need to set another one :-) (and "Abcdef" was so easy to remember!)

If they want bloody punctuation then add on "!" at the end. Or an internal quote mark and a SQL Injection and serve them right. "passwd carnegie Bum\"shutdown -rightnow -nosave -allow-reboot=never" :-)

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Marketing... or how I lost my soul to Lagos

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Is it non-coincidental?

Thank you - "exaggerated version of real life events" seems to explain the vibe I was getting.

One "IT Crowd" joke is about the words "Made In Britain". Brief explanation: this is bad news (in the show).

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Robert Carnegie
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Is it non-coincidental?

That the comic strip, to me, has a flavour of not-just-about-computers comedy show "The IT Crowd".

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Self-driving cars doomed to be bullied by pedestrians

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Yes, it IS a game of chicken.

I favour the "Mark 3 Travel Machine". Look it up. Clue - "Exterminate". And they run on electricity so zero road tax rated.

I was going to mention what the War Machines in "The War Machines" were originally called (no relation, despite appearance), but it seems that they were only ever called "The War Machines". Apparently this time they weren't going to be coy. Wikipedia says that the basic story premise in 1966 was "what would happen if the recently built Post Office Tower somehow took over". The answer seems to be a modest army of terrifying giant mailboxes on tank tracks.

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Robert Carnegie
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Re: Animal Crossing

Where there is special road crossing provision made for animals on wider roads - badger tunnel, bat overpass, frog fairway - I wonder how the animals are supposed to know which way they are meant to go. And also whether teenage badgers hang around the underpass and mug old lady badgers. On the first point, apparently research has been carried out, with mixed results - bats seem to ignore structures intended to guide them across the road. But I don't immediately see why they have a problem anyway. Maybe they prefer to fly along the road and not on the right side, consequently, bat-aclysm.

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Robert Carnegie
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Re: Hoodies playing chicken...?

I think a button may be required in the Google car to make it treat pedestrians as hostile and get you the heck out of there.

There is some safety though in the fact that the car has cameras all over to identify the enemy - as long as the Google Street View face blurrer isn't applied. Also, I expect it to be able to recognise hostile behaviour in many cases, such as "zombie apocalypse".

And there's that road near Calais where would-be illegal British immigrants do much the same thing and some of them got run over.

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Getting your tongue around foreign tech-talk is easier than you think

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Baggins of bag end

You're thinking of "Bilbo Baggins and the Thirteen Short-arses", I suppose.

Altered of course after protests, to "Bilbo Baggins and the Thirteen Other Short-arses".

Living underground, the hobbits originally had no word for "lawn ornament", but several may be found in Tolkien's unexpurgated text. :-)

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Robert Carnegie
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Re: Shampoo

Mr Dabbs was referring obliquely to the image placed next to the text, which you could mistake for a site advertisement - a common hazard. (I see one now offering a "virtual monitor", which is, um, what exactly? Aren't real ones better? It is however free.)

It reads "No poo. Une crème lavante qui ne mousse pas pour laver en douceur."

Google translates or not: "No poo. A cleansing cream that does not foam to gently wash." It's soap without bubbles, which is appropriate for some skin types or conditions.

The actual product label is in English anyway, and an arrow in the picture confusingly points to the underside of the bottle. I don't think it can possibly be actually named "No poo".

As for les experts computers francaises using English terms, I am desolated to tell you that Mr Dabbs, who occasionally fabulates, claims that he was there and heard it. When he reconnoitred.

Dictionary says: "from obsolete French reconnoître to inspect, explore; see recognize" - that's "reconnaître". Since England was conquered by William The Bastard, it may be a piece of "la sagesse des Normands".

British Windows automatically "corrects" "reconnaître" to "reconnoitre" if allowed to do so.

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Belgian court fines Skype for failing to intercept criminals' calls in 2012

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Skype can't operate in Belgium

"What's an adjective?"

(It comes in a tube and you stick things together with it)

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Robert Carnegie
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Paris Hilton

@Adam52

I don't think you meant to say "Microsoft now host their own supermodels", but, if you did, tell me more. :-)

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The new FCC privacy rules are here, and nobody is happy

Robert Carnegie
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I may not fully understand, but I propose a simple rule

If the FBI wants to see the data, then it's sensitive data.

Does that help?

PS: If American Business is reading this paragraph, then please stop showing me advertisements for personal luggage, because I bought a sports bag last month.

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Hell desk thought PC fire report was a first-day-on-the-job prank

Robert Carnegie
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WTF?

This is a man's army with no room for cissies (or women or the ethnic persuasion).

Wait, you mean it isn't? Not in any way? And we've been doing it wrong all this time? Oops.

Awareness training? I suppose so then.

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Divide the internet into compartments to save us from the IoT fail whale

Robert Carnegie
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device arrives pre-configured

with your girlfriend's name as default password. You will change it quick before your wife finds out.

Also I suppose before your girlfriend finds out.

Some technical issues in this solution to the problerm, I admit. I suppose that if first of all you install the manager app on your phone, we can find out who you are calling and maybe why...

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Yahoo! hides! from! financial! analysts! amid! email! hacking!, privacy! storm!

Robert Carnegie
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Re: I don't know that.

But still we wouldn't know if they did fight it (and Reuters isn't holy gospel). But, I admit, perhaps they didn't - although apparently they did fight the one in 2007 according to the story, with those court records still sealed.

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Adobe emits emergency patch for Flash hole malware is exploiting right this minute

Robert Carnegie
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I think now we must be well into patching the holes crated by the previous patches.

I have gardening clothes like that.

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Robert Carnegie
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Trollface

Re: Ha! Luddites exonerated

You really shouldn't be using telnet either, ...oh. I see what you did, now. \:!shutdown -frequency=daily -time=random

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Data ethics in IoT? Pff, you and your silly notions of privacy

Robert Carnegie
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Bluntly,

An autonomous Car-Thing ramming a bus full of schoolchildren will turn out to be not a question of ethics but of legal financial liability. These are similar but not the same.

So robots with the famous "Three Laws" are unlikely to appear in real life. As written, it appears that anyone could order someone else's expensive robot to jump off a cliff, unless the robot is able to calculate the harm to its actual owner of losing an exensive robot. But then that means that the Third Law (self-protection) actually is above the Second Law (obey orders), unless the robot is extremely cheap or is already subject to recall because of the exploding battery problem.

There is now apparently that AI that makes a pretty good job of calculating the outcome of lawsuits.

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Internet of S**t things claims another scalp: DNS DDoS smashes StarHub

Robert Carnegie
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Re: oxymoron

I believe text may be viewable on Facebook to non-members. The point is taken though about Facebook practising open sharing of data in both directions.

In semi-related news, I recently looked up details of personal luggage on web, and now that is about the only thing that I am seeing personalised advertising for. I think I need to invent some more interesting interests. Lightly dressed ladies... no (although, yes). Sports? Not particularly. I suppose perhaps sports practised by lightly dressed ladies... I'll think about it. For quite a while, probably.

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PayPal patches bone-headed two factor authentication bypass

Robert Carnegie
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Re: 2fa choices

I think you can get text messages sent to your household phone. Does that help?

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How Google's Project Zero made Apple refactor its kernel

Robert Carnegie
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Black Helicopters

Re: Where's all the snark?

Publishing an exploit publicly is one thing. Keeping it secret but publishing your name and address so that "Honest Ron" can pop round and use friendly persuasion to get the details out of you or your spouse and children, is another. Name and address also might be the clue that it is worth asking about e.g. A.Banker@BritishVirginIslands.com

The anonymous way, "Honest Ron" has to use friendly persuasion on The Register first, which I'm not betting on being impossible, unless "Anonymous Coward' actually is untraceable even by the Reg. But also there's no definite indication, besides the coyness itself, that anyone else would actually be interested in abusing the system.

"A Friend"

(Black helicopter seems unlikely for Ron but I'll put it on anyway)

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IBM Australia didn't stress-test #censusfail router and blocked password resets

Robert Carnegie
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Re: Fail Whale

ICBW, I thought that "Island Australia" was only created as an on-the-fly attempt to stop the DDOS in progress? So, mistakes were made, but this mistake happened after the fire started?

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In its current state, Ubiquiti's EdgeSwitch won't have much of an edge on anyone

Robert Carnegie
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Joke

Maybe you're holding it wrong :-)

I am reminded of various consumer electronics devices - digital TV receivers in particular - that have interesting or qaint ports (RS232?), which, it turns out, do not have a function.

Currently I use a video receiver box whose "timer" button on the control is more useful than expected given that the box doesn't actually have a timer function. Actually the button reverses the last channel change (including its own). I could re-label it "Wayback", if I was sufficiently bored some evening.

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