Feeds

* Posts by Robert Carnegie

2029 posts • joined 30 Sep 2009

US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

Psst: IMEI

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Mobile_Station_Equipment_Identity

since "EMEI" doesn't Google, or, rather, it Googles as other things instead.

1
0

Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge
Joke

"Metallic glass" bones eh?

I just had a hip replacement. It's lead crystal. Bugger.

PS: This is just a joke.

1
0

Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

It is a natural necessity

Whoever the hacker is, I am sure that they have or they had a mother. But maybe not a father.

2
1

NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Maybe I'm naive,

but if the NSA had this, would they have needed to do all or any of the other bad things we recently learned they were doing?

0
0

Not just websites hit by OpenSSL's Heartbleed – PCs, phones and more under threat

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Even worse than I thought

http://www.eviloverlord.com/lists/overlord.html - (c) 1997 - offers a similar rule for prudent evil masterminds in those days: "99. Any data file of crucial importance will be padded to 1.45Mb in size." And therefore couldn't be copied by enemies on a 3½ inch floppy disk, remember those? 1.44 MB capacity.

Having said that, do private and public key have to be of similar size? It could take way long to log in then.

0
0

'Monstrous' Apple kicked us off iAd, claimed we are its RIVAL – Brit music upstart

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Wrong. @Neoc

I have no idea whether other advertising services run on iOS, but I'm not going to assume that you are saying correctly that they do, because, of course, such services would be in competition with Apple's own.

The last that I heard, even designing a better keyboard program isn't allowed, except perhaps to type text into the clipboard, to paste into another application. Or else not even that.

0
0

'We’re not SNEAKY, we're DADS from the MIDWEST'

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Sell Hack: bear in mind I don't actually know what I'm talking about,

My impression of what "Sell Hack" does, or did, and how, is that it sends -your- LinkedIn personal details, when you use it, to its publishers. Then, users of Sell Hack can see the normally hidden details of other users of Sell Hack.

So, it's not magic, it's not -exactly- hacking in fact, but apparently it is still a breach of LinkedIn conditions, maybe, and it's gone away.

0
0

Homeopathic remedies contaminated with REAL medicine get recalled

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

N-acetyl-p-aminophenol

if you're fussy.

When I buy it, it is "paracetamol", and usually the acceptable supermarket brand. But a large proportion of Register readers only speak American, and the rest of us are surely smart enough to look it up, so I translated.

As for them putting this or other real drugs into "homeopathic" pills, that's only a theory - until now, apparently.

In any case, do not take more than one of these drugs together - they are the same stuff and it doesn't take a lot to make a deadly overdose, as your liver dies and rots inside you. I've also heard an argument that taking this stuff and caffeine could be a risk - including with tea or coffee - but that was based on a test tube trial. I suppose they can't very well do an experiment with people.

0
0
Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Of course

Of course they've put real medicine in their homeopathic slosh. It means that their stuff works. So you will get homeopathic headache cure with a proper does of acetaminophen in it, I bet. So everybody's happy, but it costs more than when it's called Tylenol. Still, if the customer's satisfied.

1
0

FTC: Do SSL properly or we'll shove a microscope up you for decades

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Uh, yeah

I expect that it's not really allowed to use the FTC and their interest in your affairs when you advertise. But who knows. Any other companies got that history?

0
0

Microsoft: Let's be clear, WE won't read your email – but the cops will

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Shame

The story seems to be that they found Microsoft secret information (that Windows 8.1.1 is still making users cry?) by opening the Hotmail e-mail of the non-employee blogger that it was leaked TO.

To do this, presumably they went through every other Hotmail user's e-mail, as well.

In other news, using Linux is considered to be stealing from Microsoft. Anyone receiving e-mails that mention Linux will henceforth be billed for damages. Welcome to what always was a post-Snowden world, only now you know it. (Which is what post-Snowden really means.)

15
6

Raised £350bn in crowdsourced funding? Tell me about it (not)

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Here is some verbal nonsense that I recently saw elsewhere.

"Hello everyone

"a new approach is necessary to imagine the righteousness of Jesus with

brand-new innovations when evaluating God

Prior to the debate about God , you should also try http://www.wwwwwwwwww.www

;-)"

Well, I haven't looked at the actual site and I don't intend to, but, when did the Jesus business get overrun with new-approach innovation gobbledygook? Doesn't it already have its own?

Then again, this may be randomly generated text, and also may be a malware site, and actually makes Jesus cry.

0
0

Life support turned off: NHS Direct dies silent, undignified death

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Funny thing,

In the last week or so I've been getting noticeably more spam past the filter, including a lot from, or in honour of, one or more online pharmacies. Also they want to be my friend, which is flattering, unless they mean to "Like" them on Facebook.

0
0

Windows 8 BREAKS ITSELF after system restores

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Similar problem with W7?

I think there's an option of deleting the Windows Update history so that everything is re-evaluated. That might make your phantom update go away. But don't take my word for it, because this isn't it.

1
0

Google flu-finding service diagnosed with 'big data hubris'

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

I assumed that a TV documentary about flu would cause a rush of Google queries, without spreading any more flu.

1
0

Every little helps: Dirty MOLE BANDITS clean out Tesco ATM from BELOW

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Precedent and clue

Jeremy Brett was in that one on ITV3 the other week. I didn't recognise the red-headed victim, but Scottish actor Richard Wilson played the role of "The League", whose name I've also forgotten. And it was explicitly organised by Professor Moriarty, unlike anything in the canon except for "The Final Problem", which ought to be next week, I suppose. Richard Wilson wasn't Moriarty, he was very scared of Moriarty. That was for a bank vault full of gold. I don't think Moriarty would have approved the operation in 2014.

0
0

Blighty goes retro with 12-sided pound coin

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

The cost to industry

I don't see anyone pointing out on the question of compnaies making and operating coin processing machines that will have to be set for the new coin, that that is part of their bloody job. The currency is updated from time to time, partly because the metal in coins gets more valuable than the value of the coins, and coin detection machinery has to be updated to handle the new coins. Your digital home moneybox might not work, though.

0
0

Google hit by Monday morning blues: Talk, Hangouts, Sheets crash

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Also Google Groups (for Usenet) -

Although Google Groups is showing "no issues", I assume that someone's noticed that we can't post into Usenet groups - which is what I use it for. I mean, I haven't reported it, but someone else would, right?

1
0

Barnes & Noble's Nook freed from Windows, WinPhone apps pledge

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: sniff, sniff

How about brand name "Fahrenheit" for the new Microsoft reader? As in 451 (as in not accurate, but never mind).

0
0

Taiwan Mobile unveils Granny-tracker smart bracelet

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

What does it do?

I thought it was saying something else; if I find a distressed stranger wearing one of these bracelets, I touch it with MY phone and it contacts their relatives or a care agency. Then what? I dunno, they read my location, they phone me back, we discuss the ransom money...... (joking).

0
0

Toshiba Encore: The Windows 8.1 tablet that might catch on

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

....I think last year's Samsung Ativ Smart PC Pro 700T is a tablet with 64-bit Windows, on an Intel i5 CPU, with 4 GB RAM.

0
0
Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

64 bit, why would you?

I think the spec sheet for the processor says that it's 64 bit capable and can address 4 GB RAM, but this tablet only has 2 GB. As far as I know, there was and is no point in installing 64-bit Windows unless you have at least 4 GB RAM: it won't do anything that the 32-bit version won't do. At least, not anything that you want to do on a personal computer or a tablet. So, if they can fit more RAM into this thing, then maybe 64-bit Windows is a reasonable option.

I mean: is there a more secure version of Flash Player for 64-bit?

0
0
Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Presumably SSD is a better grade than USB stick?

I assume that SSD is built more robustly than USB memory, and also has higher performance. For instance, "wear levelling" logic extends the useable life of your memory.

Also, the cost of a larger installed storage option to the end-user is liable to be more than the difference in cost of two storage devices. System builders make a profit.

However, your prices for USB memory seem to me too-good-to-be-true. Maybe that's wholesale and you get a truckload of them. Or maybe they're fakes; it happens.

I'm kind of puzzled that no one seems to be offering non-binary unit sizes on SSD. I've got a tablet with 64 GB, I don't need 128 but I could have used 96. (Of course you don't actually get a power of two as the capacity. I don't know all the details of why.) Now I guess they don't need to sell a 96 GB unit, I could just fit a 64 GB and a 32 GB side by side - if there's room in my device - and format them as one if I want to. But usually there isn't room.

0
0

Spam, a lot of it: Bubble tea is the Seoul of wit

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Attract men with large breasts

I think I don't currently have and in fact don't quite correctly remember two spam messages whose title struck me as amusing, but my brain insists that that was one of them. But it may not have been.

The other one was or wasn't "Do you want lager breasts?"

Is it OK to find "Attract men with large breasts" funny? I know they're around.

http://www.cracked.com/article_17270_100-unintentionally-hilarious-spam-subject-lines.html actually covers sender name as well as subject line.

I recently got one that said "We are (heir-hunting investigating company), did you have a relative with the same surname as you?" As of this year, as far as I know I do not - it is a good name though, isn't it?

I decided to pass it on to its e-mail hosting company (MyNet.com in, I dunno, Turkey or somewhere), the apparently genuine British heir-hunting agency, and the large Russian finance house with a London office, whose names were being abused - although it may happen all the time.

http://www.snopes.com/fraud/advancefee/inherit.asp is the scam, although my version only had point 1, and I think that page turned up in Google with the three words phrase that struck me as characteristically odd in the e-mail text, beginning with the word "standard". I thought it might be the actual name of a process and I was curious, but it seems only to appear here. Which is handy for looking it up.

I think I got an abbreviated one because then it isn't immediately clear that this is what it is. Unless you look it up to see if it's a well known spam.

0
0
Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Wot no Fan Death?

Maybe that's why the "Off" function gets a long description - it's talking about "Fan Death" and/or explaining that the device turns off itself and/or explaining the term "Dead Man's Switch" fantastically tactfully.

1
0

One good thing from the Flappy Birds crapp flap: It's a handy 'tech' media rating system

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Ahem

How the bloody hell does the fact that a software author is no longer selling his work become incidental to a discussion of just ripping him off and copying it onto your device anyway?

I hope that he had the foresight to include a "trojan mode" into unlicensed copies that wipes the bootlegger's device to factory settings.

0
4

Sony to close North American ebook store, punt customers to Kobo

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Correction

"Kobo will launch a new version of its online store in late May that will be accessible from Kobo devices directly" - presumably you mean "accessible from Sony Reader devices", or do I misunderstand?

0
0

fWHoaR! Trick-cyclists crack eternal mystery of WHAT WOMEN WANT in a man

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: A few who immediately spring to mind

If we're talking about [Carry On Screaming], Oddbod's behaviour towards women was... I suppose that for him "unreconstructed" is not the right word. But in a Carry On film, that didn't stand out much.

0
0
Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

According to the title of the latest movie, it's

"I, Frankenstein" - although it seems to say that Adam only takes the name in the last scene.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/feb/02/i-frankenstein-mark-kermode-review

"Not one for the critics", says mark Kermode, a critic.

0
0

Bangable poster firm Novalia makes printed 'leccy keyboard

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

It's like a touchscreen,

except that the picture doesn't change!

So...?

0
1

Quivering, spine-tingling wearable tech: Strap it on and don't look back

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Hmm

Research 7 years ago that hasn't changed the orthodox view... I'm not sure whether to believe it.

My experience includes RSI - I'm tapping this on a touchscreen upright in front of me now, using FITALY - and a certain amount of pain from computing in various alternative postures before this arrangement.

Orienting the spine vertically isn't all that you have to do to achieve orthodox good posture. You also need to straighten your spine by basically lifting your head straight up vertically from your customary round-shouldered slouch, - according to a physiotherapist I knew.

So maybe they didn't do that.

0
0

Candy Crush King went 'too far' when it candy crushed my app – dev

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: As for another King product -

Mr. Shakespeare's witches are acknowledged, but they are evil, basically uniform, mostly without cats as far as I remember, and originally played by male actors - which also is acknowledged. Their boy player analogues in the play in [Wyrd Sisters] are arrested by mistake, and Sir Terry's witches take their places on stage, with dramatic consequences.

The idea that spooky women may be maiden, mother, or crone and come in threes has precedents, but I considered that His Pratchettude had innovated by teaming up one of each type, and in other ways. But I'm not a lawyer.

0
0
Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

As for another King product -

On Usenet newsgroup alt.fan.pratchett we were recently discussing whether the witches depicted in the "Bubble Witch Saga" game are a rip-off of the specific portrayal of three reasonably good witches in Terry Pratchett's comedy fantasy novels [Wyrd Sisters] and so forth.

I haven't played the game, but from the description, the witches don't really do anything. They just stand there looking in their cauldon. And all of them have cats, which Terry Pratchett's witches don't except for one - but the Bubble Witch that resembles Nanny Ogg has a cat that resembles Greebo. I take it that the cats don't do anything either.

2
0

Canada says Google broke law by snooping health info to serve ads

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: I'm not sure about this

Evidently, Canada considers that it is inappropriate for Google to use your prior interest in a medical issue to send you ads, and I'm prepared to accept that that's right. I might want to show the computer screen to my mother. On the other hand, it might not be my own medical issue. Nevertheless, as their national anthem says, "Go, Canada!"

I suppose it doesn't help the rest of the world, though. Or at best "maybe".

1
0

Now we're cookin' on gas: Google crafts sugar-alert contact lens for diabetics

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: I've got the power...

Maybe it can be made to run by burning the sugar as fuel. Or by piezoelectricity each time you blink. I think this may be a not-solved detail but it looks like there's a metal ring around the lens that probably receives electrical energy by induction as well as being the radio antenna.

Famously, Google employees (or some of them) get to spend some time working on anything that they think it cool (and is approved), whether it can end up making money or not. I think that's where this comes from and where it is.

But, yes, it probably could also go with the Google Glasses - but they're not on general sale either.

0
0

Modern spying 101: How NSA bugs Chinese PCs with tiny USB radios - NYT

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Proving His Enemies Right... ExCUSE me?

As far as I can tell, this is any USB peripheral modified to include hacking into the PC and transmitting data out by radio. How it works at a range greater than most Wi-Fi from a receiver puzzles me.

So it looks like a USB memory stick, but once you plug it in, it does other things too, e.g. install itself as a "keyboard" that types in messages from the NSA.

By the way: I'm not mad. Well, not mentally ill. I am annoyed.

0
0

Boffins claim battery BREAKTHROUGH – with rhubarb-like molecule

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Woah

Chemist, I don't quite understand what you said. But my understanding of a fuel cell is that it's like an electricity generator without moving machinery, or like a battery that you top up with the necessary chemical so that the battery isn't exhausted. Fuel goes in - hydrocarbon for instance - and electricity and a chemical waste product (such as harmless water) comes out. This is the first that I've heard of a box where you can also put electricity in and basically get fuel out - not just like an ordinary battery where the chemicals are sealed inside, but you can draw it out of the reaction cell and keep it in a big tank.

I don't dismiss the problem of running it at 40 degrees, but maybe next they will invent one that doesn't have that problem - or some clever way to make it better, like James Watt's condenser. Or just keep it in a vacuum flask.

0
0
Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Woah

Superconductors are temperature sensitive too, but people are still interested in those.

This sounds like basically a fuel cell that is rechargeable, which is pretty cool. Well, 40 degrees isn't cool.

2
0

Intel bungs PC on an SD: Tiny computer for Internet of Things and wearables

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

You have commercial products aren't buggy? Where can I buy them?

3
0

Rockstar swells Spherix patent portfolio with 100 new licenses

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

What-ix?

This appears to be the only Register entry that mentions Spherix. Wikipedia doesn't have an article on Spherix, but claims that it was founded by a NASA engineer who believes that life was discovered on Mars and I suppose he thinks it was hushed up. Trying to find out more about Spherix from the Wikipedia article leads to a mystery PDF downloading at me, dated last September. What the hell is going on here?

Is Spherix a virus?

0
0

Justice Ministry to spaff £70k finding out how prisoners like to use ILLEGAL mobes

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: couldn't the SPs block by location?

Operators probably can detect that a phone is inside a prison and isn't on the whitelist, but why should they? I assume there isn't a law that makes it their responsibility. If there was, then we wouldn't be discussing the problem.

1
0

Lyrics upstart Rap Genius blacklisted by Google for Justin Bieber SEO scam

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Copyright breach anyway?

Aren't all modern songs lyrics web sites publishing someone's copyrighted text without authorisation?

I mean, yes, I use 'em, and I use Google to find 'em, but, still.

They also very often have wrong lyrics, but I don't think that's a defence.

And, chances are, they have a page for the lyrics of "Bob The Builder" that says, "If you know the lyrics of Bob The Builder, please type them in for us here." Or, if not Bob The Builder, then some other song that you were looking up.

1
0

Oi, bank manager. Only you've got my email address - where're these TROJANS coming from?

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Some addresses are guessable.

If you know that Robert Carnegie works at SomeOrganisation, then you can try,

Robert.Carnegie@SomeOrganisation.co.uk.

Or, try common names at random - if it's a large organisation, then some of them will hit. Mail administrators: add a short random number to each user's address, to avoid this, as well as for when two or more colleagues have the same name.

Technically you could send your complaint to the large organisation that leaked your e-mail address by that means, but I'm not clear if that would be illegal too. Does sending an e-mail to someone that you have no particular reasonable right to contact, count as Computer Misuse?

0
0

Station to station: Ten DAB-Bluetooth combo radios

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Who needs presets on a DAB radio?

I've got two Pure Evoke 3 - quite expensive - and a now-broken Revo Pico or something, each of which can or could record to SD card. But (1) not SDHC and (2) oddly, the larger the card capacity, the longer the set spends twiddling its thumbs before it starts recording. Default file names are DAB001.MP2, DAB002.MP2, etc. I don't see proper recording on any of the current sets, which I don't quite understand. Maybe Microsoft's terms or rules for licensing FAT. Pure has a "Listen Later" function on some radios but you can't take it out apparently. Or record more than one thing.

I also have a little Technika - Tesco - DAB set that runs on two AA batteries and plays through headphones. Off-the-shelf rechargeable batteries last for several hours.

Oh yes - presets: on the Technika I think I can only include or disinclude DAB stations on a Favourites list, and set FM presets which I can only navigate in order; on the Evoke, I have a remote control, and in order to select favourite stations quickly, I set stations in presets 11, 22, 33, 44, up to 99 - a single number means that the radio waits a while for a second number to be pressed, a doubled number obviously is quick.

0
0

Developer unleashes bowel-shaking KILLER APP for Google Glass

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Becoming normal

I think the point is that this device category is in transition from science-fiction nonsense to just a normal thing - granted, a normal thing that you're currently not allowed to use in a car or in a restaurant. And the price still isn't normal either, and I don't know how well it works with real spectacles. But we can see from here the time when a gadget like this is just something that you buy in a computer store if you want it, if there are still computer stores. Maybe all you have to do is watch a TV ad for it and nod. (Now -there's- a bad idea, one that Douglas Adams already had in his novel [Life, The Universe, And Everything].

3
0

When the lights went out: My 'leccy-induced, bog floor crawling HORROR

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Peter Skellern and Richard Stilgoe

Performing as a comedy piano song duo.

Richard Stilgoe - I think it was this way around - launches into a parody of a big hit of Skellern's.

"This is the Ladies' - I'm a man,

Where am I - supposed to stand"

Skellern, judging by the sound, slams the piano lid on Stilgoe's fingers.

0
0

Industry group blames 'outdated' kit for stock-market tech disasters

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Re: Better Idea

I think the economy would work pretty well if shares could only be bought and sold once a week. Any faster than that is just gambling, and either burning money or else giving it to people who haven't done any work to earn it.

I'm not sure if that also gets rid of the sort of trading where you make money by driving a stock down and a perfectly good company out of business.

9
1

On the matter of shooting down Amazon delivery drones with shotguns

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

Standing on a Segway flying drone...

That's the way to do it - get up there yourself, give chase, and pot the bugger from astern. Although technically this may fall outside the definition of "drone".

Also there's the risk of being shot oneself by another drone hunter, preferably by mistake.

Now, where's my flying Segway? ...oh, -not- a first... no surprise, I suppose.

0
0

Calling Doctor Caroline Langensiepen of Nottingham Trent uni

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Aussie boffins can detect orbiting SPACE JUNK using rock gods' radiation

Robert Carnegie
Bronze badge

They could probably patch that hole

as long as it doesn't hit somebody's vital organ.

And

"Each day, gravity pulls the International Space Station, or ISS, a little closer to Earth."

Er - I suppose yes, but really that's atmospheric drag. So, stuff in that orbit doesn't -stay- in that orbit.

The Kessler thing happens in the film [Gravity], so is that for real? I thought it was not credible.

0
0