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* Posts by Andrew Jones 2

526 posts • joined 27 Sep 2009

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DVLA website GOES TITSUP on day paper car tax discs retire

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: Now they have cocked this up

Yes,

that's why when we renewed last month - we only did so for 6 months.

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A moment of brilliance? UPnP for Internet of Stuff lightbulbs

Andrew Jones 2
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Home Automation is easier and cheaper than people think.

Why on earth would anyone choose to use XMPP?

MQTT exists for a very good reason - XMPP has so much overhead!

It's not rocket science people, I have an Ubuntu Server running Domoticz which is free open source and constantly upgraded. I have those DIY remote sockets you speak of -and I discovered RFXCOM who make a lovely USB transmitter/receiver specifically for talking to home automation kit on the 433MHz band - which Domoticz supports wonderfully. OpenZWave is also supported by Domoticz and I currently have 2 devices which are ZWave. Domoticz will run happily on a Raspberry Pi so you don't need a full blown computer running.

I have a second machine (a laptop) running in a different building (but attached to the same physical LAN) which is using th Teldus Tellstick which again speaks 433MHz - unfortunately Domoticz doesn't support the Tellstick hardware, but it has a lovely commandline utility called tdtool. So I use MQTT to send commands across the network to the laptop which a python script intercepts and sends commands to tdtool.

Home Automation is cheap these days to get started, the kit is not terribly expensive and you can start at the low tech end of the scale and upgrade to the higher end stuff as you feel comfortable / time allows.

As a bonus - Domoticz supports my OWL Electricity monitor so I get lovely graphs and comparisons to previous months / years. For the Theatre (the other building) I'm using a 3 phase Current Cost Envi-128 that I poll every 30 seconds using a Python script and then update the values in Domoticz using a JSON web request.

If anyone is at all interested - take a look at www.domoticz.com

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Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: So that's yet another thing missing from Android...

I believe something like that is coming in "L"

But until then -

Settings > Wireless & Networks (More) > VPN > Overflow Menu (3 dots) > Always On VPN

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BT claims almost-gigabit connections over COPPER WIRE

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: That's all very nice

Well.....

you're closer than those of us who have an exchange without a date - that has never had a date......

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Andrew Jones 2
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Re: 80% within 66m?

The BBC are incorrect -

This new idea means that the fibre equipment will installed on your telephone pole (or the ground beneath it) - BT claim 80% of people are within 66m of their pole (or drop point - FTTdp)

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Andrew Jones 2
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Re: I really wish they'd hurry up and offer us this gigabit internet speed

According to the thinkbroadband site I read yesterday, which has considerably more information about this - an average FTTH / FTTP install is around 7 hours - that's the reason BT are dragging their feet about it.

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Move over, Apple Pay: Tesco trials PayQwiq phone-flash pay app

Andrew Jones 2
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The self service machines have enough trouble scanning barcodes in the clubcard app - or responding in a timely fashion to an item being scanned. The "Activity" light which I assume to the be HDD light is flashing away like a disco light at a rave, and often when it speaks the sound is choppy.

The Tesco self service machines also behave like tech support on the phone - they don't like you jumping ahead when you already know what it is you want to do. For instance, my Tesco won't let me enter my PIN number in until it has told me to, but it's still spieling out the ways I can pay - while I have already selected to pay by card, and been told to put my card into the machine (on screen) and the little light on the card reader has turned on, I have already said I don't want cashback - but the voice hasn't even reached the part where it says "sssselecccct ccccaasshhhbaaack amounnnnnnt"

ASDA used to be the same but they upgraded their machines recently - and the voice actually gets stopped if it is still speaking at each step. So my checkout process goes something like "beep, beep, beep, unexpect.... beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, blah blah blah notes are dispensed below the scanner, please insert you..... select cashback am..... please enter y..... Thank you, please take your shopping.....<10 seconds later> Please take your shopping"

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Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: Pax681 Interesting interpretation of the source that......

Well no... not really....

All very interesting arguments - but the UN Law of the Sea 1982 & 1994 makes it pretty clear who the continental shelf belongs to......

The continental shelf is defined as the natural prolongation of the land territory to the continental margin’s outer edge, or 200 nautical miles (370 km) from the coastal state's baseline, whichever is greater. A state's continental shelf may exceed 200 nautical miles (370 km) until the natural prolongation ends. However, it may never exceed 350 nautical miles (650 kilometres; 400 miles) from the baseline; or it may never exceed 100 nautical miles (190 kilometres; 120 miles) beyond the 2,500 meter isobath (the line connecting the depth of 2,500 meters). Coastal states have the right to harvest mineral and non-living material in the subsoil of its continental shelf, to the exclusion of others. Coastal states also have exclusive control over living resources "attached" to the continental shelf, but not to creatures living in the water column beyond the exclusive economic zone.

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Andrew Jones 2
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Interesting interpretation of the source that......

It's interesting that the actual source document is a well written perfectly logical message that states pretty much what we all already know - and has no scare mongering in it at all -

but The Register replaced the word "could" with the word "would" instantly changing the message of the document from "this could happen" to "this will definitely happen and you will all lose your houses trying to pay for access to essential services, the loch ness monster will crawl out of the loch and eat small children in the night and Nigel Farage will invade and impose his UKIP ways on everyone"

I guess The Register is run by the BBC these days :/

If you really must weigh on the independence debate - maybe you might like to highlight the fact that all these new powers that Scotland was promised in the event of a NO vote - will (according to the House of Lords in 1997) be subject to a UK wide referendum.... .

Maybe you might like to postulate on what will happen to Telco prices and roaming charges once the UK votes to leave the EU?

For what it's worth to some of those commentators above -

I was born in England, I lived in England until 2006 - I still consider myself to be English but I now live in Scotland. I've done my own research, it's surprisingly easy to find real facts and figures with this wonderful tool called Google. I'm voting YES.

From an IT angle though (as that's what the site is about) - social media has proved invaluable for this campaign, if it wasn't for Facebook, Twitter and Google+ it would have been very easy to believe the BBC this last 6 months - like the other day when they showed a picture of 17 people holding up YES signs in Glasgow, and hundreds holding up NO signs elsewhere.... but they didn't show the 10's of thousands of people in Glasgow. Or even yesterday when they reported that there were around 300 people outside Glasgow HQ protesting about "alleged" bias from the BBC - but the photos and livestream showed several thousand people there. Funny really - you would think - since this was the 5th such protest - the BBC might think they ought to be careful - but then maybe they don't really need the £300million a year from the Scottish people for license fees.

Oh - and before I forget -

Passports - love this one.....

UK - it's an acronym -

we are voting to leave the UK not the landmass called "Great Britain"

the UK is - "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" and we will still be physically attached to the landmass of Great Britain thus we are still part of Great Britain thus the passport is valid.... next.....

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Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: Good God!

But the watch is revolutionary.....

instead of having a grid of square app icons, they have a grid of round app icons - that's world changing stuff right there!

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iPHONEY: Fake iPhone 6 images splattered over Chinese internet

Andrew Jones 2
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There is a Russian video which looks pretty real - if it really is a fake - it's an incredibly detailed and very time consuming one.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=657UeODW178

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Jony Ive: Apple iWatch will SCREW UP Switzerland's economy

Andrew Jones 2
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oooo look iShiny.....

Still don't understand why there is so much hype around it -

it might well be the most intuitive, easy to use, fantastical device ever released to date - hell it might have a battery life that lasts for a week. But - if I need to own an iPhone to use it. It's already completely pointless for me.

For people who bought into the Apple ecosystem, it'll probably be great, but not everyone has bought into the Apple ecosystem and that's where this hype - not just from Apple but from countless tech blogs too - that it will immediately take the world by storm - is just silly. It's the exact same reason Android Wear won't take the world by storm.

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Apple, FBI: YES we're, er, looking into the NAKED CELEBRITY PICS. Aren't you?

Andrew Jones 2
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So given that the problem was with the find my iPhone web service, does this finally explain what happened several months ago when numerous Austrialians woke up to find their iDevices had been remotely wiped overnight?

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iCloud fiasco: 100 FAMOUS WOMEN exposed NUDE online

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: "Knowing these photos were deleted a long time ago"

The downsides of CDN.

Facebook has the same issue - when you delete something it's not really gone, it's just the pointer to it that has been deleted - but anyone with the direct URL can still load it.

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Andrew Jones 2
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Re: Yes.

I think what happened is they took the photos using their iPhones and it automatically backs up the "camera roll" to iCloud?

I'm not an Apple user - so I can't be certain - but I think that's how it works.

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Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything

Andrew Jones 2
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Samsung TV!

TV's annoy the hell out of me when they do this -

In 2006 when I bought the 42" Samsung LCD TV for the Cafe to run our presentation on - I noticed when I got it setup and was playing with the menus that it had a demo for some mode (can't really remember the name now) which made HALF of the screen super super detailed and crystal clear which of course by comparison made the remaining half of the TV without this special tech applied look absolutely terrible - now I can't say for 100% certain that it was a software thing, but I'm pretty sure that the cost of making panels that are half new fangled and half old tech would be prohibitively expensive - that I can rule out it being a hardware thing. Now the thing that irritates me - is that if I wanted the entire screen to use the new fangled option - I would have to upgrade to the next model of TV - even though it is clearly present in the model I have just bloody bought!

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MEN WANTED to satisfy town full of yearning BRAZILIAN HOTNESS

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: Harmony??

I was thinking something similar,

I was thinking that they way they deal with "crime" is probably to gang up and emotionally torture the offender until she either flees town or kills herself.

I imagine this town of "hot" girls will probably be something like the mean girls in highschool.

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Secondhand Point-o-Sale terminal was horrific security midden

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: @Andrew Jones

Thankfully - the card reader system is an entirely seperate system that uses the Yellow PayPoint standalone machines.

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Andrew Jones 2
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The local shop in the village where I live has 2 POS terminals.

One of them went wrong and I noticed a USB slot underneath the monitor and offered to plug a keyboard in and take a look for them.

I was appalled to find (apart from the fact it is running Windows) no antivirus security and the firewall disabled. But I thought well it's not connected to the internet, it's not that terrible......

Then the shop owner told me, whenever it went wrong in the past - he just phoned up the company that deals with the maintenance of the things, and they remotely fix the problem, and sure enough - yup they are connected to the internet after all..... with no antivirus and no firewall.......

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UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones

Andrew Jones 2
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Why?

As I said Manufacturers already do it with wireless routers, it's not difficult to set a random pin on every phone - it's just data at the end of the day.

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Andrew Jones 2
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Despite what some people seem to think - this is actually a good idea - and here is why:

The general public largely have a - if it works out of the box, I won't need to do anything extra with it - attitude to pretty much everything.

IP Cameras for instance, come out of the box with no viewing password and UPnP enabled to negotiate a port with the router, this is the reason there still exists the ability to Google the viewing portion of the URL and get a whole list of unprotected network cameras that the owners don't realise are sitting wide open for anyone to view.

WiFi routers / access points for a long time came with NO security enabled by default, which led to a huge number of people plugging them in and finding they worked out of the box, so they didn't change the default password, they didn't enable wireless security and they didn't even change the SSID.

Enabling security features by default - does not necessarily educate users about security, but it does help them to be a little bit more secure out-of-the-box which can only be a good thing, and if a users opts to learn how to go into the settings and disable the security features, that's their right to do so, but the majority won't bother.

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Loss of unencrypted back-up disk costs UK prisons ministry £180K

Andrew Jones 2
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I still don't understand why disks, CDs / DVDs are shipped through the post full of private information?!

Haven't these people ever heard of VPN - if the data needs to go somewhere - it should be transferred securely through a dedicated VPN setup specifically for that purpose!

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BBC goes titsup: iPlayer to News websites down – Auntie working to fix it

Andrew Jones 2
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I think you will find the huge number of people outside the UK who have been downloading Doctor Who using the various well known, well publisicised workarounds may have actually been more responsible for the BBC issues.....

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Galileo, Galileo! Galileo, Galileo! Galileo fit to go. Magnifico

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: The good news, of course, being...

@stizzleswick Not sure if serious or not -

but being the internet I figure it's best to be certain so here goes -

GPS regardless of what country is launching it - is a purely one-way affair, phones, car navigation or other GPS devices cannot send data back to the satellite. The only way you can be tracked via GPS is if your device uses another method (eg Cellular) to communicate it's position once it has located it's position via GPS.

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e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

Andrew Jones 2
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"Raytheon informed us that the [UK Border Agency] UKBA had given them no benchmarks against which they were to perform. It is now clear that the UKBA didn’t know what they wanted from the e-Borders programme."

While I am sure Raytheon are not exactly squeaky clean here - the idea that the UKBA didn't actually know what they wanted from the e-Borders programme - does sound sadly like any technology based arm of the UK Government......

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Android busted for carrying Fake ID: OS doesn't check who really made that 'Adobe' plugin

Andrew Jones 2
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If "Verify Apps" has been updated to detect this issue - as the article suggests it has been, then essentially every Android Device that has the Google Play store from Android 4.4.4 right back to Android 2.2 has been silently updated to combat this issue - regardless of what manufacturers may or may not have done.

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Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: Amazing

If it was a BBC forum, they would probably not allow comments in the first place.......

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Andrew Jones 2
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Guess what - there is already a currency conversion between Sterling and Euro - while most people in the UK appear to be unaware of it - although we haven't changed to the Euro - the Euro is still valid currency that we accept. You will notice that service stations toward the south of country price stuff in both Sterling and Euros And the majority of high street shops will accept Euros even if they don't advertise the fact.

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Andrew Jones 2
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Re: Realism

Well, as that privately owned company is getting less and less money everyday due to closing post offices left and right, and palming us off with a mobile van that either doesn't turn up or can't connect to post office network if it does turn up and if it manages to turn up AND connect to post office network, it somehow manages to increase the average time taken to deliver a package by another 4 days!

A lot of us are now having to find alternative delivery methods like parcels2go which at least comes and collects from your house, and costs less than royal mail in a lot of cases.

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You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary

Andrew Jones 2
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Dear copyright protection people - how about:

Fixing the problem?

Case in point, When I got my Chromecast I bought season 1 of Friends from Google Play. When I watched all of Season 1 - I bought Season 2 of Friends. Now - for 2 seasons of Friends I have paid £40.98 for the convenience of watching it online. For between £50 and £80 I could have all 10 series on DVD. I will not pay £200 to buy all 10 series online. If anything just like the music industry learned (eventually) - it should be cheaper for me to buy all 10 series online, than it would be to get them on physical media.

Next we come to availability -

As long as Amazon / Netflix / Sky etc are going to keep having these ridiculously long "exclusive" terms, piracy will continue. Sky for example with their "once we have it, no one else can have it for 18 months" 18 months!! Exclusivity windows need to be reduced to at the most - 6 weeks. I am NOT going to have a Netflix subscription, An Amazon Prime subscription, a Sky subscription and a TV license. I am going to use one service, and anything I can't get on that service, or buy legally online for a reasonable price - I am going to have to get elsewhere.

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Chromecast hack Rickrolls Google's TV stick

Andrew Jones 2
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Never quite understood how this is supposed to work.

The Pi needs to be connected to a WiFi network with internet access, and obviously needs to be powered.

When the Chromecast deauths from the WiFi the Chromecast will enter config mode - which the Pi must take advantage of, and tell it to connect to the Pi's AP - which I get.

But then in order for the Pi to tell the Chromecast to load YouTube and then to load a YouTube video - the Pi needs to have internet access.

How does the deauth thing work - does the Pi have to be connected to the target WiFi network to issue the deauth command?

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UN to Five Eyes nations: Your mass surveillance is breaking the law

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: What do you think mass surveillance is?

No!

I am sick of reminding people of this!

Terrorists do not use Facebook, Google+, Skype, Twitter, Email etc etc in order to discuss their latest plot, they do not buy bombs from Amazon.

This whole "it's for your own good" argument would be great if it actually held any weight - but - did it stop 9/11? Did it stop the Boston Bombing? Does it help prevent School shootings? Shopping Mall shootings? Airport shootings? Cinema shootings?

It does none of these things!

Anyone who thinks a terrorist group setup a Skype call to plan where to bomb next really ought to get a reality check. We have now reached the point where not only do we know the extent of the NSA/GCHQ surveillance - we also know it's bound to go much much deeper than what has been revealed so far. Yet with all the "intelligence" at hand - they are still unable to stop the majority of what they claim they needed the intelligence for in the first place.

Look at the recent "tools" that we found out about -

the ability to artificially increase traffic to a website,

to change outcome of online polls,

The document also details a range of programs designed to collect and store public postings from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+, and to make automated postings on several of the social networks.,

Capabilities to boost views of YouTube videos, or to boost the circulation of particular messages are also detailed

None of these things are even vaguely related to terrorism, or preventing it. They are about altering the outcome of an event - what sort of event? Sticking my tin foil hat on for a moment - GCHQ could easily use that collection of tools to manipulate the outcome of something like - oh I don't know.... who you elect to run the country!

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When the robot rebellion comes, this Jibo droid will BORE you to death

Andrew Jones 2
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It performs a few basic functions out of the box,

When the platform opens up - you will be able to purchase add-on skill sets (this will be the next phase of the freemium model, you want it to do anything more useful - pay us more money)

It doesn't come with a battery, and if you want to buy one for it - it will last a whole 30 minutes!

Thankfully though - as artificial intelligence is nowhere near the level this thing would need to be useful, it runs via the cloud - so if it starts looking like it might want to try and kill you and take over the world, just turn the WiFi off.......

On the downside...... it runs via the cloud, do expect security breaches and people being monitored without "permission"

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Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?

Andrew Jones 2
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Decent developers with respect for their users - do in fact list why they request various permissions right in the description of the app.

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Google Nest, ARM, Samsung pull out Thread to strangle ZigBee

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: New Protocol ? I don't think so..

Yes,

I meant in the UK.

Example - a Google search for "Zigbee home automation uk" returns one shop on the first page which is Vesternet, who while they sell Zigbee stuff - make their ZWave stuff far more prominent. Now that I have actually found some Zigbee stuff I see that it is at least twice as expensive as ZWave and some products are as much as 3 times more expensive. I have a ZWave USB stick on my Domoticz server it works wonderfully but more importantly I can pick ZWave stuff in loads of places - including Amazon.

Zigbee seems to be more of a product that was designed for the professional world and is now trying to penetrate the domestic market, and at the prices I am seeing stuff - I doubt it's going to a foothold

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Andrew Jones 2
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Zigbee has been around for ages, but almost nothing (for the domestic user) actually uses it - ZWave is at least available in shipping devices (and fairly reliable too). I don't think it's so much a case of killing Zigbee, as I'm not convinced Zigbee was ever really alive to begin with.

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Will GCHQ furtle this El Reg readers' poll? Team Snowden suggests: Yes

Andrew Jones 2
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Unless.....

they think you answered the questions in the way someone who didn't have anything to hide would answer them - so they didn't suspect you had anything to hide....

Oh bugger - now that I have posted this - they will know I have figured out their evil plan......

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May: UK data slurp law is fine, but I still need EMERGENCY powers

Andrew Jones 2
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"She declined to comment on whether the new law would allow spooks to widen Britain's surveillance net and apply it to non-US undersea cable companies."

Sigh - I know they don't like admitting stuff - but I think it's pretty well known by pretty much everyone - that declining to comment - is basically saying "yes, you are right". I'm surprised though - that it stops short of US undersea cable companies - because you can bet NSA is monitoring everything UK citizens do - whether they admit it or not.....

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What's your game, Google? Giant collared by UK civil lib minister on 'right to be forgotten'

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Standby consumes MORE POWER THAN CANADA: IEA

Andrew Jones 2
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I wish the people who decided to declare Standby as being bad for the environment actually understood why Standby exists in the first place. Let's all turn our devices OFF when we finish using them and then in 6 months time - there will be new reports from confused politicians who can't understand why the amount of electrical devices entering landfill has tripled.....

Meanwhile - feel free to replace your car with an electric one, because from all the pushing from politicians and "energy experts" you'd be forgiven for believing that the electricity they use just appears out of nowhere and doesn't have to be generated first......

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You 'posted' a 'letter' with Outlook... No, NO, that's the MONITOR

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: My father in law

I know far too many people like this,

want to shop online at ASDA - they will Google ASDA

What about Chrome - where the search bar is already there - nope - the first thing they do when they are presented with Chrome is type Google into it. I have explained countless times they can type exactly what they are looking for into the bar without having to go Google first, but it falls on deaf ears.

Unfortunately we really must try harder, scammers know this behaviour all too well, and that's why try try really hard to get fake pages near the top of Google. Because logging in to Facebook, requires a trip to Google first in order to find Facebook, and whatever is near the top of the results - must be Facebook.

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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws' - So WHY do it?

Andrew Jones 2
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"What constitutes an invasion of privacy is the snippets of the search results that Google displays - but with a blog post or newspaper article, these only ever show the headline and first paragraph. The commenter can't logically have been the complainant."

Yes well, that's bollocks because what is displayed in the "snippet" is entirely related to the search you perform, in this case - if someone had Googled the name of the commenter, the only place his name appears is in the comments.

For instance - right now because of all the search noise I have to add "bbc" to search term, but a Google search (on the US Site) for "Peter Dragomer bbc" returns a snippet on page 1 from the 2007 article that says:

"Oct 29, 2007 - At 11:32 AM on 29 Oct 2007,; Peter Dragomer wrote: Amazing ! as an ex ML employee I would never have thought any serious financial ..."

now it is entirely possible that before the last few days, it would not have been necessary to have added the word "bbc" to the search to get this snippet. It is entirely possible that Peter Dragomer regrets informing the world that he is an ex ML employee - it may in fact be affecting him professionally.

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Google spares founders from TERMINATORS, but not Eric Schmidt

Andrew Jones 2
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Epic Fail on behalf of the author!

Surely someone reporting on a largely tech based site knows how to read a robots.txt file?

User-Agent is pointed at the robot reading the file and the Disallow statements are telling robots that they cannot follow that path. They really should have a "User-Agent: *" in there too, since this is a file aimed at killer robots.

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Your Android phone is a SNITCH: Wi-Fi bug makes you easy to track

Andrew Jones 2
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Yeah, this doesn't sound completely overblown at all........

"Oh look this phone has recently been to Tesco, McDonalds, BT-Hub-2F6J, Wanadoo-978C, The Cloud and Starbucks" yup - that sounds incredibly identifiable, quick give me a pen and a map so I can draw the exact route this phone must of took......

Bollocks.

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When PR backfires: Google 'forgets' BBC TV man's banker blog post

Andrew Jones 2
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Re: and so, ad infinitum

Peter Dragomer - ie the first comment.causes the "Some results may have been removed under data protection law in Europe. Learn more" text to appear for me.

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Conformist Google: Android devices must LOOK, WORK ALIKE

Andrew Jones 2
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Don't bother to do any research or anything before writing clickbait headlines.

Android One - that is the lower end smartphones that Google is involved with - which are for countries like India will run stock Android with no skins, and Google will be responsible for the software updates.

This does not affect existing or new smartphones sold by Samsung, HTC, LG etc etc, there is nothing anywhere that suggests that Google will prevent manufacturers who make their own phones and tablets from adding their own customisations to Android - just as they always have.

Android Auto is not allowed to be altered for a simple reason, safety! Google have sat with legal terms at car manufacturers, governments and all manner of safety types to come up with the interface for Android Auto that complies with all the necessary regulations on distractions and what not.

Android TV and Android Wear are both "stock" for purely cosmetic reasons.

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What's it like using the LG G smartwatch and Android Wear? Let us tell YOU

Andrew Jones 2
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Journalists reporting / reviewing the Android Wear watches are doing a terrible job so far -

For instance - this reporter has for some reason given the price of the LG Watch in dollars - but hasn't pointed that in fact in the UK - direct from the Google Play store - the watch costs £159 and not closer to £200.

The reviewer hasn't pointed out that the companion app for Android will allow you to block specific apps from sending notifications to the phone.

The reviewer hasn't pointed out that applications that you install on your phone that include code that will run directly on the watch, will be automatically installed to the watch when you install them to your phone.

The reviewer hasn't pointed out that the 36 hour battery life is with the screen set to always-on - but that the screen can in fact be set to turn off if you want to extend battery life.

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MPAA, meet the Streisand effect: Picture ass. slaps Reddit with takedown

Andrew Jones 2
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Wouldn't you think that if there is somewhere on the internet posting a collection of links to pirated content, the MPAA would be better off leaving that part of the internet alone and instead going after the sites that are being linked to? In effect the people of Reddit are surely making the MPAA's job much easier for them?!

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DOH! Google’s internet of things vision is powered by… Mac OS

Andrew Jones 2
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Chromebooks can't be used for development, this was in fact a question that was asked at the Android Fireside Chat session yesterday - someone asked when you would be able to write Android applications using the Chromebook and the answer given was - it wasn't likely in the near future, as development would apparently have to be in some sort of Cloud IDE.

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Own goal as World Cup Wi-Fi passwords spilled in newspaper snap

Andrew Jones 2
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Now we have to wonder how many people had successfully guessed the password before this picture became available......

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