* Posts by Richard Jones 1

556 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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Apple Pay a haven for 'rampant' credit card fraud, say experts

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: ApplePay is very secure

Some years ago back in the mid 1990s I met with credit card companies on a project that was being developed. There were two issues then, limited imagination and the huge cost and near impossibility of adding security functionality to the streaming processes then used. I am pretty sure that number two still exists and we can see (1) being exhibited now. I am amazed that people were not aware that all this talk of 'very secure', is frankly hog wash - it is with all systems. Make a more secure anything and people will look for the easy way round the security. This is no exception. I suspect that the first error was to major all efforts on one device/method of initial verification. After that it was to allow a basically insecure method to 'verify' the voracity of the set up. If you do not employ a bit of lateral thinking and periodic re-verification your security will be breached. This is a consumer product so one perceived need is an easy ride for the user, but easy rides always come with costs.- The CVC code is pretty weak, and even the secondary card not present checks are not hugely strong but at least they are better and can be updated if/when needed via an established route.

Frankly I do not care who allowed this to come about, the banks, apple, the man in the moon, or whoever, it makes no difference. It is still like making a secure vault with thick walls and armoured locks and having an unsecured air-conditioning duct or a plywood roof (it's safe at 10 feet off the ground). The product is end to end and the weakness is where ever and when ever it is found.

The risk to the well organised fraudster is zero, phone cost is a few units of currency, (probably paid for with a stolen card), load it, use it for a few days make money, dump phone, bingo.

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EasyGroup continues bizarre, time-travelling domain crusade

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Sleazy Grope

Oh dear, is it too late to register Sleasy Grope, or for that matter Sleasy Grasper?

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Telly behemoths: Does size matter?

Richard Jones 1
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Re: are you sure ?

That is a measure of your friend circle.

I must admit to being very happy with a 42 inch plasma. LCD is 'OK' but all the LCD sets have artefacts or other limits that the plasma does not appear to have.

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MEGA PATENT DUMP! Ericsson, Smartflash blitz Apple: iPhone, iPad menaced by sales block

Richard Jones 1
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Before I place an Order

Does anyone have a patent on Popcorn, Beer, chairs and other life necessities for a good spectator feeling, before I place my orders?

This could get a strong pair of running legs.

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FCC says cities should be free to run decent ISPs. And Republicans can't stand it

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Public ISP's

Yeah like a snowball's chance in hades that there will be no NSA, where do you think your private operator will get their information? Of course the private company will have managed to somehow sell as much as they can to their buddy of choice.

"We see you contacted XYZ car sales, you should buy a super wizzo instead."

Or in the case of some like Comcast,

"We saw you were thinking of buying a new car, clearly we are not charging you enough please have a double price bill in future, thank you for your custom. Please note the cancellation period for your service has been adjusted in the interests of customer support and is now 999 years."

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Thousands of UK drivers' details leaked through hole in parking ticket website

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Yet another reason. - Re Nebulour Rules.

@corestore

I did not refer to the DVLA, as having nebulous rules, mind you neither they nor the police always limit themselves to strict understanding of the rules and laws. Just look at cars that have been wrongly taken as stolen when they were the result of someone else's fraud, check it out.

However, when you mix in the insurance industry and HMRC you will begin to find out where the nebulous rules bit applies. 'An address without an income yet with expenses, lets go for them they might be on the black market, etc'. Yes the insurance industry needs to know where the car is parked, but the credit checking industry loves inconsistent data, as for the banks, just do not go there. They will not even follow the rules, and sometimes want to ignore the law and court orders, FACT. To protect the innocent, (though now dead) I could, but will not give details beyond saying that the bank in question is very well known, fortunately it caused me negligible difficulty.

All I am saying is make sure you have all your ducks in a line if you are going to go along with non regular situations.

Take it from me or learn it yourself there is nothing so stupid as a bureaucracy that goes on the rampage, - money laundering rules are a case in point. Fraudsters appear to have no trouble getting accounts, but Joe Public can have a very hard time.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Yet another reason..

If you have access to a valid alternative address for mail through which you can receive all items and meet other nebulous rules then you are (a) lucky and (b) probably on sound legal ground. Not all of us have such an easy route. One point that others might need to watch is the tie between car insurance, location and such as the farce of money laundering laws, plus the 'accidental risk' the insurance industry might wish to accuse you of a fraud.

Note not knowing your situation I did caution 'others'.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Yet another reason..

Unfortunately the 'screw you jack system' is set to do just that to you all ways round. Even if you were to use some recoding of your details while maintaining a correct address you can attract a large fine for incorrect details, making it almost 'essential' for you to expose yourself for cack handed fools like the present bunch of stupid loons to fit you up for data theft.

What is needed is real teeth in the laws that mean you can sue any bunch of stupid operatives for all costs including rest and recovery from the stress of their mistake - Lazy, deliberate or accidental. Hopefully they will be put out of business.

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Money from apps? It's all about Apple iOS, says survey

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

What are All These Little Programs

Not that I have ever seen the point of a machine that needs to have bits downloaded to make it more usable, my take is different. What do these add ons actually bring to the party? What do they do? Perhaps it is simply that the programs add something to the lives of IOS users that others do not feel they lack?

Note this is not intended to be a snide comment, for example, the average college or school person probably does not need, e.g. a stock ticker that others might rave about. So you will not sell many if the phone's demographic is wrong for your mini program. Add the fact that cost concious customers do not splash out on dumb so much as those who can easily write off the experience . Finally, 'community users' probably slag off any miniprog that adds noting to their life, thus stopping others in their circle from falling in. Perhaps IOS users simply do not deal with things the same way as others. Everyone has their own needs and interests and this may be reflected in all of their purchasing actions?

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Lenovo CTO: Hey, look around – we're not the only ones with a crapware infection

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

MS Might Share Some Blame

I was under the impression that MS were trying to halt the sale of media to allow PCs to be re-installed with Windows and that this was why you have those awful restore partitions -with their disk dies machine dies issues. Or the 'You have 30 second to make restore media do it now - before you have the media onto which to make the restore data available!

The first thing would be to promote the sale of crap free install media, Dell certainly used to do this and I have several re-install disks for various machines.

As others have said strongly, the second thing would be to be honest, this machine is sponsored by Shit Shovellers Anonymous, crap free version yours for £ X, X US or whatever currency.

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'Utterly unusable' MS Word dumped by SciFi author Charles Stross

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

In Another Case

In another case a right handed repair person tried both a chisel and left handed scissors to remove a screw rather than a screw driver and cut their hand.

Really if you chosen device it is not right; use the tool that is correct for your task.

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Facebook meets Belgian minister: PLEASE, sir, NOT THE PROBE

Richard Jones 1
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Painful Probing

I thought that painful probing was Facebook's raison d'etre.

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Calling all cybercrooks: Ready-made phone attack rig for sale

Richard Jones 1
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That Maybe True

He did not say it was easy but I bet their 'leaders' do have phones that really beg to be rung at 3 :00 a.m. their time, - it is nice to dream.

Frankly shooting the organisers would be too good; something slower would be better like endless phone ringing and music on hold played together 24 hours per day.

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Superfish: Lenovo? More like Lolnono – until they get real on privacy

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Problem is inherent to closed source

While I am in general terms in full agreement with your article I suspect that it over complicated the discussion process that went on. These were laptops out of the 'normal' Lenovo comfort range of corporate users. These were for marginal low cost customers, many of whom probably were very likely not very skilled with a PC. Note I have avoided the word savy for a very good reason.

Along came Superfish to make life even easier for the simple user, OK I know that this should have set off alarm bells round the entire company if not the world, but I will bet the original presentation went to the marketing types, 'Gee this will make the machines so much easier for the unskilled to use and we get a few cents or dollars off the price.' They would not even have the ability to know about 'What could go wrong' let alone ask the question. So marketing said shove this one the low cost machines and make them easier and cheaper to use, 'Look it even self configures so no need to change production they said to us.' The rest was history.

I do not see this as open versus closed versus any other model of software, this was a simple dumb, crass stupid commercial idea for which the customer in the middle (Lenovo) fell, or sleep walked into, hook line and sinker.

Browser helpers are always an awful idea end of. Do it your self or learn how to. Good Samaritans do not exist.

As for the company that produced the crapware, it appears unlikely, but maybe they really thought they had a good idea, or were they also paid by an unseen hand? I do not know

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Apple: Fine, we admit it – MacBook Pros suffer wonky GPU crapness

Richard Jones 1
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Meh

Re: Apple takes no responsibility for its crap.

While I hate being fair to Apple, they do not actually make the things, not an excuse but part of the explanation. Sadly when the real assembler of the bits runs them through the soldering process it is not exactly a craft operation. It is run down to a cost limit, which is bad, a time limit which is necessary to protect the bits and a quality control limit which is supposed to be good.

Sadly for too many years the process has been somewhat hit or miss, fine when it works perfectly, not so fine when it fails. Lead free solder has almost certainly increased the miss rate. However in the past it was not unusual to have the process fall over in so far as some items would be perfect, most would just pass initial inspection but a large number would then fail after shipping and some period of use.

I have to agree that knowing the risk of such failure any manufacturer should run a good, responsive repair or replace policy and in this case Apple appear to have been late to the party. Almost certainly they should have known there was a problem a good while back and it should not have taken so long to step up and deal with the the matter. If they carry out any checking they probably know where, when and how the process went off the rails, if they do not know, a double bad for them, not finding the problem and not preparing a more responsive action plan for so long.

In an industrial context I once had 19 out of twenty complex connectors fail bringing a public telecomms switch to a halt each time. The fault was rapidly traced to a fault in the OEM soldering processes and fixed

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The Revenue achieved RECORD numbers of e-tax returns ... by NOT shifting to GOV.UK

Richard Jones 1
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It is a Plan

Make the web sites so god awful that the punters have to telephone to get anywhere. That way more staff get employed and the unemployment goes down, master stroke!

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BOFH: The Great HellDesk geek leave seek

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: This sounds horribly familiar

Its OPEX only until the bean counters in collaboration with satin decide that some staff costs should be capitalised because of the projects they are working on.

And then the expense codes all have to be changed on the special Excel form someone in Outer Mongolia developed but the system throws a wobbly because staff costs and expenses should be OPEX not CAPEX. The staff cost centre has not been changed to a capitalised one as some staff still work on routine work. However, this problem only comes to light when the claim is stuck in the system having been approved via the wizzy system of pass the electronic parcel and the approvals cannot be unwound; because unwinding never happens its not been coded for...

and

the £2,000 plus bill cannot be paid because the refund is delayed

then the disciplinary hounds chase up the unpaid credit card bill.

Oh yes, suddenly my lot decided that expenses were not worth the hassle so no one went anywhere, "xyz have a specialist team for doing that".

Meanwhile hell is waiting to freeze over.

It became clear that the company had lost the plot completely.

I kept a record of how much extra annual pension I earned with each day at the office, it was the only way to keep sane.

Then early retirement was never more welcome.

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So long, Lenovo, and no thanks for all the super-creepy Superfish

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Cue the ClassAction lawsuits in 3... 2... 1...

Selling a dangerous liquid to someone who did not know about hot liquids was a dereliction of a duty of care. Which UK care home or hospital managed that McDonalds site again?

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Ads! People! love! ads! in! their! apps! Please! use! ours! cries! Yahoo!

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Fuck ads and all who serve them up

Another reason not to use a so called smart phone? Or perhaps a reason not to install dumb as a brick applications you really do not want. Most times adverts tell me nothing worth reading; I do not care to have my life style improved by, e.g. a pencil sharpener, I want my pencil sharpened by the damned thing. (Yes a silly example of the ad makers art but for the most part ads are stupid.)

If I am looking for a car I want a car to do a task so a specification would be nice, along with the costs and will it fit in with the tasks I need done. It will NEVER do anything for my so called 'style' so stop wasting my time already.

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iBank: RBS, NatWest first UK banks to allow Apple Touch ID logins

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: Not smart.

Its say ten-o-clock in the evening, I have just found that my phone is missing so I should use Find my iphone. So here I am in the car park and I pull out my missing iphone and start up Google, and oops there just might be a tiny wee problem due to the missing phone.

Never mind I do not really have an iphone and my actual mobile phone is buried deep in an inside pocket and rarely if ever touched, so I CAN use it to report my missing credit card.

Now I will be the first to say, what suits me does not suit many others and vice versa, but the sales patter does get just a little bit boring.

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Rap for fap stack in hack trap flap: This XXX site caught an STI (Script Transmitted Infection)

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Flash

Why on earth is anyone still using that pile of steaming dung called flash. No cute cat video or anything else is worth the aggravation caused by the lace curtain shield called Flash. Or do people want a career devoted to almost daily updates that always follow the release of yet another flaw exploit?

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Lenovo shipped lappies with man-in-the-middle ad/mal/bloatware

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

I Wonder

I wonder what else they have hidden in this or a similar way? I used to think that Lenovo made half way decent kit; note that I used to think that way.

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Big Content picks on small Australian ISPs again

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Alternative to piracy?

Or the film makers could issue everyone with a free device to download and pay for their tatty content, oops, sorry valuable IP.

I cannot remember the last time I went to see a film at the cinema, I do remember that I hated every second of the drivel. I was dragged there by a family member, never again. Frankly 'free' is too high a price to pay for much of the output.

As for downloading, I would feel it was unfair to the electrons tortured by the process; is there a society for the prevention of torture of electrons when you need its services?

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Inside GOV.UK: 'CHAOS' and 'NIGHTMARE' as trendy Cabinet Office wrecked govt websites

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Specification, User Requirements, Objective

I guess that those were just some of the many words that the fluffy types did not understand as they are not fluffy enough.

How about finding out what is thought to be needed and what is thought to be done, testing the basic tenets and producing a testable specification of how it will be delivered. Then doing acceptance testing where some skilled and totally unskilled users are set lose on the project to see what breaks? Whatever you do in this phase do NOT use those who 'understand the new system'. I often used the clerks from accounts to simulate ordinary users when I did such work in the (increasingly distant) past.

As a text book study in advanced project destruction this does appear to have been a master class.

To think I was rung a couple of weeks ago about my experience of a paper based system they wanted to bring on line - Inheritance tax if you are interested.

Currently something between 50 and one hundred pages, perhaps more are involved though not all pages require an entry Comprising more than a dozen sets of data gathering that should all cross relate.

Just imagine sitting down and trying to do that lot 'live on screen'. They were shocked that I said I needed a paper copy of each stage to verify entries before moving on and that cross checking was essential before submission. Frankly electronic recording would be good - the papers I produced visited most of the offices run by HMRC, Each time going by post, England, Scotland Northern Ireland and Wales all became involved. An electronic transfer would have been magic but given the track record recorded in the account it will never be possible

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Vodafone didn't have a £6bn tax bill. Sort yourselves out, Lefties

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Tax is due somewhere, surely?

The tax, if any, is due where it is due under the processes of the relevant tax law(s). It is for the German tax authorities to decide the amount of tax due on income within their country.

I assume that those who are jumping up and down are happily paying tax on their entire income and not just the part above the tax free limit? To accept that some income can be received free of tax would be to receive funds without paying tax on them, thus avoiding tax legally.

Here is another moral dilemma for you, lets say that a person has some funds sat in a bank account getting almost no interest and though paying all the tax arising from that tiny income the pay only a tiny amount of tax. Because seeking a higher income by chasing deposits is hard work they did not chase the maximum income they could get. Since almost half of any additional income would go in tax they decided that the extra work on their tax return was not worth the overall effort.

Question: Is this tax avoidance since the income and the resulting tax liability has been forgone?

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SCREW YOU, BRITS: We're going through with UK independence ANYWAY – Scotland

Richard Jones 1
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Re: The next step?

I do not care about passports for anyone daft enough to go to the socialist 'paradise of up there' but there should certainly be a need for passports and visas the other way! Ideally man the immigration barriers of the new Hadrian's Wall with clerks otherwise unable to find work, rather than automating the system. Visa charges should be used to meet the inevitable costs. Additional revenue being raised from any broadcaster or print media showing any image or part thereof relating to the poisonous leadership, tripled in the case of sturgeon

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Are you ready to ditch the switchboard and move to IP telephony?

Richard Jones 1
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Re: My personal opinion...

I tend to agree with you. Power loss is the other elephant in the room, too many IP systems stop the instant power becomes a little bit of an issue. An issue that was cracked years ago for many PSTN and PBX systems. So you might need to check how an IP system exists alongside H&S demands. Not impossible, but check first before a nasty incident, not after!

As for the posting keying delay. More than thirty years ago the PSTN POTS set up I worked on could connect calls, national and international within fractions of a second of the last digit being dialled. Mind you we did make sure that we used the full potential of overlap signalling, not always possible with some countries and their weird variable number lengths and even more weird signalling systems back then.

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Fight back against illegal GCHQ spying with PAPERWORK!

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Given this quote

The men with umbrellas were Russian agents, just like those handing out polonium tea cakes again in London. Some of KGB thug Press-the-dent Crapbucket's finest.

(A poo-tin is a crap bucket or khazi is it not?)

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UK.gov can't get farmers onto its Verify service – even to claim subsidies

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: From the Whitehall Home for the Hard of Thinking

Alternative Headline,

'Whitehall Thinkers Shocked To Find Wet String Users Unable To access Broadband'.

Given that most of the farms are in the countryside and the countryside has crap to no broadband what did these great minds expect?

Or did they think farmers live and work on the 32nd floor of some tower block in a town centre?

Perhaps the farmers are at 'the lowest level of technology engagement' hardly surprising if you consider none available broadband to be the pinnacle of technology.

However, have you seen the average technology in a tractor or harvester these days?

Farmers use technology that works and if the rural world had access they would be using it as keenly as everyone else

Based on my experience of rural users they are as keen as mustard not to have to rely on 'trips to town' to do business

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Obama administration ENDORSES Apple Pay during Tim Cook's White House LOVE-IN

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Less Than No Interest

@James 100, One point, deaf people have trouble with voice calls and those I have known deal with texts or other written methods.

I do have a touch phone, I can see it in the rack of my desk, totally useless. I have tried to use the deadbeat over the last two years. My demand for data while out is zero. E-mail while out is useless, too slow and fumble filled, have you tried it while dealing with dog walking?

When I am out and about it is to do something. Sure I could load up the device with 'music', but why? I have no time to listen while busy.

If I need 'entertainment' the car radio does what I need.

So perhaps touch phones maybe be great for all those who have to walk about with a pocket computer hoping no one calls them, but for some of us roaming data is a liability not an asset.

Apart from the PPI parasites, my voice calls are direct NOW emergencies due to family health and support issues. A dead battery just does not cut it when that happens. E-mail and text are not NOW services so are for me they would be a useless liability.

So, I too have a mental image of someone cut off from the real world living in a bubble of portable sound walls, contactable only via a few random spikes of data that may penetrate your defensive shield.

Still, since you did nothing to show me the 'error of my ways' at least you did see that buying a madly expensive device to augment what already meets all my needs has no point FOR ME.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Less Than No Interest

If someone came along and told me to buy some hopelessly expensive toy to be able to go out a buy something else I would be pretty hacked off with them.

If there was some point to all this hype I might try to become interested. I am sorry but to me it is a problem not a solution.

To start with I hate touch phones, I hate phones that go flat in less than a couple of days, ideally not for 5~7 days. My mobile phone stays untouched inside an inside pocket, though it is activated via a headset and I already have a range of payment methods that work without batteries.

Can someone please explain what the point of this idea could be? So far as a payment system it ranks right up there alongside cow pats, not very nice to handle but get the job done in some locations. At least they do not require recharging at regular intervals though they do make lousy, if not buggy phone calls.

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HELP! Windows Phone update 8.1 broke my Lumia

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Just for the Irelevant Record: My Nokia 6230i Also Still works fine

While we are talking about irrelevant details my Nokia 6230i is in fine fettle and never has any bother with updates or walled gardens either. Mind you the battery only lasts for about three days between charges, a slight drop from a the week or so that it once lasted; but hey it works after nearly 8 years.

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Blighty quietly signs deal to read giant EU border control database

Richard Jones 1
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Mushroom

Re: O RLY?

The cat might get all the headlines but the drunks on drugs who kill and maim even though their claimed religion bars such activities then stay at our expense to 'be with' the illegitimate children they never see also exist. Sadly bad cases make bad laws but really crap application of half way passable laws do no better.

The possibility that politically motivated clerks might sandbag and subvert legislative efforts should not be discounted. Since some have already been exposed that risk appears clear.

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Hear that sound? It's the Windows XP PC bubble popping

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: So does this mean

I guess it should have meant some attempts to excite sales, but with what do these pent up sales pushes come loaded? We know that MS tried to damp down demand for Windows 8 with such as their kiddie brick screen insistence and other road blocks. Windows 10 discussions suggest that silliness is still pervading MS thinking. Even if the machines are really knocked down in price, unless their specification meets what people really think they want, sales are going to be hard to generate. (Note I said 'think they want' FUD is stalking the market place. Though It may be based on poor understanding, that understanding is the one some potential buyers have.)

I am well aware that many are very happy with their new style machines. However, those who have heard the horror stories may be less willing to dip their wallet into what is getting the feeling of a poisoned well. Even Windows 7 is now on limited life. Frankly is it the time to buy a known end of line machine or is it better to hang onto whatever you can still use, while hoping that your belief that there could still be a future might still come true?

I will continue to hold my breath and nose for the time being and 'might' continue to experiment with Linux on a few older machines where it runs much faster than their windows version(s).

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Big Data, empty bellies: How supermarkets tweak prices just for the sake of YOUR LOVE

Richard Jones 1
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Pint

Re @dogged

I agree with you. Different demographic groups are in play, each with their own needs and it is their right to be different and 'go with their own flow'. Having been laid up with health issues, the supermarkets' internet ordering home delivery service has also been a life saver.

I had poor experience of the discounters/cheap sellers. I have tried them when away from home. They had limited choice, prices that were not great, fruit and veg was not local, fresh looking or very plentiful. If you are driven by budget have a family who can accept limited choices it will work for you. I found them a bit like my time in the Middle East, in the early days there were frequent limitations of stock until the next boat came in bring goods from anywhere in any language to the merchants of the suq. I don't eat lobster or pheasant or similar specials. Where I live their places are further away than the supermarkets meaning extra time and money on travel. I would have to go to a supermarket to get what they cannot supply.

I was checking out the Aldi / Lidl weekly buys. but after nothing came up after about six months I simply stopped looking.

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Dixons Carphone clings to EE, Three in Phones 4U bullet dodge

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: No

My 'at home' devices would be perfectly happy to communicate with my router, however I am less happy for my fridge or anything else to communicate with anyone or anything else except me or my wife. It bad enough when I order or purchase anything to top up the fridge, food cupboard or anything else with food without the storage spaces going off piste with their orders.

As for an extended warranty , another good reason to say No! No! No!

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Silk Road trial latest: Ulbricht's Gmail addy appeared on ad for 'Amazon.com for drugs'

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Nothing is as it seems

You may be right, the last jury I saw were unable to accept the principle of genetically developed wings for the Porcine Airways Company. They disputed the evidence that pork pies could ever be made without access to the regular flights of my formations flying pigs.

In fact the head juror suggested the whole idea was a load of porky pies.

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Hey, America. Canada's watchdog just slapped net neutrality rules on wireless internet

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Up

5 Hours of North American TV

I am shocked, are there 5 hours of good TV per month in North America?

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'Revenge porn' bully told not to post people's nude pics online. That's it. That's his punishment

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Sounds a Lot Like Wire Fraud To Me

@Old Handle, his 'business' sound to me more like wire fraud and I thought Uncle Sam did not like wire fraud or have things changed recently.

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Your gran and her cronies are 'embracing online banking' – study

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

@Dave Bell, I can beat that one, I have just shredded an old book from 1995, however I do still use cheques, just not very often!

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Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: And how much of this...

I doubt that there are many Attorneys signed up unless you have found a bank that has the slightest idea of what a Power of Attorney might be. Nitwit bank could not even follow a court order let alone a PoA so wanted to run an illegal set up, I was less than impressed.

Fortunately in another case I had third party authority prior to the PoA being activated. Some of the building societies were no better, - wanting signatures from people who were debarred from operating an account does not feel so terribly smart. Sending out cash cards to people who have lost the capability to operate a bank account and were not allowed to operate the account was another questionable move. - unless you work in financial (dis)services.

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Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Bankers for anyone...

As someone who has a number of limitations on mobility for a string of different reasons not all connected to my person and who is only months off 70 I do not use on line banking and can see little point to its use. Just watching the messes that my daughter frequently has to sort out with her on lines sets ups it is enough to put me off.

With even more passwords to forget on line banking has a range of limitations. I do pay bills on line, a boon but have no desire to lose paper statements and utility bills since it can be essential for so many transactions following Blair's money laundering fiasco legislation. The law that means only crooks can easily open a bank account these days.

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EE squashes Orange UK: France Telecom's been 'destroying it for years'

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: Tell us more !!!!

Oh come on you are giving me the pip with all of this pith taking.

Perhaps it is time to give vegetables a turn, how about Onion?

After all the way it fails in so many ways it makes you cry, it has more layers than, well an onion.

Its bulbous and not in great shape with its service offering

Its great in stews - it certainly makes customers stew all the time and as for getting to the root of problems.

It should certainly grow well the amount of fertiliser that it produces!

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Post-modem Ericsson wobbles thanks to flat sales and falling profits

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: Do some research before you post a story.....

To true, Ericsson were big in network hardware, (AXE10 for example) for years though a North American Company tried to rubbish them out of business with the company I worked for until that also started to fold up like a Kleenex car. The interesting thing is that both my old company and the North American 'network and screw up' company are but history while Ericsson who had a brief play with mobile telephone handsets continues. I actually like their handsets, but they were not 'trendy' enough for the market so they are no more.

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'It's NOT FAIR!' yell RICH KIDS ... and that's a GOOD THING

Richard Jones 1
Silver badge
WTF?

Does Economic Situation Not Count For a Lot

If you make about US$50 per minute anything less is hardly worth walking across a room to fetch. If you earn about US$1 per week, even US$1 (a week's money) has to be worth considerable efforts.

Also add in the envy factor; the rich students will almost certainly know that the other person is making a relative killing if they are only offered a few dollars. As things even out the envy factor might be considerably less of an issue, thus the reward will slide up the scale.

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BMW: ADMEN have asked us for YOUR connected car DATA

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: No need a car for that

Hang on, IOS has that dumb leach beacon system that is supposed to flash up messages as you walk past stores and eating places. I think that what you meant was that iPhone users are to be farmed but only if apple and only apple can monetise them and make a turn on the deal.

The phone co has location data even for my dumb phone and could sell the cell site data if it was so inclined. I can only be loosely tracked that way as do not have exact location data capability on my phone, it is one of the advantages of not having a chatty modern phone but one that is just a phone and nothing else.

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Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: This could really hurt the rollout of connected cars and eventually self-driving cars

Is this not what pliers were made for or a lump hammer? I am not sure where the data would display in a car, so I guess that one could block out the panel if incoming junk became an issue, but what a bl**dy cheek of the thieves.

How would popping up unwanted junk would sit with laws on mobile phone use and distracting drivers? This could have more legs than the proverbial whatever.

However, given my age and my habit of keeping cars for a very long time it might not be too big an issue for me, still it is a point to keep in mind.

Just make sure none of the Parasite Protection Invective (PPI) or ambulance chasing "you have had an accident" mob get into this business! Hanging, drawing and quartering would be far too good for the crooks.

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UK's landmark mobile not-spot deal already falling apart

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: I could never understand..

I up-voted you, however, one lot would say it was anti competitive and the other lot would want a Ministry for Aerials. This would then be stuffed full of even more people who knew even less about the subject but were taken off the unemployment register anyway.

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Young CHAP CUFFED in Blighty over Xmas Sony and XBOX hacks

Richard Jones 1
Silver badge
Childcatcher

Re: DOS on XBOX and Playstation over Christmas

I can only guess that you do not have hyper excited kids wanting to enjoy their new Christmas toys; neither do I now, but I can still remember the potential for upset.

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FERTILISER DOOM warning! PESKY humans set to WIPE selves out AGAIN

Richard Jones 1
Silver badge
Joke

Re: More interesting than "The Big AI fear", but....

Guano or bird shit to the less polite. A famous source of phosphorous.

Also a term for what some appear to use to start panicking.

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