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* Posts by Richard Jones 1

336 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!

Richard Jones 1
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What was that story I read a while back about the most reliable server on a USA campus? No one could find where it was until they realised that the builders had walled it in to a dead space a few years earlier.

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Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Not When the conspiracy Has Expensive Lawyers?

Jobs was hardly known as Mr Nice Guy was he? This is a bit like refusing evidence of prior art when dealing with patents. The Mafia did not apply protection rackets to mobile phone stuff, so could there be an issue if, magic IF, someone else thought about doing so?

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Too late, Blighty! Samsung boffins claim breakthrough graphene manufacturing success

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: Too Late

Nah, apple are patenting the invisible graphene neck tie, AKA the garotte for application to any and all competitors. All they need now is someone to design the self tightening mechanism so that they can patent that as well.

They are probably trying to patent see through graphene knickers just to stop them being sold.

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Puking! protester! forces! Yahoo! 'techie! scum!' to! ride! vile! bile! barf! bus! to! work!

Richard Jones 1
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Re: "simply market forces in action"

Without the as you so quaintly put it the 'techie scum' who would even use the Starbucks at which so many impoverished people would not otherwise be able to work? I just love the trendy use of 'gentrification' to imply a slur. I assume that letting a place decline with low rents no jobs and no maintenance, rats and whatever, perhaps a side order of so called gang culture is what some crave, should that be called crapification?

Frankly I have seen some pre-gentrification areas though I tended to only go to them once to pass quickly and did not dare go back. The idea that they were wonderful and better before they were gentrified is frankly nuts. OK, I have not been to San Francisco for well over 30 years and yes there were some very rough areas then, with shooting and knifing a hot 'sport'. Every city has its run down awful areas, (though those in Japan appeared far safer than almost any others I have ever visited) and I have seen a lot of places in a lot of countries over many years.

Did I find those that were being freshly crapified so great? No I did not. One I lived in during the late 40s/ early 50s is a case in point. Once a pleasant area, much of it is now being bulldozed in an effort to de-crapify it and hopefully make it habitable once more.

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Apple: You're a copycat! Samsung: This is really about Google, isn't it?

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: Oh please thise same tired old crap...

"There were touch screen phones before the iPhone but they were crap."

They still are.

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BlackBerry ditches T-Mobile US after iPhone advert spat

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Face Facts

T Mobile only see customers as units of cash generation.

They see the crapple phones as drawing in those with more money than sense.

CrApple require them to sell the stock they have dumped on them at cost.

So T-Mobile try to push the units of cash generation to waste more cash on an ithing.

Carriers probably hate me, I still use my old phone as it does WHAT I NEED.

The new-things do not so they sit i a rack or get given away.

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US Supreme Court Justices hear arguments in game-changing software IP case

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Similar programs and Copyright

Surely this is not as complex and intractable as it appears at first blush?

If it does precisely the same thing in precisely the same way there is a prima facie issue of copying. Examination of the code would then allow a determination as to facts. The biggest problem is not dealing with copying as such, but in being to obtain restitution for a copy that has taken place.

Is there any reason why someone would copy the code except as a full on pirate copy?

If I had to write the whole thing from scratch to even emulate the look and feel, why would I set out to copy the code line by line?

First I would have to get the detailed code and then hope it was written in the same style I used.

Once, I rewrote some computer based training programs. It was very clear that they had been written by several different people as you could soon tell which ones were written by which person by examining their code, (I had full source but no high level code writing access. I had to work in assembler at machine code level direct into memory.) I incorporated some of their previous code adding my updates. It ran on their specific hardware which was modified for our specific application, so hardly a mass resale opportunity.)

The issue that most now face is that of someone deciding to develop a computer based way of doing a mechanical task, e.g. and only as an example fuel injection on combustion engines. Its been done many ways over the years, (I was interested in one idea back in the 1960's.)

Had the first entrant to that market patented the idea of replacing mechanical logic with software logic the world be in a sad place by now. Just look about at the systems now deployed in their thousands, some more or less reliable than others but most very different from each other.

At one time Lotus 123 ruled the spreadsheet world, but now who remember the name? Had the idea of computerised spreadsheets been patented where would we be now? I say copyright the look and feel but as you stray into processes, the world becomes far more dodgy.

I still blame apple for introducing downgrades to mobile phones that replaced functions with useless dross - now they try to block anyone making a phone using the USPTO (UnSuitable Patent Office?) as their backer.

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New Sammy patent trial: Apple seeks $40 PER 'infringing' handset

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Down

Re: Oh come on.

Crapple have forgotten one major issue, no one else has copied the actual crapple so most purchasers will have bought their non crapple device because they are NOT a crapple.

Me, I am still trying to work out what the attraction is for a stupid dumb device that goes flat almost as soon as you look at it and manages to only do what I do not want while doing nothing I need.

Mind you, oh dear, my old Nokia is coming close to copying one crapple 'feature'. Its 8 year old battery only lasts a few of days now not the week or more it used to manage.

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Zombie Nortel grabs Cisco by the neck, again

Richard Jones 1
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Re: 7,385,998

Fibre optic appears to go round the issue of a metallic connection, perhaps someone should patent the use of a combined path involving hybrid solutions?

Mind you even Bell should turn in his grave at the thought of prior art. Did no one in the USPTO ever go to school, or should that be skule to help them understand?

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The plot to kill Google cloud: We'll rename Windows Azure to MICROSOFT Azure

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Attempting to give a damn...

Is it really going to be called Microsoft Azure tomorrow? like it says in the text. I guess it will be useful tomorrow then but we still have to worry about today. (Also worry about tomorrow if it ever comes?)

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It's EE vs Vodafone: 'How good is my signal' study descends into network bunfight

Richard Jones 1
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Testing Methods

I thought customers used mobile phones, not a boot full of technology when they went out and about? If I am using a mobile phone I expect to switch on and go, not carry a full test lab. I want to see test results results that confirm if I can just use the darned thing without a test lab, a couple of technicians to calibrate it and £50,000~100,000 worth of hardware.

From what I read here see on my phone and hear from contacts if they can get a signal, the current state of play has not progressed much in the past ten years. Radio communications was never as reliable as wired - yes I know wireless is more flexible I'm talking about reliable and consistent. For too many mobile users it appears the service may be fast as it dashes through and disappears again. Fifteen years ago Vodafone appeared to have a stand out name. Now we just have a bunch of mobile companies and some often surprisingly rubbish phones.

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Microsoft exec: I don't know HOW our market share sunk

Richard Jones 1
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Do Not Understand Customers?

For me it is easy, they simply stopped making products that large numbers of customers could tolerate while at the same time making products that could not pull new customers. Previously I had updated regularly, through DOS then Windows, though Windows 95 was the first really useful version. I tried early candidates of Windows 8, it felt more like medicine or a gym work out it was such hard work. Then they down graded it so I could not longer run it on an elderly but otherwise capable rig. For me that was the kill off point, Windows 8 was only intended to sell new hardware not delivery better functions to me. OK it appeared to come with the 'run up large bills feature' that Apple and Google pioneered but for some odd reason I was NOT interested in that.

I wondered why I needed a system that looked like the tablet I did not want or need or a touch phone that was hopeless. The touch phone I had traded what I needed, for a touch interface I did not want or need, after two days I abandoned that pile of carp.

Now I may not be typical but here is a thought, by coming late to a market segment and abandoning one in which they were at least moderately successful they failed to win new uses and cut off large numbers of previous more or less contented folks.

No wonder getting rid of XP is such an uphill grind, too many people see the possible replacements as delivering nothing of use or obvious benefit. This may not be correct but the cost of chucking out van loads of hardware for a device that looks like a steep learning curve is surprisingly unattractive to many.

The marketing drive that suggested you had to be an airhead that does not actually use your Microtat device to sit down and work may have been a bit too successful.

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Oxfam, you're full of FAIL. Leave economics to sensible bods

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Unless they're from the lucky sperm club they've got negative wealth

OK, brief history lesson, my father's mother was one of 7, possibly more children. Only two survived past their third birthday my grandmother and her sister, so do I come from a silver spoon background. Father had his education stopped at 16 to start work, only to have work and study disrupted by something called WW2. Then father worked his way up through a multinational company in three different countries outside the UK before resuming his carer back here.

I had no silver spoon but I did have a desire to work and progress. I was short of money when I worked here, I took the chance of overseas work, sometimes working 7 days a week for up to 18 hours a day. Money was good and time to spend it was limited, even when I worked fewer hours I still avoided spending freely.

Now I am retired my house is worth at least twice what father's house fetched when it was recently sold, and yes my house was mortgage free from the early 1980's I worked damned hard at positioning myself, as well as at the tasks I took on. If I did not know how to do something I would still take it on, learn how to do it and return the job completed.

[Short IT angle, the company bought a training simulator, then changed the process for which people were being trained, I reprogrammed it in assembler using HEX with no command interpreter or compiler. Code was entered directly to memory - good fun. I also wrote and recorded the scripts and shot the synchronised slides to instruct the trainees. I was asked by a later generation staff member where I learned what I did, RTFM - no training courses. I taught the Japanese the short cuts I developed for encoding the tapes, -they also asked where I had been taught to do the things I did.]

Was I a high achiever? No I was not. Was I the best worker? No I was not. Did I gamble with what I did? Yes sometimes I admit I did, if I thought the odds were right I would take risks - (NOT health and safety risks!)

Years ago I read an account by an agricultural mechanic. He always wanted to own a Rolls Royce. He bought one in what he called bad condition. He used his skill and tools to refurbish it and got his Rolls. He only ever really used it to take his large family on holiday. Fuel might have cost but he said it was lot cheaper than the train or other options with all of his family. He put his mind to the task and got what he wanted. He did not beg, steal, or borrow - so no huge interest bills.

My sofa will not see its 35th birthday again, I bought it cash, wasted nothing on interest with easy terms. Something broke last week, so I fixed it so I'm still obtaining my full value from its purchase.

Hard work and the right attitude can take you a long way if you are prepared to match the two elements, the lucky sperm club does not enter into things at all.

[As a child I used to play in parks that had once been owned by members of whoever's 'lucky sperm club'. They lost their luck when too many of their members died in the first world war and the family businesses floundered with no one left to run them by the thirties.]

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Apple patents the super-soaraway selfie system of the future

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: So it's true

Who would ever want to be seen out with a device dedicated to total rubbish like this? It must be the marketing equal of anti matter.

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Microsoft to get in XP users' faces with one last warning

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

I Had To Turn Off 'Update'

My portable became unusable because the windows update snagware was hogging all disk capacity 'checking'. I realised it was bent, when it had read 200% of the total disk capacity. Stopped the crap and suddenly it was like running a new, as in brand new PC a real Woohoo.

I did try the Fixit which promptly failed reporting that it was useless and could only give up. Well done Microsilly.

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Ford to dump Microsoft's 'aggravating' in-car tech for ... BlackBerry?

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: What I need...

Is a pocket for the phone and a bluetooth headset with voice activated dialling. Touch the headset, speak the name, it will confirm the party and dial the number. Look no car mounted software, sadly the mobile function is not supported in modern crud phones but hey, it works for me with my 8 year old phone so no need to down grade to a big flat look-at-me dumb phone.

Even the radio work by pushing a button or two, note button not slithery 'touch and miss' screen.

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NHS England tells MPs: 'The state isn't doing dastardly things with GP medical records'

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Broadmoor Has To Answer

I am convinced that the use of inmates on day release from Broadmoor Hospital to manage and develop Government software projects is not the world's greatest idea. It is good that the disadvantaged members of society are given the chance to contribute. However, sadly those so far used lack both the detailed knowledge and subtle appreciation of how society should function. I am convinced that this is the reason why almost all government projects have infinite cost overruns and the capacity to fail on their objectives. The "was it wasn't" illegal sale of hospital records for the princely sum of £2,500 will of course keep the NHS running for a long time; about 1 second did I hear?

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Hey 4G bods: We need to make 'phonecalls' with our 'voices', too

Richard Jones 1
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Re: "Most systems currently expect the call to drop, which means you’ll have to redial."

I do not need any of the other crap, web, music, email, instant mail - that takes an hour to arrive! and why do I have to say call and then wonder what the phone will think I want. One touch, speak the word I have assigned to the called party and go ahead. I want easy and what I want. I did use a touch phone for three days, (two of them in hospital). The half dozen touches, prods or whatever produced the right number less than half the time.

With voice I get a near instant result, every time.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: "Most systems currently expect the call to drop, which means you’ll have to redial."

I use an 8 year old Nokia with hands free , well once touch and speak dialling. Sadly the modern crap phones cannot do that, so I do not 'do' modern feature lacking crap phones.

The industry need to work out how to go forward not backwards.

Richard

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Yes! New company smartphones! ... But I don't WANT one

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Big

I also need a one hand or no hand phone calling for dog walking, shopping, gardening, etc. Currently I use a blue tooth headset, one touch, speak the name and make the call. Touchy feely phones/ phablets, etc. are useless as the phone is buried in my pocket.

My present phone does exactly what I want, its small and fully functional for my needs and is about 8 years old; nothing on the present play-phone market comes close, except in the fresh battery stakes.

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Antarctic glacier 'melted JUST as fast LONG before human carbon emissions'

Richard Jones 1
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Recent Stroms Uncover Remains of Ancient Welsh Wood

People are exploring the remain of an ancient wood that was growing thousands of years ago when the climate was much warmer. No doubt that this proves:

a) Nothing except that climate does change and has changed.

b) There is nothing new under the sun

c) That even the ancients caused global warming

d) That we still do not fully understand what is going on with climate and that taking any extreme position simply makes you an extremist, whichever side of the extreme you inhabit.

Chose your own guess, for the moment it is still a semi free world, (in spite of the recent panorama programme on the floods).

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Amazon fuses LoveFilm, subs service, calls it Prime Instant Video

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Prime one-day delivery? Ha!

It is not in my experience I usually get next day, that is I get it next day. The only exception is out of stock items or the subscription items.

As for their complaints service I have had two recent failures, 1 the delivery was refused due to transit damage. The delivery person said "I do not want to show this to you please refuse it I am embarrassed to show you." I refused the delivery and ten minutes later when I rang Amazon, they said, Oh yes sorry about that I can see you refused delivery I will replace that item now and they did!

The other item was returned as a duplicated order, (slightly long story but down to user error) half an hour after presentation to the carrier it was on the Amazon system and the credit was being processed.

I've been using Prime for several years and been very happy, its great for spare parts you need quickly.

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Magnets to stick stuff to tablets: Yup, there's an Apple patent application for that

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Oh Dear My Fridge Door Must pay a license fee?

Many burglar alarms, proximity pads, pet door openers, etc. are suddenly apple matters; there might even be a few more examples.

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MEPs demand answers from EU antitrust chief about planned Google search biz deal

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Is There Any Other Search Engine?

OK M$ have their wooden spoon effort Bing, could it find its own foot in a well lit room?

As for the rest, happily I have not found them except when I searched for them from the list of (failures) oops alternative 'hide things' engines.

Hint, if anyone wants to run a search engine, at least help the damned thing find results and present them in a sensible order.

If I had to use some of the moaner's efforts I'd need to build a taller house and add a flat roof so that I had something to jump off.

I did try Foundem once; others might enjoy the experience but not me.

I note Google have declined a bit in this regard recently but at least they no longer offer the 'Hotel 6 inch nails' and its ilk as they used to do.

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No, pesky lawyers, particle colliders WON'T destroy the Earth

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Aren't these couple of loons...

My records do not go back any time at all. The best scientific records go back a few years. Less good records go back a bit further than that but are at best patchy. Geographic records go back a good deal further and show that one 'constant' is that weather has always changed, we know that one potent force is the impact of the sun which in case you had not guessed it is also always changing its activity and thus its impact on its planets. Magnetic fields change along with the gravitational effects of other external bodies. In short the weather is a by product of a huge mish-mash of factors only some of which we know and frankly few of which we understand. Controlling the size of camp fire you can have in a back garden might make a few feel very self-righteous, but with India and China ramping up their coal fired power stations the effect of the next camp fire tax will have very little useful effect.

One thing to consider is that within any closed system an increase in one location will always be countered by a reduction somewhere else, otherwise the darned thing will not balance. Siberia has been warmer than usual North American has been colder and snowier than usual and we have been wetter than usual. I do not know the reasons in precise terms for this, I know that the sun has entered an unpredictable change in activity and I do know a tiny amount of thermodynamics, enough to understand that change produces effects that may at first be hard to understand. I also know that the feed back will be that changes will cause unexpected effects for those who do not understand that way that balances are restored.

We should learn to live with change, I am not the way I was even yesterday, I and the weather and the world will be different tomorrow, that's life.

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Friends don't do tech support for friends running Windows XP

Richard Jones 1
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Re: No

Too many things would not work reliably when I tried to evaluate Win H8 one caused full system resets, while 7 has not missed a step. Mind you when they crippled WinH8 to only run under DEP, I lost the will to fight. I was not going to risk a production personal device on something already found worse than useless.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: No

I completely agree, MS simply do not understand how large parts of the rest of the world work. The OS is an unseen tiny part of the ecosystem that either makes things work or breaks them. Printers, scanners, network hardware all add up to an excessive cost. M$ have seen fit, (as have too many stupid vendors) to use their new crappy implementation of an OS to break the relationship with both expensive hardware and software. They should not be surprised that real people who work to pay for things are NOT impressed by the heap of ,(it's unmentionable) that breaks carefully established set ups and delivers a demand for piles of 'learning experience'. Couple that with what is for many a degraded if not degrading experience and it is not surprising that the 'no thanks' club remains popular.

While flavours of UNIX have some appeal, they to would carry the same 'break too many things baggage' as windows H8.

Someone must have a shed load of appreciating Windows 7 copies, I wish I could find the key to the fault, at least most of my hardware can be hacked to work with that last of the line package.

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Samsung leaps out of volume PC game as UK market crashes

Richard Jones 1
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New PC? No Thank you - Correction Required

You Wrote

- Win8 & Office360 have to many "value add" features which asks for a subscription, free for the first x, which undermines any trust that you won't be paying extra later on.

I think you, like me see this as undesirable.

Suggest to replace "value add" with "value reduction", or "value removal", replace "features" with "miss steps".

Other than that I feel Windows H8 was a mess that succeeded in turning off too many people rather than achieving any positive and I was poised to get three copies. I even tried out the preview until I encountered its "our way or no way" approach. Windows 7 being superior IN MY CONTEXT will suit me just fine. If MS rescue something more usable then I 'might' reconsider, but only if I do not again suffer more orphaned hardware issues. Oh remove cloud insistence and forget the touch rubbish for those of us who find it user hostile.

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Snowden documents show British digital spies use viruses and 'honey traps'

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: Yeah sure...

Quote; "owning black people was legal in the US in the 1850s"

Sadly it still is a large parts of the world and even where it is not fully legal it is surprisingly well tolerated. The world is not the lovely, fluffy, cuddly place outside of the usual suspects that some people think it to be.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: dssf SIGINT-Friendly Hotels

Does anyone thing this stuff is new? It has been the norm for years. I suggest it is likely that plane seats and other transport options have also been used in this way. In fact anywhere there is an option to book facilities or steer the punter it is likely that some form of set up has been at least tried or used

It does depend on where you go. Some places have their hotels, guest houses and the like pre-wired. The most the host side have to do is connect the patch cords, in many cases that is not even required as everything is fully tested and ready to roll. Guests are steered to the 'prime' suites/rooms/flee pits where the equipment has been pretested. Staff who worked for me/with me overseas saw some of this in action, including the physical honey traps - if they were spurned in the lobby, they came calling at the door. Door wedges in addition to inclined chairs, (not always a reliable option) were a useful item of travel equipment. This was only for commercial contract management. Idle chatter about nice to have items appearing on the menu would be greeted by a new menu sporting the items shortly after. Perhaps it was all done by magic?

The list of such places may be longer than it once was, I guess it will not be shorter.

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Cisco asks court to bin Rockstar patents

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Land Of The Free To Rob?

No wonder the Americans are so keen on their guns.

Given the apparent state of their warped laws is it any surprise?

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Fujitsu launches lappie for oldies

Richard Jones 1
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There Always Has To Be One

Well done Jake for showing up as the essential dimwit troll, not only a stupid little person I guess you go along grinding down the warning studs at the edge of pavements, (sorry Jake for you 'sidewalks') showing the blind or partially sighted where to cross the road. Do you also turn off or stop up the vibrating and audible sounders on pedestrian crossings? Ban wheel chairs because the all important Stupid Jake does not like or need one. No need for crutches either in Jake's world, you either get with his plan or tough.

Personally I am ALL for inclusion where it can work; bigots like Jake can take a hike. Sure many 60 year olds are as fit or fitter than many 40 year olds were when I was born. But age related problems DO EXIST. While the current crop of sixty, seventy, eighty or even ninety year old inhabitants are in many cases still very active, some of us will, or do need adaptations to make things assessable. While an operation greatly improved my back and mobility, with damage to my hands I now find a screw top release tool useful. I may start to use voice dictation to allow assess for me to write on the computer since the keyboard is becoming hard to use; stupid ignorant raving trolls like you Jake, are simple offensive non contributors.

So a mark for Fujitsu for at least making an effort to reach out to a possible market segment that they clearly feel exists.

Did silly Jake complain about the current push to touch screen devices aimed at the young with full manual dexterity? No? I thought not! I find that rubbish totally useless, so finding a new mobile phone is increasingly difficult, I do not boycott that dross. Since I cannot make use of it there is no point to buying a new phone. I still use the ten year old voice technology on my old mobile. There is a world of difference between meeting needs and forcing fashion on those unable to employ the trend.

So Jake before you crawl back into your play pen, well done to Fujitsu for a small step forward in market choice. I do hope the machine in question is NOT encumbered with 'so called touch' and those god awful kiddie bricks of the TIFCAM Windows H8 .

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NHS website hit by MASSIVE malware security COCKUP

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: No Health Support For People Or Their Data

At one (recent) time I was told that my x-rays were being sent out to India to be read... Hence my evidence based complaint.

Has anyone done anything to stop the present problem?

Responded, it is after midday?

I guess blinding silence.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

No Health Support For People Or Their Data

I assume that as a minimum they have blocked ALL access to this dangerous mess?

I am not going to try accessing them. I will look into a router block in a few moments.

Then they did put up a warning that the site may affect the health of your data equipment?

Or it action on an NHS waiting list?

Is that the sound of a new concord wooshing across the skies or the sound of confidence in NHS records leaving the country?

Or should confidence already be lost since they are probably already in India anyway?

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Microsoft-backed lobby group demands market test of Google's proposed 'search fix'

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

I've tried a few so called search engines, zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Then I went back to Google and found that there were things outside in the real world and the results made sense. They did have problems in the past and the removal of the + and - operators is a pain, but at least I no longer get the "Do you mean the '7/8 inch drill bit' hotel?" type response that once plagued search results.

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NatWest 'spam' email cockup got me slapped with late payment fee, says angry Reg reader

Richard Jones 1
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Anyone Surprised at NitWit Bank

The title says how I feel about the stupidity that is NitWitBank, the UnHelpful Bank.

It might help if the staff were trained.

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Lloyds Group probes server crash behind ATM, cash card outage

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Most Have Never Seen Real OLTP Systems

I have seen several real time on line transaction systems get halted through system or software failures. One relied on a core changeover part, think 'Y' switch a key part of this device failed and since it was so small and so reliable and so under stressed there was no heart beat for the IC in question. It was only used during a swap over over so its status was only ever important for those few nanoseconds. Twelve hours earlier it was on line then the system went dead. Both sides reported no errors but neither could be forced back on line. That took some creative fault finding and time to clear.

Another time the on line system 'became busy', busy is not a fault condition so it reported no fault and no change over was initiated. Unfortunately the 'busy' it was involved with caused two issues, it was an unproductive 'busy' so no work was done and two, because it was 'busy' it stopped listening to ALL inputs. A system status change had to be forced to recover service and the previously on line system continued to work away doing nothing useful until a way was found to break into its (mis)operations.

The above two examples were not banking systems and not bespoke software, but systems in use in many other places. So the reality is that even systems which have been deployed many times in different countries and with different users can still have initially irrecoverable 'breakdowns' without needing human error or a lack of human operative training to cause them.

Both of the above cases resulted in expensive system re-development though as far as I am aware the changes were only ever tested by provision of enhanced 'heartbeat' and routine maintenance and never again through a system issue.

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What can Microsoft learn from 'discontinued operations' at Nokia?

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

4 Types of Would be Buyer

1) Those who buy because it is Apple

2) Those who would never buy an Apple but wants something that sort of looks similar to an Apple in case there is a point to it so buy Android.

3) Those who are largely fed up with the above two camps and wonder about something else or have given up on another lumpy phone maker and 'might' try Windowsphone but not too many of them.

4) Those who cannot see the point of what groups 1~3 buy and want a mobile phone with well designed features and probably little in the way of touch rubbish.

By the way, Asha was not the way forward, I gained a reduced cost better featured package with an Asha thrown in, three or four days of use, (two in hospital - not caused by the phone showed me that the Asha range was useless even when free.

Nokia used to make damned good phones, boy did they lose their way perhaps they should never have smashed their compass.

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Vile Twitter trolls thrown in the cooler for rape abuse tweet spree

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Trolls or Near Brain Dead Wanaby Thugs?

Frankly I do not care who goes on bank notes and if its going to be a source of trouble lets put no one on the things. I have to say that I did find the victim of this verbal assault something of a one track talker. But then so am I sometimes so perhaps that is a simple human trait?

The 'popular' idea that anyone who says any opinion is fair game for abuse has been dealt a blow and I'm happy about that. If you disagree with a view explain your disagreement and provide a reasoned alternative, attack the premiss of the idea, not the person.

If all you can do is attack or threaten the messenger you have lost the argument and shown you are a fool.

The score so far 2 fools down and a load more 'too stupid to get a life fools' to go.

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Bottom falls out of Nokia's network rump

Richard Jones 1
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I wish they still made phones not the thief beacons they are selling on to MS.

I need a new phone with the useful features of a 6230i not useless dross like touch and always look at me so called aps, or should that be asps offered by most current devices.

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EFF claims Vietnam targeted its staff with spear phishing attack

Richard Jones 1
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Black Helicopters

Give Them What they Want

OK, not exactly what they might really want. As they really need something to run about with, set up reverse honey traps that will feed out misinformation. Accidentally tell them about meetings that have not happened, with names that sound more or less credible, their government ministers are a good source of name material, but do not make the spoofing to obvious. Clearly there must be some sense of realism, just not too much.

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Five UK banks sign up to hook up customers' ACCOUNTS to their MOBILE DEVICES

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Dodgy

I'm not sure how old you are but this also stinks for me. A smart phone is about the most useless thing I have ever seen. It goes flat, does not do what I need and now can be a spigot to flow money out of an account.

Except that since the damned thing is useless I will not be subscribing.

None of my banks have been stupid enough to sign up, phew!

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'You win, Kanye': Coinye creators throw in towel after rapper sues

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

At Least I have Now Heard of Him

I wonder if this was an advertising stunt, I had never heard of him before, now I have. Sadly I have also forgotten his name already.

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Oh those crazy Frenchies! Parisian cabbies smash up Uber-booked rival ride

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: circumventing the heavily regulated systems

Be reasonable, the entrenched mob never has the slightest interest in customer service. What you are suggesting would prise them forward towards the 21st Century and in the direction of service..

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Apple files foul-up-fixing patent for fumbling slab-fondling flubbers

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Down

Is That The ifumble

What a fabulously boring item for fabulously boring kit.

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FCC net neutrality blueprint TRASHED by US appeals court

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Land of the Free - To Rip Others Off

Thank whatever deity you favour if you are not in the land of the 'enslaved by corporate greed'

I wonder how much that ruling cost those Internet Service Preventers or the rotten no value providers?

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TPP treaty nearly ready to roll over us, says Oz minister

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Will That's Easy

Will, it is easy to see how these shysters sleep at night; at your and my expense.

Take great care if you are prescribed any treatment from a US pharmaceutical company, will it kill, cripple or cure?

It will be very hard to find out; 'news management' rules!

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Don't panic! Japan to send nuke fuel rod into MELTDOWN in Fukushima probe

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

What is Renewable about Renewables?

The wind that drivers an expensive unreliable windmill is NOT renewable, it came as a result of the solar atomic furnace. It is a use it or lose it situation. The same with light power 'solar power' it was produced a few minutes ago, capture it in you expensive, fairly short life panel or hope that there is more fresh light coming.

Of course the windmills wear out as do the solar panels, then like EVERYTHING else they need to be renewed, is that what makes the damned thing 'renewable'?

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Thought the toilet camera was weird? Try actual thumb flash drives from tech's supershow

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Have to agree.....

You are laying it down wrong - oh no, hang on a minute, that's another makers machine.

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Intel ditches McAfee brand: 'THANK GOD' shouts McAfee the man

Richard Jones 1
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Re Windows 8

He was talking about software, not jokeware.

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