* Posts by Richard Jones 1

831 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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Swedish old timer pulls airsoft gun on broadband salesman

Richard Jones 1
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Iteresting idea

Now please can we have a version of the weapon for salespeople from fraudulent 'overseas' support sites please, really, really pretty please.

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Google deal means game over for mobile payments firm Softcard

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Re: So what exactly did Google buy that they didn't have before?

That pretty much mirrors my view on the whole saga. I have several NFC cards though I have yet to use any of them in NFC mode. They do have one huge advantage over a phone, there is no need for a battery that goes flat and several smaller advantages in that they are, well, smaller. They do one thing, make payments and I have never had a problem doing that with them. Having to pull out a phone from the safety of an inner pocket is a right palaver that would just slow things down for me. (The fact that I would first need to buy a suitable phone is a small, though undesirable complication.)

However, I guess it does expand 'choice' for those who need choice to go in that direction. I just wish that choice encompassed a little more of what I would find useful so I could benefit from a more recent phone with a fresher battery, rather than one that wants a cake for its tenth birthday..

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Troll seeks toll because iPhones work

Richard Jones 1
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April the 1st again?

Since mobile phones existed well before these apparently dumb ass patents who allowed stupid to be patented? The Excel Pocket Phone was only slightly bigger than most modern phones, even if it did a bit less, though it was quite good for telephone calls back in the 1980s. It was not alone

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The PC is dead. Gartner wishes you luck, vendors

Richard Jones 1
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Re @AC

I started with the 8086 running DOS and no internet at all. I built some forecasting models use Lotus 123, then we got hold of the 8088(?) twice as fast but doing much the same thing. I went through a whole herd of such machines, many with no HD and using sneakernet to collect process data for daily and weekly stats processing. The saving on paper printout per machine allowed them to replaced every 6 weeks. I never remember any of them every needing to be replaced..Then the 286 flew in, followed by the 386 and 486 and on and ever upwards, Now I am retired my i3 has been running fine for 6 years or so. My 2008 portable now runs Windows 10, though the only move it makes these days is from the bag to my desk for a weekly backup and to collect a few bits of data. When I can get a mobile phone with a 23 inch or bigger screen, a proper keyboard, no touch screen and a battery that last more than 5 minutes, 5 days would be nice, then Gartner, you can send me a postcard. Oh and this beast should fit into a shirt pocket and ensure hands free is a way of life, just like my existing phone.

So 8 year old portable; check.

So 6 year old desk PC;check

So 10 year old mobile; check

Yes all present and correct.

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How Nokia is (and isn't) back in the phone business today

Richard Jones 1
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Meh

Welcome Back Nokia IP

If they can produce a replacement for my 6230i I will be straight round to see if it has the one feature I need, the rest is horse feathers for me and only worth anything as a gift.

If it only churns out another lump of a smartphone then the 6230i will have to last a bit, no make that a lot longer.

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Catz: Google's Android hurt Oracle's Java business

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Could This be a New SCO?

It is sounding like a hopeless hollow case of the sort that makes such a rich vein for lawyer's to mine for income.

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Gov to pull plug on online ID verification portal Gateway in 2018

Richard Jones 1
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Back to Pencil and Paper Then for Self Assessment?

Oh well roll on the good times, back to computer print outs or will it be pen and paper or pencil and paper? The better come up with something usable fairly quickly or something will go pear shaped. Will there be a period of either or or another fate-full full stop crash, cut over.

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Big Pharma wrote EU anti-vaping diktat, claims Tory ex-MEP

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Nice to see that HMG have my best interests at heart (not)

I rather liked the response of someone I once knew when covered in cigarette smoke. She said

"OK I will tolerate your effluent from tobacco being sprayed over me, if you accept my effluent from drinking beer."

What is it with the e-thing posers with the desire to give their drug addiction a 'trendy' name.

Anyone for popcorn lung? Just check the list of flavourings in the liquid brew, it could be you next.

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Windows 10 build 14342: No more friendly Wi-Fi sharing

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Good

WiFi Sense was always nonsense to me. It took boring work to disable its folly.

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Transfer techies at SWIFT tell Bangladesh Bank: Don't shift blame for $81m cyberheist

Richard Jones 1
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Re: $10 second hand Router and no Firewall

The link made interesting and depressing reading. It is almost a believe or not account.

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French maverick sniffs around O2

Richard Jones 1
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So Explain To me

O2 is owned by a foreign owner and is a tiny not very useful player. So having another different foreign owner will do what to build it into something worthwhile?

O2 needs scale not another absentee landlord or absentee owner. Three minnows with one being a struggling and apparently now failing Vodafone with crap service and falling revenues, sounds like a meagre fish supper for a decently scaled but probably still useless BT-EE combo shark.

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Siemens Healthcare struck by rebranding madness

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: If only... People wanted Heal Thinners

Why would any one want heal thinners? Surely a it is a finite market?

One mark deducted for bad spelling, it should have two 'n's and a space between heal and thinners.

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Microsoft: Why we tore handy Store block out of Windows 10 Pro PCs

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Same old, same old.

The last time I looked at the Tumble Weed Park,aka Windows Store, (this morning) you had to pay for their apes, sorry apps. No account, with no credit card equalled no sale, that is just the way I will keep things. I looked just this morning or are those daft price tags there just for fun to improve the user experience and make them feel they were getting something for nothing, rather than getting nothing for a payment.

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Jailed hacker 'Guccifer' claims Hillary server gave him spillery

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Fox Fairy Stories

'Impossible to know if he was telling the truth' you say. Since when did the truth and some news outlets, especially Fox need to worry about whether anyone was telling the truth or if it was just a good story they wanted to hear?

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How to evade the NSA: OpSec guide for journalists also used by terrorists

Richard Jones 1
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Re: How to avoid being spied on...

+By bye.

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Greenpeace leaks TTIP texts, reveals strained negotiations

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Good old EU Or The French For Once?

It appears that the French are far from ecstatic about TTIP, perhaps it is time we were a bit less supine as well. They are threatening to bring the charade to a halt which just might be the best thing they have done in a long time.

Mind you Uncle Sam's massed lawyers salivating at robbing those pesky Europeans would not like it if it does go that way. So all strength to the French in this one.

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Richard Jones 1
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@SolidSquid

Was that a typing error, when they wrote 'draft', did they not mean daft?

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Asymmetry

Agreed it has to be a two way process or nothing.

We have yet to agree to change our (UK at least) largely three wire standards with a three pin fused plug and nominal 230 volt appliances. Our wiring standards are very different to those of many places and do not suit the USA practices of central boards with current flow and imbalance breakers and ECLB, etc. serving direct feeds often to specific items. What they are really concerned about is being sued when, (not if) things go wrong. Since most of the stuff comes from China anyway, which bit of Chinese production are they concerned with? If the EU standards (a very big IF) resulted in lower running costs and higher safety than USA designs that would give EU managed devices a clear advertising edge. However I suspect that the desire is to shield their marketeers might limit the ability of EU based advertisers the right to complain about substandard US products.

As an example of the possible chaos, my bathroom installer is currently battling to provide a shaver socket that works and that is from a nominally EU compliant source, god help us if USA 'wiring codes', (are they even universal in the USA?) are added to the mix.

The biggest issue is likely to be a drugs war, where some US companies have 'interesting track records' over the products they produce and foist onto an unsuspecting public. They then try to suppress data on their effects. There is also a track record over other countries' production standards with at least one situation in a more or less stable state of dispute about quality and reliability.

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Ding-dong, reality calling: iPhone slump is not Apple's doom

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

One of the problems of high market share is that it can bring in high operating costs. So if you are churning 50 billion of whatever currency a fixed overhead of say 20 billion is rather less important. Should the churn-over drop, can the fixed overhead also show the same flexibility? In apple's case it probably does not make a whole difference since the margin is so high they would have time to adjust to falling markets. Financial markets hate uncertainty so they wobble as soon as look at you. So the marketplace for certain things is showing signs of being finite. Those who want them in the main have them. Those like me who are still wanting to know what the fuss was about still cannot find where the magic is hidden. Many of us would still be happy to settle for ten seconds of apple's cash flow, but we will see how the market evolution pans out.

The end of the world is certainly not due.

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US government tells Apple it has security problems that Apple fixed last year

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: doesn't intend to patch

Perhaps apple just want to compete more widely with Andriod?

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Net scum lock ancient Androids, force users to buy iTunes gift cards

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: That Ain't going to fly

Well it would be nice to think so but I have sever doubts that they would do the right thing. I can only hope you are right.

Sherlock because he got the crook.

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Richard Jones 1
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That Ain't going to fly

Quote '"In theory, it might be possible for Apple - or its iTunes gift card partners - to track who used the gift cards provided to the criminals, which may help investigators identify them."' End Quote

Would apple give up the ID of crooks? I do not see that happening any time; ever. They would want to protect their identity - and likely keep them as customers.

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Romania suffers Eurovision premature ejection

Richard Jones 1
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Re: I wonder

Go on go ahead with that idea. Thousand would appreciate the improvements it could bring. Otherwise since we have to have it thrust down our throats oops sorry screened at us; broadcast it at 3 a.m. perhaps on the old BBC three space.

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Bypass the Windows AppLocker bouncer with a tweet-size command

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Can we close that loophole?

If you need to ask you possibly don't have the skill or possibly the rights to do so. If that is not the case go ahead, if you are a drug dealer or some other assorted low life no doubt someone will give you away anyway. Money talks in criminal circles so watch any friends you thought you had.

Of course be aware that someone, (perhaps a dodgy friend?) might already have done this to you, better go and check your bank account via some other none PC route.

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Dutch PGP-encrypted comms network ‘abused by crooks’ is busted

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Weapons are used by criminals!

Weapons are illegal to own in many countries; except the USA of course where the right to carry arms and get shot by your self device weapon, often by a family member is so very important.

I guess the wacky-backy folk will have to do something else now.

No doubt iApple would welcome the trade I would like to get excited about this non-story, where is the snoring icon when it is needed.

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How innocent people 'of no security interest' are mere keystrokes away in UK's spy databases

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Very Sloppy Headline Writing

I guess that you refer to the risk of Comrade Corbyn?

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Richard Jones 1
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Very Sloppy Headline Writing

So;

Hundreds of thousands will today be one foot step away from falling onto a train line.

Millions will be just a stumble away from falling into the path of a bus, car, truck or whatever.

(Some will even be hit by a car, bus, truck motorcycle on or off the road.)

Some will be just a key stroke away from paying the wrong person most of their money.

Thousands will be just a key stroke or two away from downloading a nasty to their or their company computer.

Some, an unlucky few will be just a key stroke or two away from destroying their company

Millions will be just an instant away from getting a fraud call from a PPI, investment scam or whatever pusher.

Countless thousands will be just a random chance away from harm at the hands of a criminal of some form or another.

That is why we have rules and laws to try to protect them.

Wow rules and laws even apply to sensitive activities like doctors, pharmacists, HGV drivers, etc. and as the article confirms, even to data miners working for various agencies. Sadly some may break the rules, that is what supervision, management, the police and other agencies are supposed to be there to control, (in spite of what some now refer to the Criminal Protection Service) and certain other actors distorting the intent of what are becoming the human wrongs acts.

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FBI's Tor pedo torpedoes torpedoed by United States judge

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: If they are able to install malware...

So you are you saying, if you visit dodgy websites (and let us all be clear it was a dodgy website) you have to be careful what you might catch?

Is there anyone on here or for that matter in much of the wider world who did not know that?

Worse still many more normal web sites also harbour very dodgy adverts that make ad suppressing software almost mandatory these days.

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Richard Jones 1
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The FBI Should say sorry

Please FBI, write a nice open letter to all of those traced under this arrangement. It should address the recipients in a nicely worded open letter through all major news outlets explaining that because of a legal 'misstep' they will not be prosecuted for their kiddie porn watching activities.

The FBI should also say that they are very sorry for not being able to proceed with further action at this time.

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European Union set to release anti-competition hounds on Google

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

@death&taxes

Quote 'They managed pretty well with their handsets before they became correctly perceived as old-fashioned bricks when the market flew past them.'End Quote

Reality check,

Apple produced a pile of over priced, over sized dung devoid of useful features for those who wanted a communication tool. Meaning I have been unable to find something to replace my increasingly elderly but still superior, (for me) old Nokia. But he ho dream on dazzled by the shear ugliness of something that constantly demands to be looked at while robbing you of your life. I never look at a phone while using it, because hands free allows me to avoid all that pointless hassle and get several days use even from the 8 year old battery. Oh, I do not have to worry about someone wanting to break its encryption, there is nothing to find on my mobile telephone phone. Try that on an Apple, iWhatever. How many times would that have to be regraded over 8 years and at what stupid cost?.

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Canny Canadian PM schools snarky hack on quantum computing

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

And For Corbyn

Perhaps Corbyn could explain how to get your tax return, accurate, correct and on time as his speciality discussion subject.

For the record I'm now about 95% done on my 2016 return (that is the one due by January 2017).

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House passes broadband bill despite promise of White House veto

Richard Jones 1
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I Spy A Serious Spelling Error

Sorry the House of Representatives, surely that is the House of Repressives?

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Apple assumes you'll toss the Watch after three years

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

It Probably Cuts Both Ways _And It is Not Just Apple

There are several factors in play here. Apple is first and foremost a marketing exercise. It is recognising this and whether its life projections are from production to failure or from production to 'selling on' are not a prime interest in the first stage. Fashion items typically have a relatively short life, some a very short life, e.g. women's fashion clothing. So the company's focus will inevitably turn from keeping it working, to up-selling the first purchaser. Looking at those figures in this light makes sense. A purchaser who has had an 'X' for 2~3 years thus becomes a prime target in a market that is likely to be finite with marginal elasticity of demand. If the first mark can sell on their once shiny new toy to ease the purchase of a new one that is a bonus. Just look at the raft of second hand shops, sorry charity stalls and nearly new emporia.

Some makers object, but others who are more worldly wise see it as part of the marketing model. Sell on your old device to a second tier user at a depreciated price. Let them lust after the better item, (better only because it is the newest fashion item). Then hope that the nagging thought that they only bought second best will make them either be a repeat second hand customer for the next gen item, or more desirably a new first time buyer. Hey Presto you have expanded the market, it is the same for almost all visible consumer items ladies coats, dresses, (shorter cycle times), iThings, even cars, (longer cycle times). (Non visible items, used underwear anyone are probably a very limited niche market, - though quite strong in some export fields I have been told.)

I tend to watch the evolution of this marketing model from the sidelines. My two cars are an average of nearly 14 years old, my phone is coming up for 10 years old, my most active desk top 6 years old, my portable 8 years old and so on.

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BT hauled into Old Bailey after engineer's 7-metre fall broke both his ankles

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

There was a Time

In the pre BT days, possibly when dinosaurs still roamed the earth that safety equipment was very much in vogue within the BT predecessor. They would get very grumpy if you injured yourself at home because you did not use suitable safety equipment. You could even borrow available safety items at one point. The suggestion was that they would rather allow you to follow safety processes all the time than have you off work because of an avoidable injury at home. I think this mainly applied to goggles, helmets and gloves.

Anyone remember the YZ club?

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Lauri Love backdoor forced-decryption case goes to court in UK

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Question

No simple straight personal choice issue for him but if political point scoring is more your bag, waltz on.

Not my dance I am afraid, so it matters not one jot to me, but if I could prove my innocence, sorry to say this, I would try damned hard to do just that.

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Richard Jones 1
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Stop

Question

If the data would clear him why not yield the point? If it could stop a one way ticket to the USA it would be worthwhile.

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Citrix asks you, yes you, to write its certification exams and courseware

Richard Jones 1
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I Don't Know Citrix But...

I did once go on a vendor course where the design data being used had been taken from a customer's specification but without naming the customer. It was clearly a dumb and unworkable set of data which became apparent within 15 minutes of the course starting.

We, well I principally, pointed out a few of the glaring problems - cue a halt in the proceedings while a telephone call was made, followed by a door bursting open and the area sales manager bursting in. "I hear you have doubts about the X's customer data" He blurted out the name of the customer, and we, pointed out what was wrong, but it was then too late to sort out the mess, the hardware was being set up and went live a shortly after. Went live was a misnomer and huge rapid retrofit efforts had to be made to resize and rework the whole thing to allow it to work with more than about 10% of its originally planned links.

So, yes someone with field experience can verify Aunt Sally data, but shouldn't manufacturers employ skilled staff to check things out all the way through?

In the above case, the maker in question asked to hire in some of our staff to help them better understand the business workings of customers. We turned them down for a range of reasons, but at least they wanted to pay..

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Look who's here to solve the Internet of Things' security nightmare – hey, it's Uncle Sam

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: When you close the fridge door

Google have already proved that the whole set up is at best flaky and unreliable by pulling the plug on one whole set up of second rate, (because they are now to be unsupported) devices.

IoT bah more like the Internet Direct Integration of Threats Including Chaos or IDIOTIC as a more correct abbreviation.

Perhaps the biggest hurdle is TTIP. Who in the right mind would want to buy some crap that would be rendered unusable because the integration supplier decided to stop support and be protected from complaint by the stupid TTIP and from bypass of their blunder by the DCMA.

One of my fridges is just about 41 years old, the other two a couple of years into life, so not too much point in worrying about what they will leak. Now examine the substance of the speculation, for fridges, first the in and out scanners, per door or per shelf? Then the product ID capability, in original cartons or put into tubs, bags or free, e.g lettuce, cabbage spring greens or whatever. So we now have a £200 fridge with a £1000? ID processor set, that should sell really well. Bigger fridges may need more costly ID and processing facilities.

As for the rest of the toys for the indulgent wild eyed, I lived my life without them until now, Non IDIOTIC things, thermostats, timers light switches, got them all; that is not going to change any time soon.

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Britain is sending a huge nuclear waste shipment to America. Why?

Richard Jones 1
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Re: "Nuclear power is safe and if designed right, does have minimal waste, "

I am with you on the problem. Sadly the 70 year history has been built on and trained its people on more or less one thing weapons grade output. We should have been more open minded years ago and developed, in parallel, alternatives which could have reduced the then potential problems. There is a problem continuing to plough the same old furrow and expecting different result to emerge, We built breeder reactors, what about thinking round consumer reactors. Too late for Hinkley Point but somewhere, sometime would be nicer.

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Microsoft rethinks the Windows application platform one more time

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Doesn't matter

Windows Store, I thought that was now known as Tumble Weed Park anyway.

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We bet your firm doesn't stick to half of these 10 top IT admin tips

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Nowhere to hide

@I aint Sparticus,

It is also an argument for something pretending to be an organisation to get organised and recognise the needs it has and deal with processes the right way. Your Mum cannot possibly be the first case of her situation, so there should be a secure, agreed process sorted out to deal with such cases and avoid the run around that is apparently needed. Sending file(s) encrypted would be a start! Providing the tools for the job would also be 'useful'.

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Mobe and Wi-Fi firms flog your location data to commercial firms, claim reports

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: I guess I'm safe for now

I have no data plan on my phone. I did get a 'feature phone' at the last renewal, it could not do what I wanted or needed, also it was touch based bah useless. I passed it on to a relation and went back to the old 2G phone which suits me fine. There was another screw up with plan so they deleted the unwanted data and added something slightly useful, success. Tracking my movements might be a mess, half the time I have no service at home so that must really help them understand me, not!

But like you, no location device other than cell site triangulation and no apps, whatever fluff they are.

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Telstra hauls in Cisco, Ericsson, Juniper to explain TITSUPs

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: 15% increase causes overload?

No that is not a correct reading as I see things. Most handsets are registered on the system as they are switched on. They remain on line until switched off, they go flat or move out of range. The system will be dimensioned on the basis of expected traffic demands and expected new service request demands plus any other relevant factors such as normal surges. Suddenly removing 15% of connections and then all of them automatically trying to reconnect is a very different thing. That is not 'normal' traffic it is a very specific type of traffic all focussed on very specific resources, those associated with control of the network not the traffic on the network.

Yes duplicated resources running in parallel through very well integrated and designed networks vastly increase network security. Two gateways with each having say 60% of nominal maximum busy hour load capacity can proved a very high level of service continuity, with three or more way diversity even better security can be obtained, provided that the load sharing algorithm does not itself eat up capacity. Cut cutting off 15% of connections and then suddenly and instantly dumping them back on the network would likely lead to something rather well over a 100% increase in control traffic on the network, note, control not customer paying traffic. Failures then lead to retries and so traffic snowballs. Such cut overs are usually managed by careful planning to avoid such out of control surges.

Back in the day when I worked on such changes we were very careful to allow new traffic to come on stream at quiet times and via tightly controlled steps. I did once decide to simulate a full power full demand restart, an interesting experiment. There were a number of fuses at different distances from where I stood, I was able to enjoy the sound of them all popping due to the slight delays in the sound arriving at my ears. We hastily checked the fuses and made sure traffic came on stream in a less sudden rush. That system had no more problems.

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'Panama papers' came from email server hack at Mossack Fonseca

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Mail?

Remember that finance did not embrace e-mail and in some cases may still not have embraced e-mail to the extent of others, rather it relied on such as telex and, other internal protocols essentially based on telegrams. Telegrams have a long and cherished, (by some) history. Both telexes and telegrams were often machine generated. I remember experimenting with generating telexes via a small desk top type computer back in the 1970s.

The English Electric Leo was running a business back in the 1950s and while many businesses struggled with 'computerisation' in the late 50s and 60s, (footnote many still have those same old problems) a lot of stuff was 'computerised' with even the banks using them by the mid 1960s. The fact that records go back 40 years is a bit of a surprise, since that only goes back to about 1976. So two comments, did they prune out the other 20 odd years through house keeping or was it simply lost through bad retention policies?

It makes the 6 ~ 10 year retention policies of many banks look really lame. Mind you, life insurance does have more distant retention horizons.

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Bloaty banking app? There's a good chance it was written in Britain

Richard Jones 1
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Re: cheques/checks

I thought that was developed for under developed banking areas, e.g. many third world locations where it, or something similar has been quite successful, Finger trouble willing that is!

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Richard Jones 1
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Cheques

Well I still use a steady small stream of cheques, mainly for gifts and sometimes for larger payments to contractors. I rather like the audit trail attached to them as I know to whom I have paid the money. Though I agreet that I do settle bills for regular accounts via direct means.

I read too many accounts of transfers, (as opposed to settlements) being made incorrectly and with my dominant hand currently out of action the risk of error is greatly increased.

Or should I wander the streets with cash? That is not easy as I have trouble with a foot which awaits NHS action.

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Ever wondered what the worst TV show in the world would be? Apple just commissioned it

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Streaming services are a joke

I guess the down vote came from a hardware maker who wants assemble all the different hardware boxes.

What will be next a love poem from the power generators who will produce power to drive all these stupid boxes or, more likely the warehouse builders who will create the storage space for the rejected unsold items.

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Let’s re-invent small phones! Small screens! And rubber buttons!

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Why Touch?

Could either of the down voters explain why I should want a stupid 'look at and touch me phone' when it is next to useless FOR ME?

Or do you insist I scratch the hell out of one of the useless touchy-feely dogs watching its battery goes flat while it fails to serve ME with any useful function?

I would love to know why I must follow the fashion of others with different needs, or were you two just showing some form of dumb fashion herd behaviour?

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Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Why Touch?

Apart from setting any new numbers into the thing, for which buttons are number one choice, I do not want to touch my phone at all.

I want it clipped in a shirt pocket out of the way. I answer calls with one touch on the earphone, or make a call with a simple earphone press followed by the name of the person I want to call. Small, but not too small for a good battery and not too heavy either. I have struggled to find something even half way as good as my old Nokias.

Big, or for that matter any phones demanding to be seen and touched are simply not for me. For the moment with several fingers in metal splints at the moment, touch phones would probably prefer to avoid my touch.

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EU ministers to demand more data access after Brussels attacks

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Priorities...

If you look into the real substance you will see that a couple of minsters have offered to resign. They security let anyone IN even if they were on a watch list because no one ever checked the list. Clear enough for you?

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