* Posts by Richard Jones 1

629 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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Blackhat hack trick wallops popular routers

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Checking?

It would also be useful if a suggested method of status checking was confirmed so that users could easily verify that their router as still using the right DNS settings. I assume that verifying that the DNS settings are as previously wanted/set will suffice to confirm the status of the router.

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Driverless cars deal DEATH to Detroit, says Barclays

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Hype

No more old guys in hats, (though what is a hat?) being held up because the young blood a little while ahead decided to remodel the hard landscaping and a few other cars while he was having fun. The last one near me took quarter of a day to clear up - about 6:00 until lunch time. It did not help he killed one passenger crippled another one, nearly murdered a woman coming the other way and missed a pedestrian by a couple of feet as he then went off road driving. Over 60 in a 40 area on bald tyres is not a pretty sight - neither is a banana shaped BMW.

Perhaps self driving cars might have some benefits after all?

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Apple threw its TV out the window after years of research: report

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: What a tool

I should not worry, I worked for a company whose shares were at about £14, then everyone said how they should soon be at £20 if not a lot higher. The next thing that happened was that they were closer to 20 pence. I am NOT saying that will happen to Apple, I am saying that too many pundits are worth less than an ant's spit.

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Blocking mobile adverts just became that little bit easier

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Conundrum

If the ad is NOT obtrusive and does not demand more bandwidth than the site itself and I I was silly enough to use a pay per byte service than it might be OK- ish. However, none of those appear to apply, I am certainly not interested in paying twice for content that I do not want, (once in terms of my wasted time and again for the bandwidth). As for the putrid video pratt-verts, it is time for the fools that make them to be publicly disposed of.

I am able to avoid their annoyance by avoiding the use of any and all so called smart (alias money grubbing) mobiles, though I do use a mobile phone.

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Apple Watch rationing caused by the MOON GOAT, not quality

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

iClairvoyant Faliure

Sounds like a failure in the new iClairvoyant application to me. I mean how hard is it to predict mass social events without a special application?

Answer; Dead easy for those who interact with real people in different locations; for the rest there should be iClairvoyant.

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Apple HomeKit: DELAYED until JUNE, mumble Cupertino spinners

Richard Jones 1
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Meh

Better To Get It Right on The Launch Date

While there are two reasons why it is of no interest to me, I know that there will be many who might want to sample the products, but I feel it is better to debug things before you launch. Possibly they might have found some 'out of normal issue' of the type which can really disrupt a product launch, yet not always show up in product development.

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The Internet of Things: a jumbled mess or a jumbled mess?

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: Why

OK, I admit I was not being honest when I termed it a 'bright' solution. It was intended to be black humour of the, 'bright is the new dumb' type.

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Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Why

To summarise, many of us, perhaps most of us have devices that function well in semi autonomous mode, heating, fridges, hot water, freezers, even lights, video, DVD recorders or PVRs, garage door openers, fire detector and intruder alarms, etc. With virtually no need for one to see what the other is doing. In a few very personalised personal cases it 'might' be useful to control a few of the items remotely, e.g. the warm up time for heating, though money spent on insulation might achieve more payback. Many of us do not have unoccupied buildings so remote access is achieved via the phone already. For industry where hundreds of device form part of a chain, interconnect is valuable - and frequently best supplied via a cable anyway. For the outside living world it is only niche users, many of which will have their own unique user profile, who will really be interested. Perhaps a lot of the fragmentation is because the market is really fragmented into different user groups with very different profiles?

The other bull filled elephant in the room is the smart meter. Now I might be the most weird set up in the world but things work like this, if the hot water is cold the heating system heats it up, likewise if I am cold I run the heating, if it is dark I turn on the light, if clothes need washing they get washed, if food is raw but needed for a meal it gets cooked, anyone see a pattern here? I do not need s stupid meter to tell me when to do these things or more importantly not to heat the water so I can wash, wash-up, have a bath, whatever. Most of us do what we do at home for a reason, therefore a so called smart device is not an item of desire, but part of a mode of irritation - or more likely another remote control disaster when some twerp turns off your power when food is cooking, the washing is washing you are showering and it is dark.

Except for the possible remote reading of the meter, (if it works), they are another example of a bright solution looking for a way to create an insoluble problem.

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Home routers co-opted into self-sustaining DDoS botnet

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Class action?

While I find the loony tunes aspects of some class action cases abhorrent, the idea here would be to prise action out of a derelict equipment builder. As such I feel that such an action would be entirely reasonable.

It would be far better if the makers of really sordidly, useless junk got active and thought about more than their next bonus cheque. If they have built the things down to a price point too far below reason that is not a defence, it is a reason for them to leave the market place.

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Attack of the possibly-Nazi clone parakeet invaders

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Time for biocontrol

The problem comes when the parasite is not only perfectly adapted to the usual host, in this case the Parakeet. Too often the parasite does one of several things, e.g. finds that the absence of parakeets cramps its style so it species jumps to another host. Or the parasite hybridises with some other parasites in its new location to become a super variant that affects some other, actually endangered animal, (or every other thing it encounters). Ruling out spread is what takes time and money to achieve and is not always achieved even then.

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Amazon creating 500 ‘fulfilling’ jobs in the UK

Richard Jones 1
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Angel

@Jim59

At 50 pence per drop a lot of van drivers do find it very hard work to get a good rate as many of them also own and support the van.

Did anyone see the food programmes dealing with the production and warehouse operation of food companies, they looked about the same as most warehouse operations I have seen.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: The Amazon Effect

Sorry, please show relevance.

A little while back many workers for German factories had poor conditions and worked, well like slaves. In fact come to think of it they were slaves. That is NOT relevant either to conditions in another country in another time, horrific though it was to those there at that time.

Some basic level manual labour type jobs are viewed as entry level for many workers,keen to get a job while they search out something better. Many people find it easier to get a job once they are already working. This can result in higher turnover, any location with a seasonal component will have turn over issues the loss of seasonal staff at the end of a season can cause others to search out somewhere new.

Conducting a mock auction of crap jobs is not entirely helpful to anyone, it devalues those who perform them either through choice or necessity.

If you don't need that sort of job, try to avoid insulting those who do.

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Scot Nationalists' march on Westminster may be GOOD for UK IT

Richard Jones 1
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Suited The TAW*s well enough in 2005

FPTP suited Blair and Gorgon Brown well enough in 2005 when they got what was it 35.2% of the votes yet a rather good for them (and possibly bad for many others) majority by getting 55.2% of the seats. So did that reflect 'the will of the people'?

*= Tax And Waste party

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HORDES OF CLING-ONS menace UK.gov IT estate as special WinXP support ends

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: The NHS

While I should not speak for others, I believe that in many cases the specialised equipment is such that there are few makers and each machine is something of a one off. If it was assembled a while ago, even for that matter last month, the team producing it may not exist any longer, so rewriting the software for some new whiz-bang down stream OS may not be entirely optional. Using a component that is so easily subject to marketing pressure, (such as an OS) is the flaw. When I was buying equipment (not for the NHS) we demanded a continuity of supply and support for the software that ran the things.

The tiny issue in, for example the NHS, is that the software, whatever it is, probably does still run the unit perfectly well, it is just that the interfaces may no longer be so safe. Perhaps one solution is to isolate any connections and apply skill to that aspect and only that aspect. Thus being able to continue running the MRI scans or whatever. Having seen that style of work done and done it myself in other domains, workable solutions can be created that way. This does not excuse 30,000 plus machine estates all being run that way.

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EC probe into murky cross border e-commerce kicks off

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Lets summarise

Right there is:

1) Language - everyone please speak and write English (I am sure that the French will agree with that one - NOT!)

2) Shipping costs

3) Shipping delays

4) Guarantees

5) Trading standards and buyer protection laws

6) Stupid VAT laws which have just shut down a number of small traders

7) Weird tax rules

8) Weird shipping rules.

9) Currency changes and costs.

10) Support arrangements includes English language support line.

There may be a few more but that is my initial set of reasons why I would never

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EU Digital Single Market plan: We will compromise fast, and compromise early

Richard Jones 1
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Re: I guess it depends how you see it...

I could not agree more. The thought of someone on the far side of the failure ground that is Europe, putting in false data to a database that everyone is forced to use does not fill me with any sort of positive feeling.

As for ending up purchasing goods from the dark-side forget that one as well. I would never knowingly buy stuff from a supplier in Europe. The cost of returns and delivery are a killer for that dumb idea.

I do agree with any anti shafting moves. I have no interest in many of the things that are broadcast across Europe, but can see no reason why someone should pay twice as much in one location than someone else in another, just because some shafting megalomaniac feels they need the money.

Now who could I have in mind?

Oops data overload, as all the well known names rush into mind.

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Security bods gagged using DMCA on eve of wireless key vuln reveal

Richard Jones 1
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Mushroom

Unable to Confirm Fault Free?

I guess if you cannot name the fault you can say that the item is not free from faults.

In all conscience you can advise that people should only consider using it if they can satisfy themselves there are no issues likely to cause an upset in a deployment.

Frankly stopping someone advising that crap is well crap, should allow anyone caught out by the crap to sue the back, front and two sides off the sloppy crap maker, sorry device builder.

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Microsoft discontinues Media Center with Windows 10

Richard Jones 1
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Sorry But I Will Not Miss It

The only time I ever came across it I wondered why the PC kept starting up at odd times. It took some tracing to find media player was looking for TV schedules. It was not a programme I ever connected to a tuner so I disabled it and had no more troubles.

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Not pro-Bono: Russian MP wants Apple to face stiff action for cramming 'gay' U2 into iCrevices

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

You All Got There First

I was going to say how worried I was that the image would have got Putin, (that gay icon for half the world that wants him as their icon) over excited.

I guess that it happened as I expected.

As for 'changing the proportion who are that way inclined' or some such gibberish. While the proportions in different species vary and in some species the boundary is far from hard and fast, I thought that as a general rule something approaching 10% was a good marker. Most typing for 'conditions'* covers a range of 'condition expression', from very mild to totally committed.

*Conditions = a generic term covering all sorts of human and animal, 'cases' (including such as e.g.left handedness, short sight, height, etc.) with no slight intended to any one. Since no slight is intended, I trust none will be taken - however if the nut jobs of Russia wish to take offence, so be it; there is no accounting for their inability to recognise the realities of life rather than their fantasy ideas.

Side issue, why does anyone have to care about the way others are or need to live their life?

The worth of someone is how they live and behave not how they might or might not chose to breed or do anything else.

If they are a useless waste of space then that is what they are - not because of some other alleged problem that can be hung round their neck.

Question: Why should I be forced to be involved in their life any more than I should force them to follow my obscure and odd-to-others ways?

Rant over, can we now all get on with life?

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Boeing 787 software bug can shut down planes' generators IN FLIGHT

Richard Jones 1
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Go

Re: So...

Since it is a fly by wire aircraft I imagine that shutting down the engines and the APU would not de-power the entire craft unless all the breakers were deliberately tripped or some other full power system shut down was ordered. Retaining some systems on standby battery power and thus running could aid subsequent power up operations. Having the GCU in a standby mode might allow the GCU to manage the engine restart more easily.

Having watched people try to systems check parked aircraft after they have been left idle, even with more traditional types of avionics the state of the batteries appears to be the first issue they address as they start system checks.

Now the fault is identified and most people would not really want to be flying round in a brick that could drop at any minute fixing or at least managing it does become mandatory.

Certification routines appear to need to evolve to catch up with the changing nature of aircraft systems and no doubt they will following this snafu. I wonder what other such traps still exist as yet untraced?

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Apple and IBM foist fondleslabs on Japanese elders in Big Data snatch

Richard Jones 1
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Slow Roll Out an Issue?

While I no longer live in Japan this item caught my eye. No doubt some would use these devices and in some ways I could see them matching each other, the Japanese are a well mannered group who generally do what the manual says they are allowed to do. However, I can still see problems ahead. A 5 year plan (it sounds a bit soviet to me anyway) would mean that hardware and software changes would likely happen during the life of the project, this could well lead to confusion by all parties. I could see the device needing to earn a place in the hearts, minds and hands of the user group or it will become a dust gatherer on the book shelf. Speaking as someone close to or possibly in the age range likely to be involved, frankly I would hate the device. I find touch a total PIA having problems with such as Carpel tunnel and arthritis. The tiny screen would drive me nuts. Though a 23inch hand held would also be less than useful, a 23inch wall mounted screen, being a better size is 'quite useful'.

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Smile! Brit transport plods turn bodycams on travelling public

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Who is Kidding Who?

Did you ever travel on the old broken rail nationalised service? I guess not, most times I tried to use them their trains were not running either. So back in the old BR nationalised railways days I went into a station master's office after the forth day with the trains not running for hours through the day. I warned them I would use a rude word, then I did it; I said it:

Maintenance.

The whole office looked shocked and terrified, what a shower.

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Surgery-bot can be hacked to HACK YOU TO PIECES

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Surgery Via A Stallite Link???

I used to work a lot with satellite communications and for some things it is great. However, commanding a remote control robot to stop and start is not one that I would favour given the delays inherent in such links. Add the normal digital transmission link delays and it would require very careful calibration of both machine and surgeon to limit accidents. Satellite links can be prone to drop outs and periodic loss due to rain, cloud, sun spots, etc. Not too important with routine telemetry and trend analysis but dangerous when cutting microscopic fibres!

Encrypted tunnels and hardened security are mandatory. It is stupid to sell a multi thousand pound/dollar/whatever machine and do a <sixpenny security job to protect its functions.

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Fukushima nuke plant owner told to upgrade from Windows XP

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: Legacy

Sadly true, then there is the issue of of the dongles which need a specific interface. Add in the fact that the code for the damned device has been lost. However, this does not really matter as it was written the computer equal of an unknown tribal language and the supplier has closed down anyway.

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Google pulls plug on YouTube for older iPads, iPhones, smart TVs

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: This is why I miss the pre-web internet.

Ah, Sales and Marketing - or the Granny sellers as we used to call them when I was at work.

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Ex-Windows designer: Ballmer was dogmatic, Sinofsky's bonkers, and WinPho needs to change

Richard Jones 1
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Re: So blameMicrsoft because it doesn't innovate...

Most mass market producers like to try run something like the old 80:20 rule. Get 80% of the market with 20% of the effort. Since the new phone was so clearly a niche product, witness the mass market rejection of the phone when tried in public situations it was clearly more of a 5:95 device, 5% of the market for 95% effort. OK @LDS they innovated and went for the 5%, fine if you are after a tiny niche and you were clearly in that niche. I have no problems with niches as it happens I like my phone as I sit in the non touch phone niche user group.

Finding what users want as opposed to what designers want used to be called market research.

Getting it right for the intended market used to be called judgement

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Amazon AXES try-before-you-buy AppStore TestDrive facility from shopfront

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: "try-before-you-buy" might be a bad idea...

Are there, were there ever any other sort for any of the systems?

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FCC hit with SEVENTH net neutrality lawsuit

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: CenturyLink? Broadband? I thought they were a telco.

I guess the second line entry was a Freudian slip when you typed DSL as DLS, presumably this is what they offer, Delay Line Service, though I have a few doubts about the word service; perhaps Delay Line Servitude would be more accurate.

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Google drives a tenth of news traffic? That's bull-doodie, to use the technical term

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: The real problem

@FF22 Frankly I am unable to follow the logic in your message. If I look at a news site for information I am already on that site. However if I ask Google 'Is there any news information about X', then hopefully Google will tell me where I can find the news about X.

You appear to suggest that I should first have gone to a site that I did not know about, to find the information about the item that interested me. That does not make sense. If I knew about the site I would have gone there first. Most days I go via my book marks to a few sites. If I either do not find something about what interests me or if I feel that those prime sources have failed to give me the coverage I need I will then go to Google.

Hopefully Google will then link me to something that I would otherwise have missed. Is this not the way that most people would work?

Or are you suggesting I should bookmark every possible news source and only when I have visited everyone should I then do a web search? If so please give me a couple of spare lifetimes.

To be honest I would tend to ignore a link to the Garudian(tm) as a first choice in favour of other news sites.

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Hungry Apple fanbois can now buy a lunch date with Tim Cook

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

What's for Lunch?

I guess it will be a little mac not; a Big Mac(tm) that would be too old hat.

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Miscreants rummage in lawyers' silky drawers at will, despite warnings

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: Surprising

It is really no surprise, the issue is that many professions appear to think that they are able to do the work of others far better than those experts. Sometimes they admit to needing an expert but most times this is not before they rub into the walls of their incompetence. Normally they see no point in seeking assistance. It is a pity that when faced with areas where professional competence is required but not forced, too many will try to mess through. For too long IT matters were seen alternatively as a black art, a tradesman's business, dead easy, I have a PC at home or just simply about the same as a Biro and paper.

I thought the 'girl friend' was simply a classic case, the legal profession does rely on laws and their printed words to such an extent that if something is not written down and demanded it does not exist. Even when it is written down, they will wonder is it completely explicit, is there a drafting gap, does it apply to me and most important will it cost me money that I cannot bill to a client?

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WORLD+DOG line up to SLAM Google after anti-trust case unveiled

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Nobody forces you

Google got where it is by being the first one to get things more or less right. Has anyone tried those alternative sites? From time to time I have and as a way of passing time and gaining nothing else it worked splendidly, but as a way of finding anything remotely useful, well even a chocolate teapot is streets better than most of the dross. Interestingly my biggest problem is finding that a Google search has returned one of those dross engines as a possible useful result - they never are.

My gripe is that the '+' and '-' operators no longer allow me to filter out the stupid stuff and I cannot now do +'this is what I want', or any other control mechanism to limit rubbish.

Still at least Google no longer offer me stupid entries like suggesting I might be searching for 'The Hotel Screwdriver' or 'The Hotel Ark Welder'.

I guess we will be forced to get used to some crap alternatives. Note if 'cant-find-it-for-me' works for you fine and good luck, they just do not work for me.

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'Arkansas cops tried to hack me with malware-ridden hard drive'

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: trust

Yes, but you would have to be careful to cover your own backside in that event. Setting up a computer with some entirely fictitious names and locations would not quite work as it might be spotted - or are they that bright? I am guessing that using real people without their knowledge could also be an issue and with a person's knowledge could drop them into a pile of extra nasty.

Perhaps it would be best to simply fill the honey pot PC with lots of made up cases involving every sort of invented bad behaviour with all 'names' substituted, but carefully matched to possible roles in the department. Much the same way that consultants do when considering take over bids. So basic grade plods might be pawn 1 through to whatever and up through the range of chess pieces? Would the chief of police be a king or a queen?

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Conservative manifesto: 5G, 'near universal' broadband and free mobes for PC Dixon

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Conservative manifesto: 5G

And the Green a Gee Gee until the hay runs out when they would do you for animal cruelty. After all they are promising a no fuel future. Now where did I put my barrier building manual in case they get a sniff of government..

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Soil and sand harden as SPEEDING MISSILES and METEORS SLAM into GROUND – boffins

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Research

I take soil liquefaction to be the result of vibration, e.g. earth quakes when the soil can almost appear to boil and once buried items can 'float' to the surface. However, this was not what I was talking about, rather the atypical, unpredictable behaviour of some soils, (but which ones and why?) when under 'duress'.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Research

Well I guess that several towns, residents and developers 'out East' are really glad that this physics research was not bothered with sooner. They are the ones who had their buildings collapse due to slow differential settlement that caused the building to tip then topple over. They probably did some fairly high impact soil compaction tests and thought that it would be fine. But buildings do not hit the ground fast, they accumulate weight over time and many soils can flow under these situations. I do not know what splendid research you would like money to be wasted on, but it is a shame that some of these alleged unemployed physics type were not able to do more useful research, e.g. on thorium power generation.

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Tech troll's podcasting patent blown out of the water by EFF torpedo

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: A stupid question

On the face of it there appears to be a hint of fraud and extracting money with menaces involved here, maybe even blackmail. I wonder if you can sue for a shakedown even if you settled, 'under duress' outside a court of kangaroos or jack asses; oops, sorry American court of law?

America used to have the best police money could buy perhaps trade practices have spread a little further?

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Bonking with Apple is no fun 'cos it's too hard to pay, say punters

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: What study?

I can see your point Aldi and Lidl are so up market and luxury just like Apple...

Oh hang on a minute!

The phone I use has a particular function I use to the exclusion of any others. While I am out it almost never leaves my pocket let alone gets waved about,but I can still communicate. It will never use NFC and I doubt I will either.

Oh I don't use Aldi and Lidl either, too expensive as they are the other side of town.

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Big Blue securo-bods warn of dire Dyre Wolf AMONG WOLVES

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

I am not the big bad wolf I'm granny with a sore throat.

It worked so well for children's stories that the same ruse works on grown (groan) ups. There was a time when banks and customers, especially large customers had a relationship. Now anything goes, the customer's clerk does not know who they are calling anyway and probably has no idea which is the right number to call. One could ask what happened to training, but as the instructions are all 'on screen' training is not needed and 'we must save money'.

Yes to give it to the crooks!

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Mozilla piles on China's SSL cert overlord: We don't trust you either

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Verbosity

So, they get some spiv somewhere to turn out what appear to be invalid security tokens. Now people don't trust these untrustworthy tokens and they say this is unacceptable. What planet or which illegal substance(s) are they on?

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Dot-com intimidation forces Indiana to undo hated anti-gay law

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: It's called freedom, folks

I completely agree with those sentiments. If I ran a business I would not I want to know the feelings, beliefs, inclinations, or whatever of a customer. Normally I do not give a fig and never did care what people got up to in their 'private time'; and yes I had a few different folk of many different types work very successfully for me. The break point comes when they are asking me to participate in some way in their private lives, that could be a bridge too far in many cases.

So would I go out horse riding chasing foxes? No.

Would I go to a swinger's party? No.

Would I contribute to a political or religious movement with which I did not agree? No

Would I go on a march for anything? No; part personal choice part old age and health issues.

Would I do work for a paying customer yes - but I would likely draw the line at adding political, religious, sexual or illegal slogans - there may be a few more restrictions, e.g. I would not want to supply bomb making parts either whoever or whichever cause they promoted.

Have I mistakenly entered a gay pub? Yes but since we were a mixed group we drank up and left as it was clear that the regulars were not comfortable. Why stay and offend them?

Selling nuts a bolts to a gay car repairer is normal business, though why anyone should need to know the sexual nature of a customer for such a transaction defeats me!

It is when someone is asked to cross the line to support or promote something with which they do not agree that I would raise an objection - it fine to help them as a person, but NOT to support their cause. Why does everything have to be defined in terms of whether someone is this or a particular orientation? Should we introduce performers as the gay dancer/ singer/ whatever, or the seriously committed atheist/ Christian/ Jew/ whatever, heterosexual, monogamous father/mother of three kids, painter?

NO!

They are either a singer, dancer, painter or whatever who's performance you admire or you do not like their work. As someone else implied, since Alan Turing was a homosexual should we now bring Hitler back, because it was unfair to defeat him? Damned stupid to try, we should not mix private lives and work: neither should we chase down anyone because of their private lives. However, bawdy or lewd behaviour may well be liable to cause a breach of the peace so you enter a grey area of possible restriction, so we should all be considerate whatever the sexual background. Should a left wing council be forced to hire out a meeting place for a far right group, even though to do so would bring out the theatrical complainers and the rent-a-mob protesters?

Sadly No and that cuts both ways.

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Energy utilities targeted by Office-spawned recon attack tool

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Ha.

Standard dumb reasons:

Corporate specification PCs strike again?

Of course those Office licenses are free aren't they? The PC came with them anyway.

And on the other hand, "We paid good money for office 97 and 2000, we cannot just throw that out can we?"

I know someone in the power business who has only stopped using Office 97 in the past 6 months - after 3 years of pressure from others and his complaints about an unstable PC!

Yes people like that do exist to cause problems!

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Cross-dressing blokes storm NSA HQ: One shot dead, one hurt

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: Tapeador

No, but the blithering idiots who go out thoughtlessly to maim and kill must surrender their 'right' to drive like a moron. I had one this morning,

I was driving through the sleepy town's main road with cars pulling out and pedestrians crossing, the moron behind appeared to be conducting a live music display, apparently urging me to go faster than 25mph in a 30 limit area, why?

Was it so he could exercise his right to wear out his brakes and waste more fuel?

What society asks is that those who set out to maim and kill should surrender their supposed 'right' to get away with the behaviour that kills,perhaps that is why we have number plates on cars? Or, are you against them as well?

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Confused a DragNet with a Drag Party?

Was it just one of those moments that some people have getting confused about where they want to go, what they feel and what they want to do. Perhaps they were just a couple of drag artists who misunderstood what was going on?

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So where's all these digital services GDS promised us?

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

The Agile Problem?

Perhaps if there was less emphasis on being agile, as in jumping from mountain top to mountain top like a mountain goat on stimulants and being more emphasis on being like a shire horse, pulling hard and getting real work done, the result would be more useful?

I have in the past used TV licensing and the old car tax websites and found them useful, but for actually getting useful information the new ways can be woeful. The information is often somewhere, it is just not possible to find or easy to access. You can go round and round often ending back where you started.

Oh and boy do they like adverse comments - not.

They are like trying to do laundry with the foam rather than water and soap or detergent.

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Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

Richard Jones 1
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Re: IT disasters...

IOD = people who generally have to make things work in their domains and who get booted round the countryside and out if they don't. Contrast that with many government projects where the team move on to a higher grade before the sh1t hits the rapidly rotating object. and the bill for the mess goes to the general public.

There is nothing smart about a meter that will tell the world when you are, and are not at home. Frankly the whole idea is dumb, My family uses the washing machine when we want to wash clothes, the microwave when we want things heated, ditto the kettle, the toaster the heating and the rest of the gubbins in the house, not forgetting the PC and its printers. Power consumption is not helped by being retired, so we are always in the house with a dependant who is largely house bound and able to do only so much for themselves.

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Belgium to the rescue as UK consumers freeze after BST blunder

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Don't away with BST, don't blame farmers

Time is a largely arbitrary concept but losing daylight for most of the population in the interests of a few members makes no sense to me.

Why the heck do I have to live with GMT wintertime? Who buys their milk straight from the farm at daft-o-clock?

If the farmer wants to milk their cows at point that suits the cows and the farm plus factory process do it then. The produce will still arrive at the supermarket, corner shop or dairy when it gets there and be available for purchase.

As for the statistics from the last 'experiment'. All the reports I have seen point to an 11% reduction in accidents affecting children. You may not care about the children not getting hurt but if that is the case at least think about the reduced cost to the NHS of not having to treat them.

The last time it was the Scots who had problems. Since apart from wanting money from London - (just look at them salivate over the proposed London housing Tax sorry mansion tax), the Scots can do whatever they like with Scotland time, - or the scheduling of their activities. They should do what they want when they are ready to do it, without slavishly clock watching.

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Starry-eyed hackers stuff Eurovision's voting app

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Eurovision Song Contest

Is that still going? I think I saw years ago. Is it still as awful as it was then with all those so called 'tactical votes'? No doubt the Russian freedom fighters will get out their ballot stuffers and be ready to pounce. Perhaps Jeremy Clarkson should head our entry.

I will still avoid the hazard of watching.

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'Why don't you buy from foreign sites?' asks Commish, snapping on the gloves

Richard Jones 1
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Try and See if You Can Buy?

Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager should try ordering from a range of foreign sites and see what happens. That way she would have direct experience and knowledge.

The other side of the coin is that an awful lot of small or tiny sites would rather not have to deal with the stupid new rules over VAT. Remember that Brown and Blair signed up to while they were working to ruin the country

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BT slams ‘ludicrous’ Openreach report as Vodafone smirks

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Where did the rural internet money go?

Funny I live within 100 yards of the Virgin Cable on a main road, on the edge of an ancient town. The odd thing is that Virgin passed us by though someone else did cable us up and allegedly have a fibre option we might be able to access - or not; the story keeps changing. However, we do have some sort of service, hence my sending the message from my desk top PC.

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