* Posts by Richard Jones 1

488 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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If at first you don't succeed ... Fire, FIRE again: Amazon mulls smartphone sequel

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Lockdown Lock Out

Locking any phone to one network is plain daft, they must have hoped that the 'partner' would help launch the beast.

It is one thing to get a phone heavily subsidised so it appears 'free' and is thus locked down. It is anther to only have one choice, from that point on you tend only to look for reasons not to go further and from reports it appears there were a few of those. Or was it more than a few reasons?

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Heads up! If Tor VANISHES over the weekend, this is why

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: What could the attackers learn?

Possibly they do not want to learn that much from the potential stoppage. It may be that they feel it is being used for something else that they really want to target and go in hard. Stopping a communications system is often a prelude to acting against users of that system in a different co-ordinated attack. A trial take over might be something else to consider, possibly some rich pickings for a range of actors.

Tying it to hints about the Sony hack might be a red herring, and very likely is, but it might also be that the same 'crew' want to do something else and that an attack or TOR could be a way of hiding or facilitating that activity.

Another issue is that while a small part of the load on any system might be illegal and the rest fully legal and acceptable it does bring forth the discussion as to which hides which. Someone might argue that the legal stuff is there only to hide the illegal. On a tiny scale in one place I worked some of the biggest fraudsters were some of the hardest workers, they tried to bury their personal stuff in a hill of good stuff, hence my raising the discussion point in this case

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UK air traffic bods deny they 'skimped' on IT investment after server mega-fail

Richard Jones 1
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It was said to be a line of code with a previously unfound error

I am slightly bemused, the actual issue was relatively short lived though the impact was rather bigger. If there is a system in the world that does not have a code error somewhere I will be mighty surprised.

Any system that runs above about 85% capacity for much of the day has almost no capacity for recovery.

I have been involved with systems that ran up into the high 90% range, recovery was a horrible process. Later load was split across two systems load sharing and even though the load climbed back well over 80% no outages were ever critical. I understand that NATs runs in the mid to high 90s for too much time.

Not the same but I remember one system with alternately worked 'sides', the Y switch at the heart of the change over failed and it took hours to get the system back on line. The item had never failed before and was not usually tested - prior to that event!

It probably never failed again after that event.

Failures do happen and systems especially critical systems need both processing space and time to come back and stabilise. It is one thing to run a few risky financial transactions through the system and have to unwind them after a full recovery if they fail.

It does not work the same way with planes that were in the sky!

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Microsoft fires legal salvo at phone 'tech support' scammers

Richard Jones 1
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@ Dave Bell

The article did say a caller would ring the mark, so it is the same as the 'your computer has a virus' calls. Though they might have varied is slightly by suggesting the computer was simply generating errors and perhaps point you to the management information that few if any understand anyway.

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Richard Jones 1
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Devil

Re: MS wants compensation for this?

I suspect that MS want to take the profit out of this activity. A big hit would hopefully cripple the businesses and suggest to them it was not a good activity. Getting 10,000 victims to sue might be far harder. Since the victims acted from their own misguided understanding and given the weird state of what passes for the USA (in)justice system could well fail. A suitable packed jury would possibly side with the business rather than the plaintiffs.

Once MS have taken hopefully successful action there should be nothing to stop the victims also getting their slice of the pie or does the USA '(in)justice system' not work that way?

As someone who has had possibly well north of 100 stupid widows support calls I would be happy to target the callers with drones filled with all the nastiest stuff I could find to ensure a really painful fate. As it is I try to mess them about whenever I have the time, "Windows key? sorry I have just dropped it and the dog will not let me have it back.", etc.

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Net Neut: Verizon flips the bird to FCC on peering deal crackdown

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

@Charles 9, I suspect that is the real crux of the issue. Those in the land of the slaves, - they are certainly not free to chose their ISP, are really just slaves to their junk ISP, such as Verizon with their 'we know we are rubbish but take it or leave it' attitude.

Are they the same shower who try to shut down any and all municipality initiated competition?

It often appears that ISP has segued from Service Provider to Service Preventer in many locations.

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Judge bars dead Steve Jobs from appearing on TV news FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

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Sony sued by ex-staff over daft security, leaked privates

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Too early to judge

I up-voted you but note that there is one issue that too many businesses fail to understand. Quality is not a bolt on extra to be added 'if the sun is shining and there is nothing better to do'. The no-more company I used to work for had that idea and it did not work for them. With all underlying parts of the business, (those that the financial management idiots cannot see and understand) you either get them right from the start and keep them right or let them kill the company. The fools that broke Sony Pictures were as we now all know those responsible for mismanaging its ship wreak. However trying to Elastoplast or Band-aid a broken system is never easy or the right way, building a stable reliable system takes ground up work and money.

The major issue is that insurance costs, I am prepared to guess that most business issues were insured, e.g. stars not completing big budget project, etc. The $100 million to have a business critical secure system is part of the insurance cost centre that helps to ensure you have a business tomorrow.

The share holders should be joining the queue to batter down the doors, throw out the lame brains who caused this shambles of mismanagement and sue them for their malfeasance in office.

A new properly run company is now needed to replace this shambles of fools.

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'Turn to nuclear power to save planetary ecology from renewable BLIGHT'

Richard Jones 1
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There Are No Real 'Renewable'

Weather driven energy capture devices are not renewable sources. They simply capture the effects of a rather large nuclear reactor situated a bit down the street . We call it the sun. What we capture today we either capture or lose since it will be transformed into something else. The problem is that as we set up capture systems we lose something else, we chop up birds, disturb bats, stress other animals including humans with the noise of windmills. We blight land with other daft flights of fancy. We could and should do a little more to capture some pathetic amounts of solar light and heat by roof panels and perhaps solar capture walls. Though at the moment few if any are cost effective without costly subsidies, so are hugely unattractive to many.

In truth everyone of our usually pathetic attempts to move forward has been driven by a less than genuine agenda. First there are the subsidy farmers who only aim to farm subsidies - these are in no way related to real farmers who grow things to eat. Then there are the so called Greens, many of whom simply wish to have an additional reason to raise taxes and promote their own unsustainable dream of a worse tomorrow. It agree with 'Could it be', from imanidiot, if at last people are staring to think it might be we can look forward to some better times.

OK the Tsunami killed a number of unfortunate souls and broke Fukushima, though to date I have seen no figures confirming that anyone died due to Fukushima in spite of the now acknowledged faults and errors with that plant's design and management.

There are problems with almost any endeavour, we used to kill thousands of miners and many are still dying. The burning of coal kills a number more but so does the entirely natural; cold and illness of winter or are the 30,000 deaths in the UK alone not enough for some people? If so, don't worry it might be a colder than average winter and kill off a few more.

I hope at least some people are realising I am arguing for a lot more balance and sensible consideration. Progress is built on the back of errors and mistakes. Some people die through car accidents sad but true, but many more live because we are not using horses - just look at the facts from the early part of the 20th century.

Thorium might yet be the answer, knee jerk stupidity will not answer anything. Fermenting waste, river power, some solar and wind - neither of which are in any way renewable and other sound ideas may ALL contribute a little each but let us get away from special pleading groups who assure us that they and only they have all the answers.

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Govt spaffs £170k to develop the INTERNET OF SHEEP

Richard Jones 1
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More Useful than a Chatty Fridge

This appears a much more useful idea than the chatty fridge. Dumb fridges can last anywhere from 5 to 40 yearsanyway and managing the addition and removal of food items will be prone to error - at least in my house. Environmental sensors are usually installed to perform a wanted task and are likely to be far less chatty than a family fridge - which may well not be updated before about 2030 anyway.

I am already aware of such telemetry being used on rare breeds.

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DoJ's extra-territorial data demands: now Ireland is baulking

Richard Jones 1
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Surprisingly Late To The Party?

For a country that alleges its love of 'due process' Uncle Sam has been tardy, lax or downright negligent in not spotting that Ireland is NOT a US state! On the other hand Ireland has been somewhat slow in spotting that someone is going fishing in their waters without the 'due process' of obtaining the correct fishing license.

The really stupid fact is that their are correct and proper processes laid down in laws and they would almost certainly have produced less heat and far more rapid results. Or was there some other motive involved in this charade? - Somehow I doubt that this will come into popular play as a party game this, or any other Christmas.

I do hope injustice silly knickers in New York gets them really twisted for her failure to understand due process and her behaviour as a colonial jerk.

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18 million iPHONE USERS HAVE NEVER BONKED to ApplePay

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

#David Lawton

Why? Or is that having shelled out a lot of money you now find the need to use it for something, anything?

As you might see above I am mystified why anyone would be electrified by such an option.

Mind you I cannot see the point of an iPhone 6 or any iPhone or any other such phone for that matter. My 2006 or was 2008 phone supports what I need and still the battery lasts longer than a modern awkward to use phone. The batteries in my cards have never yet gone flat, perhaps because they do not use a battery.

My daughter gave me a pick stick to make a touch phone easier to use but I still find them a pain in the backside to use. Rather one touch on the headphone, speak the name and I am making a call, simple.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Re the Need For Standards

Sadly some new tech is only aimed at those who are not willing to evaluate its issues. In this case for many it is a solution looking for a problem, the question is does it solve or cause the problem?

Apart from London's transport system I have yet to see anyone actually accepting these 'wonderful payment systems'. Perhaps I do not visit the emporia of the bright young things?

The funny thing is that none of my cards ever get a flat battery like a £500 pocket stuffing mini computer does. The weird phone waving does not obviate carrying alternatives when the transaction goes over the floor limit or the shops or other outlets used are not impressed by the silo technology you have selected. Selecting the correct card on a god awful method like touch screen that requires a two handed juggle does not look or feel much like progress, but each to their own on that one. Having tried a few examples I hate touch screens with a vengeance.

Barclaycard gave me the chance to disable their wave to pay ticket payment option. I willing accepted the offer since it is not likely to be any use. If I ever go to London it would be as part of a group, some of whom do not and will not have access to or the skill to use such financial payment methods.

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Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re the Need For Standards

I totally agree there need to be solid robust standards, but it also needs a real reason and benefit to be derived from its use. I have never even used wave to pay with a credit card partially because I rarely if ever have any small transactions below £20. Frankly I would be more interested in a card shield to block payments.

As for getting a very expensive phone to wave about, why? People tell me all the wonderful things you can do with a so called smart phone, like watch the battery die as it runs up high data roaming costs, but why?

My phone is stuck in an inside pocket and I use a headphone when I need to talk. No handling involved.

Would I ever wave an expensive toy about to pay for something, yea shortly after hell freezes over!

The question is why would I want to get a very expensive new phone just to wave it about when there are many other ways to pay? Having a problem with my hand recovering from an operation make it even less attractive as a payment method.

Time will tell if this really has legs, the first few weeks are not likely to set out the long term impact. Some of those who have just bought a phone will happily try it out, some may even continue to use it but with the hassle of deciding which card(s) to store on the phone and then which one to use for a given transaction, thanks but no thanks.

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Dutch lawyers seek to overturn data retention

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Odds of dying

The odds of dying in an accident at home are far higher than the odds of dying in a road accident in many countries but that has not stopped people living in their homes. The last time I checked was some time ago but the Health and Safety moron was not best pleased when I pointed out that more people had recently died at home in the kitchen then had in road accidents. (The meeting went off badly as many of the chairs set out for us to sit on were split and tended to cut the trousers or other parts of anyone who used them, so much for health and safety!)

Sadly no one has a statutory responsibility for making sure that no one stands on a chair to reach the top shelf in the kitchen. Law and order are in a different category with someone lambasted if things go wrong and people die at the hands of some psychopath. It becomes worse if law and order 'should have known' that the nut job(s) i.e. psychopaths for the devil in whatever form, should have been stopped but were still wandering the streets.

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IBM Research wants laptop batteries to retire and slum it

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re Nice Idea but

Crockclips and pliers?

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One year on, Windows 8.1 hits milestone, nudges past XP

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Cauliflower

I tried the previews up to the point when they to force new sales by insisting that only recent CPUs could be used. Was there another way to turn the PC off except to press the silver button on the front? It blue screened with almost everything. and I found the way to make it usable was to cover the desk top with batch files to load what I wanted. The kiddie bricks were all deleted from the silly oops start screen as none of them were any use at all they did nothing except for the desktop screen. Then the flak from other started.

The good point was that the underlying OS was slick and fast, the bad news was that it was hidden by crap and stupid fluff. The stupid store for example that expected you to add access to a payment method do I look cabbage coloured? The drive for cloud usage where your data is controlled by the leaky sieve/CIA/GCHQ?NORKS?whom-so-ever company was take it or leave it, I would for ever leave it alone, - to the point of searching out a hack to remove it from ever appearing if I could. If you like it that is fine, but too much of it was hard marketing to sell new stuff, be it PCs or other devices, printers scanners, print servers or the 'store' by not working with existing items.

If Windows 10 avoids those stupid moves it might be attractive for the future, but otherwise; - do I really want a PC any more?

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UK.gov mulls three-point turn on three-point turn thanks to satnav. Weeeeeeee. THUD

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Down

How About Three Point Turn in a narrow lane/muddy field, etc.?

Given the way that Satnav sends you the wrong way I feel a three point turn is ever more important. I admit to not having a Satnav. The last time I travelled with three other Satnav equipped cars they all went the wrong way until we were further away from where we were going than we had been at the start! It sent them East when the destination was to the West so something quite trivial.

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TalkTalk email goes titsup FOR DAYS. Cheapo telco warns: Changing password WON'T fix it

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Oh gawd...

It is clearly a standard script used by all ISPs, (ISP = Internet Service Preventer?)

When I reported I could log into their network but not get any further, Orange instantly sent me a new router only for access to come back 20 minutes later. By then they were unable to stop the router thing they had dispatched and it arrived three days later.

It sits in the cupboard awaiting the next time their access method fails.

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Europe may ask Herr Google: Would you, er, snap off your search engine? Pretty please

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Funded by Google's oppostition

If I am searching I usually want useful results not a run round someone's maze 'for the exercise'. I wonder how many have tried these second rate search engines?

When not actually searching for anything I have tried several, I suggest you try them and compare the results, or lack of them. A search engine that only finds other search engines is frankly rubbish, but there are plenty of them, unfortunately.

However, if that is what you want, good luck to you, at the moment you have the choice and so do I.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Euro Jealousy

If only I could turn off the unthinkably poisonous EU. Well done to them for crippling the economies of most euro countries so that the UK now has to pay a fine for doing better than the idiot countries held under the jackboot of the euro, better thought of as the crappo. The currency that just keeps on taking.

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Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

He's Almost Right

He won't be clogging my news feed any time soon. There's an easy answer, Don't use Backside Book!

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I'M SO SORRY, sobs Rosetta Brit boffin in 'sexist' sexy shirt storm

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Down

Re: Sad, y'know?

One of the major issues of the time is how easily the internet can make a non issue can become a hot topic for no reason at all. Anyone with some sort of stupid non point to make, (beyond being a fool) can start up a twit storm by simply being a twit.

I guess the only way forward is to so flood the internet with stupid shirt pictures that the fools overload and burn out.

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US Marshals commit DIRTBOX INTRUSION on Americans, says report

Richard Jones 1
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What is the difference between this and ANPR?

If this is simply tracking where a mobile is located based on its IMEI is that really any different to tracking a car based on its numberplate?

Correct me if I am missing something, (I would really like to know), but without a back haul a flying base station is not building any connections, so cannot intercept messages or be able to log any call data.

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Virgin 'spaceship' pilot 'UNLOCKED tailbooms' going through SOUND BARRIER

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: I have no idea

If you ever have to deal with users then the very first thing you find out is that they never know what they did before something failed/went bang/died or whatever malfunction now ails the machine. It is always essential to perform your own walk through. In the case of the toaster is it plugged into a socket that is turned one has the machine any signs of miss-use etc. Always work from first principals.

Guess work will take you down more rabbit holes than even the rabbits ever knew existed.

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Spanish 'Google tax' could end up like Germany's everyone-BUT-Google tax

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Dear legislators....

I was going to say that even the flees on Google's dog were brighter than the flees on your dog, but Google were bright enough to sell you their dog's flees. This was risky since you now have something brighter than both you AND your lawyers.

However I agree your final para, as long as the brown bagged morons play the rest of us suffer.

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Pay-by-bonk 'glitch' means cards can go kaching-for-crims

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: surprised? anyone?

While card companies do have moderately responsive systems, even they are not perfect and do sometimes require that you detect the irregular actions. The banks will often turn down the genuine while letting others, shall we say less genuine through. Just look at the hassle if you make a payment with slightly wrong account data. The money is withdrawn faster than you can say hang on a minute. I know that there is a recent attempt to spike those guns but the proof will be in the long term pudding.

Now all I need to do is disable pay by mistake capabilities for the damned cards that I have.

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Apple OSX Yosemite infested by nasty 'Rootpipe' vuln

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

OK Name an OS or Program That Does Not Have Holes as Yet Unfound and Patched

Title says it really, a hole has been found in an area of code that appears to have been handed down through several generations of software. I suspect that you could delete the name of the OS and write the same account about almost every other OS. It is a pity that people do not realise that code can be highly complex and that errors or bugs will happen.

The only issue in this case is that it is going to take a while to get resolved and that this could increase the chance of it being found by others and exploited. Sadly this is not the only case where a delay leaves a possible gate open but not only was it ever thus, I suspect that it will forever be.

So please, no need for flame wars

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Japan tells operators: Put a SIM lock in a new mobe? You'd better UNLOCK it for FREE

Richard Jones 1
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Black Helicopters

Re: we need free unlocking in the UK too

I understand you can blame the lovely folks at apple for that snafu. I was told that it was designed in by apple to lock you by something less than upfront honesty.

It did not apply to other makers as I had a number of unlocked phones that I readily swapped about from network to network as I needed, but they were not so called smart phones.

Black helicopter for the extended reach of dodgy dealing.

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Samsung turns off lights on LEDs worldwide – except in South Korea

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Patience.

Since moving into my house in 1992 I have had the odd golf ball lamp fail. For a while I always bought a new pack as I was not sure where the spares were. Then they were tidied up... We have replaced less than 1/3rd of the original lamps. At this rate I now have enough spares to last me until I am well over 100 years old. Still In one of the most used rooms did replace the old type with LEDs to see what they were like - vastly better than CFLs, switch them on yesterday to get horrid light today and they never fitted the lighting unit!

I am pleased that LEDs are coming down in price, but worried that with too many makers dropping out, both quality and supply will decline.

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US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: Jail Time please

Three useful letters, IRS. They are usually better at soting out justice for scum like that.

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Happy 2nd birthday, Windows 8 and Surface: Anatomy of a disaster

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: The irony is

As I sit here, a 32bit Vista portable is running my specialised scanner and delivering the results to my Windows 7 desktop where the flow of scanned negatives is now well over 5,000 and the scanned slides a number of thousands more, I now know the answer to my problem. After all I should be using a tablet with capacity for few hundred files and no useful software. Oh how did I go so wrong?

Oh hang on, I am also reading the news and writing this response at the same time as editing the image files on my 23inch screen, dang it all there must be a fault! Why am I not using a 7 inch device; perhaps because it is totally useless?

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DOUBLE BONK: Fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: because apple

Well that may be your view. Shelling out a vast wedge of cash for a 'user experience' when the card in my pockets comes without an extra charge would make me feel it was a considerably poorer user experience from my parsimonious point of view. Since I have yet to even use pay by bonk for anything with anything I am unlikely to be near the front of the stampede. I instructed my card company to disable some types of transaction when they were offered

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Warning to those who covet the data of Internet of Precious Things

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: "...such data should be regarded and treated as personal data."

I am struggling to either see when, if ever I would be interested in an IOT device and why it would be of any value to me. Certainly any data it produced would be very much personal data. However, I guess that gateway router firewalls are designed to apply any necessary restrictions to data leakage. Frankly if I was to be lumbered with something as undesirable I would only be interested in any data being routed to my data collection point.

I am aware that some 'entertainment devices' love sending stuff about you to their home location. Pardon me, but if I bought such a device, it would be part of MY home. I would do everything I could to block its wayward ways. If the device did not like the situation it would be returned without hesitation as not fit for purpose.

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SCREW YOU, EU: BBC rolls out Right To Remember as Google deletes links

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re Reruns of Jimmy Saville

I guess that re-runs of the case that he has now been exposed will be fully indexed for a long time to come along with the fact that prior to his exposure he was very popular. Well popular among those who did not know the whole story, which appears to have been a large number of people.

At the time his right to have some things forgotten does appear to have trumped all other aspects of his life.

In retrospect I am not sure that was such a wonderful right for him to have. I suspect that his 'right to have some things forgotten' may now have been withdrawn.

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Windows XP refresh will DO NOTHING for lame PC market next year

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Market Segmentation

I suspect that what we are seeing is a number of different events. First of all Windows XP expired without really laying and dying for a large number of users. It was still good enough and they had to be pushed, shoved and prodded to move and even then like stubborn mules many are still sat there.

Some moved to Windows 7 where a lot of other users are happy enough to sit hoping that the nasty smell known as Windows 8/8.1 will blow away and that Windows 10 will live up to its initial suggestion of being worth while.

That leaves the mobile devices segment, this is already said to be slowing. Most users who could find a use for such devices now have one so the market will slow. The tablet and complex phones do some things amazingly well, or so I am told. One of them is unlikely to be as long a life as e.g. the old XP machine.

Then we come to the cloud conundrum. For those who have data they mist access from everywhere except from an area with poor access right, e.g. no service or dodgy ISPs), the cloud is wonderful. Do remember that others can and will probably access that data from anywhere almost as easily. I am not so sure.

There may well be kids who can do all sort of wonderful things with all sorts of wonderful toys, it was ever thus. They may continue to do wonderful things in the future, just hope that it is not to continue to lose all those naked selfiies.

With the prospect of a decent new Windows, notice I said prospect not certainty I see a period of continued delay in the market with loads of people continuing to hold off, and yes some might adopt other devices, quill pens anyone?

Yesterday I was scanning several hundred photographs using two desk top PCs. No prospect of using anything else since limited software is on new OSs and 20MB scans need some storage space and it is NOT going to be on the cloud. If and it is a big IF windows 10 has enough support and if the price is reasonable I might upgrade, perhaps even regrade, what I do not need is a mobile 'experience' or a multi-hundred pound portable but not quite in a pocket computer - your mileage may vary.

That is why I am pleased to accept market segmentation and see many others get exactly what they want.

I was almost interested in the new Hudl for £65 just to see if I could find a use for such a beast, but I still cannot see me even getting that much use from out of something like that.

Now I am off out driving, with my 8 year old non touch phone in my pocket - (I hate touch with a real world vengeance), but others are welcome.

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Dot-gay told it's NOT gay enough – but web'll be officially .eco-friendly

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Must be more daring

I not sure where the idea that geographical domains are no longer necessary came from. I can see the desire for specialist domains in addition to geographical ones.

Ideas, feelings, activities and many other 'soft' aspects, e.g. the new dot ECO top level domain (Note I am not knocking such needs) are not geographically based. However, if I want a supplier of something, or details of regulations within my territory I do not want to sort through the regulations or suppliers of every place in the world to find what I need.

On a side note, while I have only the tiniest axe to grind* I wonder why humans are apparently so under represented in the gay stakes? Some other animal populations are said to be on average up to about 10% while many can swing either way. Certainly I suspect the rejection of dot gay was likely based more on poor case presentation than other issues. I hope it was not down to simple prejudice.

*My interest is only that by seeking to continually marginalise groups of people their need to make a fuss is increased, its the old action and reaction thing. Why can we not live and let live?

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Microsoft: Yeah, about that 50% post-Christmas customer price hike...

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Choice?

Use the cloud back door straight for Uncle Sam finest bent courts to read all your data. or have own data kept in house. Wow a difficult choice there.

Why would anyone use a USA provider unless it was to put out miss-information for the kangaroos of the US in-injustice system to read?

I am sure Ireland is wondering just what sort of illegal hornets nest they have right now.

I hope that someone can sort out a good alternative now that office et all are unusable, unsafe crap.

What has a longer life span than 'never' ever use a subscription service from MS?

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Britain’s snooping powers are 'too weak', says NCA chief

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Public confidence?

I guess what AC was saying was that we need a skilled group who are able to sort out the threats from the non threats, then get the threats neutralised.

Instead there appears to be a bunch of misfits who do not know why they are there.

The old saying was pay peanuts get monkeys but in this case I doubt that they were paying peanuts, but they still appear to have got unreliable chimps.

The tax payers did not get a bargain.

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Windows 10's 'built-in keylogger'? Ha ha, says Microsoft – no, it just monitors your typing

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: Figures

Having never heard of a programme as explicitly set out as the present one I suspect that the user feed back on the ribbon was based on a more select, (in other words biased) sample of those who were in the know. A small sample of queries raised by users about the things they needed was in all likelihood rolled into a wish list. That was then rolled into a 'we must do it a new way list'. That was then proved in focus groups (Steven Jay Sinofsky's nearest and dearest?) and inflicted on the rest of the world.

When beta testing win8 I don't think I ever found the 'official way' to shut down. I might have tried several different approaches including trying *.bat files on the desktop and Alt F4, but the one the worked best was the big silver button (your mileage may vary) on the front of the machine. Unlike hunting and pecking with the mouse the silver button worked every time.

They have been honest, said they will collect data and hopefully avoid the dumb stupid errors of the past and advised you NOT to do mission critical work on the test machine as you may be copied, lose files, etc. Seriously those are very clear almost harsh disclaimers and advice. Anyone who cannot read, does not care or plain ignores the risks does not earn much sympathy from me.

I would still like to try the new product as Win8 was a total disaster for me with all the devices that it did not support. However, it would be on a non-live rig but otherwise still connected to my network - when I was happy to run it that way and once I have a suitable stand-alone PC.

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Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Ditch the white cat, please

Dropbear, I am sorry for you but I guess that simple minds can only deal with simple things. I never once mentioned trickle down though I did mention that a number of people are required to build complex things or do you believe in cargo cults. Still if you are happy to be part of the sacrificed 1%, please do not let me stop you. Go right ahead now if you do not mind, just please do not make a mess for others to clear up.

You sound as though you have no experience of other poorer countries, you might like to correct this on the way out.

Goodbye

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Ditch the white cat, please

While it is true that no one needs any of the Learjets/Veyrons, etc. in order to live a whole army of other people do need someone to buy those things, So never mind let us take them out of the equation. Now we have a group of unemployed who are struggling to eat in a high price economy. So they will no longer buy the clothes, luxuries and even necessities they need. So a whole other group of lower paid have no income, but never mind the 1% no longer have it all. Sadly neither does anyone else. One really serious issue is that a $1.00 income in a $1.00 economy is at least passable. A zero cost for food economy does even better for those with no income other than the direct effects of their own labour, since they can grow it all themselves. In short monkey with any key aspect and expect to get bitten by the law of unintended consequences.

Not for nothing do aid workers, genuine aid workers say give a man a bag of food and feed his family for a day, teach people how to grow or harvest food and feed them for life. It is useful, more useful if no money changes hands, as that way nothing is left about for the other scourge of poor countries their corrupt leaders to steel.

One of the complexities of all economic models is that they only account for the known economic factors. So, get rid of the economic leaders, (which as the article points out includes 100% of the readers here) and what happens, frankly not a great deal. Sure they stop spending so money velocity slows down, so more people often have less, but people do not always react as you expect and who can blame them. For a start unless you kill off the entire 1% rather you just rob them and sad to sad waste your money, a large number will get the urge to reclaim what they feel they are owed It is not all going to be replaced by the penniless tribesmen of the Kalahari. The world will have a reduced value, and possibly a few million less people but apart from not having diversions like The Register and the internet to absorb weekend down time will anything much have changed.in the world order frankly no.

One example of the law of unintended consequences came clear a few years ago. Young women from villages flocked to work at factories making clothes. Sure the conditions were not always wonderful but, in many cases the girls did get (a) paid, (b) fed and (c) some education. New employment laws/rules saw them sent back to their villages without food, education and money, who gained? (I am not talking about the frankly crap buildings used in several countries which did need to be closed down before they fell down or were burned down)

Frankly beggar thy neighbour is never a recipe for harmony or success, but as the Ebola problem is showing, it can be hell trying to teach and help some people. Just getting some to accept healthcare, e.g. polio vaccines can be an uphill struggle or do such things not count.

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Be your own Big Brother: Keeping an eye on Mum and Dad

Richard Jones 1
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Big Brother

The Wonderful Internet

There is no subject that cannot attract the mindless rambling of a troll.

The subject is serious, the intent is serious and the requirement is obvious. I was fortunate in that my mother did not reach vascular dementia until she was in her late 80's and still had father there to deal with her. That was until it all became too much for him and her condition became too impossible to handle Telephone calls morning and night helped him for a while but as he was in his late eighties by then, a home for mother became the only answer. By that time Mother was barely able to walk and the strain of it had caused father's health to suffer. She died at 93 and father who was a little younger lasted another 18 months. My options were limited by living well over 200 miles away and having two disabled children to sort out and support. Operating at a much lower level I tried to think of ways to use technology to help but many of the issues raised in the article and in the links are very familiar. One of the greatest issues is wandering, itself an off shoot of memory failings and a sense of not belonging, even if it was their home of 50 years. On one occasion on seeing policemen Mother 'chased out of the house' to report her parents were missing. They had died 20~30 years before, no technology is going to help much with that situation. Once mother went into a home where she needed 24 hour support - none of which was paid for my any aspect of NHS, father was alone. For a while he still drove I am not sure how well, but a couple of falls meant that he had to go into care. I am not sure how much help technology could have provided for him either.

To be effective it would need to be built in with sensors that function as part of the furniture - though as the mental aspects of dementia take hold even furniture can be a target for movement if not outright abuse.

In short any and all technology would need to be in place well before it is needed and even then might be of use for only a few years perhaps 1~5 years at best.

The value of any technology can only be assessed once it is in use and by then if it achieves nothing it is too late to 'un-spend' the time and effort. In any case a one size fits all old people situation is never going to be of value. In cases like this, one cannot have too much choice of methods or too much guidance as to how to assess the needs.

The assessment problem is a vital one, unless you specialise in the subject, (from experience no one does!) you will not understand where problems might be eased, only with that data can one start to assess what, if anything might help. However, I suspect that while it might help for a short time and it does depend on each individual, once the skids of decay have been greased there is no real way to stop the downhill progression. The one real benefit is that it can ease the feelings of isolation and, prevent the issue of a faller remaining undiscovered for too long. However, that is an issue for more than the old and lonely.

One other monitor that might be valuable is one that checks such things as the vacuum cleaner, or items needed for personal hygiene since cleaning in various forms can be an issue.

For all that, I end up wondering if this is not just another example of trying to find a home for homeless technology where actually people would do it better?

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Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

A Difference

Murdock would never dream of trying to manipulate opinion, would never employ people who hacked into private communications and never did any thing his lot did not warn you about in advance. Of course has TV stations do not charge you a subscription and still bombard you with adverts.

Whereas Google tell you what they are doing, don't charge a fee, do expect to make money to stay in business and don't hack into your phone - unless doing what they said they would do counts as hacking.

So I can see he has a really strong case; well I hope he has so he can pack up his strong case and go off home.

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Euro chiefs: Hi Google. Here's how to REALLY protect everyone's privacy. Hello? Hello?

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: "select markets"

I have a family concern with research limitations. I know that at least one member of my family can ab-react to certain pharmaceutical products, rendering them unable to walk in an extreme though recent case. I am also aware that some drugs react in different ways with different ethnic and as said above, genetic or condition groups. I am therefore keen that such data is available to researchers for enhanced drug research and for explicit prescribing guidelines.

I am not in favour of selling the data to anyone who might want to spend an afternoon fishing for an idea.

Likewise with 'commercial data'. Frankly I do not care that anyone knows anonymous data saying, e,g. that 80% of people who looked for (a) went on to buy (b). is available. I would be far more concerned that the fact that I did or did not buy x or y was being sold to anyone. However, I am not sure that Google or any other search engine would know what I bought. If I search for instructions on how to service x, it does not mean that I own x, I might research it to help someone else or to look for possible issues with x before deciding to buy x.

The fact that other so called search engines are so good at finding what I need, (they cannot!) raises severe doubts that they would ever find any useful data to sell to anyone is another matter.

As for the 'right to have crimes forgotten' that has now been established by the EU, I am aghast at this travesty. Where were my human rights when I lost the right to find out if the doctor was a sex pest, incompetent surgeon or whatever? Or that the financial adviser was a bankrupt who stole from previous clients, etc.?

A review of some of the cases de-listed from Google but still held by numerous legal and news reporting sites makes very worrying reading. Some appear to go right to the heart of serious organisations.

I realise that for those who use other services such as e-mail and storage facilities additional questions arise and that there are other issues for them to answer or not use the 'service'. But the last thing I want is to read through a 10, 20 or 30 page disclaimer list every time that I need to find, e.g. the opening times of the x-ray or blood test unit at a hospital.

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Move over, Apple Pay: Tesco trials PayQwiq phone-flash pay app

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Sounds like a non starter

Since it is a very early trial with only a few staff at this stage all the odium appears somewhat misplaced. If the users find an issue then it can be addressed before anything goes further or is that not the idea of a restricted test phase? I used to try to get the accounts staff using any new method or service since they knew absolutely nothing about what was going on and could be guaranteed to find the problems in far less time than anyone else, what is more they would then ask questions and not try to fix things themselves.

In my day with in house trial it was often the practice to try aspects that were not thought likely to fly well to encourage people to come back with their ideas for improvements.

Since cashless wave and pay is going so well in its present forms in shops everywhere I have no doubt that this will not be needed, Oh hang on has anyone shown any desire to use wave and pay?

Don't all rush there must be at least one person somewhere.

True London's transport is making use of this style of technology but I doubt that is the last word on the subject either.

[I disabled it on my credit card since I never go near the system and would only ever travel as a member of a party so it would be doubly useless.}

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'In... 15 feet... you will be HIT BY A TRAIN' Google patents the SPLAT-NAV

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Public domain.

Remember that by patenting the idea and method Google have tried to lock out the patent trolls from this idea field.

Taken that way it is not nearly so bad.

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Microsoft vs the long arm of US law: Straight outta Dublin

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Who Still Has Data In MS Ireland?

I am surprised that anyone still has real, as opposed to dummy/false data still held by MS Ireland. While e-mails and similar communications might pass via a US parented company, storing data which I take to mean business or personal information in a facility not owned and controlled by the data owner was always going to end badly. Just look at the 'celebrities' who apparently/allegedly stored personal stuff on the web.

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Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Up

Class Action?

I am guessing that getting more of the targets together to fight these parasites would be limited by some form of competition law, but it would be a seriously good way to deal with those who appear identical to crooks.

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Oh God the RUBBER on my SHAFT has gone wrong and is STICKING to things

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Heat Shrink Tubinng

You might improve the situation with a bit of heat shrink tubing slide over and heated. Avoid any buttons!

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