* Posts by Richard Jones 1

754 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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'Adobe Creative Cloud update ate my backup!'

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: There are no words

I guess that QA in their speak means Question and Answer as in:

'Please see the FAQ section'.

FAQ

Question: What is software testing?

Answer: Not found

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Indonesian comms ministry orders 'gay emoji' block

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: @Syntax Error - Emoji

Sadly language is highly flexible and subject to the laws of evolution. Gay used mean happy, pretty colourful until it usage was changed to mean something very different. I am not sure how the mechanism for that one that one worked either, but let us be clear for a word to be expected to remain with a static usage is just not going to work.

The main issue is that words can and do collect odium almost by some twisted for of osmosis, so queer which probably meant nothing more than different collected far more baggage and was discarded in favour of a different word.

So it is with the word ghetto which has changed in some geographical locations to mean something far removed from its initial meaning. Which was far closer to a concentration area and is still used in that way in other locations - causing massed confusion and resentment in the process.

The notion that all living populations can be neatly cleaved into one for or the other with a single set of ways for each side has low been discredited across all species, some species can even switch sides in physical as well as 'emotional' forms. (Emotional was simple the best word I could find to mean inclinations, basic drives and feelings.) Some animal groups are well known for their highly fluid arrangements as I am sure many already know. Gosh surprise - surprise we are like other living things, naturally possessed of differences.

So perhaps the real issue is having words that set out to label folk, when the real applicable term is 'normal' and applies to all.

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Council IT system goes berserk, packs off kids to the wrong schools

Richard Jones 1
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Coat

Re: In a Facebook posting... "Please spread the word!"

Or given the failure they have had to date perhaps it is best not to trust their random number address machine, oops sorry e-mailer application.

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Uber, Taskrabbit, other Silicon Valley darlings urge Europe not to screw their business

Richard Jones 1
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Times Might be Changing @quattroprorocked

I understand that quarterly reporting to HMRC is coming in and that for some it might even move to monthly for the VAT return. As long as the rules, including planning laws (and 'zoning') as those on the wrong side of the pond might have it are observed, in full we might have a more receptive attitude to being told we have it all wrong all the time.

Perhaps they should also be told that our Wyatt Earps are less tolerant of scoff law types and that little people don't become bigger because they like to play with guns.

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Bluetooth direct to the internet: What could possibly go wrong?

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Zika Virus or What?

Has there been some mass outbreak of dumbness?

Could this lunacy be the result of some infection with a madness agent?

Will anyone be left sane?

Oh and then there is the TTIP, truly madness is abroad at the moment.

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TTIP: A locked room, no internet access, two hours, 300 pages and lots of typos

Richard Jones 1
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Re: If legislators have any sense, this sort of thing will kill the deal

With conditions such as those being put in place the ONLY conclusion that can be drawn is that the heap of crap is a heap of crap that should be flushed down the sluice of life ASAP.

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How one of the poorest districts in the US pipes Wi-Fi to families – using school buses

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Up

Re: So when are the big ISPs going to scream about government-subsidized competition?

Sadly that was exactly what I thought, where is one of those sharks to cut this off by the legs. It is still a great idea, while it lasts.

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Government hails superfast broadband deal for new homes

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: Meh who cares?

Too true! If they must build on flood plains, make sure the place floats and that there is a mooring for the escape boats. Oh and ensure that the place can be insured; then water proof the electrical systems and ensure that the drains do NOT push back and flood the house with raw sewage, (cooked sewage is NO better).

Given the location issues perhaps radio broadband might be a better bet? At least the floating house should still be able to use it then!

Utilities should be just that as you said.

Oh and stop builders doing what mine did, waste 30% of the floor area with stupid boxing in for just a couple of pipes. The space would have made a good priest hole, or a flat for someone who was really keen for a home.

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FTC: Duo bought rights to Android game – then turned it into ad-slinging junkware in an update

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: "... complaints and fines from the FTC"

Or how about one leg for the first conviction, a second leg for the next and so on through their various limbs. It might bring a new meaning to such sharp practice costing and an arm and a leg.

Joke icon but only half said in jest.

Oh and a fine of just a bit more than 100% of all revenue.

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College kids sue Google for 'spying' on them with Apps for Education

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Normally I hate the lawsuit mentality @ Triggerfish

As a carer for someone with a range of issues, (which I shall NOT disclose), I can say they would no more parade them on the net than walk naked down the street.

I am sorry you did not appear to master the ability to read what I wrote, hence your childish response 'Also why the fuck do you think you want other people knoiwing it?'

(I am trying not to call that a really stupid unrelated-to-anything comment.)

Real people who do not want people to know something DO NOT PUT IT ON PUBLIC FORA, (the big type to help with your eyesight issue) though many ill advised folk, do use such crap as facebook, where they publicly post really, I mean really unwise guff.

Why put secret information on what is a public network?

Use the postal service the telephones, (remember what they are?), or talk face to face with a trustworthy contact. The REAL people with REAL issues whom I know, only do face to face.

I really feel sorry for your disadvantaged hypo-person as they have been badly advised, perhaps perhaps by you?

I feel they they should be in sheltered living, not a college, sharing their life with everyone.

Fortunately I have so far seen no evidence that they exist, outside of the fertile minds of those who dream them up.

I guess the rest of the world gets on with life.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Normally I hate the lawsuit mentality

'Doesn't sound as harmless put like that does it?' Yes, since that information is likely to be quite freely known among her hypothetical circle anyway unless took steps to ensure she reserved for what?

If you cannot kill cookies I guess you can get horribly worried, if that suits your psyche. However frankly I still see nothing to worry about. If you do not want private data to be publicly available do not use an insecure system such as e-mail. The postal system does still exist if you have paranoia or really deep dark secrets, though putting them on paper may not be a good idea either.

Knowing what you are doing is frankly part of growing up. I guess your hypothetical female will also have posts on facebook where all will be laid even more clear via all the posts 'hypo-she' makes. These will show her friends, where she socialises, what she eats and so on a so forth. All of that appears without anyone needing to do any data mining at all.

You still feel that the chance to target adverts in return for free facilities is so bad? If rather silly people are not aware of what can be done with the data they freely give away then it might just be time to wise up. If you have stuff you really want to secure then don't publish the stuff.

As for me I do not use backside-book, neither do I use G-mail or any of the antisocial websites either. If I need to send something to someone that I would rather not have read freely by everyone plus dog and flees on dog I use an encrypted attachment, the last time was some draft government returns that I did not want casual readers to access. If the security people wanted to read them they would perhaps see errors of typing and calculation which were hopefully cleared up in the final printout and submission.

I still say grow up and think before you act everybody, there are NO free lunches.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Normally I hate the lawsuit mentality

Typical students, or some ambulance chasing lawyers seeking to make a name for themselves?

Do they feel the world is some great charity that owes them a free living?

Sorry if they did not understand terms of trade. If you want something you either do it yourself or pay someone else for materials and / or time to do it for you.

It appears to me that the students thought they were no longer expected to be able to read, think or do anything for themselves.

As others have pointed out, no one actually 'reads' their witterings, though a key word algorithm 'might' trigger the display of adverts related to their witter if the original contract allows for that action. Who forced them to react to any adverts? Or did the silly little kids feel that they the adverts forced them to spend money. Perhaps they should be forced to grow up a little - not much hope of that though!

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Assange will 'accept arrest' on Friday if found guilty

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Looks like he knows the UN has agreed with him

I had forgotten all about him! The headlines came as a blast from the past.

I guess his publicist had some spare time in their diary.

How the whole saga got spun the way it was I struggle to know - or care. To me he will always be the creep from Wikicreeps after the way he has behaved. While he was happy to dig the dirt on others he really did not like his dirty laundry paraded about.

As far as I am concerned, he is still trying to deflect that odium.

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Little warning: Deleting the wrong files may brick your Linux PC

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Sounds Really Clever?

Thank you to those who clarified where the mess of UEFI stores its data.

My mistake was assuming that its use of a look alike file structure meant that it was stored on the HD, I am glad it is not.

However it appears to have been totally stupid that it should be possible to cut the heart out of what is increasingly appearing to an outsider to be a highly flawed downgraded BIOS replacement.

Perhaps happily the present old BIOS machine may well last me until I no longer use a PC.

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Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Sounds Really Clever?

Perhaps NOT?

I assume that same bit of folly would mean that a system with a faulty hard drive or no hard drive would suffer the same failure or would something slightly less dumb recognise that error condition? Could a bricked machine be recovered by removing the hard drive and adding the required files back via another system?

Or was it all part of some really daft sealed box effort to stop users ever changing anything in the computer they have paid to, well 'sort of' borrow till it breaks.

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Oracle kicks Amazon after Glacier download bill shock

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Archive != backup

Classic wrong tool wrong job, I guess we all know that archive is for such things as years back tax returns, copies of almost forgotten insurance records, etc. but sadly the world does not really understand that tools are designed to do specific jobs. Some simple rules, chisels make lousy screwdrivers, hacksaws are not good tin openers, (TNT is worse) hammers are not good for pushing glass panels into place, push bikes are not good for heavy goods transport and so on. At a push you 'might' mow the lawn with wail scissors - and complain that it grows faster than you can cut the stuff. Oh on a communications theme, remember that depleted uranium plates make a terrible substitute for airmail paper for too many reasons.

It might be simpler to suggest RTFM.

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Sensors, not CPUs, are the tech that swings the smartphone market

Richard Jones 1
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Re: >we tend to judge of our computers by their CPUs, rather than their complement of sensors

A bit like my reaction to all of the hype in one report only the word that kept flashing into my mind and obscuring the read in big letters was;

WHY?

Does no one understand that the market is NOT one market but a whole range of different market segments? I have almost given up looking for a new mobile to replace my old Nokia as nothing I have seen comes close enough to meeting my needs.

They may well be perfect for the needs of others, al they are both lucky and welcome to their devices, but they simply cannot do what I explicitly need.

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Kentucky to build 3,400-mile state-owned broadband network – and a fight is brewing

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Dug their own grave

@Meldreth, well said I really, no I mean I really enjoyed that one, on a dull morning with the family ill and unhappy with colds, it made my day.

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India's mobile operators move to head off dropped-call refunds

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Down

Re EE

Or just a little way outside the M25 sat at home. The 'mobile service' with no way in house communications.

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DWP building a separate ID tool as Verify can’t cut it, whisper sources

Richard Jones 1
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Re: This is a solved problem surely?

Opening a new bank account is dead easy with one proviso, you have to be a crook opening the account for nefarious purposes like money laundering or those scammers who con people out of bank details and want them to make stupid transfers so the money can be stolen.

It is only honest folk who have problems and they do not count do they?

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EE, O2, Giffgaff, BT Mobile customers cut off as mobile networks fail

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Hmmm...

While network redundancy can be provided in a number of ways, diverse routing being but one it is rare that such provision is designed to handle 200% of the expected maximum load. I'm retired now but would have cheerfully have accepted a diverse route plan that could, when split and broken handle up to 100% of the average load for say the 12 normal busier hours but might fall short, perhaps down to 60% or less in the few real peak periods. It is down to practical issues like available income and the return that investment will likely make.

(I am assuming that there are a number of quiet hours where even a 30% of peak capacity could assure 100% service availability.)

Of course if the issue was access to 'logical services' rather than e.g. the physical line system then redundancy can become a whole lot more complex. Data centre failures, devices 'data bombing' each other, etc. can be a nightmare that takes time to resolve and no service level assurance can be held in those circumstances.

We all know the sorts of issues that affect interconnected devices if one or more go rogue, and flood the system with cries for whatever the device(s) wrongly think they need.

In extreme cases it can be very hard to re-establish control rapidly.

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Lights out! Newbie IT manager's dark basement trip

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Ah Diesel Generators

We had a lovely powerful standby generator that performed flawlessly during every routine test powering the entire system with effortless ease. There was however one tiny problem, it was fed from a smallish header tank which was replenished by a pump system from the main supply. This filled the header and rather than mess about with float valves and the like, once the header was full any excess went back to the main store. Well that was the theory. The snag was a multi-way valve which controlled the various possible fuel flow patters. Sadly there was one position which stopped flows going anywhere. So the main pump overheated and died unnoticed, until that was, we had a 'real power cut' The generator cut in and took over only to splutter to a halt as the header tank was finally exhausted. The error of the valve setting was soon noticed and corrected. Getting a new fuel circulator pump took a lot longer...

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Use of big data can lead to 'harmful exclusion, discrimination' – FTC

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

Re: "employees who live closer to their jobs stay at these jobs longer"

Yes, because they were too stupid or not allowed to think by their 'lets-all-be-stupid' employer and have to use a poorly programmed computer. It started with banks, now it is everywhere.

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Swiss try to wind up Apple with $25k dumb-watch

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Dumb Watch?

Looks like a watch, tells time like a watch and in all probability sounds like a very quiet watch, so it is a watch. Nothing else to say except that it also looks like a decent watch though I was not sure about the strap, I tend to rot leather.

The great thing is that in ten, 20 years time (or even longer) it will still have all the above attributes while other trendy stuff will have been forgotten as you will not be able to get the !"£$%^&*() batteries by then.

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2016 in mobile: Visit a components mall in China... 30 min later, you're a manufacturer

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Wearables come with inconvenience?

Well my phone lives under layers of clothing at this time of year, so it is super convenient to pull it out and wave it round, having first undressed or not?

The credit card has yet to have its battery charged and access is far faster than undressing. As for single touch, one word calling, I have that now with my 'dumb' phone and its hands free earpiece so the handset needs no hand holding.

You have confirmed what I knew SMS is used where it should NOT be used.

Too many times have I been called, (one touch answer with the earpiece) only to be asked why I have not replied to an SMS I have not received.

As for touch, I gave away the touch phones I was given as they were useless with their demand for full attention and two handed fumbling.

The issue of Pizza or Indian could only ever come from someone who knew nothing about me. It would thus need no answer

I guess it is all a question of style, lifestyle that is.

For me communications methods are tools for life, not a faux way of life

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Richard Jones 1
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Wearables come with inconvenience?

Well they need constant recharging or they do nothing.

They cost a fortune while doing little if anything of value or real use.

My credit card has none of these 'advantages'

Wearables do not support one touch, one word telephone calling or single touch call answering.

They might have shed loads of other stuff that flattens the battery faster than anyone would really want.

I do NOT want to read e-mail on a 1 inch square face while I am busy doing something useful. If I need to read an SMS I would like to be able to see it and reply to it in a considered manner. Since SMS can only be used for non time critical trivia it can wait until I have time to read and think about the contents. Remember SMS is a store and forward system, (as is e-mail) what you get now, might have set off hours ago so cannot possibly be a 'urgent matter'. If it was urgent at the time the sender was foolish or ignorant so why do I need to rush a reply?

To date SMART phones have been a cypher for something that does nothing of what I want, the wearables are the same but on some form of steroids.

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Janet pulls open network info for good after DDoSers exploit it

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: Our new infrastructure is organised thus...

Yes but the lasers are good, but they burned the ropes on the drawbridge!

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Our new infrastructure is organised thus...

I agree @AC, their may be a lock, but what type, what form, how many new locks and what other devices support the lock? I have a moat and drawbridge but no need to describe what sort of crocodiles live in the moat, nor the boiling oil vents above the entry passageway!

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Help! What does 'personal conduct unrelated to operations or financials' mean?

Richard Jones 1
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Protecting The Company

I suspect that the words have been carefully chose to avoid any implication of problems for the company's operations. In other words 'our company financial health is rudely perfect so don't ask'. One can speculate that he did something to affect relations in one way or another, but speculation about the real issue, as ever is just that, often with no justification.

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Google says its quantum computer is 100 million times faster than PC

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: Heisenberg

But will it find Lord Lucan?

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Smut-seeding Prenda Law ringleader must sell home to pay $2.5m debt

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Happy Days

Given their ways and behaviours, perhaps they should not keep anything least of all the clothes they came to court in. That way every pocket can be properly searched. Plus they can be give a medical check for any other hidden assets - live on some streaming net service for those who like such things.

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Sysadmin's £100,000 revenge after sudden sacking

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

No Option Really

Since he was given the bum's rush out of the place and all contact with others was directly blocked, I am not sure what options he had to advise the company of anything, he had no responsibilities whatsoever to them.

He was no longer an employee so no responsibilities and inward communications channels were blocked. Clearly the company was supremely well managed and could sort out the problems they created without recourse to any 'off the street' outsider.

His force termination instantly made his status 'outsider with no association'. He had no ongoing responsibilities and was forced to accept that they had everything under control. The fact that he later heard, almost by accident, that they had not managed the situation well, simply demonstrated they had misplaced confidence in their own abilities. They were, purely the agents of their own misfortune, a situation they almost certainly failed to use as a learning experience.

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Microsoft encrypts explanation of borked Windows 10 encryption

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Decrypted :

Nearly right corrected version;

**** we don't know, we only wrote the stuff.

They have brought back another unwanted feature for me, a refusal to hibernate or sleep.

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UK.gov pooh-poohs Virgin Media's whinge to Brussels over beefy broadband pot

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: VM = Virtual Media?

I could almost accept your assertion that it was an economic issue. However, using bully boy methods to deny the prospect of anyone else doing any to ease the problems with which Virtual Media cannot be bothered, speaks of less savoury agendas. If Virtual Media cannot run their business well enough to meet legitimate service desires, let them but out again. If some cannot have the option, why should anyone deal with them? Please make the case for the unbalanced, unsatisfactory present status.

Of course one answer might be to fold all the network level activities into one company combining Open Reach (Out of Reach?) and Virtual Media 'Out of Reach Virtual Media' perhaps and let the sloppy service providers run their sloppy service on the highways so created. Only having to build, maintain and operate one network should allow some economies of scale and less duplication of limited economic effort. This would allow the gravy to be spread more evenly and over a greater service area. I am sure Sky would like that, or perhaps not?

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

VM = Virtual Media?

After Virtual Media dug up the main road ten or fifteen years ago to get along to the flats and small plot houses further along they left, (a mess) never to do anything more.

My road is within 50 metres of their cables but Virtual Media do not want to compete or offer service, so Lost all Faith you get an upvote from me. Virtual Media cannot be bothered to provide competition and simply want to block others from doing what they cannot be bothered to do.

I guess this is what their US master demands, drag in the rubbish USA closed market prices at rubbish USA (sub)standards

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Superfish 2.0: Dell ships laptops, PCs with huge internet security hole

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Continuing saga of Microsoft software collapse

Yes bring back clay tablets, papyrus and reed pens.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Connection?

So I think you are saying that the PC becomes in effect a certificate issue factory that will then accept any certificate it is persuaded to generate using the details held on its system.

The net effect is that the certificates are not certificates of anything at all.

Is that a correct reading?

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Edgy online shoppers face Dyre Christmas as malware mutates

Richard Jones 1
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Buy Locally, Your Are having a Laugh

Pay sky high parking charges for local high street access, or wait for a mythical (well outside of large cities) thing called a bus, then ditto for ticket prices.

Go to shop, item out of stock, order it for next week/month/year, wait until hell freezes over and still do not get the item.

Or;

Sit at home order item get it next day.

I can see the point in the high street as a half baked 'budget control system' assuming the goods cost more than the parking/bus fare, but not for anything else.

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ISIS operates a crypto help desk – report

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: "university education"

@Rick Giles

Or a Tea Party Republican.

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Google wants to add 'not encrypted' warnings to Gmail

Richard Jones 1
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Go

Re: Bathroom Refurbishment

I thought that were two ways this would be exposed to senders and receivers.

Based on the address the sending client could warn that the country was liable only to accept decrypted mails. The receiver would of course only receive decrypted mails.

On receipt of a return mail I guess the message would be flagged as have an insecure, non encrypted link protocol.

I Assume that the address header part 'your_isp.some_country' would be enough for any origin to know if that destination would, or would not accept encrypted communications.

Alternatively, there were only a small number of countries listed, I guess a blanket warning could easily be generated that XYZ country only accept plain text mails

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: We're the only one...

Except of course, the account points out that the far end are demanding clear messaging and Google want to advise senders that their message to such far ends will be sent clear because of this far end situation.

So however much you might like to troll Google do have a fail for this one.

Mind you while I do not use Google mail, I have never knowingly sent an encrypted message to anyone, I just hope the tooth fairy reads birthday lists and that Santa does the same for Christmas wishes. My rule has been never send anything in an e-mail that would matter if world plus dog, even down to the flees on world and dog read the contents. So no bank details or credit card codes.

I wonder if said dog likes the pictures of my bathroom refurbishment?

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BT reveals vanishingly small detail about its fibre broadband network

Richard Jones 1
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I Guess Those Are the Ones With Decent Access

The index also shows that a quarter of homes were munching their way through 75 per cent of the total data consumed in an average month.

I think the title says it all, those poor blighters with 0.5 MB access or less will not be downloading very much!

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Virgin Media whines about Sky's customer service claims, ad watchdog agrees

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Sky!

Perhaps Sky will now claim the best wonky adverts. Along the lines of "a Sky spokesman was not yet quoted as saying, Sky can can offer better wonky adverts than anyone else - and this time the advert is approved by the advertising watchdog."

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Get an Apple Watch or die warns Tim Cook

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Alternative View?

I'm on the cusp of 70 and have never owned an apple ithing, my parents were in their 90s when the grim reaper collected his dues. Neither of them ever owned an Apple device. Although mother did eat quite a lot of apples.

Perhaps only unhealthy people need an Apple product, or perhaps chance plays a bigger part in life?

Cats, dogs and all sorts of other animals and things have previously been claimed to save lives, unfortunately with the cost of housing I cannot manage to get at least one of every life saver into any house I can afford.

Now where is the live in doctor when I need one?

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OmniRAT malware scurrying into Android, PC, Mac, Linux systems

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

The Zero Day Error Is The User

If the (L)user is daft enough to bend over and say "do me", it will take a very hardened OS to completely stop the action. This is especially so if the (L)user keeps jumping through hoops to allow the crap to install.

Is it time that users were licensed, in some cases they should have a licence to even draw breath.

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PM wheels out snoop overseer minutes before latest snoops' charter bid lands

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: nice to see

His role should be to verify the legal status NOT the technobabble that went behind it.

Hopefully he will not fall for: their dog barked, crapped, went to the wrong school area, etc.

At least he should/ought to know what the legal position is along with the relevant legal precedent, though I am less confident that he will be there long enough at his age.

Mind you I did know a retired solicitor some years ago, he was 88 and after he got bored with running his own pension fund, he took on various semi official local roles. He was sharper than most of the other customers queuing at the bank. He came with a rich background of legal experience, though he did not dispense it freely and only talked about general issues.

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Apple’s TV platform just became a little more secure (well, the apps at least)

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: This is a different meaning of security

Possibly a bit of a shame really and why my very analogue eyes and ears are unlikely to be troubled by such 'stuff and nonsense'.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Good

And of the remaining 36% what percentage will have reverted to dumb or normal within 12~18 months of purchase anyway? I'd give it about 90% of them. So on balance about 96% will still probably function as Televisions with an external box that does not do anything very smart anyway. I just do not see me ever wanting a box marked apple, unless it is filled with tasty fruit.

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Police in US, Europe raid homes of supersnoop Droidjack RAT suspects

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Probably Not

When you kick over the dung heap looking for particular dung beetles you can often find a load more little dung feasts going on. Old time crime 'firms' used to hate certain crimes and criminals as they would increase the heat on everyone causing a spike in arrests. This Dridjack RAT raid festival could be an out-wash from all sorts of ongoing investigations.

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UK finance sector: IT security testing 'becoming close to mandatory'

Richard Jones 1
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Hold Steady

It appears that this failure at clap trap was not at the door of some simple sap in IT but at the level of process and system. It appears to have been yet another weak link in the chain. I hope I am safe, I left their clutches a long time ago, yet their rubbish processes apparently may have kept details on file for ex-customers who have long since left their clutches. This is a process level failure at corporate process and governance level, not IT staff level. If they ran such a sloppy ship then what else is broken at the same corporate level, if regulation is needed and it sorely appeared to be needed to weed out such weak links then regulation and mandatory audits should be the way forward. Regulation should only ever catch those in charge of process and design errors, not those who have no responsibilities for other than than their defined role.

Clap trap are part of the financial service chain, if they or anyone else does not like the heat give up and send the bag man round to collect cash on door steps.

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