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* Posts by Richard Jones 1

459 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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Samsung turns off lights on LEDs worldwide – except in South Korea

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Patience.

Since moving into my house in 1992 I have had the odd golf ball lamp fail. For a while I always bought a new pack as I was not sure where the spares were. Then they were tidied up... We have replaced less than 1/3rd of the original lamps. At this rate I now have enough spares to last me until I am well over 100 years old. Still In one of the most used rooms did replace the old type with LEDs to see what they were like - vastly better than CFLs, switch them on yesterday to get horrid light today and they never fitted the lighting unit!

I am pleased that LEDs are coming down in price, but worried that with too many makers dropping out, both quality and supply will decline.

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US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Jail Time please

Three useful letters, IRS. They are usually better at soting out justice for scum like that.

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Happy 2nd birthday, Windows 8 and Surface: Anatomy of a disaster

Richard Jones 1
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Re: The irony is

As I sit here, a 32bit Vista portable is running my specialised scanner and delivering the results to my Windows 7 desktop where the flow of scanned negatives is now well over 5,000 and the scanned slides a number of thousands more, I now know the answer to my problem. After all I should be using a tablet with capacity for few hundred files and no useful software. Oh how did I go so wrong?

Oh hang on, I am also reading the news and writing this response at the same time as editing the image files on my 23inch screen, dang it all there must be a fault! Why am I not using a 7 inch device; perhaps because it is totally useless?

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DOUBLE BONK: Fanbois catch Apple Pay picking pockets

Richard Jones 1
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Re: because apple

Well that may be your view. Shelling out a vast wedge of cash for a 'user experience' when the card in my pockets comes without an extra charge would make me feel it was a considerably poorer user experience from my parsimonious point of view. Since I have yet to even use pay by bonk for anything with anything I am unlikely to be near the front of the stampede. I instructed my card company to disable some types of transaction when they were offered

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Warning to those who covet the data of Internet of Precious Things

Richard Jones 1
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Re: "...such data should be regarded and treated as personal data."

I am struggling to either see when, if ever I would be interested in an IOT device and why it would be of any value to me. Certainly any data it produced would be very much personal data. However, I guess that gateway router firewalls are designed to apply any necessary restrictions to data leakage. Frankly if I was to be lumbered with something as undesirable I would only be interested in any data being routed to my data collection point.

I am aware that some 'entertainment devices' love sending stuff about you to their home location. Pardon me, but if I bought such a device, it would be part of MY home. I would do everything I could to block its wayward ways. If the device did not like the situation it would be returned without hesitation as not fit for purpose.

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SCREW YOU, EU: BBC rolls out Right To Remember as Google deletes links

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re Reruns of Jimmy Saville

I guess that re-runs of the case that he has now been exposed will be fully indexed for a long time to come along with the fact that prior to his exposure he was very popular. Well popular among those who did not know the whole story, which appears to have been a large number of people.

At the time his right to have some things forgotten does appear to have trumped all other aspects of his life.

In retrospect I am not sure that was such a wonderful right for him to have. I suspect that his 'right to have some things forgotten' may now have been withdrawn.

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Windows XP refresh will DO NOTHING for lame PC market next year

Richard Jones 1
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Market Segmentation

I suspect that what we are seeing is a number of different events. First of all Windows XP expired without really laying and dying for a large number of users. It was still good enough and they had to be pushed, shoved and prodded to move and even then like stubborn mules many are still sat there.

Some moved to Windows 7 where a lot of other users are happy enough to sit hoping that the nasty smell known as Windows 8/8.1 will blow away and that Windows 10 will live up to its initial suggestion of being worth while.

That leaves the mobile devices segment, this is already said to be slowing. Most users who could find a use for such devices now have one so the market will slow. The tablet and complex phones do some things amazingly well, or so I am told. One of them is unlikely to be as long a life as e.g. the old XP machine.

Then we come to the cloud conundrum. For those who have data they mist access from everywhere except from an area with poor access right, e.g. no service or dodgy ISPs), the cloud is wonderful. Do remember that others can and will probably access that data from anywhere almost as easily. I am not so sure.

There may well be kids who can do all sort of wonderful things with all sorts of wonderful toys, it was ever thus. They may continue to do wonderful things in the future, just hope that it is not to continue to lose all those naked selfiies.

With the prospect of a decent new Windows, notice I said prospect not certainty I see a period of continued delay in the market with loads of people continuing to hold off, and yes some might adopt other devices, quill pens anyone?

Yesterday I was scanning several hundred photographs using two desk top PCs. No prospect of using anything else since limited software is on new OSs and 20MB scans need some storage space and it is NOT going to be on the cloud. If and it is a big IF windows 10 has enough support and if the price is reasonable I might upgrade, perhaps even regrade, what I do not need is a mobile 'experience' or a multi-hundred pound portable but not quite in a pocket computer - your mileage may vary.

That is why I am pleased to accept market segmentation and see many others get exactly what they want.

I was almost interested in the new Hudl for £65 just to see if I could find a use for such a beast, but I still cannot see me even getting that much use from out of something like that.

Now I am off out driving, with my 8 year old non touch phone in my pocket - (I hate touch with a real world vengeance), but others are welcome.

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Dot-gay told it's NOT gay enough – but web'll be officially .eco-friendly

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Must be more daring

I not sure where the idea that geographical domains are no longer necessary came from. I can see the desire for specialist domains in addition to geographical ones.

Ideas, feelings, activities and many other 'soft' aspects, e.g. the new dot ECO top level domain (Note I am not knocking such needs) are not geographically based. However, if I want a supplier of something, or details of regulations within my territory I do not want to sort through the regulations or suppliers of every place in the world to find what I need.

On a side note, while I have only the tiniest axe to grind* I wonder why humans are apparently so under represented in the gay stakes? Some other animal populations are said to be on average up to about 10% while many can swing either way. Certainly I suspect the rejection of dot gay was likely based more on poor case presentation than other issues. I hope it was not down to simple prejudice.

*My interest is only that by seeking to continually marginalise groups of people their need to make a fuss is increased, its the old action and reaction thing. Why can we not live and let live?

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Microsoft: Yeah, about that 50% post-Christmas customer price hike...

Richard Jones 1
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Choice?

Use the cloud back door straight for Uncle Sam finest bent courts to read all your data. or have own data kept in house. Wow a difficult choice there.

Why would anyone use a USA provider unless it was to put out miss-information for the kangaroos of the US in-injustice system to read?

I am sure Ireland is wondering just what sort of illegal hornets nest they have right now.

I hope that someone can sort out a good alternative now that office et all are unusable, unsafe crap.

What has a longer life span than 'never' ever use a subscription service from MS?

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Britain’s snooping powers are 'too weak', says NCA chief

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Public confidence?

I guess what AC was saying was that we need a skilled group who are able to sort out the threats from the non threats, then get the threats neutralised.

Instead there appears to be a bunch of misfits who do not know why they are there.

The old saying was pay peanuts get monkeys but in this case I doubt that they were paying peanuts, but they still appear to have got unreliable chimps.

The tax payers did not get a bargain.

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Windows 10's 'built-in keylogger'? Ha ha, says Microsoft – no, it just monitors your typing

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: Figures

Having never heard of a programme as explicitly set out as the present one I suspect that the user feed back on the ribbon was based on a more select, (in other words biased) sample of those who were in the know. A small sample of queries raised by users about the things they needed was in all likelihood rolled into a wish list. That was then rolled into a 'we must do it a new way list'. That was then proved in focus groups (Steven Jay Sinofsky's nearest and dearest?) and inflicted on the rest of the world.

When beta testing win8 I don't think I ever found the 'official way' to shut down. I might have tried several different approaches including trying *.bat files on the desktop and Alt F4, but the one the worked best was the big silver button (your mileage may vary) on the front of the machine. Unlike hunting and pecking with the mouse the silver button worked every time.

They have been honest, said they will collect data and hopefully avoid the dumb stupid errors of the past and advised you NOT to do mission critical work on the test machine as you may be copied, lose files, etc. Seriously those are very clear almost harsh disclaimers and advice. Anyone who cannot read, does not care or plain ignores the risks does not earn much sympathy from me.

I would still like to try the new product as Win8 was a total disaster for me with all the devices that it did not support. However, it would be on a non-live rig but otherwise still connected to my network - when I was happy to run it that way and once I have a suitable stand-alone PC.

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Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Ditch the white cat, please

Dropbear, I am sorry for you but I guess that simple minds can only deal with simple things. I never once mentioned trickle down though I did mention that a number of people are required to build complex things or do you believe in cargo cults. Still if you are happy to be part of the sacrificed 1%, please do not let me stop you. Go right ahead now if you do not mind, just please do not make a mess for others to clear up.

You sound as though you have no experience of other poorer countries, you might like to correct this on the way out.

Goodbye

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: Ditch the white cat, please

While it is true that no one needs any of the Learjets/Veyrons, etc. in order to live a whole army of other people do need someone to buy those things, So never mind let us take them out of the equation. Now we have a group of unemployed who are struggling to eat in a high price economy. So they will no longer buy the clothes, luxuries and even necessities they need. So a whole other group of lower paid have no income, but never mind the 1% no longer have it all. Sadly neither does anyone else. One really serious issue is that a $1.00 income in a $1.00 economy is at least passable. A zero cost for food economy does even better for those with no income other than the direct effects of their own labour, since they can grow it all themselves. In short monkey with any key aspect and expect to get bitten by the law of unintended consequences.

Not for nothing do aid workers, genuine aid workers say give a man a bag of food and feed his family for a day, teach people how to grow or harvest food and feed them for life. It is useful, more useful if no money changes hands, as that way nothing is left about for the other scourge of poor countries their corrupt leaders to steel.

One of the complexities of all economic models is that they only account for the known economic factors. So, get rid of the economic leaders, (which as the article points out includes 100% of the readers here) and what happens, frankly not a great deal. Sure they stop spending so money velocity slows down, so more people often have less, but people do not always react as you expect and who can blame them. For a start unless you kill off the entire 1% rather you just rob them and sad to sad waste your money, a large number will get the urge to reclaim what they feel they are owed It is not all going to be replaced by the penniless tribesmen of the Kalahari. The world will have a reduced value, and possibly a few million less people but apart from not having diversions like The Register and the internet to absorb weekend down time will anything much have changed.in the world order frankly no.

One example of the law of unintended consequences came clear a few years ago. Young women from villages flocked to work at factories making clothes. Sure the conditions were not always wonderful but, in many cases the girls did get (a) paid, (b) fed and (c) some education. New employment laws/rules saw them sent back to their villages without food, education and money, who gained? (I am not talking about the frankly crap buildings used in several countries which did need to be closed down before they fell down or were burned down)

Frankly beggar thy neighbour is never a recipe for harmony or success, but as the Ebola problem is showing, it can be hell trying to teach and help some people. Just getting some to accept healthcare, e.g. polio vaccines can be an uphill struggle or do such things not count.

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Be your own Big Brother: Keeping an eye on Mum and Dad

Richard Jones 1
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Big Brother

The Wonderful Internet

There is no subject that cannot attract the mindless rambling of a troll.

The subject is serious, the intent is serious and the requirement is obvious. I was fortunate in that my mother did not reach vascular dementia until she was in her late 80's and still had father there to deal with her. That was until it all became too much for him and her condition became too impossible to handle Telephone calls morning and night helped him for a while but as he was in his late eighties by then, a home for mother became the only answer. By that time Mother was barely able to walk and the strain of it had caused father's health to suffer. She died at 93 and father who was a little younger lasted another 18 months. My options were limited by living well over 200 miles away and having two disabled children to sort out and support. Operating at a much lower level I tried to think of ways to use technology to help but many of the issues raised in the article and in the links are very familiar. One of the greatest issues is wandering, itself an off shoot of memory failings and a sense of not belonging, even if it was their home of 50 years. On one occasion on seeing policemen Mother 'chased out of the house' to report her parents were missing. They had died 20~30 years before, no technology is going to help much with that situation. Once mother went into a home where she needed 24 hour support - none of which was paid for my any aspect of NHS, father was alone. For a while he still drove I am not sure how well, but a couple of falls meant that he had to go into care. I am not sure how much help technology could have provided for him either.

To be effective it would need to be built in with sensors that function as part of the furniture - though as the mental aspects of dementia take hold even furniture can be a target for movement if not outright abuse.

In short any and all technology would need to be in place well before it is needed and even then might be of use for only a few years perhaps 1~5 years at best.

The value of any technology can only be assessed once it is in use and by then if it achieves nothing it is too late to 'un-spend' the time and effort. In any case a one size fits all old people situation is never going to be of value. In cases like this, one cannot have too much choice of methods or too much guidance as to how to assess the needs.

The assessment problem is a vital one, unless you specialise in the subject, (from experience no one does!) you will not understand where problems might be eased, only with that data can one start to assess what, if anything might help. However, I suspect that while it might help for a short time and it does depend on each individual, once the skids of decay have been greased there is no real way to stop the downhill progression. The one real benefit is that it can ease the feelings of isolation and, prevent the issue of a faller remaining undiscovered for too long. However, that is an issue for more than the old and lonely.

One other monitor that might be valuable is one that checks such things as the vacuum cleaner, or items needed for personal hygiene since cleaning in various forms can be an issue.

For all that, I end up wondering if this is not just another example of trying to find a home for homeless technology where actually people would do it better?

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Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims

Richard Jones 1
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A Difference

Murdock would never dream of trying to manipulate opinion, would never employ people who hacked into private communications and never did any thing his lot did not warn you about in advance. Of course has TV stations do not charge you a subscription and still bombard you with adverts.

Whereas Google tell you what they are doing, don't charge a fee, do expect to make money to stay in business and don't hack into your phone - unless doing what they said they would do counts as hacking.

So I can see he has a really strong case; well I hope he has so he can pack up his strong case and go off home.

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Euro chiefs: Hi Google. Here's how to REALLY protect everyone's privacy. Hello? Hello?

Richard Jones 1
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Re: "select markets"

I have a family concern with research limitations. I know that at least one member of my family can ab-react to certain pharmaceutical products, rendering them unable to walk in an extreme though recent case. I am also aware that some drugs react in different ways with different ethnic and as said above, genetic or condition groups. I am therefore keen that such data is available to researchers for enhanced drug research and for explicit prescribing guidelines.

I am not in favour of selling the data to anyone who might want to spend an afternoon fishing for an idea.

Likewise with 'commercial data'. Frankly I do not care that anyone knows anonymous data saying, e,g. that 80% of people who looked for (a) went on to buy (b). is available. I would be far more concerned that the fact that I did or did not buy x or y was being sold to anyone. However, I am not sure that Google or any other search engine would know what I bought. If I search for instructions on how to service x, it does not mean that I own x, I might research it to help someone else or to look for possible issues with x before deciding to buy x.

The fact that other so called search engines are so good at finding what I need, (they cannot!) raises severe doubts that they would ever find any useful data to sell to anyone is another matter.

As for the 'right to have crimes forgotten' that has now been established by the EU, I am aghast at this travesty. Where were my human rights when I lost the right to find out if the doctor was a sex pest, incompetent surgeon or whatever? Or that the financial adviser was a bankrupt who stole from previous clients, etc.?

A review of some of the cases de-listed from Google but still held by numerous legal and news reporting sites makes very worrying reading. Some appear to go right to the heart of serious organisations.

I realise that for those who use other services such as e-mail and storage facilities additional questions arise and that there are other issues for them to answer or not use the 'service'. But the last thing I want is to read through a 10, 20 or 30 page disclaimer list every time that I need to find, e.g. the opening times of the x-ray or blood test unit at a hospital.

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Move over, Apple Pay: Tesco trials PayQwiq phone-flash pay app

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Sounds like a non starter

Since it is a very early trial with only a few staff at this stage all the odium appears somewhat misplaced. If the users find an issue then it can be addressed before anything goes further or is that not the idea of a restricted test phase? I used to try to get the accounts staff using any new method or service since they knew absolutely nothing about what was going on and could be guaranteed to find the problems in far less time than anyone else, what is more they would then ask questions and not try to fix things themselves.

In my day with in house trial it was often the practice to try aspects that were not thought likely to fly well to encourage people to come back with their ideas for improvements.

Since cashless wave and pay is going so well in its present forms in shops everywhere I have no doubt that this will not be needed, Oh hang on has anyone shown any desire to use wave and pay?

Don't all rush there must be at least one person somewhere.

True London's transport is making use of this style of technology but I doubt that is the last word on the subject either.

[I disabled it on my credit card since I never go near the system and would only ever travel as a member of a party so it would be doubly useless.}

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'In... 15 feet... you will be HIT BY A TRAIN' Google patents the SPLAT-NAV

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: Public domain.

Remember that by patenting the idea and method Google have tried to lock out the patent trolls from this idea field.

Taken that way it is not nearly so bad.

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Microsoft vs the long arm of US law: Straight outta Dublin

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Who Still Has Data In MS Ireland?

I am surprised that anyone still has real, as opposed to dummy/false data still held by MS Ireland. While e-mails and similar communications might pass via a US parented company, storing data which I take to mean business or personal information in a facility not owned and controlled by the data owner was always going to end badly. Just look at the 'celebrities' who apparently/allegedly stored personal stuff on the web.

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Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone

Richard Jones 1
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Thumb Up

Class Action?

I am guessing that getting more of the targets together to fight these parasites would be limited by some form of competition law, but it would be a seriously good way to deal with those who appear identical to crooks.

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Oh God the RUBBER on my SHAFT has gone wrong and is STICKING to things

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Heat Shrink Tubinng

You might improve the situation with a bit of heat shrink tubing slide over and heated. Avoid any buttons!

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Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Except that...

It does appear that too many police are forced to spend hours filling forms and doing diversity training, audits and other vital tasks rather than looking after the people who need their help.

Certainly the rise of those who feel it is valid to drive straight on at roundabouts, So far this week I have had one a day nearly T-bone me as I go round and they go straight across the mound. Overtaking on double white lines 'isn't that what the lines are for?' appears to be the attitude of many drivers these days. Red lights just mean cross faster; hand held phones are for folding - NOT just apple things but any phone will do.

There was an error in singling out the apple watch thing. It should have been a timely reminder that any (all?) similar device(s) are already covered by existing legislation. In this regard apple is nothing special and should not be picked out.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Speedo?

I find the cruise control wonderful. Cruise up to say 48 for the 50 limit and just sometimes use the up and down to maintain a near constant safe speed. It works blindingly well through motorway works. Mind you a speed limiter would be even better. However I do have a nice easily read set of instruments.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: "...powers exist to seize and interrogate devices..."

(a) They can demand the code under RIPA, but

(b) also they can and will obtain the data from the service provider relating to activity at the time of or immediately before a serious accident.

The shame is that the evidence is retrospective and too late if the user or someone else is dead.

I have just followed a stupid person out of a hospital car park. The effort to pull out of a parking space was considerable increased by their need to hand hold two phones in one hand! Fortunately they then turned left so I turned right.

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iPhone 6 will make you fork over with Apple Pay if you want to BONK

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Another reason Not To Use NFC?

NFC has had a long lonely road so far and this apple idea is not going to make it any less lonely.

I see that transport in London is now trying to push it on buses and its trains but that is another don't care for me.

Who is the person who wants NFC anyway?

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Massachusetts shoots down car dealers' Tesla-busting sueball

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

500,000 Batter Packs

Would those be for your fish with any chips in the car?

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DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Ve haff vays uff making you run fast...

My thoughts exactly and yes in my youth I did discover it was not the speed part that was too hard, it was the brakes and steering that mattered! So we have the battle scene;

80lbs of kit, check;

jet pack, check,

fuel, check;

running shoes disguised as boots, check;

uneven terrain, check.

Ignition, check;

large tree or rock or wall or steep down hill descent on soft soil or sand (delete as required), check; Medic... Medic...

Oh well back to the drawing board.

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Uber alles-holes, claims lawsuit: Taxi biz sued by blind passengers

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

@Velv

I am not at all sure you are anywhere near right on that point. In many if not all jurisdictions some recent laws will issue instructions over and above those in older laws. Health and Welfare and disability are two such law 'families' where the new requirements can and will modify existing practice. Now I am no lawyer but I would strongly suggest that trading standards in the UK, or the disability folk might have a strong thing or two to say. I doubt that they would be any less interested in other places unless the local sheriff or mayor in the US has a different axe to grind. If there is clear evidence of an offence in English law it can be an offence not to report the issue. While the mileage in other locations may be different one should go with all force after law breakers. Video and witness evidence can be most useful.

Sadly Rochdale has shown that one does sometimes have to hit the authorities over the head with something very, very hard as there they did tend to arrest the messenger rather than deal with the offences in a timely fashion. Still, even in Rochdale there is now the appearance of action. Interestingly that is also reported to have involved 'taxi' drivers though not from Uber.

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Holy sentient blender, Batman: Telefónica to trial AT&T's Internet of Home Stuff in Europe

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Is There Really a Market For This Stuff?

I can see sellers wanting a piece of the pie, but is there really a pie that is big enough to slice? Retrofitting a home for all this stuff is not going to be found as a give away with the cornflakes. Most people buying a new home can barely scrape up the cost of the deposit, after that each month brings in bills, more bills and yet bigger bills. If this does as well as the smart meter fiasco this should really fly - - - back home.

I am not knocking the achievement - I have not seen it in action so cannot knock the execution. It is just that it appears to be a vanishingly tiny potential market populated by few more than gadget aficionados.

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Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears

Richard Jones 1
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Angel

Re: On a cloudless day...

I guess it is even more simple than that, only those who do not care about such things are likely to buy enough volume to continue to interest makers of this stuff. Put simply you do not count several times over, you do not buy from iTunes, you do not rack up ISP charges you are not their market. Now go away. Their attitude not mine. When a company knows what is best, the off message buyer simply does not count.

Perhaps someone else will provide the sort of device that those with a collection of their own can use to their benefit. The apple band wagon has stomped on most of the competition by convincing most buyers that apple are the only way.

PS, I have no apple products and NEVER carry round any music when I am out. I am clearly not a target demographic so I am free; neither a fanperson, a wanabe or anything else of the ilk, just me.

I do have one use for apple, I have just had one for breakfast, very juicy it was too!

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Carphone Warehouse, Dixons return from honeymoon with injured numbers

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: I'm not at all surprised...

Recently? My local one was like that years back. I have not visited them since.

I thought that mobile shops only exist to make banks look good.

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Moto 360: Neat gizmo – if you're a rich nerd

Richard Jones 1
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Re: just me ??

Each to their own, I do not like texts, they take too long to create and far too long to read and who knows when, or if they have arrived? They demand whole attention, if only for a few seconds and the use of hands as well as eyes. But a voice call to the earpiece gives two way near instant contact, everything done in a very few words. Life can continue without disruption hand and eyes can continue their appointed tasks, whether it is dog walking, shopping, walking, painting or anything (everything?) else.

Oh and I still use a Nokia 6230i with a bluetooth headset as it simply does what I need better than anything else I have so far found - and it fits in my inside pocket where it can stay all day long, never needing to be looked at. The new touch toy I was sent sits in my desk tidy where it has been for the last 18 months useless, all new 'features' and no usability.

However, if your usage and needs patterns find something else useful, good luck to you; it is all about choice as long as I can have my ideal tool so can you. But please don't tell me a watch is smart, mine tells me the date and time, that is smart enough!

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The Schmidt hits the clan: Google chief mauls publishers' 'abuse of dominance' claims

Richard Jones 1
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Search Results that Contain new Search Engines are crap

If I am searching for something, lets call it a stop widget I want to find a place that can SUPPLY a stop widget. I most clearly DO NOT WANT a list of second rate search sites that may link me to other second rate search sites that may link me to yet more second rate search sites, but never tell me how I can get the item. I also DO NOT WANT the Hotel Stop Widget as a search option, though Google have managed to kill of most of that stupidity.

Before anyone asks, yes I have had that experience when searching for rare, obsolete items, you end up with some half baked silly site that claims to have the item but only lists even more stupid sites that DO NOT have what I need.

Customer service would be improved if I could bar all listings for secondary search sites, if this option appears I might unblock the Google cookies to allow it to work.

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'Everywhere I look ... it's bad': HP claims email shows Autonomy CFO panic, pre-buyout

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Play Ground Name Calling Anyone

I am not sure if the playground kids are shouting about the other kid or if they are alleging the other kid's parents do not bath or something, 'look we need to buy more soap' scrawled on a shopping list does not mean they have not bathed for a week. This carefully scripted public show is doing nothing for clarity or to establish what issues matter. However it is doing everything to make me think that the case is legless without careful manipulation of a heap of 'who knows what was being talked about mails'.

Could this be the script for a low to no budget TV show well off prime time?

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Flaming heck! Watchdog scolds Apple Mac, iPad fab in staff safety probe

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Interesting timing

It might well be interesting for another couple of reasons.

1) The launch of a new anything, not 'just' an iThing, comes with a blast of publicity so it 'might' strengthen the publicity for change.

2) Given the potentially explosive nature of the dust, having the factory blow up just before a launch might not be the best ever event!

3) Now a cynical observation, the new EU vacuum cleaner rules mean that high power machines might be cheap at the moment so facilitating the required clean up.

Few people realise just how dangerous such dust can be before it blows up and even fewer have an awareness after the blast and fire has wiped them out.

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Microsoft's SELFIE-TASTIC Nokia 830, 730: Complete with DOG SMILE WHITENER

Richard Jones 1
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Re: But Will They Have Any Useful Attributes?

I have been using my 20th century bluetooth set for years with my Nokia 6230i. Sadly while useless touch phones do work with bluetooth the phones do not do what I need.

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Richard Jones 1
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But Will They Have Any Useful Attributes?

There appears to have been no improvement in the one single feature I need, good quality hands free with NO NEED for look and peck useless touch screens. Goodness know Nokia had it right with the 6230i years ago so I am still forced to continue with an increasingly aged phone.

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Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?

Richard Jones 1
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Mushroom

So What If Houses Go up in Price?

My understanding is that the very top end of the market consists of a very few percentage points of the total housing stock, though due to being very over valued a large part of the value. The number of >£10million houses is still small, the number of >£5million is larger but still small, it is only when you come down to the >£500,000 that numbers are large enough to matter with the number of <£500,000 houses being almost as small as those >£10million. To blame the super expensive houses for the housing shortage is plain stupid.

The argument then shifts to 'if builder could not build >£10million house and flats they would start building crappy little <£250,000 flats, no they would not; they would stop building all together. What is needed is something to stop the famine of building land and building permits that currently exists. That can only be achieved by a devaluation of both the land and the permits. In effect flooding the place with both, so that buildings can be created in sufficient quantity and at a sufficient price to mop up the demand. Yet this can be done as I have found since I returned to the country some years back. After working for many years outside of the UK where sometimes I did 18 hour days on the trot I came back in urgent need of a new house. I bought a new build outside of London and sold the previous small place I had owned- it was not possible to fit my family into the old place. The planning permission for the 'new build' had been contested as it lay on the edge of the town, but as ex-war department land there was no bar to re-cycling the land. Since then a number of other small scale builds have been completed, a filling station site now has >60 flats, an old pub will have perhaps 10 chicken coups and a burnt out work shop was replaced by half a dozen or more new, tiny houses. In fact, the trend to re-cycle land is seeing a number of larger properties being replaced by impractical tiny residences, which after a few years need to sprout loft extensions or other space generating warts. A side effect of planning moves to encourage smaller dwellings.

Is this the end of space as we know it in the area? No, there is still probably the equivalent of 10% of the built area, perhaps more that is currently derelict brownfield or otherwise blighted land. So now we have the other limitations, transport, water sewerage, schooling and power. Just like London we have the issue of ageing and failing ground plant exploding and causing power cuts

Oh I forget another 50 or 60 dwellings were recently built on ex school land - no not the playing fields as such, some very uneven land to the side of the school plot and near to the road.

So in spite of any nimby effect the town has built perhaps an average of >50 new dwellings per year, with the greatest rush of building in the last 3~4 years. However, this is the recent record; go back to the 1980s when industry was dying and the once great industrial engines that built the district were ending and the suitable buildings were converted to flats. The unsuitable ones were bulldozed and replaced by hundreds of flats. So where once wooden aeroplane parts were built, now later generations can sleep peacefully

None of these were intended for or sold to absentee owners and while some do now fetch well over £500,000, many still fall well below that level. Most have between excellent, very good or good access to rail 'services' into London. Using brown field sites the town had quite likely increased its population by between a third and a half in 30 years, so expansion on brown field land is highly possible and at far more 'affordable prices'.

This is considered and expensive area, my daughter recently bought a house in the adjacent town for less than £160,000, OK that is considerably more than the <£20,000 we paid for our first house in the 1970s, but the value of money has been wreaked, not by bankers, but by 'spend what you like' politicians.

As I remember it we had rent controls in the past and we also had slum landlords to go with those controls, the name Rackman comes to mind.

So, it is wise to repeat failed experiments and expect a different answer: NO!

Is it better to discover what works and how it can be improved, now that is difficult. (The answer is YES by the way.

As a final shot, I guess my house has more than doubled in value since I bought it, so what?

It will mean more IHT but that is of questionable value to me, in fact the increase in value of the house is more of a disadvantage than a benefit; discuss.

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TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Perhaps A mandatory Name Change Next Time?

It would be nice if the trolls lost their nice cosy names after any lost case with the new name being chosen to complete their humiliation. For example, Shyster and Crook Inc, even better if they all had the same handle as in Shyster and Crook Inc. 1, Shyster & Crook Inc. 2 etc.

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Pay to play: The hidden cost of software defined everything

Richard Jones 1
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Facepalm

Not Always a Bad Thing - But Only if You Know in Advance

I was buying big devices a while ago that most people were paying about £2million a pop to obtain. Not having that budget and not needing all of the features, I negotiated a deal that brought the cost down below £0.5 million. Sure the incremental upgrades cost slightly more than the upfront cost, but we only turned on what we needed when the business existed, i.e. we had a customer with cash in their hand who wanted the upgrade.

However, all features we considered essential to the operation were delivered and working on day 1 and everyone knew exactly what they were getting and expected to deliver.

What is not acceptable is the hidden slicing that some appear to use. Oh you want to back up/disaster recover/obtain management statistics, etc,, that is an extra cost.

No! Make sure your supply contract specifies what you expect and require, BEFORE you sign up to the deal.

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HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: Backlash

I have never found a use for a tablet which possibly makes me the odd one out. I do not care who makes the thing I can see no point, but now Apple have come up with a killer application to ensure I will never want one, at least one that has access to this 'feature'.

Who on earth would want this other than as a single purpose odd ball deployment in a bizarre environment?

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Richard Jones 1
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Are They Trying To Cripple Sales?

I have yet to find a use for a tablet so do not accuse me of any pro this or anti that bias. However, the idea of being lumbered with full screen adverts on a device for which I have yet to find a use makes me think this is aimed at a very odd market segment to which I have no, make that absolutely no relationship - whom-so-ever launches such a defective device.

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Bright lights, affordable motor: Ford puts LED headlights onto Mondeo

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Daytime running lights

Another week another Monday and another superior being who, while only visiting earth for a short time appears to think he knows absolutely everything about life. As others have pointed out to you Jamie Jones, there are many people living on earth who lack eyesight well above the 20/20 vision limit such as you appear to think you have. Some are so poorly equipped they can be classified as legally blind in some countries, however, even they can sometimes detect moving lights. Humans show what is often called a spectrum of abilities, ranging from the lowest level of, e.g. visual capability to the very highest.

It may be of interest to check how many accident participants claim not to have seen other vehicles. Motorcyclists are not the only ones who often fail to be noticed, check your next drive and see how many apparently legal drivers fail to see you as you drive along. Given that well above 10% of road users, those with allegedly acceptable eye sight fail to see me on straight roads in day light I frequently resort to the use of dipped head light in an attempt to improve the odds of being seen.

Now I realised given your superior beliefs you will expect to take all of these failings in your stride. For the rest of us there are prudent steps we can and most do take. As for emergency vehicles; in addition to noisy horns and blue lights they have alternating head lights, this is due to recognition of a human factor. An apparently moving light jumping from side to side will be detected even more rapidly than one coming towards you. Since the emergency vehicle is likely to be moving faster than ordinary traffic increased detection speed is important perhaps, not for you, but for the other 99.9% of the population.

Sadly in spite of all the steps currently taken accidents still involve even emergency vehicles.

While the 5mph (or was it 15mph) buffers on American cars were not a success in reducing insurance claims, since they made any at or above the impact limit more expensive. Most safety measures are introduced after careful evaluation including tests over a wide range of conditions.

It always surprises me how many people are clearly in the wrong line of work given their strident views and widely based synthetic knowledge.

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IT blokes: would you say that LEWD comment to a man? Then don't say it to a woman

Richard Jones 1
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No Excuse

It is 30 years since I used to attend global conferences and I still miss them. Fortunately I never saw anyone acting like those in this unforgivable display. For me coming from a rather more restricted environment the shear joy was meeting minds, not bodies that could extend my understanding of the business and improve my knowledge. I am glad that some still think that is what conferences should be about. Though I shall never again get the chance to travel and enjoy such meetings I am violently concerned that a few think they are simply an extension of 'Sleazy Joes night club and catch what you can emporium'.

As someone else said, sod HR go for the police jugular those creeps ruin conference experiences for everyone.

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Carbon tetrachloride releases still too high, says NASA

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Carbon Tet ?? banned since the 1950's... I thought...

I thought most people used the so called OXY bleaches for laundry to avoid or mitigate the effects on colours? I certainly agree on the odour from too many environmentally sound 'cleaning machines.' A weekly boil wash of the towels along with the odd oxy wash does help with that issue.

Thank you for suggesting, or perhaps pointing out a possible new source. It appears the only law the lobby industry cannot repeal is the law of unintended consequences.

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Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: Dry Cleaning ?

Very unlikely to be from dry cleaning now. Dry cleaning is a lossy process hence you could smell the product in the long gone past. Unless someone is making and spitting new stuff into the cleaning business the old stocks should have been lost by now. If levels are increasing someone or something is making it or slowly releasing their strategic stocks. It is a long time since tetrachloride was a favoured production chemical in any business due to its 'side effects'. In the UK and I suspect most places Perchloretheylene came in to replace it industrially during the 1960s, so either someone is very keen to use it for their favourite military project, a clandestine maker has forgotten to stop making it and is venting excess production or it is a side stream output from an old or current activity. Due to its relative stability, it could possibly be that very old stock is simply leaching out and that with further time the rate will decline until it becomes negative.

However, the watchers of these things hate doubt so it is wise to check that no one is breaking the rules or that some other unknown process, natural or industrial is creating more of the stuff. The latter case would be the more worrying.

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Think crypto hides you from spooks on Facebook? THINK AGAIN

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

We Are Talking About Facebook Right?

Has anyone ever put anything useful let alone interesting on Facebook.

Surely most users would, if followed by any authority, be more likely to be charged with wasting police, (and everyone else's) time?

Or is there some magic to knowing what someone you never see bought, had for breakfast, went to see, etc., for the moment consider me totally confused.

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e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

Richard Jones 1
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Some Useful Phrases and Words

Statement of Requirements and Objectives

Request for Proposals

Tender Documentation

Compliance Statement(s)

Contract

Delivery Schedule

Acceptance Test Schedule

A clear process in the event of a failure to deliver including what might constitute a breach of contract, e.g. a delivery schedule with clear milestones and testable milestone acceptance criteria.

There has been talk of this running four years late. If true that would be an achievement given that it it is claimed it was in trouble after only four years of life.

The partial information does not help those who are paying to understand what they are paying for other than a total cock up.

It is still not clear who screwed up and how, though I suspect a crap contract was at the root of the problem.

The old favourites such as liquidated damages are not worth the paper they are written on. You want a system, not years spent arguing in a court room over next to no payout for failure.

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Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA

Richard Jones 1
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Pick any Comparision

Dealing with opinions of Murdock and his warped views of the world. You have had a few but my opinions of the duffer run along the lines of:

Murdock is worse than plague

Murdock is worse than ISIS

Murdock is worse than Al-Qa'ida

Murdock is worse than your worst nightmare

Murdock is worse than a gang of drug crazed muggers

He ruined the print media, he ruined television, now he wants to wreak the internet.

Can the devil please come back out of retirement and swap roles back with him so letting the poor demented fool fester in peace somewhere.

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