* Posts by Richard Jones 1

514 posts • joined 10 Sep 2009

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EE squashes Orange UK: France Telecom's been 'destroying it for years'

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: Tell us more !!!!

Oh come on you are giving me the pip with all of this pith taking.

Perhaps it is time to give vegetables a turn, how about Onion?

After all the way it fails in so many ways it makes you cry, it has more layers than, well an onion.

Its bulbous and not in great shape with its service offering

Its great in stews - it certainly makes customers stew all the time and as for getting to the root of problems.

It should certainly grow well the amount of fertiliser that it produces!

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Post-modem Ericsson wobbles thanks to flat sales and falling profits

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Re: Do some research before you post a story.....

To true, Ericsson were big in network hardware, (AXE10 for example) for years though a North American Company tried to rubbish them out of business with the company I worked for until that also started to fold up like a Kleenex car. The interesting thing is that both my old company and the North American 'network and screw up' company are but history while Ericsson who had a brief play with mobile telephone handsets continues. I actually like their handsets, but they were not 'trendy' enough for the market so they are no more.

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'It's NOT FAIR!' yell RICH KIDS ... and that's a GOOD THING

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Does Economic Situation Not Count For a Lot

If you make about US$50 per minute anything less is hardly worth walking across a room to fetch. If you earn about US$1 per week, even US$1 (a week's money) has to be worth considerable efforts.

Also add in the envy factor; the rich students will almost certainly know that the other person is making a relative killing if they are only offered a few dollars. As things even out the envy factor might be considerably less of an issue, thus the reward will slide up the scale.

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BMW: ADMEN have asked us for YOUR connected car DATA

Richard Jones 1
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Re: No need a car for that

Hang on, IOS has that dumb leach beacon system that is supposed to flash up messages as you walk past stores and eating places. I think that what you meant was that iPhone users are to be farmed but only if apple and only apple can monetise them and make a turn on the deal.

The phone co has location data even for my dumb phone and could sell the cell site data if it was so inclined. I can only be loosely tracked that way as do not have exact location data capability on my phone, it is one of the advantages of not having a chatty modern phone but one that is just a phone and nothing else.

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Richard Jones 1
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Re: This could really hurt the rollout of connected cars and eventually self-driving cars

Is this not what pliers were made for or a lump hammer? I am not sure where the data would display in a car, so I guess that one could block out the panel if incoming junk became an issue, but what a bl**dy cheek of the thieves.

How would popping up unwanted junk would sit with laws on mobile phone use and distracting drivers? This could have more legs than the proverbial whatever.

However, given my age and my habit of keeping cars for a very long time it might not be too big an issue for me, still it is a point to keep in mind.

Just make sure none of the Parasite Protection Invective (PPI) or ambulance chasing "you have had an accident" mob get into this business! Hanging, drawing and quartering would be far too good for the crooks.

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UK's landmark mobile not-spot deal already falling apart

Richard Jones 1
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Re: I could never understand..

I up-voted you, however, one lot would say it was anti competitive and the other lot would want a Ministry for Aerials. This would then be stuffed full of even more people who knew even less about the subject but were taken off the unemployment register anyway.

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Young CHAP CUFFED in Blighty over Xmas Sony and XBOX hacks

Richard Jones 1
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Childcatcher

Re: DOS on XBOX and Playstation over Christmas

I can only guess that you do not have hyper excited kids wanting to enjoy their new Christmas toys; neither do I now, but I can still remember the potential for upset.

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FERTILISER DOOM warning! PESKY humans set to WIPE selves out AGAIN

Richard Jones 1
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Joke

Re: More interesting than "The Big AI fear", but....

Guano or bird shit to the less polite. A famous source of phosphorous.

Also a term for what some appear to use to start panicking.

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Security? Don't bother until it's needed says RFC

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

I'm Probably Reading This Wrong

On the face of it this makes total sense. There is less than no point in firing off a secured message if the only person who could ever read it is the sender. On the other hand if you need a secure exchange of information it goes against the grain to send it in clear text when it could have been more securely exchanged. Is this not tantamount to creating a transient virtual VPN on the fly just for the duration of a message exchange.

At first I was ready to think that it would not apply to me. Then I realised the only times I have ever encrypted anything was to prevent casual reading by other than the recipient. Prior to transmission I agreed the method and applied the method and the agreed decoding mechanism so I guess the exchange followed in a manual form what is being proposed - or have I completely missed the point?

I also tend to only converse with people who speak the language I use though this does not always avoid communications problems.

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Stop viewing Facebook at work says Facebook at work on Facebook at Work

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Re: I have this vision...

I suddenly had a vision of Zukerman as a Judas sheep leading his flock into the maw of death. I had better go and lay down.

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Should spectrum hog TV give up its seat for broadband? You tell us – EU

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: No.

@Lusty You assume that all the present not spots would suddenly become yes spots - Can you really see that happening?

Where is the flying pig icon when it's needed?

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Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW

Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re: Never forget

At least recovery and re-installing appears far easier with Windows 7 than with Windows H8. I see a never apparently ending stream of people having issues trying to recover windows 8/8/1 machines that have ended in never again land. I gave up on it during beta time when they ruled out fully functioning (with 8) CPUs, I guess that the load of whatever was in H8 did not get any better with time.

I guess it is too much to hope that 10 might get that done better?

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It's 4K-ing big right now, but it's NOT going to save TV

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Main TV is Standard Definition

The main room TV is a standard definition plasma and does quite nicely thank you as the room is big enough to take the beast.

The kitchen and bedroom both run SD but both could support HD if there was any point. So far there is no point that anyone here has seen. Rather than ever higher definitions if might be useful to improve the crap quality of both choice and programmes.

Until that happens to arrest the declining TV watching in my home I'm sorry but even so called HD is not a train going anywhere.

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It's LUNACY, you SWINE! Er, what, security? Moonpig DOT GONE

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

Water Recycling

Water recycling has been going on for years, if the process is being improved for use in more water short locations, great. If the less liquid products are rendered safe for other down stream uses even better, but can I please stand up wind until others confirm that the drier bit is not how it usually is?

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‘Get off of my Cloud’ Verizon tells users ahead of 48-hour maintenance outage

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Re: Wow

Heinz and the amazing string company? Heinz will be supplying the new improved baked beans tins?

I guess that Verison are just using their usual dyslexic reading of service, they thought cloud was the same as cr*p. Still if they think they run a monopoly or is it a single parrot operation as in mono-polly)?

A good chance for others to do a bit of comparison advertising me thinks.

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Saudi Arabia hires 'ethical hackers' to silence smut slingers

Richard Jones 1
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@Suricou Raven

I understand what you are saying as a statement of fact. I doubt that you were trying to defend their actions which to many people with a knowledge of their warped ways are offensive and highly unethical. States do try to define ethics in their own country and within their own boarders according to their own whims and in some cases rather less than objective standards. As other have said this can and does appear to apply to all countries including the land of the some times free and other times not so free.

The restrictions applied in state often do over step the mark as considered by others, e.g. the NORKs leaving many of their people to starve without the right to object while fat boy kim has the chance to treat the country as an all he can eat cafe.

One of the original human rights objectives was to try to put boundaries on the way that states plunged into aspects of their citizen's lives and this is where at least two courses of ethics collide. Sadly while the human rights laws were supposed to deal with what most people would regard as basic human rights to life and property and have clearly failed to achieve this for many, e.g. in Saudi some have sought to extend them into protections for those whose activities are against the rights of the majority of other citizens. This has made the whole issue a poisoned chalice. So while it appears to fail to protect the basic rights of many in Saudi it has also offended the rights of others else where to live without the threat of criminals disrupting their lives.

No one could have created a bigger mess if that was what they set out to achieve.

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Renault Captur: Nobody who knows about cars will buy this

Richard Jones 1
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Meh

Looks Good For Dogs

The low opening at the rear looks ideal for dogs, perhaps I will not need that for too much longer for my arthritic elderly Lab, but still good for my daughter's two hounds. As a town run about dog and granddaughter transporter the only things that puts me off are the maker, their reliability record and its a diesel. Still my Jazz is getting a bit long in the tooth and mileage is now building so I need something to think about as a replacement.

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UK banks prepare for Apple Pay 'invasion', look to slap on bonking protection

Richard Jones 1
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Re: So my choices will be...

Mattress? for storage

Cash? Chicken bones? Nose rings? for payments

It will not be apple, for either, ever.

Others are welcome to their own position; for the moment it is still a free - ish world and would do nothing to limit those with the desire using apple if they so wish

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UK retailers in TABLET PRICE SLASH BONANZA

Richard Jones 1
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Go

Re: But Has Anyone Found something To Do With Them?

@James12345 and AC, I think you have unwittingly made my point for me. There are those who have a tablet find it useful and that it meets a need in their life. I have a choice of desktops and a couple of portables, the portables rarely move from my 'office' space in the house, though one did go out in 2009...

For example, I do not collect DVDs and have no need for any portable device to catalogue them or anything else, see above.

For those who have a use and a need, tablets can be wonderful and perhaps to them a life saver, they are one side of a coin. To those with other issues not suited to the tablet they would not be useful and would be an encumbrance, not an aid. So there is a clear divide between the tablet demographic and the non tablet demographic. No amount of brass knobs or even chrome knobs will change that situation. For those that the tablet suits it is now a replacement market not a growth market. Not dead, not even dying but more of a steady state situation with which makers will have to live. A SMART-ish phone sits unloved, unwanted and unused in my office tidy a solution that has sought a problem to solve for two years.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

But Has Anyone Found something To Do With Them?

I discussed buying a tablet with my wife. The discussion lasted about 10 seconds,

"Why,

What For?

Not something else to keep charged"

And that was the end of discussions.

I tend to agree with her viewpoint, they feel like a solution looking for a problem.

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Freedom of Info at 10: Tony Blair's WORST NIGHTMARE

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Burden

I'm not sure how much paid for time should be spent on giving details of a local councils plans for handling zombie invasions.

On the other hand having dealt with some slippery contractors quoting to me in the private sector in the past, I am not sure how much detail of winning contracts I would have liked to pass on to the losers to help them shaft me in the future.

However, as a start point they could have tried to meet the requirements in the specification. A point that I was happy to pass onto them!

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Why has the Russian economy plunged SO SUDDENLY into the toilet?

Richard Jones 1
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'@frobnicate

Guttering candle effect?

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NSA's Christmas Eve confession: We unlawfully spied on you for 12 years, soz

Richard Jones 1
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Re: to conduct a little research on her husband...

Total agreement with you, it is largely down to the person to make their decisions, 'from the get go'. I said that the Snowden affair highlighted a total breakdown in the recruitment of staff. I am not talking about trying to track the wrong person, the internal; processes should and must prevent that and there are (well used to be) established ways to minimise that particular snafu. They are process errors and the processes need a kick in the rear to improve them - oversight can help with that matter.

However staff who are happy to 'go rogue' are another matter all together. They sacrifice the job and threaten a wide audience while on their personal vendettas, not just because they miss what they should be doing, but because they smoke screen the operation and thus prevent any sight, not just oversight of what should be happening.

No organisation is ever perfect but it feels as though some have a huge backlog to recover - I wonder how many if any of the present staff should remain employed at all let alone remain employed after 'retraining'.

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Privacy-loving BOXING KANGAROO BIFFS DRONE out of the sky

Richard Jones 1
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Holmes

Invade the Space of any Animal With Young

If you want to upset any animal with young just invade its space. Even humans with children they would sometimes like to disown will help you on your way if you interfere. The drone must have been far to close.

One up to the roo, good on you mate.

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Bring back big gov, right? If only the economics, STUPID, could tell us more

Richard Jones 1
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Happy

@J. G. Harston

I think if you had read a line or two further you would have seen I said,

"By the time people started to read the writing on the wall for much of industry the wafer thin margins generated were not enough to allow for investment."

However, I was talking about machines that were actually installed being subject to suspicion and often times such things as manning rules that insisted on higher levels of staffing that did not make them competitive. For example the railways and print industries both suffered from arguments over this issue. It is still happening in London now with disputes about trains and station manning.

If machines which had been installed 60 years earlier had not been amortised by then the business had been running on lean margins for far too long already.

I agree that almost everyone in the Far East did not carry the baggage of sentimental attachment to ancient equipment since many were starting with a clean piece of land with no accumulated history.

Note I have corrected 'if' to 'of industry' in the above quote

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Richard Jones 1
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Childcatcher

Too Many Easy Answers

I suspect that the problems of flattening growth are more complex than too many 'planners' like to think. After the privations of the 1920s, '30s and 40s there was both a desire to improve and a pool of people willing to try to make it happen. However even as that hope was being driven the seeds of destruction were being watered and nurtured. Most industry was old, tired and frankly well behind the times. During the 1960s it was nothing to see factories still lovingly working with machines that were built before the turn of the century, items that proudly bore their build dates of 189X or perhaps there was a modern one showing 190X. Anything new was greeted with suspicion. Again we were a world master at things that the world was already losing interest in doing. We developed some of the most sophisticate steam railway engines, not always the most reliable but the most complex all the same. By the time people started to read the writing on the wall for much if industry the wafer thin margins generated were not enough to allow for investment. For a while I worked with a chap whose PhD studied factors affecting large companies in commoditizing markets. As the scale of production increased, margins shrank rapidly, but the cash rolled in. However, the slightest decrease in the market would kill anyone who was not the leanest, most efficient and highest volume producer. Anyone on the second or third rung would fail rapidly.

Sure we decided that the best idea was to largely abandon making things, after all we no longer had the pool of hard workers prepared to put up with almost anything in order to get something made. (Neither should we have tolerated their appalling conditions but we should have captured their work ethic.] So we went in favour of manipulating things since that was an easy low cost of entry service business, clean hands and nice warm offices, Play your cards right you could gamble with other people's money and make a fortune and one or two recent governments thought it was wonderful. Barrings and the UK economy might like to discus how well it really worked.

So we did cling to some outmoded ways of working and a right roll call of dishonour can be read out over that! Rather than capture the ethos of those who had laboured in all weathers to rivet ships for a world that wanted cleaner, faster welded ships we cast aside the development of skills, wasting what little money we had on trying to stem the tide, not spending it on real investment and retraining.

At last with most of the old smoke stack industry gone along with the sense of grievance at its passing and some sense of entrepreneurial spirit rising from the ash lands the economy is starting to threaten a recovery. The heady times of rapid growth are past, but we need to avoid the doom sellers and other near-do-wells killing off the hope of a real economic future. It does not belong to one location or country it belongs to those with drive and interest to make it happen.

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If at first you don't succeed ... Fire, FIRE again: Amazon mulls smartphone sequel

Richard Jones 1
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FAIL

Lockdown Lock Out

Locking any phone to one network is plain daft, they must have hoped that the 'partner' would help launch the beast.

It is one thing to get a phone heavily subsidised so it appears 'free' and is thus locked down. It is anther to only have one choice, from that point on you tend only to look for reasons not to go further and from reports it appears there were a few of those. Or was it more than a few reasons?

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Heads up! If Tor VANISHES over the weekend, this is why

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: What could the attackers learn?

Possibly they do not want to learn that much from the potential stoppage. It may be that they feel it is being used for something else that they really want to target and go in hard. Stopping a communications system is often a prelude to acting against users of that system in a different co-ordinated attack. A trial take over might be something else to consider, possibly some rich pickings for a range of actors.

Tying it to hints about the Sony hack might be a red herring, and very likely is, but it might also be that the same 'crew' want to do something else and that an attack or TOR could be a way of hiding or facilitating that activity.

Another issue is that while a small part of the load on any system might be illegal and the rest fully legal and acceptable it does bring forth the discussion as to which hides which. Someone might argue that the legal stuff is there only to hide the illegal. On a tiny scale in one place I worked some of the biggest fraudsters were some of the hardest workers, they tried to bury their personal stuff in a hill of good stuff, hence my raising the discussion point in this case

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UK air traffic bods deny they 'skimped' on IT investment after server mega-fail

Richard Jones 1
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It was said to be a line of code with a previously unfound error

I am slightly bemused, the actual issue was relatively short lived though the impact was rather bigger. If there is a system in the world that does not have a code error somewhere I will be mighty surprised.

Any system that runs above about 85% capacity for much of the day has almost no capacity for recovery.

I have been involved with systems that ran up into the high 90% range, recovery was a horrible process. Later load was split across two systems load sharing and even though the load climbed back well over 80% no outages were ever critical. I understand that NATs runs in the mid to high 90s for too much time.

Not the same but I remember one system with alternately worked 'sides', the Y switch at the heart of the change over failed and it took hours to get the system back on line. The item had never failed before and was not usually tested - prior to that event!

It probably never failed again after that event.

Failures do happen and systems especially critical systems need both processing space and time to come back and stabilise. It is one thing to run a few risky financial transactions through the system and have to unwind them after a full recovery if they fail.

It does not work the same way with planes that were in the sky!

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Microsoft fires legal salvo at phone 'tech support' scammers

Richard Jones 1
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@ Dave Bell

The article did say a caller would ring the mark, so it is the same as the 'your computer has a virus' calls. Though they might have varied is slightly by suggesting the computer was simply generating errors and perhaps point you to the management information that few if any understand anyway.

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Richard Jones 1
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Devil

Re: MS wants compensation for this?

I suspect that MS want to take the profit out of this activity. A big hit would hopefully cripple the businesses and suggest to them it was not a good activity. Getting 10,000 victims to sue might be far harder. Since the victims acted from their own misguided understanding and given the weird state of what passes for the USA (in)justice system could well fail. A suitable packed jury would possibly side with the business rather than the plaintiffs.

Once MS have taken hopefully successful action there should be nothing to stop the victims also getting their slice of the pie or does the USA '(in)justice system' not work that way?

As someone who has had possibly well north of 100 stupid widows support calls I would be happy to target the callers with drones filled with all the nastiest stuff I could find to ensure a really painful fate. As it is I try to mess them about whenever I have the time, "Windows key? sorry I have just dropped it and the dog will not let me have it back.", etc.

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Net Neut: Verizon flips the bird to FCC on peering deal crackdown

Richard Jones 1
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Flame

@Charles 9, I suspect that is the real crux of the issue. Those in the land of the slaves, - they are certainly not free to chose their ISP, are really just slaves to their junk ISP, such as Verizon with their 'we know we are rubbish but take it or leave it' attitude.

Are they the same shower who try to shut down any and all municipality initiated competition?

It often appears that ISP has segued from Service Provider to Service Preventer in many locations.

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Judge bars dead Steve Jobs from appearing on TV news FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

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Sony sued by ex-staff over daft security, leaked privates

Richard Jones 1
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Re: Too early to judge

I up-voted you but note that there is one issue that too many businesses fail to understand. Quality is not a bolt on extra to be added 'if the sun is shining and there is nothing better to do'. The no-more company I used to work for had that idea and it did not work for them. With all underlying parts of the business, (those that the financial management idiots cannot see and understand) you either get them right from the start and keep them right or let them kill the company. The fools that broke Sony Pictures were as we now all know those responsible for mismanaging its ship wreak. However trying to Elastoplast or Band-aid a broken system is never easy or the right way, building a stable reliable system takes ground up work and money.

The major issue is that insurance costs, I am prepared to guess that most business issues were insured, e.g. stars not completing big budget project, etc. The $100 million to have a business critical secure system is part of the insurance cost centre that helps to ensure you have a business tomorrow.

The share holders should be joining the queue to batter down the doors, throw out the lame brains who caused this shambles of mismanagement and sue them for their malfeasance in office.

A new properly run company is now needed to replace this shambles of fools.

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'Turn to nuclear power to save planetary ecology from renewable BLIGHT'

Richard Jones 1
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There Are No Real 'Renewable'

Weather driven energy capture devices are not renewable sources. They simply capture the effects of a rather large nuclear reactor situated a bit down the street . We call it the sun. What we capture today we either capture or lose since it will be transformed into something else. The problem is that as we set up capture systems we lose something else, we chop up birds, disturb bats, stress other animals including humans with the noise of windmills. We blight land with other daft flights of fancy. We could and should do a little more to capture some pathetic amounts of solar light and heat by roof panels and perhaps solar capture walls. Though at the moment few if any are cost effective without costly subsidies, so are hugely unattractive to many.

In truth everyone of our usually pathetic attempts to move forward has been driven by a less than genuine agenda. First there are the subsidy farmers who only aim to farm subsidies - these are in no way related to real farmers who grow things to eat. Then there are the so called Greens, many of whom simply wish to have an additional reason to raise taxes and promote their own unsustainable dream of a worse tomorrow. It agree with 'Could it be', from imanidiot, if at last people are staring to think it might be we can look forward to some better times.

OK the Tsunami killed a number of unfortunate souls and broke Fukushima, though to date I have seen no figures confirming that anyone died due to Fukushima in spite of the now acknowledged faults and errors with that plant's design and management.

There are problems with almost any endeavour, we used to kill thousands of miners and many are still dying. The burning of coal kills a number more but so does the entirely natural; cold and illness of winter or are the 30,000 deaths in the UK alone not enough for some people? If so, don't worry it might be a colder than average winter and kill off a few more.

I hope at least some people are realising I am arguing for a lot more balance and sensible consideration. Progress is built on the back of errors and mistakes. Some people die through car accidents sad but true, but many more live because we are not using horses - just look at the facts from the early part of the 20th century.

Thorium might yet be the answer, knee jerk stupidity will not answer anything. Fermenting waste, river power, some solar and wind - neither of which are in any way renewable and other sound ideas may ALL contribute a little each but let us get away from special pleading groups who assure us that they and only they have all the answers.

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Govt spaffs £170k to develop the INTERNET OF SHEEP

Richard Jones 1
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More Useful than a Chatty Fridge

This appears a much more useful idea than the chatty fridge. Dumb fridges can last anywhere from 5 to 40 yearsanyway and managing the addition and removal of food items will be prone to error - at least in my house. Environmental sensors are usually installed to perform a wanted task and are likely to be far less chatty than a family fridge - which may well not be updated before about 2030 anyway.

I am already aware of such telemetry being used on rare breeds.

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DoJ's extra-territorial data demands: now Ireland is baulking

Richard Jones 1
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Surprisingly Late To The Party?

For a country that alleges its love of 'due process' Uncle Sam has been tardy, lax or downright negligent in not spotting that Ireland is NOT a US state! On the other hand Ireland has been somewhat slow in spotting that someone is going fishing in their waters without the 'due process' of obtaining the correct fishing license.

The really stupid fact is that their are correct and proper processes laid down in laws and they would almost certainly have produced less heat and far more rapid results. Or was there some other motive involved in this charade? - Somehow I doubt that this will come into popular play as a party game this, or any other Christmas.

I do hope injustice silly knickers in New York gets them really twisted for her failure to understand due process and her behaviour as a colonial jerk.

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18 million iPHONE USERS HAVE NEVER BONKED to ApplePay

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

#David Lawton

Why? Or is that having shelled out a lot of money you now find the need to use it for something, anything?

As you might see above I am mystified why anyone would be electrified by such an option.

Mind you I cannot see the point of an iPhone 6 or any iPhone or any other such phone for that matter. My 2006 or was 2008 phone supports what I need and still the battery lasts longer than a modern awkward to use phone. The batteries in my cards have never yet gone flat, perhaps because they do not use a battery.

My daughter gave me a pick stick to make a touch phone easier to use but I still find them a pain in the backside to use. Rather one touch on the headphone, speak the name and I am making a call, simple.

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Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Re the Need For Standards

Sadly some new tech is only aimed at those who are not willing to evaluate its issues. In this case for many it is a solution looking for a problem, the question is does it solve or cause the problem?

Apart from London's transport system I have yet to see anyone actually accepting these 'wonderful payment systems'. Perhaps I do not visit the emporia of the bright young things?

The funny thing is that none of my cards ever get a flat battery like a £500 pocket stuffing mini computer does. The weird phone waving does not obviate carrying alternatives when the transaction goes over the floor limit or the shops or other outlets used are not impressed by the silo technology you have selected. Selecting the correct card on a god awful method like touch screen that requires a two handed juggle does not look or feel much like progress, but each to their own on that one. Having tried a few examples I hate touch screens with a vengeance.

Barclaycard gave me the chance to disable their wave to pay ticket payment option. I willing accepted the offer since it is not likely to be any use. If I ever go to London it would be as part of a group, some of whom do not and will not have access to or the skill to use such financial payment methods.

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Richard Jones 1
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Unhappy

Re the Need For Standards

I totally agree there need to be solid robust standards, but it also needs a real reason and benefit to be derived from its use. I have never even used wave to pay with a credit card partially because I rarely if ever have any small transactions below £20. Frankly I would be more interested in a card shield to block payments.

As for getting a very expensive phone to wave about, why? People tell me all the wonderful things you can do with a so called smart phone, like watch the battery die as it runs up high data roaming costs, but why?

My phone is stuck in an inside pocket and I use a headphone when I need to talk. No handling involved.

Would I ever wave an expensive toy about to pay for something, yea shortly after hell freezes over!

The question is why would I want to get a very expensive new phone just to wave it about when there are many other ways to pay? Having a problem with my hand recovering from an operation make it even less attractive as a payment method.

Time will tell if this really has legs, the first few weeks are not likely to set out the long term impact. Some of those who have just bought a phone will happily try it out, some may even continue to use it but with the hassle of deciding which card(s) to store on the phone and then which one to use for a given transaction, thanks but no thanks.

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Dutch lawyers seek to overturn data retention

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Odds of dying

The odds of dying in an accident at home are far higher than the odds of dying in a road accident in many countries but that has not stopped people living in their homes. The last time I checked was some time ago but the Health and Safety moron was not best pleased when I pointed out that more people had recently died at home in the kitchen then had in road accidents. (The meeting went off badly as many of the chairs set out for us to sit on were split and tended to cut the trousers or other parts of anyone who used them, so much for health and safety!)

Sadly no one has a statutory responsibility for making sure that no one stands on a chair to reach the top shelf in the kitchen. Law and order are in a different category with someone lambasted if things go wrong and people die at the hands of some psychopath. It becomes worse if law and order 'should have known' that the nut job(s) i.e. psychopaths for the devil in whatever form, should have been stopped but were still wandering the streets.

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IBM Research wants laptop batteries to retire and slum it

Richard Jones 1
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Re Nice Idea but

Crockclips and pliers?

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One year on, Windows 8.1 hits milestone, nudges past XP

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Cauliflower

I tried the previews up to the point when they to force new sales by insisting that only recent CPUs could be used. Was there another way to turn the PC off except to press the silver button on the front? It blue screened with almost everything. and I found the way to make it usable was to cover the desk top with batch files to load what I wanted. The kiddie bricks were all deleted from the silly oops start screen as none of them were any use at all they did nothing except for the desktop screen. Then the flak from other started.

The good point was that the underlying OS was slick and fast, the bad news was that it was hidden by crap and stupid fluff. The stupid store for example that expected you to add access to a payment method do I look cabbage coloured? The drive for cloud usage where your data is controlled by the leaky sieve/CIA/GCHQ?NORKS?whom-so-ever company was take it or leave it, I would for ever leave it alone, - to the point of searching out a hack to remove it from ever appearing if I could. If you like it that is fine, but too much of it was hard marketing to sell new stuff, be it PCs or other devices, printers scanners, print servers or the 'store' by not working with existing items.

If Windows 10 avoids those stupid moves it might be attractive for the future, but otherwise; - do I really want a PC any more?

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UK.gov mulls three-point turn on three-point turn thanks to satnav. Weeeeeeee. THUD

Richard Jones 1
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How About Three Point Turn in a narrow lane/muddy field, etc.?

Given the way that Satnav sends you the wrong way I feel a three point turn is ever more important. I admit to not having a Satnav. The last time I travelled with three other Satnav equipped cars they all went the wrong way until we were further away from where we were going than we had been at the start! It sent them East when the destination was to the West so something quite trivial.

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TalkTalk email goes titsup FOR DAYS. Cheapo telco warns: Changing password WON'T fix it

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Oh gawd...

It is clearly a standard script used by all ISPs, (ISP = Internet Service Preventer?)

When I reported I could log into their network but not get any further, Orange instantly sent me a new router only for access to come back 20 minutes later. By then they were unable to stop the router thing they had dispatched and it arrived three days later.

It sits in the cupboard awaiting the next time their access method fails.

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Europe may ask Herr Google: Would you, er, snap off your search engine? Pretty please

Richard Jones 1
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WTF?

Re: Funded by Google's oppostition

If I am searching I usually want useful results not a run round someone's maze 'for the exercise'. I wonder how many have tried these second rate search engines?

When not actually searching for anything I have tried several, I suggest you try them and compare the results, or lack of them. A search engine that only finds other search engines is frankly rubbish, but there are plenty of them, unfortunately.

However, if that is what you want, good luck to you, at the moment you have the choice and so do I.

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Re: Euro Jealousy

If only I could turn off the unthinkably poisonous EU. Well done to them for crippling the economies of most euro countries so that the UK now has to pay a fine for doing better than the idiot countries held under the jackboot of the euro, better thought of as the crappo. The currency that just keeps on taking.

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Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY

Richard Jones 1
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He's Almost Right

He won't be clogging my news feed any time soon. There's an easy answer, Don't use Backside Book!

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I'M SO SORRY, sobs Rosetta Brit boffin in 'sexist' sexy shirt storm

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Re: Sad, y'know?

One of the major issues of the time is how easily the internet can make a non issue can become a hot topic for no reason at all. Anyone with some sort of stupid non point to make, (beyond being a fool) can start up a twit storm by simply being a twit.

I guess the only way forward is to so flood the internet with stupid shirt pictures that the fools overload and burn out.

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US Marshals commit DIRTBOX INTRUSION on Americans, says report

Richard Jones 1
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What is the difference between this and ANPR?

If this is simply tracking where a mobile is located based on its IMEI is that really any different to tracking a car based on its numberplate?

Correct me if I am missing something, (I would really like to know), but without a back haul a flying base station is not building any connections, so cannot intercept messages or be able to log any call data.

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