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* Posts by David 14

46 posts • joined 4 Sep 2009

HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert

David 14

For security - consider BlackBerry

That is as simple as it gets, really. I have been a longtime blackberry user who has decided to move to Android, but am doing so knowing that I am accepting much more risk in doing so. It means I will not store banking passwords, etc. on my mobile... and I will look to run anti-malware on my device.

BlackBerry may not be as app-rich of an ecosystem, but the darned things are pretty solid in terms of core function, reliability and security..... or at least, that is what the USA's NSA want's us to think... lol.

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Greenpeace rejoices after getting huge renewable powerplant CANCELLED

David 14

case in point...

I was at living in residence at University when another guy living there decided he was going to join Greenpeace and headed down to the waterfront to protest the arrival of a US Aircraft carrier. His protest was about keep Halifax (the city we were in) a Nuclear Free Zone... the ship has a nuclear reactor and capable of (and likely carrying) nuclear-type weaponry.

On his return I asked him if he really felt that strongly about being Nuclear-Free... of course his response was that he was dedicated to it! It was only then that I informed him of his gross oversight in paying tuition to a University with not only a nuclear physics doctorate program, but a functional nuclear reactor that is used for training purposes.

Not surprisingly, his enthusiasm for following the "Cult of GP" waned pretty quickly on facing the fact that he was financially supporting a nuclear reactor operation in the city.

The point of this story is that I somehow doubt that the Greenpeace activists that were protesting here were made up of people without reliable or affordable power... but rather those people that have much more privileged positions in the world, where is is easy to look down at others for trying to climb the ladder of prosperity.

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I am NOT a PC repair man. I will NOT get your iPad working

David 14

Re: That's actually quite offensive...

To be fair, the vast majority of people do not even realize that "retard" is considered insulting to people with mental retardation.... probably because the term does NOT refer to people with real mental retardation, but rather to people who choose to not use their fully functional brains out of laziness.

I avoid the term, not because I would be offending persons with mental development challenges, but because the Politically Correct police are always jumping down people's throats for reasons that are mostly benign.

There are a couple of expressions used in my "neck of the woods" when a cashier short-changes you.... well, the one that is most common is that you were "giped" (gip, rhymes with tip)... I have also heard people say "jewed". I immediately found the second very offensive because it was an obvious slight on jewish folks and their supposed frugal money-management ways. So, I used "giped".... opnly to be informed after using the term for a decade, that this was a slight on Gypsies, and I was a horrible person for doing so.... I ask, though, how could I have been insulting to a group of nomadic people for 10 yeaqrs if I didn't even realize that the term was in reference to them?

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David 14

Re: Took ages to convince my parents...

Depending on the specific products installed, If you uninstall Symantec or McAfee instead of simply changing the settings to make it perform better, you are doing a dis-service. These products are great in terms of cabability, but shite in terms of "out of the box" settings.

My $0.02,

David.

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David 14

Re: Apparel Solution

I like to just float the hourly rate that companies pay for my IT consulting time... between $150 and $200 per hour in the local market (what my employer charges, I wish it was what I was taking home!).... that way when "fixing my PC" question is asked, I can laugh it off saying "you can't afford me"...

In the end, I end up fixing more PCs than I care to count, and I have.t done that work professionally in over 20 years.

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What data recovery software would you suggest?

David 14

Crashplan Free

Your question mentioned specific products but not your recovery goals.

I use Crashplan's free edition for my family and friends computers. We all have home fiberoptic internet without caps (50Mb/s upload connections minimum) so speed is not an issue for us.

The concept is that you back up your machine's important files to a friend or family members' machine at another location, and they do the same. If you get a large group, you can simple pitch in for a USB HDD to place at a couple of locations and all use them. The data is fully secured and encrypted, so only you can read your own data.

This deals with 2 potential situations: (1) the inevitable dead HDD, and (2) a disaster like a fire or flood destroying your machine (and backup drives in many cases!).

Has worked well for me for about a year, though I am not sure about the "free" longevity... buy there are never guarantees!

My $0.02

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Oracle accused of breaking US competition law over Solaris support

David 14

Re: IBM or Redhat funding Terix to attack Oracle?

Solaris is a good OS... it was the best and others had to catch up.... the problem is that since Oracle purchased SUN, Solaris has been slipping. It is not the "Hottest" OS... not even close.

You mention the single-instance scalability of the OS.... even if I simply agree 100% with you... I have to ask, who actually scales anything to that size in the IT industry? The answer, I am afraid, is very, very, very few customers.

What I will say is that most customers want virtualization... the ability to slice and dice the machine to meet the demands of the various workloads. In that realm, Solaris is WAY, WAY behind. Containers are very old technology, that have some benefit, but many, many drawbacks... The hypervisor component of SPARC boxes, for example, using LDOMs and Solaris VM Server for SPARC is about 5 years behind in the management capabilities of IBM/PowerVM and about 10 years behind VMware.... with whom all enterprise vendors are trying to complete.

Simply put, Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center is an embarrassing product... it is buggy, inflexible, and downright incapable of providing a stable, reliable and robust virtualization management platform. It is getting better, but my own experience says that there is more work needed.

The Underlying technology for Solaris VM Server and the LDOMs is pretty good... but still not at the the level of IBM LPARs.... heck, just ask this simple question: I want to have fully isolated VMs and share threads between them... how do I do that? Oracle Answer: Containers... but the VMs will share a core OS. *FAIL*. IBM Answer: LPARs can share all CPU resources and if you need containerization, we can do WPARs.

Ultimately, while IBM kicks Oracle's butt in the "real world implementation" of Enterprise UNIX... the "Hottest OS" is Linux... Redhat Enterprise Linux to be precise. More traditional UNIX workloads are being moved to X86 running RHEL than anywhere else.

My $0.02..... from an Oracle and IBM and VMware certified consultant and contractor.

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Everything you always wanted to know about VDI but were afraid to ask (no, it's not an STD)

David 14

I recommend taking a look at Citrix XenDesktop 7.5

First: yes, I work for a re-seller and implementer of Citrix... we also re-sell and implement VMware.

Second: I just finished a small project to implement a pilot implementation of XenDesktop... and the ease of implementation, and the ability to extend the capabilities were simply impressive.

The latest XenDesktop 7.5 software can be freely downloaded for a basic test of the software... following a couple of the online walkthough guides for XenDesktop 7.x will let you install, configure and deploy desktops in not much more than an hour if you have an available Windows server and one or more desktop images to point clients (physical or virtual desktops will work for this test!).

The Citrix has built in capability not dis-similar to AppSense to really provide some great mobility options, and the Citrix receiver/StoreFront web capability is simply reliable and functional.

While VMware is the "Hypervisor King".... Citrix really has a very deep heritage in remote delivery... and the latest XenDesktop product is showing it.

I was impressed by the product... and think that if you are considering VDI, it would be a dis-service to not download the software and give it a once-over as part of your VDI product consideration.

My $0.02.... and NOT a paid opinion... :)

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So, just how do you say 'the mutt's nuts' in French?

David 14
WTF?

Re: Quebecois

Not just Quebecois-Canadian... but being in Newfoundland, Canada, we use the same expression.... except no so polite... "the cat's ass" is our more vulgar expression for something good.... "the cat's meow" for those wishing to be more polite.

Strangely enough, an expression here to describe a person who is a proficient tradesman in welding is that he/she "could weld the arse on a cat".... which is, I am sure, related in heritage to the previous vernacular.

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MPAA spots a Google Glass guy in cinema, calls HOMELAND SECURITY

David 14

Re: Going to be a painful future

Hmm... I live in Newfoundland, Canada. Most Americans I speak to have no idea where that is... I guess their ignorance of geography means they have no right to other opinions?

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David 14

But... it is the USA...

You know... the same place where property rights as so sacred that it is considered acceptable in many states to kill a person with a gun if they are sealing something from you. Only in the USA does theft of "stuff" mean so much that death is considered an appropriate punishment.

Yet for some reason, John Q. Public of the USA would be at the front of the demonstration that was fighting against cutting of a persons hand for stealing if it were to happen in a Middle Eastern country.... go figure!

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Unlocking CryptoLocker: How infosec bods hunt the fiends behind it

David 14

Re: Sensible to Suggest Ways of Blocking The Spread?

Or maybe just download the free VMware Viewer application from www.vmware.com and then download one of the many pre-packaged Web Browser Linux appliance virtual machines. This makes a VM on your machine that is a rock-solid barrier between your web browser and your on-machines files. Use your regular browser for known and trusted sites, let the appliance be your way to browse the net for fun or even for "dodgy" stuff... lol.

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Meet the BlackBerry wizardry that created its 'better Android than Android'

David 14

Re: "If it uses QNX rather than Linux"

"... Linux, originally conceived as a Unix-like substitute in larger machines"

Hmm, not sure what you reference as "larger machines". Larger than a cell phone, sure... but back in the 1992 timeframe, when I first started using Linux (and was forever grateful to the 1993 "slackware" release of the O/S making it as easy as downloading and writing only 55 x 1.44 MB floppy disks)... it was designed for "386" processors running in the 12 to 40MHz rating... something that is dwarfed by modern cell phones.

Linux has become a system used in larger server, for sure.... but it did not start that way!

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Actifio and the curious affair of the AIX copy reduction tech

David 14

Re: AIX since 1986

I would add that AIX 5.3 is not a bad target to possibly include given the large number of enterprise customers "stuck" at that version for various reasons. But, your point is quite true and valid... the variability is much smaller than they let on.

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BlackBerry hits 88MPH, goes back to the future with NEW old 9720 mobe

David 14

embedded batteries = lower refresh cycle

Lets be honest.... having a phone that cannot replace a battery is simply a way to make the electronics "wear out". Otherwise, people (like myself) who are not hard on their electronics may not need to replace their device in 2 or 3 years.

The electronic portion of a phone (smart or otherwise) will continue to function for well over a decade without issue if treated well and kept dry. The battery, on the other hand, will wear out relatively quickly. Even modern lithium cells fade with use... losing (if my memory is accurate) 20% capacity annually, on average. So after 3 years, you have significantly less functionality from the battery than before, and by then the software updates are likely chewing more and more power, making the situation even worse.

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David 14

You must have never owned anything except a blackberry!

I have had a 9900 for about 2 years now, and just recently replaced the battery because of recent reduction in life. I can get 2 days out of a full charge without excessive use.... a fully day is never a problem, even with heavy use.... as long as I am not in a 3G area (luckily, there is no longer any legacy 3G towers in my area).

When travelling to other locations that are 3G, the battery life is reduced pretty noticeably.

I would suggest a fresh battery, available pretty inexpensively on ebay - just beware of cheap knockoff batteries!

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Apple FINGERED our personal packages every day, claim shop staff

David 14

Not a big deal - should have been able to fix out of court.

This is pretty black and white in terms of compensation, it would seem to me. The time should be compensated at the legal amounts. What may be difficult is that the amount required will differ based on State, as I believe employment standards differ between states... I know in Canada, our Provinces have different standards.

I would assume the issue was brought up to management at the store to no avail... which would have precipitated the legal action. These type of law suits are not uncommon, and are viable and valid ways to deal with multiple interpretations of law - you get a judge to... well... judge.

Hope the requirements are clarified and suitable compensation is offered as/if required,

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NSA whistleblower to tech firms, Obama: 'Grow a pair!'

David 14
Megaphone

No real surprise here...

I know this is getting a lot of coverage... but for me, it was about who said it, not what has been said.

Snowden was a spook-for-hire... his job was to be the snooper and help in the snooping. The fact that we have the "name" of the snooping operation and some details on the extent are not really a big deal... as most everyone has already assumed it to be the case... haven't they?

I know, as a Canadian IT person, that the Patriot Act is one of the best known pieces of US Legislation, just behind their constitution and their Miranda-rights which are so often part of TV drama....

The Patriot Act, though, forms a regular part of my consulting with IT departments as reasons why US-based providers or even US-based consultants are issues when dealing with Canadian citizen data... if the data is in the USA, or managed by a company that is USA based, there is a (real) fear that it can and will be disclosed to the US government without notification.

I am not a fan of people breaking a trust to disclose such obvious acts, this does not seem to me to be a situation where the protection of freedom warrants the treason against one's own government.

My $0.02

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US boffin builds 32-way Raspberry Pi cluster

David 14

Re: @JDX

In what world is "Windows 8" the only choice for Windows?

Windows Server 2012 supports 64 physical processors, with up to 640 cores supported. I expect the next version to go even higher with upcoming Intel processors scaling up the core-counts.

All that being said... this was about a cluster, not a multi-threaded or multi-core computer... they are quite different in their goals and design.

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Ellison aims his first Oracle 'mainframe' at Big Blue

David 14
Meh

Now... if they can make a quality firmware hypervisor and beef up Oracle VM For SPARC to be more competitive in terms of features and stability as IBM PowerVM, I would happily return to the Oracle Solaris fold.

The reality of what I deal with is that few customers need massive oracle-only environments, so virtualization is critical to provide for isolated mixed workloads, and only licensing the amount of compute power you require to do the work.

Oracle has artificially, IMHO, kept the Intel x86/x64 world at bay simply by not supporting sub-licensing in VMware hosts, so that there i really no competition for a mixed workload environment there... the software licensing costs are too darn high for all but large enterprise customers.

My $0.02

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IBM skips BladeCenter chassis with Power7+ rollout

David 14
Happy

PureFlex != Flex Chassis

Okay... it was alluded to in another comment, but it should be made clear. PureFlex is not equal to the BladeCentre... though, the Flex Chassis is, arguably, so.

The Flex chassis is a 14-slot chassis, with a lot of I/O bandwidth, power and cooling, etc. It is 10U, but supports higher power and density machines, though it is not the most dense equipment IBM sells.

The Flex chassis is a component of the PureFlex, but PureFlex is actually a full integrated-package offering that includes servers, storage, network and management appliance.

Other components of PureFlex include:

Flex System Manager (FSM) - a single-bay sized appliance that provides a single pane of glass to manage the server, storage, network of the system... can support (currently) up to 8 chassis of equipment, and can also run the full Cloud Management Suite - SmartCloud - from IBM.

I/O Modules - these are the ethernet or fibre modules that would be installed in the chassis. They are designed with full redundancy and very-high thoughput. They also support east-west traffic so that inter-chassis traffic can work at backplane speed versus the network/fibre wire speed.

Chassis Managament Module (CMM) - like the older blade equipment, a management interface for a chassis-based hardware management, also can be installed in redundant pairs.

v7000 flex module - basically, a v7000 that fits in 4 node bays rather than in an external unit.

Compute nodes - xSeries or Power nodes in several versions, including single and double-wide nodes.

I have installed these already, and while there is always a few growing pains of firmware updates, etc. that are to be expected, the systems seem to be fine replacements... even if that is not what IBM had targeted them as (officially, at least) as can be seen by IBM's difficulty in getting their own support staff trained up in implementation services

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IBM grafts old AIX 5.3 onto shiny new Power7+ servers

David 14

One reason for 5.3...

Oracle 9. Simply put, this version of Oracle is still out there is a big way.... and to run it on AIX and stay within Oracle's support matrix, you need version 5.3 of AIX.

I have done many projects migrating people to IBM Power systems, and those running Oracle 9 are stuck with the older OS version, and a much-reduced performance capacity due to limited SMT capabilities compared with AIX versions 6 or 7.

I must admit, it is a great carrot to encourage DB version upgrades, and that is never a bad idea to consider when you are running such old versions!

Cheers!

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Oracle fudges touts Sparc SuperCluster prowess

David 14
Alert

Of course there is spare CPU cycles...

That is how Oracle rolls... make sure each CPU is highly under-utilized... because how will Larry ever be able to buy a new super-yacht if people onlu license software on the ACTUAL CPUs that are required?

When I read 20% utilized CPU, I see 80% waste and likely a machine that is imbalanced for the workloads... needing more CPUs to address internal system bandwidth issues...

The SPARC T4-4 is a competitive server... and if they took a high road and compared similar systems, they could argue the fine details to claim their's is better... but Oracle is constantly making marketing claims that prey on ignorance of the reader.

My job is to continue to call bull$h17 whenever I see it.

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New guide: Bake your own Raspberry Pi Lego-crust cluster

David 14
Thumb Up

Great.. .but better ways to do the power...

I love this implementation, and the link to the UNI blog was a fantastic step-by-step on the IT install, and even some good pics to use as a Lego guide... :)

One thing I will say, is that for a group of techies, they really didn't get creative with the power supplies! That many power strips and each RPi getting it's own mains-connected adapter?

One fo the great RPi features is the simple, 5v DC power input... any old 5v will work when pinned properly to a proper USB cable... so I would believe that a single DC adapter capable of providing sufficient amperage at 5v would work fine...

The RPi, I believe, will demand up to 500mA... if that is the case, they would need to be able to provide 32A of 5v power... something that should be able to be done with at least just a few old PC power supplies, or even just 2 enterprise grade server power supplies from old servers... very little involved in splicing in the required octopus of cables needed for the multiple drops... but would be more efficient, for sure, and much less complex.

Cheers!

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HP storage unit battered as buyers dodge EVA, tape

David 14
WTF?

Just what they asked for...

Okay... as a person who works for a successful HP Business Partner, this is no surprise!

They have spent the last year pushing their 3PAR arrays very hard, and for those not looking at that level of enterprise storage, they push the P4000 series.... I have been struggling with this myself as when HP themselves are talking to customers they push 3PAR as the FC option, and P4000s as the other option, but it has been iSCSI only.

This leads customers to see the obvious that EVA is out of the picture and being ignored even by the vendor, so continued investment here is not an option... so they are faced with replacing their FC SANs or moving to iSCSI... and many shops are not ready to strand an investment in FC and go full-on to iSCSI.

Being a business partner with HP is tough in the storage arena often... luckily, also selling EMC, IBM, NetApp, and others helps, when we have that option!

My $0.02

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Oracle cans IBM attack ad after ticking off from watchdog

David 14
Happy

There is no comparison in overall quality, scalability and reliability.

Oracle's Exadata system is an Intel-based cluster of servers, so the database scales horizontally which will work well for some workloads... it also is exceptionally complicated to manage and tune compared to a "regular" database, and the hardware is good for one thing only... the databases.

IBM Power servers are general-purpose computing environments that can scale from 4-core machines up to 256-core machines... and the level of virtualization and the robustness of the environment is second to none!

The kicker for many companies is that they get caught up on the sticker price of the hardware, rather than the big-picture, total cost management view of things which will include software, downtime, risk, management, longevity, etc.

And, for the record, I sell and architect solutions based on Oracle, IBM, and HP hardware... but the winner in the enterprise compute environment is a clear one in my mind and experience.

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Win a monster laptop

David 14
Unhappy

Crud... UK Residents only! :(

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What should Oracle do with Sun

David 14

Re: Hang on a sec

The engineered systems are _MOSTLY_ not SPARC based, but rather x86 servers running Solaris x86 and Oracle application workloads... They did mention the SPARC Supercluster, though, which is (surprise, surprise) SPARC based... :)

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IBM boasts of Power-AIX win at E-Trade Korea

David 14

Performance increase is not goal of a replacement....

A strategic platform selection and migration process does not require, nor is there any reason, to provide increased solution performance.

Those not familiar with this type of effort may scratch and wonder why do it... but the reasons for a replacement is not usually performance...

Oracle has taken a nosedive in market capitalization in the RISC system space, as has HP (especially since Itanium was pronounced dead by both Microsoft and Oracle). IBM Power systems are the only player that is growing market share in this space.

The comment in the article about a Linux cluster shows a lot of ignorance. There are many, many reasons why a Linux cluster may not work for this customers application, and there is the aspect of additional stability, reliability, vertical scalability, and flexibility that IBM Power systems can provide.

My view on this industry (one in which I make a living) is that when Sun was purchased by Oracle, the SPARC platform stopped its drive to be a general-purpose compute environment, and started focusing only on Oracle applications. In most every way, they are behind IBM hardware, and behind AIX and even RedHat capabilities in the OS. The last couple of bright spots seem to to only be DTRACE and ZFS, both of which will only appeal to a small number of business customers.

Cheers!

David - (certified in Oracle SPARC/Solaris, IBM Power/AIX, and RedHat Linux)

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SHOCK: RIM PlayBook outsells Apple iPad

David 14

Re: US Government Agencies Ignore Security Threats...

They may route through one of several RIM NOCs, depending on your location. But, the email data is encrypted through the process and is not available even to RIM...... a heck of a lot better than regular SMTP, which is as insecure as it gets.

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David 14

Re: US Government Agencies Ignore Security Threats...

Blackberry communications are fully encrypted between the BES server and your blackberry phone... the only unencrypted transmission ocurrs as part of the standard SMTP mail interchange.

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David 14

US Government Agencies Ignore Security Threats...

That seems to be a good headline for the comment in this story about people leaving BlackBerry handsets for iPhones... it is amazing to me that any government agency would adopt an iPhone or an Android phone over a BlackBerry if you are talking about corporate data!

I understand the need to support the desires of the employees to want to use their consumer devices... but I challenge you to count the number of stories of security issues on iOS and Android handsets over the last year... GPS tracking, remote hijacking, etc, etc.

BlackBerry, in the same timeframe has had a relatively short service outage that delayed delivery of emails and brought down the blackberry-only secure IM feature of BBM... but in reality, this outage seems to me to be far less intrusive for enterprise (BES Server) customers than the media portrayed.

I like my BlackBerry, I like the fact that BlackBerry does operate in a country that (for the time being) does not require backdoors for "government" watchdogs, and I like the fact that the device is still primarily about what I need to do for business. It is efficient but feature-rich where it counts.

Oh - and the Playbook.... it follow the same line as the handsets... simply works. And since the new OS, works very well... and I could care less about "native email"... actually have not even configured it ... the BlackBerry Bridge is a much better solution for me!

My $0.02

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A sysadmin in telco hell

David 14

Always have a non-800 number available!

A lesson from my own past... again, this one is in the Canadian telecom marketplace...

I do not know the exact technical configuration of this today, as my story did occur back in the late 90s, during the run-up to the Y2K milestone. During this time, not only was there a lot of coding, system upgrades, and new deployments all ongoing at breakneck speed, but the need for "Business Continuity" plans was top of mind to most businesses.

Sometime in the 1998 or 1999 timeframe, there was an outage of the 800-number lookup service in this part of Canada (East Coast). It turns out that at the time (and maybe even today) each 800 number dialed in this large geographic region (and covering about 22million people) all used a single lookup system running in a Montreal-based datacentre.

For about 24 hours, no 800 lines worked. And it became painfully apparent during that time that almost every contact number we had for IT support vendors were of the toll-free type.

While maybe the system is now more robust, I still, to this day, always demand a direct-dial number alternative for any critical contact information alongside any 800 line service.

Cheers!

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BlackBerry PlayBook OS gets RIM spit 'n' polish

David 14

Re: Setup .. horrific

Hmm... sounds like you have a problem understanding BlackBerry devices in the first place, to be honest.

- You were running an operating system that is N-3 and you had problems upgrading it... not the PlayBook's fault.

- You had problems understanding how to install and use AppWorld, again, not the PlayBook's fault.

- You had problems getting the bridge to function... something that worked in seconds on the 4 devices I have configured, so not sure where the issue is.

- You had a very old phone that you wanted to connected to a new tablet, it was hard for you... okay, my answer to that is so what?

Deploy an iPAD and then have to get people to use iTunes to sync files, purchase new data plans to the iPADs can work out of WiFi range, and install bridge infrastructure so that you can safely deploy secure corporate applications and data to the iPAD.... etc...

Wonder which is a better solution?

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David 14
Thumb Up

Re: Re: It is my understanding that ...

More like, yeah, just Yeah!

The Playbook is a fantastic media device. I have not tested the new OS's media capabilities yet, but the included video codecs on the original PB OS was fantastic, just a few audio issue on some avi encodes I had available. You can get to the playbook directly over wi-fi if you want to, so moving files around is easy and does not require silly tethering and special applications to do so.

The comment about company data shows there is an ignorance about how the playbook was designed to work.... an iPAD will natively require local data storage of corporate data... a PlayBook is designed to work with existing BlackBerry devices and the commonplace corporate BES server controls of those devices... so you view your corporate data on the playbook, but it remains on the secure and protected blackberry device itself.

So far, the OS v2 is a nice change. The user interface changed slightly, but not significantly better or worse in my mind. The native email client will be nice for some, but not something I want or need (I use the blackberry bridge for email already).

The "use the blackberry as a remote keyboard/mouse" is great! Using the BB9900 with a multi-touch screen and a traditional BB keyboard I now have a much better mechanism to control powerpoint shows in meetings, take notes and write short documents, and when not working, to remotely surf the net and watch videos from my couch/hotel bed with the playbook connected directly via HDMI to the TV.

All in all, nice update to a great little device. Much happier with the PlayBook than my HP TouchPad or iPAD.

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RIM readies 7in, 10in BlackBerry tablets for 2012

David 14

Also a PlayBook Lover...err.... Liker!

Have a 64GB PlayBook that was supplied by my employer (love the "out of pocket": price of $0!).

I was not sure what to expect, but being a BlackBerry phone user, it simply WORKED. The BB Bridge to tether the two just worked instantly, and Email, Calendar, etc... as well as mobile browsing all worked instantly... and that is all with the "old" operating system.

I have a couple of complaints, mostly the limited apps, but once I got over that hump I have realized that the device kicks the butt of other (even larger) tablets for business use. The lack of simple connectivity to an overhead projector is a show stopper for many(most) tablets out there, and is something that ism so easy on a Playbook.... step 1 connect HDMI cable from projector (or TV) to playbook... step 2 Enjoy.

Looking forward to the next OS simply for the additional Apps that developers have not been willing to port to the PlayBook.... not RIMs fault, per se, but still it is something they wear daily in the negative marketing.

The device and the true multi-tasking OS and interface is so nice compared to Android and iOS, I think that the bad press is simply based on the market share issue and the love by Fanbois of all things apple!

I like my apple products fine, but the PlayBook kicks arse!

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Windows 8 hardware rules 'derail user-friendly Linux'

David 14

... its not just about a Win8 phone, but how about a tablet that you buy and then decide, hey, I want to run Android on it?

Also, as the Win8 OS is moved to other hardware devices such as Thin PCs and maybe some home theatre devices, etc... which would more than likely be ARM based as well, they are locking out the Linux or other OS enthusiast from the hardware.

This is the type of behaviour that has got them in trouble with various governments in the past! It seems that threats of anti-trust legislation is all that stops MS from doing such underhanded things!

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Wi-Fi desk rodents break free from oppressive cabling

David 14

Umm... WiFi Mice are already around...

Maybe using a different spec for the WiFi connection, but I am using an HP WiFi Mouse now on a brand-new(ish) ProBook 6460b which does not have Bluetooth,

The mouse was purchased for less than $50 at Staples in Canada... so mouse connections over WiFi is not exactly cutting edge.

Cheers!

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Huge mob swarms phone launch – but it's a BLACKBERRY

David 14

Yeah... that's been a real problem... sure!! (please note sarcasm)

Fanboi's love to mention a couple of datacentre glitches, but forget about crappy antennas, high prices, and the all-mighty fruit gods choosing what content you should be allowed to see on your phone.

I'll stick with my blackberry and playbook... the hardware kicks ass and the functionality for what I do is far and above that offered by android or iOS devices...

My $0.02

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El Reg in SHOCK email address BLUNDER

David 14
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No big deal...

Despite all the Chicken Little "oh my god, the sky is falling" crap that many will complain about, this is no big deal. Anyone out there that has some belief that their email address is some sort of private or secret thing is just delusional.

More so if those same individuals used their so-called private email address to sign up for a free email distribution from an IT news outfit. No offense El Reg, but being an avid reader does not make me believe that giving you my personal bits of info is a good idea.. :)

Someone at the Reg should be lambasted for the error, and maybe a bit of technical change is in order to prevent this from happening again in the future... but otherwise... no worries! You can find my email on pastebin.... and a million other online places where I use my (anonymous) gmail account!

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Don't bother with that degree, say IT pros

David 14

There IS a difference

Been in this industry for over 20 years, and there is a difference between degree-holding consultants and others... but if you are talking coding, sure... I will admit that a degree to code seems a little overboard.

That all being said... an individuals aptitude and work ethic plays far more of a role in their overall ability to excel than a degree.

My $0.02

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Time to say goodbye to Risc / Itanium Unix?

David 14

Simple....

Small Intel Linux server running an Oracle database requiring Enterprise Edition features:

- single socket, quad core server = $2000

- Oracle license for server = $200,000

- annual maint costs for HW & Software= $44,000

Actual CPU usage = less than 10%

Virtualize, and you share a piece of hardware with other machines. So now you have the same server.. lets see:

Server = $2000

VMware = $8000

Oracle = $200,000

Maint Costs = $48,000

Number of similar machines it supports = 5 or 6

So about $250K in costs per server if physical... or about $50K per for virtualized.

Pretty simple stuff!

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BlackBerry tablet boots from 'floppy disk OS'

David 14
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Nice Business Device

I must admit, being an IT guy, I am interested in a small, portable tablet to do some browsing, etc. I am quite suprised with the overall design and the functionality this new PlayBook is currently promising - linking to BES and pairing with BlackBerry handsets for sharing data is a fantastic use for many enterprise businesses, where bringing in an iPad is still... well... not encouraged.

Dual-Core, HDMI, 1080p output (with dual screen display!) is impressive, but as many will mention and understand - the battery will be the achilles heel... whats the point of all this capabilit if the system can only run 2 hours on a charge. One of the reasons I love my blackberry is the 4-days between charges I can get on the device... 2 full days with moderately heavy use!

I stay cautiously optimistic and awate to see the final device in 2011.

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IBM packs 'em in vertically

David 14
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IBM Following SUN on this one???

For those that are familiar with the SUN product line... there was a server that was code-named "thumper" several years ago that also have the storage mounted vertically... 48 1TB SATA drives in a 4-U enclosure. The current version is an Oracle SUN X4540... and that server is a full server with 2 x 6-core AMD processors, etc.

A similar frame of 48 vertical drives is also available from Oracle as a SUN J4500 storage array system.

This is not a "new" thing to do... just new for IBM, and maybe newsworthy for the extra 12 drives?

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WTF is this country called America?

David 14

Ignorance abounds

Okay... admittedly the original comment was not what one would consider well written or well presented, but lets cut to the chase here.

The name of the country is the United States of America, not "America", The common use of "American" to refer to a citizen of the USA is quite different then referring to the entire country simply as America, something that maybe you should ask people in other North and South American countries about, and not just assume that you know best.

Second, the retort to the poster was quite ignorant. This individual may be a bit of an idiot, buit the comment about the seals??? Really!?!

Being a person from Canada, and from a province of Canada where we do participate in the annual hunt of Harp Seals, I know that there is a great deal of misinformation and ignorance of this industry, ignorance which is easily found in the off-handed commend about beating a seal cub with a baseball bat.

Please, do yourselves a favour and get informed before making such comments. Maybe try a source based on science and fact and not one based on profit-driven "animal rights" organizations that have nothing to do with anything close to reality.

Here is a site put in place by the federal government of Canada...

www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/media/seal-phoque/seal-phoque-eng.htm

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Startup makes thin clients look chubby

David 14
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It is an ASIC

Pretty much - a custom ASIC, anyway. Fantastic technology, a bit less capable than a SunRay, but also cheaper (and easier to implement) in the end. Great solution for a windows-only shops. Now... if only they would be purchased by a real "enterprise" company so I could recommend to my customers that they actually base their business on this technology! Come on EMC... you have lots of cash... buy 'em and brand the devices as VMware, and make it part of the VMware View suite of offerings.

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