* Posts by moiety

1575 posts • joined 28 Aug 2009

Broadband routers: SOHOpeless and vendors don't care

moiety
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Re: e.g. ''pizzahad' or 'beerhad'.

Pot legalisation campaigners could declare a highhad. They would announce this by producing a fatwahn.

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International effort to wrangle t'internet from NSA fizzles out in chaos

moiety
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What the internet needs isn't another committee...it's decent, reliable end-to-end encrypted software that's easy to use and is trusted and thoroughly reviewed.

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Tinder Plus charges oldies MORE to ogle young hotties' pics

moiety
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Re: NSFW

Spanked it, more probably.

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Lenovo: We SWEAR we're done with bloatware, adware and scumware

moiety
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Re: Ingredients

I for one don't eat anything with Aspartame in it, and would love to be able to make the same choice about my laptops.

I've done a bit of lightweight Friday night research; and I think you're safe to eat whatever laptop you like.

DISCLAIMER: Do not do this! Just remembered it was Friday...

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moiety
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Re: Too late, too late

I'm prepared to give them the benefit of the doubt...if they'd kept on with their initial "fuck you, peasants" approach then, yeah, they'd be on my list too. Whether that initial response was an attempt to bluff; panic; or simply being unaware of the seriousness of the problem is a source of conjecture; but that is an absolutely normal reaction for a big company getting caught fucking up.

What redeems them partially in my eyes is the extensive efforts since to make good. It's not easy for a Chinese company to admit they were wrong with the whole 'face' thing and all. It's not easy for any company to admit any kind of liability because they are inevitably going to be hit with a monsoon of lawsuits about 0.4 seconds after the press release. They have -unusually- listened to their customers and have taken the incredibly brave step -for a corporation- of fessing up; got a removal tool out in a very short time and have taken other steps to make sure they're not going to get caught out again. And they know they're going to be watched quite closely for a time, so you can more-or-less guarantee that the measures are things that are actually happening rather than PR promises.

Not convinced about the McAfee; but you have to ship new computers with some prophylactic measures (or else they'll be pwned as soon as they hit the net) and McAfee probably pays a few quid so meh. Better than nothing. Possibly.

For me, their actions have removed them from my 'Sony' list (not never, no way) to my 'to be watched suspiciously for a while' list.

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RIP Leonard Nimoy: He lived long and prospered

moiety
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Dying is not logical. I wish him well with his next project.

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Paranoid Android Kaymera smartmobe takes on Blackphone

moiety
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"If all else fails and the phone user is physically attacked, he or she can type in a distress PIN

Well and good if you see it coming. How about the many types of attacks that are a surprise?

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Google to tame Android's Wild Wild West to please suits

moiety
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When the OS's entire point is to haemorrhage data back to Google, it really doesn't matter how secure the apps on it are.

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Gemalto: NSA, GCHQ hacked us – but didn't snatch crucial SIM keys

moiety
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Re: Another predictable line of comment....

So you blackmail/bribe/threaten an insider.

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Why does the NSA's boss care so much about backdoors when he can just steal all our encryption keys?

moiety
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The spymaster reckons Americans should secure their communications against all eavesdroppers – except, of course, those working for the police, FBI and the NSA (to counter terrorism or something). Experts warn any backdoors allowing this to happen will be exploited by criminals.

Exactly. A system is either secure or it isn't. You can't make it selectively secure even if you wanted to because sooner or later the "bad guys" will get the keys to the door. And I'm being massively generous there by not adding police, FBI, NSA, alpabet alphabet to the "bad guy" list.

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Google opens 'Inbox' heir-to-email trial to biz users

moiety
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Re: If it ain't broke

Welcome. For keeping your own act together then, I'd go the POP (home) + IMAP (out and about) route then. You just have to remember to synchronise your portable client to fetch mail before the home-based POP comes in and downloads it all. I use a similar system for mailing myself back ideas from the pub and also taking client notes (also from the pub) and -after a bit of initial fiddling- it works rather well. Free over pub wifi.

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moiety
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Re: If it ain't broke

@Sir Runcible Spoon

You looked at The Bat (http://ritlabs.com)? Awesome mail client and they do a client-on-a-usb-stick version (voyager) that might solve your portability problems.

Failing that, you can use POP3 at home and IMAP-leave-it-on-the-server on your phone throughout the day, so you can stay informed, and the archive version ends up on your home machine.

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Microsoft: You want on-prem wares, UK.gov? We'll make you pay

moiety
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Re: @moiety And yet it's already happening

Short-termism and 100% clueless about IT. Yep, that's our government alright - I'd recognise them anywhere.

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moiety
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I wouldn't have thought that letting a foreign company control access to your data would be a particularly bright move for a government department.

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SSL-busting adware: US cyber-plod open fire on Comodo's PrivDog

moiety
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Goddammit! Anyone know what the SSL cert looks like? Ironically enough, I used comodo to block the PrivDog stuff (There's no way I'm running anything from a company called AdTrustMedia). Thought I'd got it all....

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Lenovo to customers: We only just found out about this Superfish vuln – remove it NOW

moiety
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Lavasoft? Ad-Aware?

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moiety
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There seems to be a lot of ex-spooks suddenly turning up in this story.

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moiety
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"Unfortunately, in this situation a vulnerability was introduced unintentionally by a third party."

That's bollocks.

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Tweak comms laws or Facebook 'n' Twitter folk will be treated like CRIMINALS

moiety
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There's some twitchy cunts who find everything offensive.

There are some traffic wardens who find the phrase "fuck off" to be alarming, harassing and whatever the other word is, and I'm an official criminal to prove it (a wholly unrepentant one too - the officer concerned can thoroughly, entirely and comprehensively fuck right off).

The problem with woolly phrasing like that law is everyone can come a cropper. A Christian fundamentalist -say- would find every syllable I would utter on the subject of religion offensive. I find doorstep conversion attempts offensive (and I find know-nothing bollocks like Cameron's no-encryption, no-safe-places speech fucking obscene).

Where do you draw a line when it's thoroughly subjective, and a significant number of offended people are just being offended because they think they should be.

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Superfish: Lenovo? More like Lolnono – until they get real on privacy

moiety
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We are to all intents and purposes part of the security industry groundswell. Agreed that we're all small cogs but not entirely without influence. People come to us for hardware recommendations, for example, and I personally have cost Sony a fair few quid since they pulled that rootkit stuff with my anti-recommendations.

All statistically meaningless on an individual basis; but -as us nerds seem to react in a fairly uniform way to this sort of unethical shenanigans- the cumulative effect may not be inconsequential (especially when you consider that we're not especially forgiving and those consequences may last for quite some time).

Even bitching on forums serves a purpose; that of spreading information to people who otherwise might not have known about an issue or it's possible ramifications. There are many occasions that I've found the comments -especially on El Reg***- to be more enlightening than the story because someone will chip in with a different perspective, or a nugget of information or just the right keywords. So it's worth doing.

***No dissing of the El Reg hacks intended

EDIT: Oh yeah. The other thing about nerds is we research stuff. We're still in the process of finding out how deep the rabbit hole goes with Leovohno...I don't think we've found the bottom yet.

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moiety
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@dogged - good points; but if we don't give Leovono a hard time then who will? If it all goes down without any rumble of dissent then it will encourage other people/companies to pull the same sort of shit.

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moiety
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Actually a head on a platter (or, indeed, pike) might just do it in this case.

Lenovo's response arguably did as much damage as the superfish thing, if not more:

Peter Hortensius, the firm's *chief technology officer*:

"We’re not trying to get into an argument with the security guys," he told the Wall Street Journal. "They’re dealing with theoretical concerns. We have no insight that anything nefarious has occurred."

He can go, for a start.

Potentially sending the contents of every HTTPS session of affected users to Superfish (whos very business model means that they cannot be trusted) is a bit more than theoretical and definitely counts as nefarious in my book. They got caught and tried (badly) to lie their way out of it.

And then to add salt to the wound:

<paraphrase>Ha ha! We only did it to the peasants....we wouldn't do it to our corporate users because we love you guys</paraphrase>

...forgetting that IT bods do occasionally leave the office and have their own gear at home.

If the company had responded to the effect of:

"Holy shit! We didn't realise it did that! We are so, so sorry. We are going to immediately try to fix the problem for all our affected users; we are going to have a serious word with Superfish who are about to account for every single byte of information siphoned from our users; and we are going to review all of our internal procedures to make sure that nothing like this can ever happen again"

...they might have had a chance.

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moiety
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Carp diem.

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10 Top Tips For PRs Considering Whether To Phone The Register

moiety
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My personal favourite is "Hello, Lesbian Switchboard; may I take your order?"

Completely bluescreens most people.

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Man the HARPOONS: YOU can EASILY SLAY ad-scumware Superfish

moiety
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Superfish is also the name of a jquery menu system:

http://users.tpg.com.au/j_birch/plugins/superfish/examples/

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A truly SHOCKING tale of electrified PCs

moiety
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Talking of electricity and stupidity, always unplug strip plugs before troubleshooting because the "electricity is here" light might be the thing that's broken. Found that out the surprising way.

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HAWKING ALERT: Leave planet Earth, find a new home. Stupid humans

moiety
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Religion is fine, some people seem to need it and it does contribute to wellbeing and stability in some people. To misquote Robert Heinlein, though, you should do it in private and wash your hands afterwards.

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Ads! People! love! ads! in! their! apps! Please! use! ours! cries! Yahoo!

moiety
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No! We! Don't!

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Superfish: Lenovo ditches adware, but that doesn't fix SSL megavuln – researcher

moiety
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No. Fuck off; I'm full.

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(Re)touching on a quarter-century of Adobe Photoshop

moiety
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Well, I was thinking of pin-hole burns more in the Pink Floyd sense:

♫...the inevitable pin-hole burrrrrrns; all down the front of my favourite satiiin shirt.....♫

I haven't been smeared with ink since I stopped refilling ink cartridges. That stuff is worse than glitter. As is the whole home/business printer industry now I come to think about it.

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moiety
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"After a hard day at the office, image editors would go home with their clothes splattered with ink or dotted with pin-hole burns."

Image editors still go home with pin-hole burns. :)

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After Brit spies 'snoop' on families' lawyers, UK govt admits: We flouted human rights laws

moiety
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So the takehome from this is that if you are suing the government, meet your lawyer in person somewhere eavesdropping is difficult.

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Your hard drives were RIDDLED with NSA SPYWARE for YEARS

moiety
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I remain unbagged and unvanned at the time of writing, thank you for your enquiry.

The line remained unfinished because I was just back from the pub so I could have gone on a multi-page rant about the entitled tosspots who think they have a fucking right to mess with my own possessions in my own fucking house...or I could just fire up the Xbox and work out my ire on some pixels; which I did.

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moiety
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Just when you think you're paranoid...

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Obama turns back on spooks: 'I'm on the side of strong encryption'

moiety
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Re: Sony

Sony being hacked by the Norks is far from a given

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Samsung's spying smart TVs don't encrypt voice recordings sent over the internet – new claim

moiety
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An internet of thing with no bloody security whatsoever. Quelle surprise.

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DARPA's 'Cortical Modem' will plug straight into your BRAIN

moiety
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Doesn't appeal - what happens when advertisers get hold of it?

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REPORT: UK needs online eBay-style court for civil justice

moiety
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The dispute resolution service has downsides for both parties. For the seller it's the fact that the service favours the buyer. For the buyer it's the fact that the dispute is auto-killed in less time than it can take a package to arrive from China.

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UN negotiations menaced by THOUSANDS of TOPLESS LADIES with MAYONNAISE

moiety
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Pics, or it isn't going to happen.

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Lashed Saudi blogger Raif: Prince Charles has word with new king

moiety
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This always cheers me up. When the old Saudi king came on a visit to the UK in 2007 (I think) the Welsh guard played Darth Vader's Imperial March as a lightweight protest/commentary about Saudi policy and actions. It's a pretty good news report and goes to show that nothing much has changed.

All the receiving dignitaries have my undying respect for keeping straight faces...I would have howled.

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moiety
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Barbaric.

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French minister: Hit Netflix, Google, Apple et al with bandwidth tax

moiety
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Attempting to surprise-tax Google worked so well for Spain. What are these people on?

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Anonymous HACKED GAS STATIONS - and could cause FUEL SHORTAGES

moiety
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"The internet will be so many IP addresses because of IPv6, so many devices, sensors, things that you're wearing, things that you're interacting with that you won’t even sense it, it will be part of your presence all the time. Imagine you walk into a room, and the room is dynamic, right?

And – again – with your permission and all of that, you're interacting with the things going on in the room, a highly personalised, highly interactive and very interesting world emerges because of the disappearance of the internet."

--Google exec chairman Eric Schmidt

The IoT is seeming pretty noticeable so far....

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Skin colour's irrelevant. Just hire competent folk on their merits, FFS

moiety
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That was an interesting read. The thought occurs in that particular experiment that it might be "blue mud in the belly button" syndrome. Robert Heinlein said that if you ever found yourself in a society where everyone rubs blue mud in their belly buttons at intervals, you would be well advised to do the same, just as solemnly as everyone else (paraphrasing a bit there).

To put it another way; white knights in meatspace run an excessively high risk of being stabbed.

I'm not convinced about the conclusions of that experiment...if everyone around you is condoning torture, is it a bright move to be the first to poke your head over the parapet and decry "This is wrong!" On the one hand, that could be the pebble that starts the landslide of "Nopes" that gets it stopped. On the other hand, if you're reading the room wrong, you're in a roomful of people *condoning torture*, and you could be next if you piss them off by standing out.

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Now Samsung's spying smart TVs insert ADS in YOUR OWN movies

moiety
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Re: Do adverts actually work?

It's mostly all deductible, so it might be a way of handing some wedge to their mates instead of the tax office.

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moiety
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Re: Come back SONY all is forgiven.

Speak for yourself. I definitely haven't forgiven Sony. Samsung have now added themselves to my shitlist as well.

I have a smart-ish TV - it's never seen the internet and never will.

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'Giving geo-engineering to this US govt is like giving a CHILD a LOADED GUN'

moiety
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"Other amendments specifying that it is caused by humans failed to win the necessary majority."

That's probably because the congresscritters are being paid by people who are making lots of money by accelerating the process.

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REVEALED: TEN MEEELLION pinched passwords and usernames

moiety
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Re: Increase the noise ?

@Cuddles - sorry, but the only secure password *is* an unrememberable random string of multi-character gibberish. Minimum of 18 characters, with the sort of cheap firepower available from Amazon etc. these days.

The lifehacker article is more-or-less there except they use dropbox to store their password file which strikes me as definitely risky.

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