* Posts by moiety

1403 posts • joined 28 Aug 2009

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NORKS: FBI's Sony Pictures' hacking allegations are 'groundless slander'

moiety
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I'm finding the sabre-rattling from the US a little disturbing. The decision of theatre-owners not to show the film seems sensible (and quite possibly insurance-driven). The chances seem pretty small of NK being able to mount a physical attack, but what if you're wrong? Might chance it if I were a theatre-owner in Arsendofnowhereville, Ohio (But with very prominent "at your own risk" signs just in case) as you'd clean up if you sold US flags; "I survived the interview" t-shirts; and similar stuff on the way out. No way in hell would I chance it if it was a theatre -say- in Times Square or somewhere touristy.

Also, Xmas Day release...symbolic in a number of ways; and a successful terrorist attack then would get all the publicity any terrorist could ever want.

I don't really blame the theatre-owners too much...the pot isn't that big (fuller houses for a little while, plus a bit of mechandise) and the stakes are high (preventable deaths if you spin the wheel and you're wrong). By all accounts the film isn't all that anyway.

I don't really blame Sony -a Japanese-owned company- for yanking the release...nowhere to show the film, plus the preventable death thing, plus they are still being blackmailed. When you have them by the bollocks, their hearts and minds will follow; as the saying goes.

Where I'm getting the disconnect is all this "a blow against US freedom" cobblers. It's a blow against *Sony's* freedom, right enough, but they're Japanese; therefore foreign and don't count (going by the rest of US foreign policy). So the US gets to see a (reputedly) crap film a little later than originally planned and a reasonable response to that is bombing an entire nation into a glass car park, if the online opinions are anything to go by.

America, you are spoiled rotten. Go to bed this minute, and tidy up your room while you're up there.

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Feds finger Norks in Sony hack, Obama asks: HOW DO YOU SOLVE A PROBLEM LIKE KOREA?

moiety
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Re: Yeah

That bit seems credible to me. NK doesn't apparently have too much internet and they are nutters with nukes. I would expect absolutely everyone to be tapping the feeds in and out.

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moiety
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Re: ...

I believed it probably was the norks until the FBI said it was. Seemed fairly straightforward and it is a film the norks have declared jihad against. But what if it's a framing attempt or some reason to slap some embargoes on the norks or something even more devious?

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moiety
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Norks, FBI, Sony...can't trust one of them as far as you can spit a hedgehog; and who gives a monkeys what the MPAA's opinion is?

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The Shock of the New: The Register redesign update 4

moiety
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*ahem*

You can, apparently.

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moiety
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Re: it might be more manageable to give us your feedback directly via this article

No we won't! (Just arguing for the sake of it...).

:)

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moiety
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Much appreciated, thanks.

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El Reg Redesign - leave your comment here.

moiety
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Re: @moeity

@JDX - I see where you're coming from and -yes- consultancy does not come without it's own pitfalls, but it can be done with minimal pain if you structure your consultancy properly and state the rules upfront; something along the lines of:

1) These bits are going to be changed in this way for this reason...we're open to suggestions to better ways of doing it, but these things -or something analogous- are going to happen.

2) These are the bits that might be changed - thoughts? Remember that we only have so much space and implementing a new toy may well require losing an old one.

3) Any other suggestions, including things about the current design that annoy you and maybe can be fixed while we're poking it.

RULES: We know we're not going to please everyone. Weapons will be confiscated at the door. Thank you.

The main argument for consultancy is prepping your audience so that they know that something's coming and lessening the shock when it actually arrives. People will -of course- still bitch but consultancy takes some of the heat out of it and also redirects and disperses some of it. Then there's reader engagement and making people feel involved in the process which helps keep your loyal users loyal. There's also the fact that there's no clickbait like a good argument and -with a suitably rabid userbase- you could keep it going for a good week or three. From an adminning point of view, it's funny as fuck to watch the "Off-White Crew" square off against the "Semi-Transparent Sepia Militia"; with occasional raids by the "What's Wrong With Cream You Cunts Posse". Then someone will inevitably mention fonts (office pool for the time interval) and it all goes religious, as do your ad impressions.

The other main point is to remind people gently whose site it is. Our territorial instincts are just not built for other people's 'property' to be running in our homes. The correct etiquette is, I believe, to call whoever changed anything twelve types of bastard and threatening to leave. Dropping the design and the mic does establish ownership, right enough; but it's possible to broach the subject in a much kinder fashion and establish a mood that's more we're all in this together rather than take it bitch.

It is hard work, I'll grant you; but worth doing, in my demi-anonymous internet opinion.

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moiety
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Re: Redesign for ad changes

Welcome. The post above was mostly to point out that a shitstorm was inevitable, so don't take it to heart; and also that you can lessen the pain somewhat in future by having a consult first (although I suspect that -after this has all blown over- you might not feel like redesigning for quite some time) rather than just sproinging it on people between page refreshes.

I posted about the psychology and effects because you seemed disheartened and a little surprised by the reaction. Remember that a UI redesign for software that people use often is -actually and physically- rearranging their desks without asking them. Only a tiny bit of the desk, but nevertheless. Butthurt is going to happen and there's no avoiding it. The "without asking them" part is key and that bit can be avoided.

Apologies for the assumption that the redesign was ad-tuning based - your early posts did seem to imply that a bit.

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moiety
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@theregister - you're doing it wrong. The biggest mistake of all was just dropping the design on us.

People ***HATE*** UI changes. That seems to go double for nerds. Look back at the comments for any UI changes, by anyone, anywhere and you will see exactly the same reaction. I refer you particularly to Windows 8; Facebook changes and any software that people spend a lot of time on; but any UI change will do. Partly this is to do with convenience...people don't like having to relearn where everything is and what happens when you click this bit etc.

What you should have done was to consult with your readers first. This would have the triple benefit of 1) throwing more brains at the problem so you would have got more ideas (and you would have been made aware of stuff that you maybe hadn't thought of; the 'print' bit being useful for those using text readers as an example) 2) you would have got some people onside so the commentardery would have been more various factions and it wouldn't be Reg vs. readership ("I am become death, destroyer of eyesight") and 3) It would mitigate the fact that the redesign is mainly for the benefit of El Reg and it would seem less like a fuck you from our point of view. Bear with me for a sec here...the redesign would appear from your initial comments to be largely about ad placement and tuning the ads for maximum profit. You're the site owner and nobody has a problem with you making a few quid (although it's fairly dicey ground to start with given your readership's near-allergy to ads and tracking and that sort of malarkey); but what works for you is not necessarily what site visitors want. Designing the site for your own purposes at the expense of treasured toys and dropping it on your readership is going to feel like a gigantic "fuck you and your opinion because you're not important, minion" to every single reader. And you're looking at 18 pages-worth of the results of that feeling.

Everybody uses the site differently; in their usage patterns; the kit they are looking at it with; and their reason for visiting the site in the first place. Therefore different aspects of the redesign are going to have varying effects on different visitors. I have a mouse with a scroll wheel, so I don't give much of a toss about scrolling. I have a 17" 1080p monitor and mostly work at night, so the glare is a big problem for me...it would be hyperbole to say that I'm getting calls from the local lighthouse asking me to turn it down a bit; but saying that I can't see the fucking thing for 15 seconds after using your site is a statement of fact. It is really -in case you've missed it in the subtle comments- too bright. That's my particular bugbear, followed closely by the lack of vlink contrast. Other users are going to have other things that particularly piss them off, depending upon the way they use the site etc.

@Drewc - don't take it personally. Everyone hates UI changes. Dropping UI changes upon an unsuspecting bunch of readers is going to be seen as a fuck you and that will affect the tone of any response. Doing that to a readership who are technically sophisticated just...doesn't help.

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moiety
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Re: Since You're LIstening To Your Users...

@BongoJoe - it does do that already...click on the "8hrs" (or whatever) link and it takes you straight to your post. Took me ages to spot that.

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moiety
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I'm late to the party. Or gang bang, looks like. I'm old, and therefore required to hate any change, and I do. Also get off my bastard lawn. I don't hate it as much as some previous posters seem to; partly because I do design work myself and may have been drinking the cool aid too long; and also because the way I use the Reg and possession of a mouse with a scroller wheel means that I'm not too stressed by scrolling...I can see that those who have to swipe their way around would be annoyed. Some comments then:

● Holy shit that is white. El Reg is normally the first site I visit while I get outside of a coffee and wait for some neurons to warm up. The overall impression on the retinas could be fairly described as 'violent', I feel. Could do with some colour or something to take the edge off. Or El Reg could issue everyone with tanning goggles.

● Harder to read. Probably as a result of everything being adrift in a snowscape; but maybe also partly that I'm not used to it yet.

● Big picture at the top is a pointless waste of space - I preferred the old, 5-story bit. It looked better; packed more info in, and didn't make me feel like I'm looking at a children's book.

● Grey vlink. That'll have to go...you actually have to concentrate and pay attention to see what's been read. The old red or maybe a darker red if you feel like being a bit more subtle (#730000 is a darker shade of the banner colour; with the added bonus that you could claim it was Marsala (Pantone's new colour of the year) and you'd get a whole year of free hipster-trolling thrown in).

● Most commented - I used that, periodically, as a way of finding stories that I wouldn't otherwise have bothered with going by the title alone.

● Huge picture at the top of stories - pointless and I wouldn't have thought it would endear you to people with data limits.

● People need to be able to open stories in a new tab. The issue isn't affecting me, but you need to fix it for people who it is. That would be a deal-breaker for me.

S'pect I'll get used to it; but overall it's a step in the wrong direction IMO.

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Sony looks at unpopular Google Glass, shouts 'ME TOO!'

moiety
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Why does it have to be Sony, dammit! Also a sliding/flipping hard lens cap should be available for this sort of thing. I'd like one for hands-free reading; but would rather be spared the batterings from people who think I'm filming them.

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Sony hackers dump more hunks of stolen data, promise another 'Christmas gift'

moiety
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Re: @boltar

Count me in for some gluttony, as applied to beer. Comes with it's own built-in downfall, so Trevor can cheer and we'll all be happy. Hooray!

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Boggling bum babe Kim fails to 'break the internet' – Robin Williams instead tops Google charts

moiety
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That is the most fucked-up headline that I have yet seen. Well done.

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Sony to media: stop publishing our stolen stuff or we'll get nasty

moiety
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"Those CD's never made it to these shores"

Beg to differ.

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moiety
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Re: Cyber Sec victim blaming ? Plus ça change ...

Nice imagery, but your comparison is incomplete if you don't mention -to run with your metaphor- that Sony have themselves been caught raping; and wandered away scot-free with no thought for the victims.

Moreover, -still running- Sony's attack was on literal and metaphorical innocents; whereas you would expect a company that large and aggressive to be packing the metaphorical equivalent of a can of mace and a couple of beefy bodyguards.

I feel sorry as hell for everyone who's been caught up in this; but Sony -the corporation- absolutely do deserve it. Not vindictive or interested enough to take part, but I won't mourn Sony's passing, if it comes to that.

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moiety
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Not quite sure what I pulled a downvote for just then. I don't recall any compensation; attempts to make good; or even sympathy for having to clean up their rootkit mess. Nor do I recall any response but "tough bollocks" when they nuked the linux setup on their games machine without warning or options (I would have been in the market for one of those at the time, had Sony not already been on my shitlist).

If Sony are expecting anything but a Nelson Munz "HAha!" -certainly from me- then they'd better prepare for disappointment.

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moiety
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Much rattling of the barn door after the horse has already disappeared over the horizon.

"Those who don't comply, the letter warns, will be held responsible for any losses the company or third parties experience."

Good try at shifting blame. Meanwhile, the rest of the world will be blaming whoever left all of this stuff on poorly-secured internet-facing servers. And we will be pointing and laughing.

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EU Google-bashing is making us look really bad, say Google bashers

moiety
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"There is no vendetta and no bias against US companies."

Wouldn't bet on that...I've moved a few companies away from US hosting since the Snowden thing.

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Sony Pictures email hack: The bitter 'piracy war' between Google and Hollywood laid bare

moiety
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Re: Well this is awesome.

Also goes to show that there's no point in helping them or capitulating in any way as it won't change anything.

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Sony Pictures hit by 'fightback on filesharers' DDoS claims – report

moiety
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Re: Not what I have read..

Sorry Trevor:

"Sony doesn't get to play by a different set of rules than regular citizens."

If I had attempted to rootkit the entire planet, pretty sure that I'd still have a stripy suntan today. AFAIK nobody from Sony was jailed.

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moiety
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Poisoning the well might play out differently in court to a standard DDoS for a couple of reasons:

☺ If Sony's using AWS instances then they are paying for much of the bandwidth involved, as opposed to the traditional method of using a pwned botnet where the bandwidth could be said to be stolen

☺ If it's proceeding as Rabbit80 says further down; then all the 'victims' of the attack are engaged in sketchy behaviour at the time of the attack (to whit: attempting to download data that they know was 'stolen'). Compare this to a 'traditional' DDoS when their victim is usually going about their lawful business.

☺ The basic method: A 'traditional' DDos aims to break things by flooding the machinery involved with more than it can handle. This attack aims to replace these packets with those packets. Entirely different thing.

☺ Collateral damage. Like I say, the point of a DDoS is to break stuff. This affects not only the target, but anyone else who was using the destination machine; and often spreads as other machines attempt to compensate and fall over themselves. Add in shared servers and the effects spreading to upstream and downstream providers and you can potentially ruin a lot of people's days. Poisoning the well would add a bit of stress to the host machine (who could themselves be said to be facilitating naughtiness), but probably won't break anything and should, in theory, not affect anyone who isn't actively involved in shenanigans.

☺ Precedent. There's lots of precedent for straight DDoS attacks; but little or none -AFAIK- for this sort of attack.

☺ Balance of power. Sony, I expect, can find a couple of quid and a lawyer or two to throw at the problem. I suspect that the 'victims' (people running the host servers and those attempting to download) would be 1) outgunned and 2) a little bit reluctant to engage as their own positions won't look that good in the harsh light of day.

So. While I agree that the attack is indeed a denial of service, the 'distibuted' bit can be argued and it is radically different -in aims, methods, collateral damage and results- to what is usually referred to as a DDoS attack. That difference can and will be exploited if it comes to court; and there's enough mitigation in there (not to mention that the 'payload' is details of a large number of fairly influential people who will approve of the actions and might well be prepared to publicly support them) to keep a court busy for quite some time.

I'm playing devil's advocate here a bit. I have in no way forgiven the fuckbags for their rootkit. Calling it a DDoS and expecting it to be tidily rubber-stamped as such with the perpetrators being automatically jailed might be a little optimistic though.

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moiety
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I find the thought that Sony would launch a DDoS fairly hard to believe. Poisoning the well by adding a bunch of fake torrents, sure, but DDoS? Nah.

Quite apart from the legal aspects (and Sony have plenty of money to be sued for, so you would expect at least a little caution there); a DDoS is 1) lame and 2) would be officially laying down the gauntlet for every hacker in the world. It would be announcing their intention to play the game from the black hat side and that would be tantamount to suicide.

False flag?

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QEMU, FFMPEG guru unleashes JPEG-slaying graphics compressor

moiety
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SImilar filesize but better quality than JPG but with an alpha channel? Do want. Hope it takes off.

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Blu-ray region locks popped by hardware hacker

moiety
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Re: Forced to view content (Adverts etc.)

I don't need to watch the anti piracy video etc.

And let us not forget that the soundtrack for the "you wouldn't download a car" was stolen.

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One-click, net-modelled UK copyright hub comes a step closer

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Review mass-snoop laws regularly, says RIPA daddy Blunkett

moiety
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“There is a general agreement now that if you review regularly you can stop the dangers that people have identified,” Blunkett said.

"There is a general agreement". Weasel words. Is that "I agree with myself generally"; "me and my rich buddies agree"; Or something else? Not implementing bloody stupid ideas would be -in my view- better than regularly reviewing them. On past form, if there's a concept that Blunkett agrees with, it's time to hit the pause button and seriously rethink it.

Last week the Investigatory Powers Tribunal ruled that GCHQ did not act unlawfully by carrying out mass surveillance using the interception of communication powers in RIPA.

Well of course they did. Lawmakers investigate themselves. Find selves not guilty. Amazing. Also passing a law so that those involved in such shenanigans have plenty of loopholes to play with and then saying "it's legal according to this law wot we just passed" is more than a little disingenuous, if not actually fraudulent.

"I think Philip [sic] Snowden was a traitor to his country and a thief but I actually think he opened up some of these bigger issues in a way you can’t do [otherwise].

Traitor and thief. Big scary words. A consensus definition of traitor seems to be "One who betrays one's country, a cause, or a trust, especially one who commits treason.". So fucking over 99% of the population by treating them as criminals doesn't count, does it? Also DNA Bioscience would definitely seem to be betraying the trust of the country; and would probably have counted as thievery if he'd not been caught with his hand in the till.

Blunkett can still go and fuck himself. With a cactus.

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So - you thought you knew all about the INSTANT COFFEE DUNES of TITAN?

moiety
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Re: Ethanol?

"Most of it is undrinkable,"

Syntax error. Redo from start.

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PlayStation Network blasted offline AGAIN. Just not Sony's decade

moiety
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Re: Pissing off the wrong people.

Bollocks. Ran out of editing time. You were right to call me out on the phrasing Destroy All Monsters. Given the scale and thoroughness of just last week's hacks (the ones that hit the papers that we know about), though, it would seem likely that everyone has been compromised. Certainly the prudent course of action would be to act as if the details were definitely gone. Phrasing it as definite just saved me some words is all.

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moiety
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Re: Pissing off the wrong people.

Fair enough.

you do know that your details -including whatever you used to pay for the subscription- are probably now in the hands of whoever cares to download the data, right?

That better, or shall I chuck an 'allegedly' or two in, just to make sure?

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moiety
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Re: Pissing off the wrong people.

@FlatSpot - you do know that your details -including whatever you used to pay for the subscription- is now in the hands of whoever cares to download the data, right?

There's quite possibly enough out there to fuck you right up if someone gets on your case; or even if your number comes up in the "Who shall we choose?" lottery.

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Yes, Obama has got some things wrong on the internet. But so has the GOP

moiety
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The GOP seems to be doing OK if their recent hack of Sony is anything to go by.

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'We're having panic attacks' ... Sony staff and families now threatened in emails

moiety
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You beat me to it. However -amusing as this might be to people who haven't forgiven them for that fucking rootkit and boycott their products to this day- it does raise a further point in that there is no possible way that Sony can claim to be ignorant of the field of IT security. They got their games network thoroughly pwned fairly recently (Apil 2011) and have also had a go -as a corporation, mind you, not a "independently operating loose cannon from within their ranks"; at hacking other people themselves.

Arguably, Sony's hacking attempt was the more heinous in principle, because it was targeting innocents; whereas you'd reasonably expect a corporation (with a gamer network yet!) to have some defences, expertise and personnel to throw at the subject.

I feel sorry for the victims, but no sympathy whatsoever for Sony. It'll be interesting to see how they try and wriggle out of it when the inevitable lawsuits come flooding in

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What a pity: Rollout of hated UK smart meters delayed again

moiety
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Re: assoles

...or use laptops; which gives you time to switch it off gracefully when you notice everything else blink off.

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Gaming's driving ambitions: The Crew and Grand Theft Auto V

moiety
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Oz gamers are calling for the bible to be banned:

"Withdraw The Holy Bible – this sickening book encourages readers to commit sexual violence and kill women

It's a book that encourages readers to murder women for entertainment. The incentive is to commit sexual violence against women, then abuse or kill them to proceed or get 'god' points – and now Target are stocking it and promoting it for your Xmas stocking."

https://www.change.org/p/target-withdraw-the-holy-bible-this-sickening-book-encourages-readers-to-commit-sexual-violence-and-kill-women/share?just_signed=true

Made me laugh anyway.

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#Gamergate folk load flamethrower, roast own feet over GTA V 'ban'

moiety
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Re: more misogyny

Cobblers. Violence against everything is entirely the point of the whole game. Picking on one facet of the game and calling it an "ism" is just bollocks, frankly.

I can destroy fire hydrants in a multitude of interesting ways, but does that make it fire-hydrantist? No it does not.

That the prostitutes are all female and that there's no female characters you can play, now that's misogyny -probably cost-driven- but being PC is not what GTA is for.

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moiety
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Everything's a target in GTA.

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Feds dig up law from 1789 to demand Apple, Google decrypt smartphones, slabs

moiety
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On the plus side, at least they're using due process this time, even if they had to go back 225 years to find a process that fitted. Unless, of course, they're only trying the legal route after all the usual illegal methods have failed.

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High Court: You've made our SH*T list – corked pirate torrent sites double in a day

moiety
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Re: Yawn Infringement

It's technically NOT theft because you are not depriving the owner of anything. It's copyright infringement.

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How to get ahead in IT: Swap the geek speak for the spreadsheet

moiety
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Probably requires some education for the suits as well...some companies get it and some don't.

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Dawn raids on Orange over TROMBONING allegations were fine, rules EU court

moiety
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Re: Tromboning?

No need - all the evidence was tainted.

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MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'

moiety
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Did you mean 'crumple zone' there perchance? A crumble zone is that area of the kitchen I'm not allowed in while the pie is cooling...especially if I'm holding any kind of cutlery.

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moiety
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Re: RE: 1984 is looking more and more realistic nowadays.

I think we left 1984 behind some time ago. In the book, there was only video cameras and microphones, so a 'miscreant' had to be actively planning/doing something in order to get picked up.

With the current setup, everything you do, search for, and purchase online is monitored, as well as every payment that goes through your bank; which I find much more scary. Not only is there much more personal infomation being rummaged through; but it would appear that the rummaging is being done by humourless twats with no sense of perspective. Thus someone is arrested for jokingly threatening to blow up Robin Hood airport while actual terrorists fall though the cracks.

Frankly, they should learn to manage the powers they already have competently before asking for more. Also, they would benefit from looking up the fucking phrase 'due process' before continuing...if they hadn't begun with the stance that everyone is a criminal, then they might find a public that is more willing to assist them. Also the "sod the law; we're going to hoover up everyone's private info anyway" attitude is sending out the wrong message anyway.

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Woman who stung Tinder with sex-pest sueball stings again – with rival Bumble app

moiety
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"Strangely, Wolfe and other Tinder cofounders who have left the upstart still list Tinder as their current employees."

Employer. I, therefore, believe nothing in this article.

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