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* Posts by moiety

1266 posts • joined 28 Aug 2009

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Brits STUNG for up to £625 when they try to cancel broadband

moiety
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"The regulatory rules also call for early termination charges to be limited and for charges to only apply if the supplier has met its commitments, which is arguably not the case when broadband speeds turn out to be less than promised or outages are frequent."

If the ISP haven't delivered what they said they would deliver then surely they were first to break the contact; which is then null and void. Less speed is probably unenforcable due to the "up to $speed/sec" weasel-wording; but frequent outages would certainly be cause to tell them to go fuck themselves.

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ICANN can't hand over Iran's internet, bomb victims told

moiety
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Re: Americans

Following the logic in this case; if they won you could give a good case for giving Russia to the citizens of Ukraine. That would be interesting to watch from a safe distance. From orbit, possibly.

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Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold

moiety
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Re: [no payment was supplied]’

@Andrew Orlowski - everything is most definitely not available for low cost. Take your Netflix example...the US catalogue is much more comprehensive than the UK one for example and when people are getting carved out by artificial scarcity they will simply find other sources. Not to mention that in order to access a certain catalogue you usually have to subscribe to a service; cough up personal details; and if the media you want isn't there then you have to subscribe to a different service etc.etc. And cash often isn't the only 'price' you will pay for these services...you also have to factor in who your information will be sold to and how much of your subsequent life you will have to waste watching adverts and deleting spam etc.

As regards pricing, we're still being charged 'physical copy' prices for digital media and that just isn't right.

@Turtle - I was using the current copyright laws as an example of why giving rights owners more law is a bad idea. The copyright laws are unbelievably one-sided and -as things stand- work very much to the detriment of society as a whole. Revising copyright terms to something within the realms of sanity wouldn't stop piracy, no, but while they are in place in the current form people will resist further laws on the subject. I also don't think that you are 100% correct when you state that people won't wait a single day. I could live with waiting -say- five years for most of the current offerings; but then I'm old and don't give many fucks.

The various rights holders have spent the last 20 years since the internet became popular essentially training us to become pirates. They've been treating their customers like The Adversary and now seem surprised that that's what we've become.

Piracy is hard to compete with, this is true, and at the current state I'm not even sure that pricing is a major factor. It's certainly not the only one...I don't have to cough up any personal info for a pirated film; there's no DRM; there's no adverts; and it'll work for the rest of my life.

People will pay a reasonable amount for legitimate media; but that media has to be available and relatively easy to get hold of.

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moiety
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The various rights industries have spent the last century at least screwing absolutely everyone and -now that the tables have turned somewhat- have discovered that they don't like being on the receiving end.

Now copyright infringement *is* a problem and quite possibly some new law to cover the advances in technology might be worth doing. But not while the copyright laws are so bleeding ridiculous. Fair enough let creators have a chance to make a few quid; but 70 years past the creator's death? Fucking stupid. So there is going to be considerable resistance if things stay as they are.

All rights holders need to do is make their products available everywhere, to everyone, at a reasonable price and much of their infringement problems will go away.

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Secondhand Point-o-Sale terminal was horrific security midden

moiety
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Re: POS

Oh. I see what you did there.

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You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary

moiety
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As far as I know, you're NOT allowed to make a copy of media in the UK. The Fair Use thing is a US law and doesn't apply in the UK, I believe. It's a civil matter; incredibly difficult to enforce and everybody does it anyway...but not legal.

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moiety
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So how exactly did these copyright holders get hold of £3.5M of taxpayer money then? Copying intellectual property (neither piracy nor theft, by the way) is a civil matter, and should be paid for by the injured party and maybe the defendant if the rights-holders win in court.

As ways of attempting to stuff the genie back in the bottle go, I suppose education isn't he worst thing that could happen; but it does seem pretty pointless. And expensive.

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UK.gov's data grab and stab law IMMINENT as Drip drips through House of Lords

moiety
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This is no way to run an alleged democracy. A bill that they would emphatically not get consent for, rushed through by dodgy means to create law to screw the populace over.

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Microsoft: You NEED bad passwords and should re-use them a lot

moiety
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Re: @moiety: Try downloading the data sheet for a chip

Wow. That's the most unpopular thing I've ever said on this forum. All the downvotes in the world aren't going to convince me that re-using passwords is a good idea though.

@ J.G.Harston - Does your library access allow for using USB sticks? If yes, then something like this might do it for you:

http://portableapps.com/apps/utilities/keepass_portable

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moiety
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Re: I Disagree

What is "an offline piece of software"? If it's on an on-line device, it's not really off-line in the security sense, even if it's not designed to access the web itself.

OK, a piece of software that doesn't itself access the internet then, even if the host machine is connected. I did say it wasn't perfect; but it's the best solution I can think of. 100% better than using the same easy password for multiple accounts anyway.

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moiety
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The researchers are idiots. Even a minimally important account can be used if pwned for -say- posting kiddieporn links or terrorist comms; and that account would be tied to at least your IP address. You'd have a real job in court trying to explain that it wasn't you.

Plus if it's your account, then there's probably some real data in there that can be used to help with identity theft. And that's just two obvious misuses...there are some real evil bastards out there.

There's no perfect answer; but an offline, encrypted piece of software to remember PROPER AND UNIQUE passwords for you isn't half bad.

"pushing users to light up even a small amount of grey matter "would be wasteful"."

The same would appear to apply to researchers.

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Remember when Google+ outed everyone by their real names? Now Google's sorry

moiety
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I expect they slap down enough supercookies and similar to extract real names in fairly short order anyway.

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Get an EYEFUL OF CURRY for the sake of your brain

moiety
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Re: 2nd test I've seen for Alheizheimers in a week.

SImple test for alcohol dementia: "Do you post on the Register forums?" If the answer is yes, book 'em in.

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moiety
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@tojb Ah, thank you. It was the "Not to be confused with curcumin." disclaimer at the top of the cumin page that threw me off, together with the fact that curcumin isn't mentioned anywhere in the rest of the page; whereas the turmeric page leads off with curcumin. The overall impression is that there's no curcimin in cumin and whoever named it was just trying to confuse people.

@TRT Have you thought of Kickstarter? You don't necessarily need one wealthy foreigner when a bunch of them chipping $5 each in will have the same effect.

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moiety
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TLDR: So...have a curry; wait a bit (time unspecified); and either look into a device as yet unmarketed or everyone's phones could be made to do the testing. And you know how much risk you are at of whatever the article was about in the first place.

Splendid.

P.S. Circumin has nothing to do with cumin, apparently. I looked it up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curcumin

Sort your fucking nomenclature out boffins. Last thing people with Alzeimers need is to have extra confusion about which bloody curry to order.

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Will GCHQ furtle this El Reg readers' poll? Team Snowden suggests: Yes

moiety
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Re: Financial Damage

That'd be cheaper. Job done.

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LG unfurls flexible SEE-THROUGH 18-inch display

moiety
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Re: See thru Haynes Manual Overlay

"If this comes out as a finished product, would it kill the nascent Augmented Reality tech companies using smart phones over your eyes? I suspect hands free would only survive in specific niches."

The Google Glass form factor is far better for something you're working on because it leaves both hands free to actually do the work. A pen with a screen you could unroll would make a pretty good phone; but it might be better to project your screen in the long-term, as an unrollable screen would be quite the weak point.

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El Reg nips down IKEA's 'I've Got A Screw Loose Street'

moiety
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Re: Hang on..

Tornillo is something that is turned. Screw, vice...something that you apply torque to. So unless you're doing helicopter sex (and by that I mean some sort of kama sutra torque-relevant 360 degree horizontal spin; not sex where your parents hover anxiously waiting to pass you tissues when needed and have tea already waiting for half time) then tornillo isn't really the word. There are a couple of Spanish words that might do the job; but none that would have gone on a sign in public.

The fault; when you think about it, is in the English. Screwing someone rarely involves torque. Or not much beyond the normal wriggling.

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moiety
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Re: Hang on..

In Spanish, falta can be 'I lack' or 'I need', so translating it to English makes it marginally filthier.

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'Apple is TERRIFIED of women’s bodies and women’s pleasure' – fresh tech sex storm

moiety
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Re: Why is this article marked as NSFW?

"Work" is the NSFW bit...it is Friday, you know.

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moiety
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Re: @tkioz

"if you want something they won't do then go to a local engraver to get it done"

That would have been my first thought and exactly what I would do if I cared enough. If I paid out that sort of money for a device then it would be mine to deface in whatever manner I found amusing at the time. A lot of the appeal of iKit is the "let them handle the tricky stuff" ethos and I suppose that people shouldn't moan if Apple handles whatever it is in a way that suits them. It is sexist and probably should be changed; but it's only a couple of crappy lines of text. With a halfway decent engraver you can have graphics and customise it properly.

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Watch: DARPA shows off first successful test of STEERABLE bullet

moiety
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Obvious concept is obvious. The first time I encountered the concept was in a Vernor Vinge book; and the protagonist popped up from behind a treestump and whacked a bunch of possible bandits with one burst of a machine gun.

Lovely concept in a book; but it's the sort of thing that absolutely should not be allowed in real life.

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Telefonica inks deal with mobile ads platform: Find your customer? There's an API for that

moiety
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When will companies realise that charging people extortionate rates should be enough? That's Telifonica off my Xmas card list.

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'Dread Pirate Roberts' suspect's bid for freedom fails

moiety
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Is opinion some kind of legal term? I always thought that judges were supposed to be impartial. I would view someone who had a 57-page opinion on anything with some suspicious.

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Weaponised Flash flaw can pinch just about anything from anywhere

moiety
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May I submit ActiveX to the hitlist as well?

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Storm-battered Rockall adventurer recalls 'worst experience of my life'

moiety
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Re: Prevailing winds

"Sure, which is why I'm sceptical: the prevailing winds for Rockall may be from the SW but the north Atlantic does experience significant changes of wind directions as the various system move across."

My speculations were speculative. Mr. Hancock nearly got collected by a wave in the middle of the storm and washed away until (if there was preparation for that eventuality) rescue ships homed in on his beacon and rescued him (although probably with the caveat that he did his own laundry).

My -wholly theoretical- theory is that -given the events- it might be an idea to put a great big rock between you and the brunt of the weather. Now this idea would be more expensive; troublesome; and labour-intensive than just strapping the lifepod to the best flat bit you can see but as we now know that waves can wash over the top of the rock then future expeditions should plan with that possibility in mind.

Might not be an option anyway if the rock won't support it.

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moiety
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Re: Prevailing winds

Because you do your dangling on the lee side of the rock (that's the side opposite to the direction the weather is coming from, for non-nautical types). You use the body of the rock to protect you from the worst of the wind and waves; which would protect you from being cleaned off the top, as nearly happened to Mr. Hancock.

I used the word 'dangle', by the way because Lester used it and I was running with the idea. My idea of dangling would -in this context- be pinned top, bottom, sides, fore, aft, diagonally, and every other way I could think of. With very big pitons. There would be some dangling involved...you'd need a rope ladder at least to get you to the brow of the rock (but that would be seriously pinned along the entire length if it were me doing things, plus separate anchors for double safety lines while in transit between the two); and some dangling would be necessary while installing your nest; but that's where any dangling would end.

All of this is theoretical, of course and if the rock isn't solid or has rotten bits, the idea may be a non-starter. It also depends upon whether the weather can be relied upon to come from the same direction for the duration of your stay.

Sure sleeping over a dizzying drop doesn't appeal, particularly, but neither does being cleaned off the top of a rock in mid-Atlantic in the middle of a storm.

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moiety
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Re: Prevailing winds

:)

Also fair enough.

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moiety
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Re: Prevailing winds

As a professional dangler-of-stuff-off-cliffs in a past life, I was merely pointing out that there are other options than the horizontal. Whether the benefits (shelter) would outweigh the risks (the extra effort, equipment and risk) is a matter for conjecture as I've never been there and have no intention whatsoever of correcting this.

Shelter would seem to be quite important, given what's happened.

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moiety
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Re: Prevailing winds

Dangling from a cliff face might have been the better option at the time, from the sound of it. Certainly dangling the supplies might have been a consideration. All depends on where the weather's coming from; the condition of the rock; how far you're prepared to deface the rock by sinking twatting great pitons into it etc. etc.

And now he knows to get barrels with stronger handles if he wants to give it another go in the future. Or lash them down with nets. Still, it's a partial success if he can hang in there long enough to break the record. Doubt if any of us commentards would last that long without wifi.

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NSA dragnet mostly slurped innocents' traffic

moiety
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Re: Dan 55 mooooooity OMGeeez!!! What a DISASTER!!! We're all DOOOOMED!!! Etc.

@Matt Bryant

You claim that no harm has been done by the retention of data; therefore the onus is on you to provide proof. I am calling "bollocks" on your argument both because it seems extremely unlikely that nobody involved has misused it and because 'victims' of any misuse will not necessarily know where their problems came from.

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moiety
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Re: mooooooity OMGeeez!!! What a DISASTER!!! We're all DOOOOMED!!! Etc.

""......The hoovering and subsequent actions of the people with access to the information are all secret.""

"Not so. The journos that Snowjob has been feeding these docs to claim they have been able to unmask a number of them, so it should be easy enough for the same journos to go and ask the 'victims' if they have actually been the sufferers of any 'harm'."

You're not getting the point. The hoovering is secret. The people with access to the data are in secret jobs. Any actions they took (including passing nuggets of information to people who then made use of said nuggets to make decisions) wouldn't be widely publicised. Any 'victims' would know only that something went wrong. They would know only that they didn't get that job, for some reason; or that company X underbid them by precisely the right amount to score the contract; or that somebody suddenly decided that they didn't want a relationship. The victims would only know that the hammer had fallen; not who swung it or what caused it to start dropping.

You cannot possibly state that no harm was done without considerably more information. That's just as speculative as my contention that quite possibly harm was done. My point of view is based on what I know of human nature -backed up by scientific studies of how people behave when they think they are anonymous (or at least won't get caught)- and I would say that it is eminently possible -even likely- that information has been misused.

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moiety
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Re: OMGeeez!!! What a DISASTER!!! We're all DOOOOMED!!! Etc.

You cannot possibly state that no harm was done. The hoovering and subsequent actions of the people with access to the information are all secret.

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Phone motion sensors can receive data

moiety
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I like the passing keys idea. That could be useful. You could have decently encrypted exchanges between those 2 phones from then on; and it wouldn't require the user to have any real expertise.

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ANGRY ALIENS hit by BEBO SPAMGASM probably don't exist

moiety
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Re: Poor, innocent aliens..

Could have been worse...it could have been Buzzfeed that sent the blast.

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New NSA boss plays down impact of Snowden leaks

moiety
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Re: "Regain the public trust?"

Thanks. Couldn't find it.

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moiety
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Re: "Regain the public trust?"

Do you have more info on the LED thing?

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Remaining Snowden docs will be released to avert 'unspecified US war' – ‪Cryptome‬

moiety
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Re: Paul Crawford Cryptome

The problem isn't who's in the chair now; but who could be in the chair in the future. The classic oft-cited case of the IBM census is a case in point...the people involved thought they were filling in a standard census form and couldn't have known at the time that it would lead to some seriously horrible repercussions less than a decade later.

Information can be misused and the real problem with it is that once it's out there, it's there forever. You never know if the next guy in the chair is going to have a hard-on for people called 'moiety' or use of the word 'sheeple' (I might even vote for that) or be -for example- a devout muslim and crack down on the use of beer (that'd be all of us fucked).

We probably aren't going to stop the information hoovering...if I was a spook then I'd be hoovering up everything I could get my hands on too. What we do need to do is regulate it and limit the storage time.

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True fact: Your CAT wees ... like a racehorse

moiety
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Re: "... a long and wider urethra results in faster flow ..."

Maybe you can preload it.

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Retiring Reg hack explains how bass playing = tech reporting

moiety
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Goddamit! RTFA moiety! Good catch.

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moiety
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Pint

So you retire and now you start to fret? Sure there's something wrong there...

Happy retirement.

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Aereo has to pay TV show creators? Yes. This isn't rocket science

moiety
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Pint

Hah! I looked at the title of this article on the El Reg front page and bet myself a beer it was an Orlowski piece. Cheers!

You can have the letter of the law (which Aero were apparently kosher by) or the spirit of the law (which was the ruling). You can't have both without making the law pointless.

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MPAA, meet the Streisand effect: Picture ass. slaps Reddit with takedown

moiety
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Re: Not the first time for these retards..

You know; the MPAA story reminds me that I haven't seen what's on YIFY for a week or two.....

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Cryptome pulled OFFLINE due to malware infection: Founder cries foul

moiety
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Re: @ moiety

I'm pretty sure that it wasn't censorship; purely because they were back within 48 hours. Sure the site's content is a probable motivating factor for the malware to be there in the first place (although it could just have well been an unfixed hole in the site picked up by an automatic scan for that vulnerability).

When malware is detected -especially email-spewing malware- things begin to happen...Search engines posting warnings; adding to blackhole lists and so on. This affects not only the site in question; but anyone on the same shared server; their hosts; the upstream providers of their hosts; the owners of that IP address parcel and so on. Action has to be taken and quickly...which action is taken sorts out the men from the boys, webhost-wise and NetSol's is kinda lazy but reasonable. They can (in order of wankiness, most to least):

1) Shut down the account and wait for the site's owner to come to them asking where their site went. This has happened to me. Needless to say, we were out of there that same day (and by the way, this is why you should ALWAYS keep your hosting and domains separate...having to extract the domains first would add considerable time to getting back in the game). Also shuts down any sites on that same account.

2) Shut the account down and message the owner explaining why. Also shuts down any sites on the same account.

3) Shut the domain down and contact the owner. This is not uncommon; but leaves the unfortunate catch-22 that the (remote) owner is unable to access anything and therefore can't see or solve the problem.

4) (As happened in Cryptome's case) Shut HTTP down and simultaneously message the owner.

5) Leave the site running; contact the owner; but move the site somewhere else where it's not going to interfere with other clients of the service. This takes time, and is more risky for the webhost. Give the owner a deadline to fix the problem.

In any of the above cases, the webhost may or may not tell the customer where the problem is.

The issue seems to be the 48-hour delay before the site was reinstated. Netsol is a big host and it could be due to something as simple as them switching to a new support system. Or a new policy. Or revenge if the guy has been a bit of a tosser in the past. Blaming everything on a conspiracy seems a little entitled to me.

Certainly if I had a site that was mission-critical or as guaranteed to piss people off as Cryptome; I'd have a plan B site waiting in the wings; then it's just a case of flicking the domains over...20 minutes tops until you're back on the air. If the domains (on a separate provider) get sanctioned then you can start moaning about conspiracies.

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moiety
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Shutting sites down because of a suspect file is a classic sign of a wanky webhost; and is a sign that you should change hosts immediately. It's perfectly possible to shut down a particular file or URL; and contact the owner of the site with a deadline for fixing it. Shutting a whole site down is a sign that the host is phoning it in.

Happened to me twice on 2 different hosts; and in one case they buggered off for a week (one external hack; one disgruntled subcontractor on a client's site). Of course shutting the site down often impedes the owner of the site from finding out what's wrong and fixing it as well.

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Microsoft: NSA security fallout 'getting worse' ... 'not blowing over'

moiety
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Re: Really?

I can't think of a single good move MS have made recently...I doubt if the NSA stuff has helped; but they should be looking in a mirror first.

I had a look at signing up to XBox Live recently, with the idea of giving this multiplayer stuff a go. They wanted me to take out an XBox live subscription (sacrificing TWO email addresses in order to do so); they then wanted more money to allow multiplayer; and would only accept payment types that were registered to a credit card. You maybe get to take the piss financially OR harvest my data if it's something I want badly enough; but you certainly don't get both.

XBox One - wall-to-wall fuckup of historical proportions

Windows 8...is not being well received.

And so on.

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9 Dark Social Truths That Will Totally Blow Your Bowels!

moiety
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Re: Social Media and ISIS

Yeah, you can't tell if it's duckface or if they forgot to take their pipe out.

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moiety
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Re: WTF? "Sun level" @ AC

Why not do an El Reg day-trip over to Buzzfeed as anyone can contribute?...I'd suggest "9 fatal flaws in cloud computing as expressed by kittens" as an opener, but I'm sure commentards could come up with a list.

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Snowden's HELPING public clouds says VMware hybrid head

moiety
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Re: "there is now universal acceptance"

I couldn't agree more with you Mr. Monett. Unlike this statement:

"you started out scared by the NSA but now you are awed by the power of web-scale operators

Code Spaces were a web-scale operator. Awed would definitely not be my first choice of description.

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