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* Posts by moiety

1306 posts • joined 28 Aug 2009

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South Korea's top wireless carrier builds Internet of Eels

moiety
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Re: Nice reference, Mr Lecter.

Has to run back to the farm...that's the Achille's eel in the scheme.

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Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES

moiety
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Re: you are beautyfull

Why thank you; but I need planning permission before posting nudes..

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moiety
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Re: Polaroids FTW

Dunno about polaroids; but it would certainly be a reasonable precaution to move photos you don't want to escape off internet-facing gear and onto a non-connected USB drive if you have any sort of public status.

Ricky Gervais caught a lot of flak for tweeting "well don't have nudes on your phone" then, or some such; but I agree with him to the extent that accepting some megacorporation's bland assurances of "yeah it's secure" is a mistake.

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moiety
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Re: What's a jlaw?

Jennifer Lawrence. The actress who was in the Hunger Games.

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Google flushes out users of old browsers by serving up CLUNKY, AGED version of search

moiety
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Re: What pleb uses Opera 12 still?

Well in my case, it's the sort of pleb who believes the "You have the latest version of Opera" prompt after I ask it to check for updates.

Also, when I go to opera.com and hit the 'help and support' link (I was looking to see what developments have developed before committing to anything; now that I know there's a new one), it's just help for v12.

Only difference I can see is they've done away with the separate search bar; which doesn't make me happy.

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RIP MSN Messenger, kthxbai. Microsoft finally flicks on KILL SWITCH in China

moiety
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I tried that - not working for me for some reason. Should have thought to post the link though. Upvote for your superior organisation skills.

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moiety
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MS also killed SkypKit recently, thus stuffing all those people running multi-im-network clients like Trillian. There are workarounds; but they all involve running a full-fat copy of Skype in the background.

The real problem is that Skype is like bloody Word in that you have to use it (or at least maintain some sort of compatible presence) because everyone else is using it.

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Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather

moiety
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Notice how these cunts are always talking about other people's privacy and not their own.

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Siri: Helpful personal assistant or SERIAL APP KILLER?

moiety
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Re: someone else's program

Going to go a bit further along this line of thought:

"Do you agree with what I'm seeing here? The prospects are endless and Siri/Cortana/Google whatever should become the speech recognition app interface abstraction layer. We will still need app functions but they will be hidden away behind the smart personal assistant (SPA).

I don't agree. It depends upon how much of yourself you are willing to sell for personal convenience. The well can and will be poisoned if you trust a corporation (or any business/company/whatever).

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moiety
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Problem is, Siri is someone else's program, running on someone else's computer and primarily for someone else's benefit at the end of the day.

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Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case

moiety
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He doesn't seem to have been very good at cybersecurity for a 'czar'.

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6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)

moiety
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Quality journalism; you know you can count on El Reg for proper news. Can we have more vultures in tiny hats for the next article please?

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Wall Street's internet darlings require an endless supply of idiots

moiety
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Two Godwins before the comments have even started. Could this be a record?

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Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

moiety
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Judging by the comments above, I'm firmly in the barbarian class. Russell Hobbs 14899 Platinum Grind and Brew Coffee Maker Machine and expresso beans from Lidl. Good coffee and minimal messing around. Maintenance costs aren't too bad either.

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Vampires and Ninjas versus the Alien Jedi Robot Pirates: It's ON

moiety
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Are we going to be factoring in friendly fire?

I'm thinking human military (USA! USA!); vampires feeling peckish and/or dynastic; and zombies who will walk right over their brethren when counfounded by -for example- a kerb.

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True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS

moiety
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I watched it to fact check, simple as that. To compare what I observe with what's being shovelled at us via the media.

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moiety
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Re: ISIS

Muslim != Terrorist extremist psychopath

All Muslims? Seriously? It's "thinking" like that that just creates more terrorists. Just as not every Christian goes on cinema rampages with an AK47; and not every Buddhist sets themselves/monasteries alight; not all Muslims are psychopaths.

If you treat all Muslims like they're going to break out into jihad and dodgy raps at any second, you're going to create resentment and -in the end- create the conditions to create more terrorists.

The vast majority of Muslims just want to be left alone to get on with things, same as the vast majority of everybody else.

Neither of your choices are actually choices. The truth -as ever- lies somewhere between the two extremes.

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Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state

moiety
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That is disgusting. What are these people on?

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Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?

moiety
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Good point well made. And, to complete the thought, the gov couldn't put any empasis on any foreign-ness they noticed because it would make things distinctly more uncomfortable at home.

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moiety
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The impression that I got was that the guy wasn't a sarf Londoner at all...the way he spoke gave me the firm impression that English was very much a second language because of his inflection and mispronunciations. Yes, there was a strong sarf London accent; so he had either spent some time in the UK or he learnt English from those who had. Or is a consumate actor. May even have an English passport, but I'd lay a few quid down on him not being born and raised in the UK.

And yet the UK papers (and El Reg, sadly) just go with "English accent" and stop there. That, and the PM saying "British Citizen". If your theory is correct, wouldn't they be emphasising the foreign-ness?

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moiety
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"Government policy and the media narrative are threatened by this video."

Can't see how. Name a conflict and there's always a few Brits who join up for shits'n'giggles (and others...it's not an exclusively Brit hobby). And if you were joining on the 'terrorist extremist' side then you'd obviously be up for an atrocity or two.

I haven't seen the full video though (I did have a look just on general principles after that copper arsehole's statement; but can only find sanitised versions. Not totally sure I want to see the full version anyway). Does the original actually show the execution, or does it cut to a body? What I have seen, though, all the reports of the "British accent" are a bit misleading. The person has definitely spent some time in the UK (or some time with people from there); but there is definitely another accent in there if you listen past the Sarf London.

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moiety
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Can't see why a false flag would be necessary with ISIS...they seem to be doing a fairly good job of arousing hate on their own. Mind you; they're getting close to the oil, so maybe we're not hating fast or deeply enough.

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The Register to boldly go where no Vulture has gone before: The WEEKEND

moiety
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Re: Nubile young women lusting...

"Let meow-t"

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moiety
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Suggestion: Porn review

Guaranteed monster page hits; plus a possible record-breaking webcast as the Register Hacks compete to see who gets the job. Some job interview suggestions:

● Cage match

● Drinking competition (you'd probably need to hook up some big data for that one, as I would expect a loooong war of attrition with Reg Hacks)

● Geocache race around London (and other reg-nest cities) where the contestants have to alternate between London cabs and Uber cars; with bonus points being awarded for the promixity of the drivers to each other.

● Ultimate bacon creation competition (only counts if the contestants eat all of their creation without their arteries exploding).

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moiety
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"Complete with containers of beer - variably full - placed adjacent to the kit, in order to create a fully realistic RF blocking environment."

You did that with a straight face. I'm truly impressed. And will be stealing that line.

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Time to ditch HTTP – govt malware injection kit thrust into spotlight

moiety
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Re: SSL is a good thing

Namecheap have got one for €6.72 right now, and they usually have something in the $10/yr range. It's relatively easy to do, especially if you have cPanel hosting. Generate a server key, buy your certificate and then install it on the server.

Self-signed is fine for personal use or for a small group who either have enough technical knowhow to know that a self-signed cert isn't the end of the world; or who you can tell in advance "your browser is going to have fits at this point...just ignore it".

You just can't use it for anything involving random visitors because the chances are that they will never see your site. I'd have SSL on everything just as a courtesy detail if the warnings weren't so dire.

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moiety
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Re: SSL is a good thing

You can't really use self-signed certificates. Browsers pop up really alarming warnings that would put off most of your traffic.

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Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?

moiety
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Well traditionally Microsoft have alternated between halfway reasonable and "screwed the pooch" operating systems, so it makes sense to hang in there and see what 9 has to offer.

Of course, if MS don't start listening to their customers soon then that could be the best thing that has ever happened to linux.

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Russian PM's Twitter hacked to slap down Putin, post fake resignation

moiety
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The banning electricity part was pretty funny.

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Anonymous threatens to name cop who shot dead unarmed Michael Brown

moiety
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...or (the cynical version) could be used as an excuse to let the officer off scot-free as seems to happen on a disturbingly regular basis in cases of abuse of power like this.

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HTTP-Yes! Google boosts SSL-encrypted sites in search results

moiety
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Re: $10/yr is the tip of the iceberg

I do realise that self-signed are worth the paper they're not written on; but that depends upon what you want to use the SSL for. If it's important or popular or user details are involved then you should do it properly. For small sites to protect login details; or for switching SSL on as an option 'just because' (mostly to avoid marketers tracking you and to make those bastards at GCHQ and the NSA earn their paycheques) then it should appear a little less alarming. I'd suggest maybe an orange or yellow padlock displayed in the browser toolbar (as opposed to the green ones for expensive certificates or whatever the colour is for the $10 special offer certs) that shows encryption is being used but you shouldn't necessarily be putting your bank account details in there. Possibly with a popup to alert you if the cert has changed since the last visit.

As things stand browsers react to self-signed certs like you're going to be imminently pwned and then fisted by terrorists. So nobody bothers.

Sure you run the risk of a MITM by someone faking the certificate; but sending everything in plaintext ALSO runs the risk of MITM, and requires less skill to do so.

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moiety
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Re: $10/yr is the tip of the iceberg

....not to mention the actual level of trust in the 'trust authorities'.

I would also like self-signed to be more acceptable. Currently browsers hoot like you've just set the bloody thing on fire when it encounters a self-signed cert.

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Ecuador follows Bitcoin ban with digi-currency proposal

moiety
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Currency is based on belief. If Ecuador haven't even got their shit together enough to have their own paper currency, I can't see it going anywhere.

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CryptoLocker victims offered free key to unlock ransomed files

moiety
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Re: It was inevitable.

It hasn't been cracked - they found a stash of private keys when raiding a control server. Presumably the naughty guys will be generating a new lot now.

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African samba queen: Don't cut off pirates' net connections – cut off their FINGERS

moiety
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I think she's got this whole 'digital music' thing wrong.

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Google on Gmail child abuse trawl: We're NOT looking for other crimes

moiety
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Not much sympathy for child abusers; but is anyone else getting that "paedophiles today, littering tomorrow" mission creep feeling?

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Your fitness tracker is a SNITCH says Symantec

moiety
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Internet of Things again. Unless it connects to a private machine and ONLY a private machine to aggregate your data/make shiny graphs/whatever then you can pretty well guarantee that it isn't secure and is leaking. Almost certainly to the manufacturer; quite probably to a bunch of ad agencies; and the chances are good -bordering on certainty- that it isn't hard to hack.

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Brits STUNG for up to £625 when they try to cancel broadband

moiety
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"The regulatory rules also call for early termination charges to be limited and for charges to only apply if the supplier has met its commitments, which is arguably not the case when broadband speeds turn out to be less than promised or outages are frequent."

If the ISP haven't delivered what they said they would deliver then surely they were first to break the contact; which is then null and void. Less speed is probably unenforcable due to the "up to $speed/sec" weasel-wording; but frequent outages would certainly be cause to tell them to go fuck themselves.

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ICANN can't hand over Iran's internet, bomb victims told

moiety
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Re: Americans

Following the logic in this case; if they won you could give a good case for giving Russia to the citizens of Ukraine. That would be interesting to watch from a safe distance. From orbit, possibly.

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Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold

moiety
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Re: [no payment was supplied]’

@Andrew Orlowski - everything is most definitely not available for low cost. Take your Netflix example...the US catalogue is much more comprehensive than the UK one for example and when people are getting carved out by artificial scarcity they will simply find other sources. Not to mention that in order to access a certain catalogue you usually have to subscribe to a service; cough up personal details; and if the media you want isn't there then you have to subscribe to a different service etc.etc. And cash often isn't the only 'price' you will pay for these services...you also have to factor in who your information will be sold to and how much of your subsequent life you will have to waste watching adverts and deleting spam etc.

As regards pricing, we're still being charged 'physical copy' prices for digital media and that just isn't right.

@Turtle - I was using the current copyright laws as an example of why giving rights owners more law is a bad idea. The copyright laws are unbelievably one-sided and -as things stand- work very much to the detriment of society as a whole. Revising copyright terms to something within the realms of sanity wouldn't stop piracy, no, but while they are in place in the current form people will resist further laws on the subject. I also don't think that you are 100% correct when you state that people won't wait a single day. I could live with waiting -say- five years for most of the current offerings; but then I'm old and don't give many fucks.

The various rights holders have spent the last 20 years since the internet became popular essentially training us to become pirates. They've been treating their customers like The Adversary and now seem surprised that that's what we've become.

Piracy is hard to compete with, this is true, and at the current state I'm not even sure that pricing is a major factor. It's certainly not the only one...I don't have to cough up any personal info for a pirated film; there's no DRM; there's no adverts; and it'll work for the rest of my life.

People will pay a reasonable amount for legitimate media; but that media has to be available and relatively easy to get hold of.

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moiety
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The various rights industries have spent the last century at least screwing absolutely everyone and -now that the tables have turned somewhat- have discovered that they don't like being on the receiving end.

Now copyright infringement *is* a problem and quite possibly some new law to cover the advances in technology might be worth doing. But not while the copyright laws are so bleeding ridiculous. Fair enough let creators have a chance to make a few quid; but 70 years past the creator's death? Fucking stupid. So there is going to be considerable resistance if things stay as they are.

All rights holders need to do is make their products available everywhere, to everyone, at a reasonable price and much of their infringement problems will go away.

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Secondhand Point-o-Sale terminal was horrific security midden

moiety
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Re: POS

Oh. I see what you did there.

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You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary

moiety
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As far as I know, you're NOT allowed to make a copy of media in the UK. The Fair Use thing is a US law and doesn't apply in the UK, I believe. It's a civil matter; incredibly difficult to enforce and everybody does it anyway...but not legal.

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moiety
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So how exactly did these copyright holders get hold of £3.5M of taxpayer money then? Copying intellectual property (neither piracy nor theft, by the way) is a civil matter, and should be paid for by the injured party and maybe the defendant if the rights-holders win in court.

As ways of attempting to stuff the genie back in the bottle go, I suppose education isn't he worst thing that could happen; but it does seem pretty pointless. And expensive.

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UK.gov's data grab and stab law IMMINENT as Drip drips through House of Lords

moiety
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This is no way to run an alleged democracy. A bill that they would emphatically not get consent for, rushed through by dodgy means to create law to screw the populace over.

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Microsoft: You NEED bad passwords and should re-use them a lot

moiety
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Re: @moiety: Try downloading the data sheet for a chip

Wow. That's the most unpopular thing I've ever said on this forum. All the downvotes in the world aren't going to convince me that re-using passwords is a good idea though.

@ J.G.Harston - Does your library access allow for using USB sticks? If yes, then something like this might do it for you:

http://portableapps.com/apps/utilities/keepass_portable

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moiety
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Re: I Disagree

What is "an offline piece of software"? If it's on an on-line device, it's not really off-line in the security sense, even if it's not designed to access the web itself.

OK, a piece of software that doesn't itself access the internet then, even if the host machine is connected. I did say it wasn't perfect; but it's the best solution I can think of. 100% better than using the same easy password for multiple accounts anyway.

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