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* Posts by chr0m4t1c

870 posts • joined 18 Aug 2009

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Why Comrade Cameron went all Russell Brand on the UK’s mobile networks

chr0m4t1c

Re: 'Normal Collier'?

Different phenomona

Norman Collier is when you have dropouts so that you miss words or parts of words.

Dalek is when the data rate drops for voice so you still hear all of the words, but the caller sounds like they are speaking through a "dalek" voice changing microphone.

Record a voice and then encode it with successfully lower bitrates to hear the effect for yourself (you'll probably need to start at something like 80k and work down).

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Who wants to be A MILLIONAIRE? Not so fast, Visa tells wannabe pay-by-bonk thieves

chr0m4t1c

Or just keep it inside one of the readily available card carriers that block the reader when you're not using it.

Search for "RFID blocking" on eBay and there are lots of options from complete card wallets to things that you can put in your existing card carrier.

In reality, "New security measure" != "100% effective" does not mean that "Old security measure" > "New security measure".

Seatbelts don't prevent all injuries, but for real world examples they are generally better than no seatbelt.

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Japan tells operators: Put a SIM lock in a new mobe? You'd better UNLOCK it for FREE

chr0m4t1c

Re: we need free unlocking in the UK too

>It sounds like an Apple thing

Yeah, but it looks like it was CPW that messed up. Apple ships all phones unlocked, but some of them are pre-registered to be network locked as they're supposed to be sold under contract.

They're not locked to a specific network until you put a SIM in them, at which point the locking is triggered and they are tied to the network of that SIM.

CPW should either have not sold him that particular handset, or informed Apple (normally that's just done through the POS system) that the handset had been sold as SIM-free, he should probably take it up with CPW.

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Big Retail's Apple Pay killer CurrentC HACKED, tester info nicked

chr0m4t1c

Re: Concerns

>I dunno, but can the 'tap to pay' merchant terminals in the UK be adapted to work with Apple Pay - or a Google NFC system?

Yes. Apple Pay is an implementation of the standard currently in use for these transactions.

Currently the primary limitation in the UK is that there's no way to load your card onto the phone because no banks have the systems in place to generate the tokens (yet).

If you have a supported US credit or debit card you can set your iPhone region to the US, which will enable the OS support, and then load your card into the phone. After that you can use it at any PayWave terminal, but (of course) you will have the currency conversion charges to pay on any transaction.

A few people around the world, not just the UK, have already tried and found everything works as you would like.

From what I have heard Visa and MasterCard are already working with the banks to bring the functionality to the UK next year.

There's an interesting article here if you want something more in-depth:

http://bankinnovation.net/2014/09/heres-how-the-security-behind-apple-pay-will-really-work/

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Microsoft discovers long-lost phone division down back of sofa

chr0m4t1c

Re: One step closer

Yeah, and Samsung's latest figures aren't terribly inspiring.

Was it something like 90% drop in the last quarter's profits? That's going to sting a bit.

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Tesla's Elon Musk shows the world his D ... and it's a MONSTER

chr0m4t1c

Re: Donations for politicians

>Better option: Let's start an El-Reg party, and get some normal, intelligent, forward-thinking, incorruptible (I hope) people in power!

You're new here, aren't you?

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Vulture takes BlackBerry's Passport through customs

chr0m4t1c

Re: Keyboard won't be a gamechanger for BB

iOS has Swype now too.

Keep up :*)

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Sapphire glass maker's woes caused by Apple relationship 'breakdown'

chr0m4t1c

Re: Well, duh

I must admit, my first thought was that Apple had done this deliberately in order to buy them at a discount, but I am also unable to think of a single instance where they had followed this approach before.

In fact, Apple have (so far) gone out of their way to avoid owning most of their own manufacturing capability, prefering to invest with existing companies to either improve their facilities or introduce a new capability and then have that investment be recouped as manufacturing discounts and/or guaranteed production levels.

Natually, anyone who wants to continue to believe that Apple are evil should ignore any developments in this story that do not support that supposition.

2
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First Irish boy band U2. Now Apple pushes ANOTHER thing into iPhones, iPods, iPads

chr0m4t1c

Re: OS vs apps: Paint

>The first iPhone didn't even have 3G, only wifi. So having a data plan was irrelevant.

The first iPhone had 2G (GSM/GPRS/EDGE) and was really only intended to be used on one network in the USA, even though it did make it to some networks outside of the US shortly before being replaced by the 3G version.

So having a data plan was not irrelevant, but it was essentally useless given the speed of the data.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s

chr0m4t1c

Re: "... The interface is terrible. I mean, it’s awful!”

I don't think it's just the providers.

My TV has a network interface and will connect to Netflix, so does my streaming box, my games console and my cable box and each one of them has a different interface for the same service.

If one provider can't even manage to standardize, there's no chance when you're working across multiples.

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Scared of brute force password attacks? Just 'GIVE UP' says Microsoft

chr0m4t1c

Re: Interesting

>That's exactly what I said, except for your pro-Apple spin.

My reading of your post was that it implied that Apple were lying. The iCloud servers were not breached, but individual accounts were hacked, pointing out the facts is not pro-Apple spin.

>Failure to enforce lockout after multiple failed login attempts is pathetic and there's no excuse for it.

Apple lock out accounts for eight hours after 12 failed attempts.

Apple's reset process invloves providing email address, date of birth and the answer to any one of a number of securty questions (e.g. The name of your first pet). Unfortunately for people in the public eye most of that information is likely to be easily available from a number of sources and like most people they wouldn't think of just making up an answer, so a quick trip to Google will almost certainly allow you to gain ilicit access to the account of pretty well anyone famous.

Is this Apple's /fault/? Debatable. There are more things they could do, but then there are already additional security features available for Apple accounts that do not appear to have been turned on in this case (e.g. if you have 2FA turned on, then the password reset process will also require you to go through that).

So we're back to square one, is it the fault of any company if users who do not use the security features provided then have their accounts breached?

No. It's the fault of the people who gained access, in the same way that if you forgot to lock your front door it's not your fault if someone steals your TV. What you did might have inadvertently made it easy for them, but make no mistake that the person at fault is the thief.

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Apple Fanbois (and girls) already lining up for NEW iPHONE

chr0m4t1c

Re: 3 minute orgasm

I happened to be in New York a couple of years ago when the iPhone 5 launched and there were TV crews from around the world interviewing people in the line pretty much 24 hours a day.

The story says that these two have some software to promote, making this a marketing exercise - they'll get 18 days of worldwide press coverage for their $2,500 ($3,200 including phone), which is a bit of a bargain.

Fanbois? Not likely.

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PHABBA-DABBA-DOO! Samsung Galaxy Note 4, Edge, Gear VR – feast your eyes

chr0m4t1c

Re: Note Edge

I think Fanboi tends to relate to Apple devotees these days, Fandroid is used for Android fans so can't really be properly deployed for a specific manufacturer.

I would suggest either Fansung, Samboi or, at a push, Samdroid.

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Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch

chr0m4t1c

That's some serious spin.

“Samsung is leading this exciting and rapidly developing wearable category through progressive innovation,”

Or by being one of the few manufacturers making smart watches. Take your pick.

Having a dig around, it looks like Samsung has a significant lead in the US (78% of the userbase, compared to Pebble's 18%) and a reasonable lead worldwide (where the figures are 34% and 6%). But that's from a total userbase of three million, which isn't a lot of people when you consider the potential market and the fact that the major competitors (lets say Motorola, LG and Apple) haven't entered the market yet. If any one of them ships a product that sells well, Samsung could be quickly overhauled.

“The Samsung Gear S redefines the idea of the smart wearable and the culture of mobile communication."

I'm not seeing anything that looks like a redefinition in the specifications. Anyone care to elaborate?

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So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL

chr0m4t1c

Re: Who Innovates In The Cell Phone Business?

>It's good but not an innovation

Given what was on the market at the time (and had been for >5 years), I think it could be argued that a polished UI *was* an innovation, but not in the sense of being an innovative idea, more in the sense of delivering it to the consumer as it seemed that no-one else had thought of actually doing that.

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Experimental hypersonic SUPERMISSILE destroyed 4 SECONDS after US launched it

chr0m4t1c

"Happily no one was hurt"

Doesn't that slightly defeat the point of a weapon?

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Pull up! Pull up! Pull up! Ding ... HP ends eleven-quarter sales nosedive

chr0m4t1c

When I think of HP I think of the massive HP:Invent campaign that they launched at the same time as closing down 60% of their R&D.

They then hitched the future of their big iron to the towbar of the then unproven Itanium from Intel and offloaded most of their field engineers.

After that they were surprised that customers wondered why they should pay for expensive HP support that they could get cheaper from the companies that the engineers went to or why they wouldn't pick HP's big iron for a system with a 10+ year lifespan when HP couldn't demonstrate a roadmap longer than about nine months.

Yes, I think "succession of hopless CEOs" sums it up rather well.

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Don't think you're SAFE from Windows zombies just 'cos you have an iPhone - research

chr0m4t1c

@ jcitron

I think someone needs a hug.

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FEAST YOUR EYES: Samsung's Galaxy Alpha has an 'entirely new appearance'

chr0m4t1c

Re: They all look alike

"Alpha" may refer to the stage of readiness for production.

Presumably there'll be a Beta in about six months that will have fewer issues, but the one you really want will be the Gold Master.

Or it is just possible that I need to get out more.

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New twist in China Apple hardware ban riddle: THE TRUTH at last?

chr0m4t1c

Re: Please explain

I think what he means is the same thing that comes up every 18 months or so when some fresh people discover that iOS can send crash dumps to Apple.

Every iOS device asks you if you want to allow this behavior when it's first set up and you can turn it off and on in the settings (General->About->Diagnositcs & Usage).

Nevertheless, this is evidence of Apple secretly spying on everyone, because: Apple.

I don't know what this "network sniffer" is meant to be, but it seems to me that a network sniffer could be a FUD way of referring to normal WiFi discovery or possibly normal service discovery once connected to the network.

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SOULLESS machine-intelligence ROBOT cars to hit Blighty in 2015

chr0m4t1c

Re: £10,m?

how long it will be before some systems admin who has been up all night fixing a problem or who has spent 20 hours in the office kills someone or themselves while driving home.

Already happened at my place about 6 years ago, an engineer worked a full day and then got called and had to work through to about 4am. He fell asleep at the wheel on the way home, hit a lorry (I think it was a bin wagon or a skip truck) and died.

I seriously doubt that he was the first or the last.

The only practical way to prevent this kind of thing is to have shifts so that you're always limiting the amount of time people are likely to be asked to work. In reality that costs money and the suggestion seems to put the screaming heeby-jeebies up about 50% of the work force for some reason, so it isn't always possible to implement.

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Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?

chr0m4t1c

Re: Realism

If the Spanish block out EU membership then they will not be respecting the UK constituation to allow a democratic vote, and that will give the Catalonians and Basques a big stick to beat them with.

As far as I know (and I may be wrong), there's never been a case of an EU member state splitting and there may not be any EU rules that cover such a case.

Essentially there are two possibilities in the event of independance:

1) Scotland is allowed to continue as an EU member because of it's previous membership as part of the UK.

2) Scotland is out of the EU, but may apply for membership as a new country.

Which one of those things happens is down to the EU, whatever the Yes camp say on the matter, it simply isn't up to Scotland (or England for that matter) on their own. Spain will form part of that debate, but it will (probably) only happen after a Yes vote, so Spain will not be interfering in the democratic vote for independance in any way, they will be debating the consequences along with all the other member states.

If there is a Yes vote and if the EU decides that they can't just continue as members that is when things could get tricky, but it's possible that it would all be sorted as part of any independance debates and discussions before the final break-up. It's not as if Scotland will actually be independant by the end of the year, it'll take years to get all of the infrastructure and financial stuff sorted out first.

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Microsoft: We're making ONE TRUE WINDOWS to rule us all

chr0m4t1c

Re: One OS

>Until it stops suddenly, as horses sometimes do.

Put it on roller skates, problem solved!

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Apple OS X Yosemite 4 TIMES more popular than Mavericks

chr0m4t1c

Re: Exactly

I think I read somewhere that they've also made it available to registered iOS developers rather than just registered OSX devs.

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'Ribbed' for your pleasure: Jony Ive unveils NAKED IPHONE

chr0m4t1c

Re: Brittle

Yes, but reality how many people have flint-gravel drives and how many of them regularly drop an unprotected phone onto them?

I'm reminded of talking to a friend many years ago when I bought a ruggedised torch to replace one that had broken when I dropped it while up a step-ladder.

"Ah", he said, "but it wouldn't survive a 100 foot drop onto concrete, that's how most of my torches die.". (He worked for the National Grid at the time.)

Do you know what? He was probably right, it wouldn't have survived that. But then I wasn't planning on putting into that situation and never did. All I needed it to do was to survive a drop of around 6-7 feet onto carpet or possibly lino, and it did that.

Eventually it died the usual torch death of being left in the back of the drawer and then eaten from the inside by its own leaking batteries.

Anyway.

Point is, if you have a flint-gravel drive that you regularly drop your phone on to then an all-glass phone is probably something you need to avoid, or maybe buy a case for it.

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Computing student jailed after failing to hand over crypto keys

chr0m4t1c

Re: Noggin Silly sod

I see that you're taking the Daily Fail approach of assuming the diagnosis was given during the judicial process.

The story makes no mention of when he was diagnosed, would you have made a similar suggestion if he had been confined to a wheelchair?

As has been pointed out, we are getting better at diagnosing mental conditions, which leads to more people being diagnosed (and treated) than would have happened in the past, which in turn leads to a greater percentage of people in the court system who have been diagnosed with some kind of problem.

Implying that it is purely a ploy used to get obviously guilty people off the hook is offensive to people who have these problems, those who live with, work with and care for those people and to the justice system itself.

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'iPhone 6' survives FRENZIED STABBING. Truly, it is the JESUS Phone

chr0m4t1c

Re: Enthusiastic, pumped and hardened.

>Two words.

>Vibrating Alert Function.

Yeah....

Count again.

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Amazon snubs FTC: We'll see you in court over kids' in-app cash blowouts

chr0m4t1c

Re: Easy access?

Agreed, on iOS there's a PIN protected area in settings that allows you to enable and disable access to a loads of applications and functions, including in-app purchases, as well as setting age restrictions on media (or disabling a specific type of media altogether like music or TV shows).

You can also decide if a password is required every time a purchase is made or only after 15 minutes have elapsed from the previous purchase.

On top of that lot there are other settings for privacy and stopping someone from changing various system settings (such as when mobile data can be used).

Overall, pretty comprehensive.

And if that lot isn't enough, you always have the option of setting up an account that has no credit or debit card linked to it so that it needs to be pre-loaded from gift cards.

So, yes, I will also call BS on the "Amazon offers all of this protection and the others don't" statement.

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Xiaomi: Hidden Android dragon is growing fast, despite being unknown in the West

chr0m4t1c
Joke

Re: Let them come

If even the commentards are getting Samsung and Apple mixed up, maybe those design lawsuits had merit after all.

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Sorry, chaps! We didn't mean to steamroller legit No-IP users – Microsoft

chr0m4t1c

Everything OK now, you say?

::checks VPN access using DDNS::

Nope, still not working, 09.20 BST.

I see the MS helpdesk still operates on the same principal of telling you something is fixed so that you have to go away for a bit to try it and find that it isn't.

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Conformist Google: Android devices must LOOK, WORK ALIKE

chr0m4t1c

Re: History repeating...

No.

Potted history:

Android, Inc. (Founded 2003) _created_ Android. Google _bought_ Android, Inc. in 2005.

Android was originally meant to be an OS for digital cameras until they realised the market wasn't big enough at which point they switched to developing a smartphone OS intended to take on the awful Windows Mobile and ageing Symbian (this was before the Google buy-out). Early prototypes had no touch-screen and a QWERTY keyboard, like a Blackberry.

Google open-sourced Android in November 2007 at the same time as the Open Handset Alliance was announced, it's not clear if that was their original intention or not.

The first commercially available Android handset was the HTC Dream, launched November 2008.

For historical perspective, the first iPhone was announced in January 2007 and went on sale in June 2007. Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google, was on Apple's board of directors from August 2006 until August 2009.

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Microsoft's anti-malware crusade knackers '4 MILLION' No-IP users

chr0m4t1c

Re: Good thing...

As far as I am aware all of these sites have an audit trail, they'll record each change of dynamic address, both the new end point and the address of where it was changed from.

I think it's highly likely that someone up to no good will avoid paying for a service with their own money don't you?

And they've borked my No-IP lookup too, which means they're not sticking to the remit of only taking down malware domains.

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Finding the formula for the travelling salesman problem

chr0m4t1c

I'm sure that's already available somewhere. It's a while since I placed an online order, but the last time (Sainsburys, I think) offered me tiered delivery prices based on other deliveries they were already making, if I remember correctly I was offered a £3.50 delivery for one slot as they were already in the area in the same slot, £5 for one where it was "close" to another delivery and £7.50 for the slot where no other deliveries were happening nearby.

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DANGER MOUSE is back ... and he isn't half a GLASSHOLE

chr0m4t1c

Re: Or....

That reminds me, I've always quite liked the idea of inviting a load of my friends over for a Peruvian Dinner Party and then serving marmalade sandwiches.

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New Apple iOS to help fanbois thwart Wi-Fi network spies

chr0m4t1c

Re: Apple copying again! - Android's Pry-Fi

It's almost impossible to tell, Chainfire seems to have announced Pry-Fi at the end of January, which would theoretically allow Apple sufficient time to add the functionality to iOS8 in time for launch roughly four months later.

However, iOS8 will have been in development for well over a year before the recent launch and we have no way of finding out if they had already included the functionality.

In addition to that, Apple started adding anti-tracking options (for advertising) as far back as iOS6.

Given that public wi-fi probably wasn't being used to track movement until last year, there would not have been any need for this solution and all we may seeing is two seprate entities trying to resolve the same problem and coming up with the same idea - not a great strech of the imagination once you know how the tracking is taking place and the way the protocol is operating.

TBH, Pry-Fi requires a device to be rooted in order to function, I'd much rather than Goolge (and MS for that matter) "copied" this idea too so that it's part of the OS and then we'd all be better off.

1
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The enemy of my enemy is my, well, temporary ally: Apple and Microsoft in pact against Google

chr0m4t1c

Re: Did anyone else see the enormous u-turn here?

It think they're slightly different offerinings, but it certainly suggests a short memory from everyone suggesting that it's a new foray into cloud storage that will have people like Dropbox worried.

As you say, they offered something similar that was discontinued two years ago and they've now brought it back, why are people getting in a flap?

0
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New iOS 8 SDK: Come in, apps. Get cozy, sip wine, swap numbers

chr0m4t1c

Re: Welcome to 2009

Erm, all of that stuff existed in other places *before* Android was even bought by Google.

Are we to live in a world where an advancement from one company cannot be added to anyone else's products?

Good luck getting that idea to fly, because you can't put any wings on it as they've been used by someone else.

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Android is a BURNING 'hellstew' of malware, cackles Apple's Cook

chr0m4t1c

Re: Really?

>$15M taken from iOS users by ransomware and banking exploits in the last month

Link?

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Senate decides patent reform is just too much work, waves white flag

chr0m4t1c

Re: @ chr0m4t1c

As I inferred, and you have ignored, I am not standing up for Microsoft and Apple per se (or is that too pretentious as well?). I was simply pointing out that your assertion that Apple and Microsoft are against the reform is incorrect.

The "for" was quoted (like that) because, during my educational years, it was the convention to write "for" and "against" when referring to the arguments. You may think of it as a non-verbal tick if you wish.

I wrote "evil" because it is the convention within the comments of The Register to refer to companies as evil when they do something that hurts the delicate sensibilities of the gentle readers. Evil is a concept that is in itself open to a broad debate, but ascribing moral values to any given company is simply pointless and serves no useful purpose; once you have decided a company is "evil", then you are highly unlikely to take a balanced view of any activity they undertake.

Hence, whenever Apple wins a court case there are people in this forum who are absolutely convinced that they only won because the case was held in America or because Apple had paid off the judge and/or jury.

The patent system (in the USA) is broken because when the law was created it simply didn't occur to anyone that the entities we now refer to as "patent trolls" might come into existence and mess everything up.

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chr0m4t1c

Re: who are those companies?

You need to stop guessing based on personal bias and predudice.

The patent reform bill is supported by 400 companies, you can find their names here:

http://www.patentprogress.org/letters-support-patent-reform/

Apple and Microsoft are both in the "for" camp.

You may now proceed to use congnitive dissonance to downvote this post because we all know that pointing out that Microsoft and/or Apple are not being "evil" is exactly the same as being a mindless fanboi that will buy any old crap they happen to sell.

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iDevice gizmo-snatcher Oleg... you must be taking the Pliss

chr0m4t1c

Re: Please confirm...

(a) Yes, it does. But if you do that *first* then why would anyone pay you the ransom?

(b) Also true. But our hacker has to cunning enough to change your password so that you can't just re-authenticate the device. It appears our hacker was not cunning enough, or not motivated to do that for some other reason. One problem with that is that when you change your password Apple will immediately email you to say you've done it, so that would at least ring alarm bells for some people. Although, given that this appears to be a case of re-used login credentials from somewhere else, that may be wishing too much intelligence on the users.

IIRC, in order to delete iCloud backups you have to use an iDevice authenticated to iCloud, I don't think you can use a web browser, so that would be time consuming.

(a? again?) Two factor authentication is available for account access, but it is not turned on by default and as one of the options is to have a code sent to a mobile number as the second stage, this would be problematic when trying to wipe a stolen device. Think it through. You would need to be able to securely change the second phase of two-factor authentication to something else. Answers on a postcard, please.

(b? again?) No, it doesn't, for the reasons detailed above.

0
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El Reg Quid-A-Day Nosh Posse back on the bacon

chr0m4t1c

Re: "Neil Barnes and missus Anita"

And for extra geek points, it's worth pointing out that one half of Barnes & Barnes was in fact the actor Bill Mumy, best know for playing Will Robinson in the 1960's Lost In Space series and less well known as the Mimbari ambassador's aide Lennier in the 1990's classic series, Babylon 5.

2
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Thanks for nothing, Apple, say forensic security chaps

chr0m4t1c

No.

Well, maybe.

It's complicated, but if you take all the default user options you still don't get everything backed up in the cloud, apps can have a temporary data area that isn't backed up, usually it's used for things that can be downloaded again and are large so you don't want them backed up because they just fill your backup space (iOS will default to backing up application data). Financial apps normally use this area for authorisation data, so that if you restore a device the data is not present and you have to re-authorise.

That's the default position, so already not all of your data would be in the cloud, although you should still be able to recover a device; you just re-download any content from the relevant provider after a restore. Even with this option you can still have calendar entries and contacts that are only stored on the phone if you wish.

After that, you have options. Most secure thing to do would be to simply not configure a cloud account if you're worried about security.

Next thing you could do is to disable backup of specific apps to the cloud, which should work quite well given the sandboxed nature of iOS.

After that, depending on the data you want to keep secure, you could use a specifc app that provides the security you want, they normally feature an additional level of encryption, so that even their backup data can't be easily breached.

And, of course, there's always the option of either writing your own app or paying someone to write one for you that has the features you want.

1
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USB reversible cables could become standard sooner than you think

chr0m4t1c

Re: You need to remember...

I don't think so, USB was designed to replace things like Centronics (IEEE 1284), RS-232 and RS-432 type connectors that were in use at the time.

USB was meant to be as fast as the fastest of those, smaller than the smallest and a standard size as well as more robust so that is could be regularly connected and disconnected without bending or breaking pins.

In addition to that, USB devices were all supposed to be hot-pluggable (not recommended for some devices using the previous standards) and it made it standard to put sockets on machines and peripherals so that all cables were plugs. In the olden days there was no standard, so every IT person in the land had to have a drawer full of M-M and F-F adapters for emergencies.

You youngsters don't know the half of it :-)

Now you basically have USB as A-A or A-B and a length.

Back then an RS-232 could be 9-9 pin, 24-24 pin, 9-24 pin and then the gender connectors on top of that - 10 combinations before you even get to length. And then on top of that, not all pins had to be connected or even in the same order, so you had to have all of those combinations along with further ones for things like pass-through and crossover.

Some places I worked at had entire stock rooms full of the various cable combinations and nothing else.

</PYTHON_YORKSHIREMAN_PARODY>

8
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'iPhone 6' with '4.7-inch' display 'coming soon', but '5.5-incher' 'delayed'

chr0m4t1c

The current screen is supposed to be the perfect size for using with one hand, which it probably is for a surprising large number of people.

The earlier screen was pretty much the industry standard size when it launched.

Now that the balance is - or has - tipped from dumb phones to smart phones, most people don't use their handset with only one hand for a lot of operations, they've become accustomed to using both.

That opens the door for larger screens, but they may want to tweek OS an application style guides to allow some things still to be done one-handed.

Whatever eventually arrives, we'll still have the usual internet flame wars and click-bait news stories to keep us all going.

0
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BlackBerry sucker-punches TV star Ryan Seacrest in patent brawl

chr0m4t1c

Re: It must be a *Design* patent (on design and appearance)

US patents 7,629,964, 8,162,552, and D685,775 apparently.

Only the third one is a design patent, the first two are for physical keyboards optimised for mobile use (broadly speaking).

0
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It's EE vs Vodafone: 'How good is my signal' study descends into network bunfight

chr0m4t1c

Yeah, I was wondering about that bit too. RootMetrics themselves have a link to their app on both iOS and Android on this page: http://www.rootmetrics.com/products

I have it on my handset too, and I'm reasonably sure it was a story right here on El Reg that led me to it in the first place.

0
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Worlds that could support LIFE found among 715 new planets

chr0m4t1c

Re: Are any of the earth-sized planets NOT tidally locked?

I don't think you've fully appreciated the science being used here.

"Verified" does not mean "seen". They know the planets are there by the way they effect the star they are orbiting, but there is no data about basic things like planetary rotation or atmosperic composition at this point.

Given that we haven't even put people on Mars yet, it's probably a little early to worry about colonisation of favourable exoplanets.

You're talking about moving house from London to Sydney by walking before you're capable of walking to the end of your own garden.

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Facebook ditches TOP SECRET email service. Did YOU know it had one?

chr0m4t1c

Re: Much as I dislike Facebook, I wish...

>You mean like gmail's Report Phishing option..?

Yeah, those Google reporting tools work really well.

I've had a GMail address almost since the service became available and I always report false positives when asked, yet it still sends every single email I get from PayPal, Amazon and my bank into the spam folder.

In the end, I got so fed up that I specifically set up filters for the more common cases to stop it putting them in the spam folder - at which point it helpfully displays a message above every one of these messages insiting that it *is* spam and that I should change my filters.

Damn you, Google Mail Team! ::shakes fist impotently::

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Google gives Maps a lick of paint, smears it over screens worldwide

chr0m4t1c

Re: A taste of things to come?

I have an uncle who used to be a funeral director, he uses churches as reference points for directions, it's *really* weird the first time you encounter it.

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