* Posts by gerdesj

724 posts • joined 15 Aug 2009

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Sorry slacktivists: The Man is shredding your robo responses

gerdesj
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Gimp

Department of Culture, Media and Sport

It's the Ministry of Fun. End of.

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State Department finds 22 classified emails in Hillary’s server, denies wrongdoing

gerdesj
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Spot the oxymoron

I've given up with trying to quote and [sic] etc. After de bullshitting and trimming (this is an abbreviation):

1,000 emails include 22 that contain material that is classified, but wasn’t at the time the messages were sent.

Re-read the above carefully and note the words "wasn't at the time".

This is a carefully placed piece of wank against a politico against whom I nearly don't care about and who is running for a position in a country I call foreign. Why should I care?

I care about facts or at least a reasonable argument about what is factual.

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Facebook tells Belgian government its use of English invalidates privacy case

gerdesj
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Gimp

Re: Lingua Franca?

I didn't spell it out properly: Cookie is an English borrow word from the Dutch (koekje or koekie.) Dutch is an official language of Belgium.

Yep: Zuck's legal tentacle is trying to tell an entire country how to speak one of their own languages.

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gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: Schoolyard

It does seem strange to use a language based argument in a country with multiple official languages and is all too familiar with the problems associated with getting a point across effectively in a subset of the Tower of Babel.

I am not familiar with Belgium's legal system but given that one of the words FB cite (cookie) is actually a borrow word from Dutch and GB had a rather large hand in the formation of Belgium and that Belgium is an EU country and that English is one of the official languages of the EU, then I don't see that an argument based on language will get too far.

Even if it is a fair attempt within Belgium's legal system, the fact that it makes them a laughing stock internationally will cost them hard and demonstrates that a $B245 company can behave like twats despite it being bleeding obvious that approach is stupid.

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gerdesj
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Paris Hilton

Lingua Franca?

RLY? I'd love to - oh I did and I wasn't disappointed. Google this:"cookie - etymology" (hint - Dutch)

The irony is absolutely delicious (omnomnomnom)

IIRC Belgium has several official languages already and hence running with "English" terms as a form of IT lingua franca is quite normal. In the UK we are even bilingual in this area accepting disk for disc, along with font for fount (*sigh* - they are typefaces.) Actually the en_GB originals are fading - that's how language works.

Lingua Franca means language of the Franks (Frenchy/Germanic sort of). English is a massive borrower of words and is quite happy to reciprocate the honour. My favourite is: "Boeuf" (French) -> "Beef" ... "Beef steak" (English) -> "le biftek" (French). Apparently the French used to boil their beef until Parisians, besieged by British troops, saw our plucky err invaders grilling theirs and saw the error of their ways.

Nice, Chrome underlined boeuff (above, corrected now) for me and would have offered the correct speling if I'd right clicked. I've just used a dictionary!

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What’s new in Hyper-V in Windows Server 2016?

gerdesj
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http://lmgtfy.com/?q=hyperv+Discrete+Device+Assignment - Yes.

BTW, Used it for years on VMware. I have an eight port MPEG decoder for security cameras to a ZoneMinder VM at work. It looks like an orange octopus with really thin arms is climbing out of the expansion slots. On my home system I have several DVBS2 decoders for my virty MythTV backend and a Sangoma POTS card for my FreePBX VM (as you do.)

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gerdesj
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Big Brother

HV in VM

"Top of the what’s new list is nested virtualisation"

I used that a few years back on VMware when it was added so I could try out HyperV.

I didn't like it.

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Open source plugin aims to defeat link rot

gerdesj
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Re: More shitty animated GIFs

"Happy to hear my GPU isn't broken ..."

It is if you can hear it.

Anyone who is synergesic around here is probably frantically trying to blow white noise out of their nose after seeing that headline piccie.

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gerdesj
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Re: Hosts

Hosts??? If I was a betting man, I would guess your hosts file is at c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc Has that not ever struck you as an odd place for a config file? Real nerds keep theirs in /etc/ . Actually, real nerds run their own DNS server or at least their own (configurable) resolver, such as "unbound".

Pointing remote sites at yourself via "hosts" is not a good idea. I am assuming that, according to a lot of intertube wisdom, you are making entries like this:

127.0.0.1 www.site.ihate.com

Don't

1.1.1.1 www.site.ihate.com

is safer. Even better (minimally) is a decent set of firewalls, AV/AS/etc, a web proxy and perhaps a solid grounding in IT Security. None of those are beyond a household budget (many good (best) ones are Open Source and hence free)

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gerdesj
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Paris Hilton

Re: Hosts

Funny how things come to bite you. I have been using "Privacy Badger" as a plugin within Chrome for yonks. I was introduced to it via an article here. Tonight - I'm on GMT - I noticed el Reg go a bit odd as those bloody huge piccies vanished and the headlines mangled a bit.

I don't know exactly what criteria you have to meet to incur the wrath of PB but finally, after several years, regmedia.co.uk has managed to slither over the line.

Congratulations: You've shit it.

Oh God, I had to do it. Turned off PB and my retinas burned

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NSA’s top hacking boss explains how to protect your network from his attack squads

gerdesj
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Gimp

"Words that should be beaten into the heads of damagement until they finally """get it""", and then, maybe they will think twice about embracing the cloud."

I do "get it" thank you (MD - but not a doctor.) Please go easy on the quotation marks - I don't get that.

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Pay up, Lincolnshire, or your data gets it. Systems still down after ransomware hits

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

I'm cleaning up a machine right now

The only way to be safe from Cryptolocker, Teslacrypto etc is backups. You need 14 days at least and ideally a grandfather/father/son rotation. The backups *must* be elsewhere and inaccessible to your machine(s) ie don't just copy docs to a network share unless it is backed up.

If you run Windows, you might turn on restore points because that enable Shadow Copies which could be a saving grace and DO NOT CLICK YES on a sudden request that wants to delete shadow copies (quite often the first thing you notice wrong when they strike)

If you get hit and you do not have backups to fall back on:

Pull the power out. Buy another disc and a caddy and clone your existing disc to it (Linux boot CD or you can get disc duplicator caddies quite cheaply). Ideally make two clones. Put one of the clones into your machine and boot off it to make sure that it works. Disconnect all other PCs from your network first or isolate it in some way. Download and install Spybot and Malware Bytes - both have free versions. Update them and run them until the disc is cleared then wait a day or two and do it again. That will capture the zero days usually. You may have to use safe mode and a vulcan nerve pinch.

Finally, if you have a large disc and not much in use and the bastards haven't wiped the free space to cause deleted space to be reclaimed then you might be able to recover the original unencrypted files with "Photorec" now known as Testdisk.

MAKE BACKUPS NOW IF YOU RUN WINDOWS. It really isn't funny explaining to someone that their entire digital photo collection of 12+ years is gone. Yes I'm now running qphotorec and praying for some results ...

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Cops hate encryption but the NSA loves it when you use PGP

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: RE: Start encrypting every bit of Internet traffic

Calm down something_or_another. Take your dried frog pills and a deep breath.

You can take the piss out of el Reg, its readers and (possibly put it back in, if that's your thing) Mr C but not the Queen - thank you.

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Now you can easily see if a site's HTTP headers are insecure, beams dev

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: Hall of Shame

This link seems to be broken: https://securityheaders.io/?q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.theregister.co.uk%2F (scan again over https)

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Thought you were safe from the Fortinet SSH backdoor? Think again

gerdesj
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Windows

pfSense lacks this feature

How on earth is pfSense expecting to be taken seriously if they lack the security basics like a backdoor?

I've grepped the source for "backdoor" (I even used -i) and nothing came up!

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Cabling horrors unplugged: Reg readers reveal worst nightmares

gerdesj
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Windows

Cable party?

In the last picture: The blue cables should be split into two. One lot follows the current path (run to far left, up and flow in left to right) the second lot should go straight up and flow in from the right to left.

*Tsk*

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Boffins: There's a ninth planet out there – now we just need to find it

gerdesj
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Artist's impression

.

(Apparently comments need to have content around here, so here it is)

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Eighteen year old server trumped by functional 486 fleet!

gerdesj
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Linux

Trigger's laptop

I have had the "same" computer since 2003. It started off life as a desktop running WinXP and then spontaneously transmogrified its OS into Gentoo Linux. I've been running it ever since, through several hardware refreshes, including turning into a laptop about 2005. Each time I imaged the old to the new and around 2009ish converted it from ~x86 to ~amd64 (32 bit to 64 bit). It's now a Core i7 with 16GB RAM and a SSD. It does boot rather quicker than when it was younger, with a pair of IDE discs.

The make.conf still has the original creation date stamp and I have all the kernel configs. Also /home/<me> is still the same and /boot is still ext2.

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European human rights court rules mass surveillance illegal

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Who will rid me of the ECHR?

Whatever happens in an EU in/out related referendum in the UK, I hope that we stay signed up to whichever treaty involves the ECHR. They are not related apart from both being tagged "European".

I am not an expert in this area but it does seem to me that the ECHR has a nasty habit of ruling to protect fundamental and basic rights that one might expect to enjoy in any society that operates according to democratic principles.

It is a crying shame that we need organisations that puts the Demos Kratos back in the fucking government.

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For fsck's SAKKE: GCHQ-built phone voice encryption has massive backdoor – researcher

gerdesj
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VPN

IPSEC and OpenVPN are long established VPN technologies. If you want encrypted voice, then use them (carefully.) You are more likely to be secure than rubbing snake oil on the blower.

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Trustwave failed to spot casino hackers right under its nose – lawsuit

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

framepkg.exe

That'll be part of McAfee's ePO agent IIRC. OK probably not the real one but if it was then it will look like a highly suspicious application.

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The Day Netflix Blocked My VPN is the world's new most-hated show

gerdesj
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Linux

Squid

If using Squid, try the following:

via off

forwarded_for off

follow_x_forwarded_for deny all

httpd_suppress_version_string on

That makes it quite hard to detect that a proxy is in use ...

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What do Angolan rebels, ISIS widows, Metallica and a photographer have in common?

gerdesj
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Murdered?

"before finally being murdered by government troops in 2002"

Killed is the word you want here, I think. Murder is something defined by a government or rather, generally speaking, the judicial bit of the body that runs a state. OK, the connotation behind the word murder is "wrongly killing someone" and wrongly is usually enshrined in some form of law or in the absence of a legal system: a belief system (or both)

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Boozing is unsafe at ‘any level’, thunders chief UK.gov quack

gerdesj
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"Bloody hell...The gin and the orange juice were a new one on me"

The OJ + Blue Curacao is what makes it green 8)

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gerdesj
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Holmes

(Tom -1): "unless all I ever learned about statistics is utterly wrong"

No but I think you might be lightly accused of misapplying it! It's that anecdote vs data thing. You can't really talk about Mr 45RPM's life duration with respect to his drinking as though it is a deterministic process viz: drink three pints a day and therefore you will live x time longer.

Both of us and all the other commentards on here could bore ourselves silly with "well my gran drank 40 fags a day and snorted 10 glasses of homebrewed wine a night and lived to 95" stories. Those are still anecdotes and are not statistics unless we gather enough of them, in which case they will obviously form one of the finest studies ever performed.

All we can really do with these types of statistics is make predictions across a population <slurps more wine>

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gerdesj
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Pint

"Can't for the life of me remember what it was called "

Green Dragon - Pint glass. 1" orange juice, 1 shotish of Blue Curaceu (hic), two to four shots of gin and/or vodka to taste and fill up with "snake bite" (50/50 lager/cider). To add a bit more interest, use barley wine and scrumpy for the Snake Bite component. This beast tastes a lot nicer than it sounds and should have a clean crisp flavour. Bloody lethal though.

However a Green Dragon is not transparent and more grass green.

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How hard can it be to kick terrorists off the web? Tech bosses, US govt bods thrash it out

gerdesj
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Paris Hilton

Re: Confused thinking

I'll admit to being pissed when I write the above but a large part of my job is "IT Security Consultant". I will not make a very good representative or congressman due to my RP accent, tinged with Somerset. I probably wouldn't make a very good American to be honest.

I have a very good idea how encryption and the internet works, thank you. Modesty precludes any willy waving at this point ...

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gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Confused thinking

The debates over encryption are still confused over the difference between the physical and virtual world.

In the physical world you (dear commentard) and I both know that a burglar could get in to our home reasonably easily unless we protect it properly. Unfortunately our family members insist on windows and doors that only need a simple key that never changes to open. So we have to compromise and go easy on the bits of welded on angle iron, spiked pits and gun turrets. At least we don't have to worry about anyone, for absolutely anywhere in the world, turning up at the house.

In the virtual world anyone from a Jehovah's witness to the Chinese People's Army could appear at my front door at any time and they don't even bother to knock first before looking through the windows. A bunch of tossers from Eastern Europe, the US and Spain (according to GeoIP) are currently doing this right now at my place.

Fuck terrorism causing knee jerk drop the only protections we have: I want to see initiatives like enforcing IP addresses -> Country (not thought through completely) or advice on how to keep baddies out. I want to hear how my country's law enforcement have screwed up some baddies.

I do not want to feel like a hacker(cracker) for knowing how to use nmap and wireshark. I really want to see ubiquitous encryption: otherwise the entire world can hear me, not just people within earshot.

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Cardinal sin: Ex St Louis baseball exec cops to 'hacking' rival team's db

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Gate open, horse bolts

"Whether it's preserving the sanctity of America's pastime or protecting trade secrets, those that unlawfully gain proprietary information by accessing computers without authorization must be held accountable for their illegal actions."

I suggest that the gaping hole created by the practice of not enforcing effective password related policies (or any at all) should also be punished in some way or at least highlighted. If America (how can a US Attorney escalate this local fuck up countrywide) wants to preserve the sanctity of their pastime or protect their trade secrets, then they do so and not leave the door off the latch. Note that you can't throw assault rifles at this task, unfortunately you have to use common sense instead.

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Dutch govt says no to backdoors, slides $540k into OpenSSL without breaking eye contact

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: Dutch government and IT (Security) in general

"Let this be a step for the Dutch government not only to sponsor a good opensource project but to really improve their own security posture."

ISTR that the Dutch govt settled on OpenVPN as their VPN of choice and after auditing the software created their own distribution of it. OpenVPN uses OpenSSL, so this sponsorship would logically help to improve their security.

As OpenSSL is open source, then we all benefit - thanks Netherlands. Mind you I can't help but notice the lack of a padlock in my browser at the moment 8)

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iOS 9 kludged our iPhones, now give us money, claims new lawsuit

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Can't switch?

"Furthermore, the seductiveness of Apple's software ecosystem meant that the plaintiffs couldn't easily move to the competition, the lawsuit claims"

That is probably the most stupid thing I've heard in quite a while. It's as daft as saying you can't buy a Ford because you only drive Renault (ooh nooes, I can't find the headlight switch and can't read a manual)

A family member has an (old) iPhone and an iPad. On Black Friday they went out to buy a new phone. Apple wouldn't discount so they went elsewhere and bought a heavily discounted Sammy 6 Edge. Well that anecdote is one data point ...

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Spooks, spyware, Ashley Madison and Windows 10: What you read in 2015

gerdesj
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~100 articles per day? Really?

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Researcher criticises 'weak' crypto in Internet of Things alarm system

gerdesj
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"oops. have just bought this very hardware for an alarm upgrade"

I recommend you discover the joys of multiple VLANs and multiple SSIDs. 1 for your PCs/laptops, 1 for NASs/servers, 1 or more for IoT stuff, 1 for your phones, 1 for guests. Each will need routing, and a good firewall policy. It's non trivial but necessary if you want a modicum of security.

The trouble is, not only is it a bugger to setup the above properly but you will need a bit more than your average ISP freebie router to do it. However get yourself something like a Draytek or FritzBox or a custom ROM based thing like Tomatoe or pfSense on an old PC/laptop plus a modem as required and you can do all of that. Reasonably cheap switches can be had eg Netgear GS110TP for PoE + layer 2 managed for cameras and the like.

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What did we learn today? Microsoft has patented the slider bar

gerdesj
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Windows

Re: The Patent office has gone downhill....

"... since the guy who invented Relativity left."

I'm sure we all refer to the Swiss Patent office (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_Federal_Institute_of_Intellectual_Property) as THE Patent office. However, here we are debating a US Design Patent.

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Hey, Santa – duck! Space shaft buzzes Earth on Christmas Eve

gerdesj
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"Santa and his eight tiny reindeer"

There are nine reindeer FFS (http://www.noradsanta.org/)

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No, drone owners – all our base are belong to US, thunders military

gerdesj
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Joke

"do us a massive solid"

*snigger* <drops drawers>

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Australian government urges holidaymakers to kill two-factor auth

gerdesj
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Blimey

Fuck me: Aus really is weirder than I thought (not really - it's odder than that).

Here in Blighty we are generally discouraged from using anything naughtier than ROT13 (not really) but down there you are being encouraged to disable 2F because ROAMING FEES. What kind of pencil pushing knob end came up with that gem? Damn: mentioned in the article.

I suggest you don't (step down your protection) and accept that a SMS might be pricey but worth it.

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Launch embiggens Galileo satnav fleet

gerdesj
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Re: Embiggens....groan

"Verbing of nouns weirds the language."

If you can noun a verb (gerund) why not the reverse? If the new word works OK and enough people use it then off we go.

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Newspaper kills 'what was fake' column as pointless in internet age

gerdesj
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Windows

There will be a re-adjustment (hopefully)

Times, they are a changing even as we speak. Things are moving rather quicker nowadays than they used to. When I was a lad you had these odd things called newspapers which told you what was what. You had (UK) the "broadsheets" like the Times and Telegraph to the Right and the Grauniad err Guardian to the Left - huge things with about A2 sized spread. Then you had the "red tops" like the Sun, Mirror, Star - smaller, flexible political allegiance, more tits and some seriously memorable headlines. There were others but I wont bore you with that. I will mention that the BBC, ITV and eventually C4 (wow: a fourth channel!) did serious news on the telly.

Fleet Street moved to Wapping, the internet appeared, broadsheets shrank, the Independent appeared and the world went barking mad (not necessarily in that order and frankly the world has always been a bit odd)

Now, we still have many of the above and everyone and their dog getting a voice, which is nice. I suspect <engage crystal ball> that the format we are using here and now will be the eventual ubiquitous model for news dispersal and it will involve payment via ads. You and I both know how people work and they will not pay a sub for something like the Times .... or will they?

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New bill would require public companies to disclose cybersecurity credentials

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

NACD are qualified to judge?

"Just 11 per cent of public boards have a "high-level understanding of cybersecurity," according to the National Association of Corporate Directors."

I wonder how the criteria were determined and stats were gathered for that 11% headline figure. I really hate the term cybersecurity. Anyway, why not mandate something like the UK's "Cyber Essentials" as well as getting info on what the Board's understanding of IT is. We (UK) could do with a similar bill, IMNSHO.

So if a corp, subject to this regulation, lodges expertise and knowledge then the scope for claims at court in the event of a slight technical hitch due to haxx0rs will be increased. I suppose the presumption for the bill is that it will help the corp. in some way (financially) by demonstrating expertise and hence investors will come flocking.

For the board members it is a simple risk analysis: I suspect that many corp board members will suddenly develop IT skill amnesia.

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'Unauthorized code' that decrypts VPNs found in Juniper's ScreenOS

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: So whats in the Huawei code then?

"Now unauthorised code has been found in JunOs"

JunOS (L2/3 switches) is not ScreenOS (routers I believe). Now I know that JunOS looks suspiciously BSD based, probably FreeBSD with lots of stuff on top. I presume that ScreenOS is similar. So you get the worst of both the open source and closed source worlds in a hybrid. I use a lot of pfSense boxes which are based on FreeBSD. I watch them quite closely and I haven't seen them decrypting their own VPNs - IPSEC and OpenVPN are the ones I use, more are available.

It seems odd that in eight years, no one has taken a look at the packet contents going through their Juniper routers, eg by spanning ports. An IDS is also likely to flag odd flows and someone would have seen that before now.

There's more to this story.

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Congress strips out privacy protections from CISA 'security' bill

gerdesj
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2nd Amendment

If the Second Amendment to the US Constitution can still be used to justify carrying of firearms, then surely it can further abused into the 21st century and the intertubes. Why on earth are the NRA not teaching people how to use weapons grade (*) encryption and how to install and use LOIC? Surely a cannon is what you need to protect your property and family.

So why on earth is the discussion about how to bugger up encryption even happening? I would expect that a properly briefed bunch of Republicans would understand that IT tools like encryption and LOIC are actually God given and required by the Constitution of the USA and subsequent Amendments. All right minded Americans should be tooled up immediately.

Cheers

Jon

(*) Remember when us foreign nationals were only allowed 512 bit SSL with American products because stronger forms were considered munitions?

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HMRC bets the farm on digital. What could possibly go wrong?

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: This entire argument is arse about face

>>"Britain has probably the most complicated tax code in the entire world."

>I doubt it.

Absolutely. Anyone (here) in the UK needs to observe the US systems of taxation to believe it. For example people in New York have three sets of income tax to deal with (City, State, Federal). Also, everyone gets to do the equivalent of self-assessment over there. The concept of PAYE normally gets Yanks dribbling at its simplicity for the employee when explained.

Now on consumption style taxation, they are also pretty adept at phenomenal complication. For starters, in the UK, notice how the price on the ticket in a shop is what you pay (unless you haggle it down.) It says £4.99 and you pay £4.99. As DavCrav points out, in the US you have to mentally allow for between 0 and 2 digit % sales tax, depending on where you are and what you are buying.

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Samba man 'Tridge' accidentally helps to sink request for Oz voteware source code

gerdesj
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Big Brother

Somewhat disingenuous headline

My reading of the article here does not lead to the headline. As presented, he (Tridg) appears to have answered the questions put to him. He was accepted as an expert witness and seems to have acted as such. How his answers were interpreted is up to the court - not him. The outcome, ie judgment of the court is also not up to him.

As I'm also a regular /. reader I wont bother following up the links but simply jump to conclusions: Mr Cordover's questioning of Tridg was not sufficient to get the sort of evidence he needed out of his expert witness.

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NZ unfurls proposed new flag

gerdesj
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Re: Rats!

"And another piece of red left my atlas today."

The colour pink was used to denote the extent of the British Empire on atlases, at least within the empire.

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MPs slam gov heads over 'childishness' on failed farmer IT project

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: Guess the followup comments from the civel service/political wonks involved.

Bingo!

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Whisper this, but Java deserialisation vulnerability affects more libraries

gerdesj
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Linux

Re: Serves the Java community right

"The reluctant Gentoo Java lead"

@chewi: Thanks for your herd's work. Life with Java in Gentoo is a lot more straight forwards these days.

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gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: end users still tend to get the software handed to them in one fat bundle

"An end user needs a single bundle. You don't buy a car, then go and get an engine, some suspension, some wheels, brakes, an exhaust etc.... End users want a working thing, they don't care that it's made of lots of sub-things."

Car analogies tend to break down pretty quickly these days. I want 20 cars and I want them to only have a different coloured windscreen and different dashboard items. Some of them I want to run on diesel and some on petrol. Some I want to have two seats and some of them I want to have four or maybe eight at times.

I do not want to have to get three versions of petrol (one of which is four star which I have trouble buying due to the lead content - Java 1.4 or MS Java ... )

It can be done just but it is tortuous. Why not stick to describing software packaging - they are not cars?

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Smart telly, router, app makers have left a security hole open for – drum-roll – three years

gerdesj
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Childcatcher

Re: Happy with my sneakernet TV

"On a side note I bought a 'dumb' TV recently and whilst flicking through the instruction manual was surprised to find a full copy of the GNU GPL."

Not sure there is such a thing as a dumb TV anymore. I've even seen a "set top box" for FreeSAT that clearly had MythTV in it (although somewhat torn to bits and re-assembled like a 2 year old with an Airfix kit). Yours probably has bits of FFMPEG or libmpeg in flash somewhere - why reinvent the wheel?

My Samsung telly even has an AV section in its menu. It lives on a separate VLAN +SSID I keep for IoT stuff. Must get around to looking at the flow logs to see what it gets up to. The Zoneminder server and RPi on the same subnet/VLAN have firewalls, that refuse connectes from their own network. I'm scared of my telly 8)

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