* Posts by jonathanb

2543 posts • joined 14 Aug 2009

Startup founder taken hostage by laid-off workers

jonathanb

I think "enhance stakeholder value" would be better than "leverage significant concessions".

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Top FBI lawyer: You win, we've given up on encryption backdoors

jonathanb

Re: Condescending git

2001 was an outlier, because of the 7/7 bombings, in most years, terrorism deaths are 0 or 1. The last one I'm aware of is Lee Rigby, and before that, the Glasgow Airport bombers which I'm not sure really count as the only deaths were the terrorists themselves.

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HMRC 'reluctant' to crack down on VAT fraudsters – tax ace

jonathanb

It's a lot easier for companies to do their VAT return than for example their Corporation Tax return.

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jonathanb

Re: This is a road to a bigger issue

And if they were bought to be sold on, the 2nd hand margin scheme applies and the buyer can't reclaim the VAT on the purchase.

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jonathanb

Re: (amazon) we don't have the authority to review their tax affairs.

VAT numbers can be checked here - http://ec.europa.eu/taxation_customs/vies/

If a customer from another EU country gives you a VAT number to claim exemption from being charged VAT, you are required to check it there before zero rating the sale.

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jonathanb

VAT actually works very well in terms of collection cost vs amount collected.

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Has Voyager 1 escaped the Sun yet? Yes, but also no, say boffins

jonathanb

Re: replacement

It's the kind of job you would want to continue doing even if you had dictate the commands to someone else because you could no longer tap a keyboard.

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Get 'em out for the... readers: The Sun scraps its online paywall

jonathanb

Re: "The Sun scraps its online paywall"

If they take it down today, they have to refund all the subscriptions, take it down next month and they can collect next month's subscription up to the day the wall comes down. Processing all the refunds, putting negative sales figures on the MOSS return and trying to get VAT refunds from all the EU countries they sell to would be a major hassle.

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jonathanb

The main criteria is whether or not you can claim the subscription on company expenses. That is why the Financial Times's paywall works.

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Teenage boy bailed until November over TalkTalk incident

jonathanb

Re: 'Ang on.....

He's British, not Irish, from Northern Ireland, and from a neighbourhood where most people vote for Unionist parties.

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jonathanb

Re: Not to worry

Increasing the severity of punishment for corporate criminals would be effective, because the small fines they get at the moment are just written off as a cost of doing business, and are no deterrent at all. For individuals, I agree with you.

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jonathanb

Re: this lad

If they took it down because they noticed a flood of attempted attacks, that would have stopped him before he found the magic incantation. He must have already been in before the DDOS happened, though he could have been flooding the site with download requests.

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Further confusion at TalkTalk claims it was hit by 'sequential attack'

jonathanb

Techies? At Talk Talk? Are they the ones that suggest turning if off and on again to see if that help?

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'iOS 9 ate my mobile broadband plan'

jonathanb

The status bar isn't visible if you are watching video in full screen mode.

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TalkTalk attack: 'No legal obligation to encrypt customer bank details', says chief

jonathanb

That's the difference between encryption and password protection.

However, if you get remote access to my MacBook while it is turned on and logged in, FileVault is not going to stop you getting at anything.

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jonathanb

The encryption cases relate to stolen laptops. Some people think that if the laptop has a password, it is secure. It isn't. Either boot up the laptop from external media or take the drive out of it and connect it as a secondary drive in another machine. You then don't need a password to access the contents.

Where the data is stored on a server in a server room or data centre with physical access controls, then it is a bit different.

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jonathanb

Encryption is only effective if the key is secure. If the system needs access to the data so that customers can view their accounts and change those details they are allowed to change, for example the bank or card they want to use to pay their charges, the billing system can allocate charges to the correct place, and the collection system can collect the money every month, I'm not convinced that encrypting the data would help that much.

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We can't all live by taking in each others' washing

jonathanb

Re: Shame

If the price of one specific type of food went up, we would buy substitutes instead. It is only if the price of all food increased that demand would be inelastic.

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Tardy TalkTalk advertised for a new infosec officer 1 week ago

jonathanb

Re: They've contacted the ICO

Pharmacy2u were fined £130,000 for selling customer info to fraudsters, which I would say is a more serious offence than what Talk Talk did. To be proportionate with that, the fine would probably be about £25,000. But I agree, the fines are way too low to be an effective deterrent.

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Silicon Valley freeze-out: EU watchdog tells firms clock is ticking to limit data transfers

jonathanb

They can collect data from the US, if you use your card there, or with a company based there, but they can't store or analyse the data there.

That's fine for dealing with your account. However, to work out that for example everyone who purchased tickets from Heathrow Express over a certain period had fraudulent transactions on their account afterwards, as happened many years ago, and therefore Heathrow Express must be having problems with their security, that would involve analysing data from people in many different countries. If you look at just the UK data, you might have found that most of them had also purchased from Tesco, but bring in the international data, and you will be able to pinpoint the source much better.

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jonathanb

Re: Yeah, But,

It doesn't specifically have to be in Croatia. Ireland, where their EU operation is registered, is fine, they can store it there.

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TalkTalk attackers stole 'incomplete' customer bank data, ISP confirms

jonathanb

I wonder if any of the people who complained about having bank accounts emptied had accounts with Lloyds. It appears the information they had was enough to open account there, and the recently closed security hole at Lloyds meant that they could have accessed other Lloyds accounts held by the victim.

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Joining the illuminati? Just how bright can a smart bulb really be?

jonathanb

Re: Bayonet? - Why not a bayonet cap option?

My kitchen and bathroom are wired for 12V DC lamps, so a new standard is possible. Having said that, I will probably switch the kitchen to a 230V supply, because 50W, 680 lumen spots are not particularly bright, not at all energy efficient, and only illuminate a 1m diameter circle on the floor leaving the rest of the kitchen in darkness.

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jonathanb

Re: Size Does Matter

You should replace it with an E27 ceiling lampholder, however if you live in the UK, finding such a thing could be a challenge, and you will probably have to import it from Europe.

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jonathanb
Joke

Maybe we could add a Bluetooth wall switch to turn them on and off, much easier than fumbling around with a smartphone app.

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Northamber: Windows 10 killed our sales momentum

jonathanb

Is there anything a new computer can do that my five year old computer can't do? Not really, so I will replace it when it breaks, not because it has some amazing new features I want to play with, much like the appliances in my kitchen.

I am the sort of person who goes out and buys the latest model to play with new technology, but with PCs, there just isn't anything to tempt me.

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American robocallers to be shamed in public lists

jonathanb

Re: UK comparison

The Telephone Preference Service is actually worse than useless. People who list themselves on the Telephone Preference Service receive more nuisance calls than people who aren't on it.

It is run by the Direct Marketing Association. They send the list to any nuisance calling outfit that asks for it, and of course no one would even think of using it as a "please call me" list rather than a "do not call me" list.

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Chaos at TalkTalk: Data was 'secure', not all encrypted, we took site down, were DDoSed

jonathanb

Re: A fish rots from the head

She studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics. Not sure how that qualifies her to run a telecoms company.

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jonathanb

This is Talk Talk. They don't employ people who know what they are talking about.

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No VAT on Bitcoin, rules ECJ, but capital gains still apply

jonathanb

If you operate an exchange, then the profit on your bid/offer spread would be subject to income tax, not capital gains tax.

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Bosch, you suck! Dyson says VW pal cheated in vacuum cleaner tests

jonathanb

My Samsung has such a light. It is red when sucking dirt and green when sucking clean air.

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Accidental homicide: how VoLTE kills old style call accounting

jonathanb

Re: Indeed

I can see 2G potentially surviving longer than 3G. 2G's advantage over 3G is better coverage for the same number of masts, but other than the ability to make voice calls, there aren't any advantages of 3G over 4G, and voice calls aren't any better over 3G than 2G.

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jonathanb

Sending data over a voice call session isn't a new idea, it is how we used to do things before broadband was invented.

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Minicab-hailing app Uber is lawful – UK High Court

jonathanb

If Ryanair take a different route from normal due to weather conditions or whatever, and charge you extra for it, then yes they are.

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jonathanb

With other private hire operators eg Addison Lee, they give you a quote for the journey, which may be based on distance and estimated time based on current traffic conditions, or any other criteria they see fit, and if you accept it, that is the price you pay regardless of what happens afterwards.

There are apps that will give you quotes from a number of different operators, along with the estimated time of arrival, and you can pick the one you want. Again, if you accept it, that is the price you pay.

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Slacker vendors' one-fix-a-year effort leaves 88% of Androids vulnerable

jonathanb

I don't have to wait for HP to deliver patches to my desktop computer, they come straight from Microsoft, so why can't it be the same for handsets?

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Weight, what? The perfect kilogram is nearly in Planck's grasp

jonathanb

Re: Wouldn't it be easier...

It leads to a circular reference, because you need to specify the pressure of the water, in Pascals, and that unit is derived from the kg.

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jonathanb

Re: Heavy science

No the reference kilogramme will weigh a different number of Newtons depending on where you do the measurement, but it will always be 1kg of mass.

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Ouch! Microsoft sues recycling firm over 70K stolen Office licenses

jonathanb

Re: Dont tell me...

If it is sent to them as a Category A write-off, then yes.

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Laser razor binned from Kickstarter resurfaces on Indiegogo

jonathanb

Re: They stole my idea for a laser-based lawn mower - just moved it to the chin/legs/etc.

Laser based hair removal systems do exist, though you generally go to a clinic where a skilled operator uses it. There is also something called intense pulsed light, which you can buy to use at home, if you have white skin and dark hair.

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How long does it take an NHS doctor to turn on a computer?

jonathanb

But switching a computer is a basic life skill along the same lines as being able to take the cap off a pen or operate a light switch.

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jonathanb

Re: I still can't get my head round this one

The browser address bar is a revelation to just about everyone. Almost everyone I know types for example "facebook.com" into the Google or Bing search box and selects the first search result.

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World's oldest person scoffs daily ration of bacon

jonathanb

Re: Bad timing

Biscuits = scones; gravy = some sort of puke-like substance. Look at the recipe pages on this site.

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Online VAT fraud: Calls for government crackdown grow louder

jonathanb

Re: Ugh

I think you will find that road tax was re-introduced in the most recent budget.

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jonathanb

Re: Let's talk VAT numbers..

The registration threshold is based on turnover, not profit, and is £82,000 for UK businesses, or £70,000 for businesses that are registered for VAT in another EU country, and exporting to the UK.

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Join Uber in a tale of rent seeking and employment law

jonathanb

Re: Employement status is more complex than that

In the UK, you pay a lot less National Insurance if you are self-employed, and usually less tax, as you can generally claim more in expenses. However you don't get sick pay, maternity pay, holiday pay, unfair dismissal rights and so on.

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jonathanb

Re: Employement status is more complex than that

As far as I'm aware, you do have to accept the jobs that are assigned to you while logged on, though you can log out at any time, and you do have to follow the route on their sat-nav.

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Terror in the Chernobyl dead zone: Life - of a wild kind - burgeons

jonathanb

Re: Radiation is safe for wildlife...

Humans could probably survive long enough to have children, which is about 12-14 years old if you don't follow modern societal norms. That doesn't mean they will be healthy.

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Digital Services to be killed off early next year, Gov.uk confirms

jonathanb

Re: Is it just me?

I was thinking more of Disk Operating System, the obsolete OS from the 1980s and early 1990s.

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Guess who owns Netflix.news and Netflix.website – clue: definitely not Netflix

jonathanb

Re: Huh?

The complainant has a choice of dispute resolution processes, and will choose the one that is most likely to rule in their favour.

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