* Posts by jabuzz

110 posts • joined 13 Aug 2009

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Little big phone: Sony Xperia Z3 Compact, a toothsome hand-fulla Android

jabuzz

Re: Z2 Compact

There is no such thing as a Z2 Compact. There is a Z1 Compact and a Z3 Compact. Probably because the only real difference between a Z1 and a Z2 is the IPS display, and the Z1 Compact has an IPS display already. I have the Z1 Compact for reference.

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Ofcom mulls selling UK govt's IPv4 cache amid IPv6 rollout flak

jabuzz

Pushing IPv6 implementation is easy, new regulation prohibiting IPv4 CGNAT unless the provider also offers IPv6. Large fines for those not in complying.

If you then find CGNAT on your IPv4 to be a problem you can switch to IPv6.

Simples really.

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Plusnet could face DATA BREACH probe over SPAM HELL gripes

jabuzz

Re: How big a problem and why?

Yes I would because it is a very specific form of spam that they are complaining about and I don't have any matching spam in my inbox or anywhere on three PlusNet accounts that I have checked.

So the question is if said database has been breached why has the spam not been delivered to the none PlusNet email addresses for these three accounts?

My Occam's razor is at this point telling me the spammer got them from somewhere else.

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No NAND's land: Flash will NOT take over the data centre

jabuzz

Re: "what comes after is breathing heavily down the neck of flash"

Only iron oxide is rust, all other metal oxides are just that oxides. So given the platters are either glass or aluminium, that the recording layer is devoid of any iron based materials there is no "spinning rust" in a hard drive and it has been that way for many years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rust

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Plusnet customers SWAMPED by spam but BT-owned ISP dismisses data breach claims

jabuzz

Re: no proof

Sorry but you can setup your email at PlusNet so that all email to *@myid.plus.com gets delivered. It is one of the features of their system and has been like that since well longer than I care to remember certainly more than an decade. That said I have the wildcard address directed to /dev/null another very long standing feature, though I can remember a time when it was not.

The amount of spam I get on my PlusNet hosted email account is very limited ever since they included virus and spam filtering by default rather than an optional extra. I have personally not received the spam in question, and one would presume that if the PlusNet database had been compromised that the spammer would have spammed all the addresses harvested not just some.

That last bit suggests to me that the spammer has managed to harvest the email address from somewhere else. Where and how is the question.

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Intel offers ingenious piece of 10TB 3D NAND chippery

jabuzz

Re: So, can Kryder's Law in fact carry on?

There has been no iron oxide in hard disks for over a decade at a minimum. The whole spinning rust notion is complete nonsense. Hard disks have aluminium or glass platters coated with magnetic materials that don't include iron.

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Why can't a mobile be more like a cordless kettle?

jabuzz

You aready can

A "cordless" kettle has to be placed on a special base. Funny because I can simply drop my Z1 Compact onto a special base just the same. In fact "charging bases" exist for the whole Xperia Z line up. In the past I had something similar for a Nokia 6310i. So to answer your question mobile phones can be more like a cordless kettle, that yours is not is down to the choice you made when you purchased the device, just like you can still buy corded kettles.

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Google gives Microsoft office an awkward hug with new plugin

jabuzz

Not Free

If you have to have a Office 365 subscription and are therefore forking out money to get your "unlimited" OneDrive space then it is by definition not free but part of a the Office365 subscription. I am surprised the ASA has not called them out on that.

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

jabuzz

Re: With a Maunder Minimum you win some, you lose some

The lack of frost fairs on the Thames has everything to do with London bridge being replaced and the embankments being built. Put another way the winters of 2010 and 2011, where plenty cold enough for the Thames to freeze, but it came nowhere close. It did not freeze in 1947 and 1963 either. It is unlikely the Thames will ever freeze again in London.

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Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey

jabuzz

I would happily agree to the condition to give up my first born child safe in the knowledge that such a term is unenforceable in the U.K. at least.

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Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC

jabuzz

Re: Sorry Tom

Just exactly how does that work with the download feature of iPlayer then? They actually advertise it as being suitable for taking stuff on holiday, and in my experience it worked in the France on my Kindle Fire HD earlier this year.

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Limits to Growth is a pile of steaming doggy-doo based on total cobblers

jabuzz

You can't beat theromodynamics

Basically if energy usage continues to grow at around 2-3% even if we converted tomorrow to fusion reactors in a few hundred years we would simply boil the planet.

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Just when you thought you were alone in the bath: Hi-res mapping satellite ready for launch

jabuzz

Re: Who says they can?

Given DigitalGlobe are a U.S. based firm and that they are launching for a polar orbit from a U.S. military base I think it is perfectly reasonable for the U.S. government to limit what they are doing.

Want to set up a company outside the U.S.A., build your satellite outside the U.S.A. and using components that are not under U.S.A. export restrictions and then launch using none U.S.A. launch vehicles outside the U.S.A. you would be good to go selling what ever resolution imagery you want. That is presuming other governments don't also put restrictions on what you want to sell...

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Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage

jabuzz

femotocells

Mobile coverage in my house is hopeless due it would appear to some sort of iron (aka magnetic) based compound in the bricks. However a femotocell soon fixes that and all the networks will provide one if prompted. Even at £100 it would be small beer in comparison to the cost of a house.

What is more important is good internet connectivity, aka can I get FTTC, FTTP or cable. Clearly the people in the survey are rather clueless.

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BT: Hey guys, we've developed NEW MOBE TECH! It’s called... 2G

jabuzz

3G is pointless for voice

So in an office environment a 2G voice signal is just fine because for data there will likely be WiFi which offers better throughput for a lower cost.

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Bezos house 'on FIRE': Amazon in-app kiddy megabuck charge storm

jabuzz

Don't hook it to a credit card

If you give your kids a tablet of any description that is connected to a credit or debit card and they are not 100% supervised then you are asking for trouble.nn

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Saddle up for the Tour de Firmware

jabuzz

Re: Frame

Take a look at the Shimano Nexus and Alfine range of hub gears available in 7 and 8 speed versions. They are aimed at commuter bikes however, their big selling point being the much lower maintenance and the possibility of using full chain guards to reduce chain maintenance. They introduced an electronic shifting model last year. There are also 8 speed Sunrace Sturmey Archer hubs these days.

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Supreme Court nixes idea of 'indirect' patent infringement

jabuzz

Re: Interesting ruling, but

The Treaty of Versailles confiscated the Asprin trademark as part of war reparations from Germany. So in USA, UK, France, Russia there is no such thing as brand name Aspirin. One presumes that parts of the world that where in the British Empire in 1919 can also claim the trademark is not valid, as could fragmentary parts of the victor nations so Ireland, Belarus, Ukraine etc. are also covered.

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No spinning rust here: Supermicro's cold data fridge is FROZEN

jabuzz

No iron in hard disks

It has been some time since a hard drive had any iron in their platters. They started being made out of aluminium and then even glass many years ago, and the coatings don't contain iron. Why are they referred to as spinning rust?

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Toshiba's CB30-102 13.3in Chromebook – imagine a tablet with a keyboard

jabuzz

Personally I would have though an updated AC100 with a 1368x768 resolution screen and a Snapdragon 801 processor (quad core 2GHz ARM with 2GB RAM and 16GB flash) would have given something that stands out from the pack of me too Chromebooks.

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HP breaks ranks: Foresees data ARCHIVING on Flash

jabuzz

Re: For marketroid values of "archival"

Funny the archive life on the side of my LTO tapes says 30 years. You probably want to shift the data onto newer tapes sooner because of issues with tape and drive compatibility, so if your data is on LTO3 you probably want to move them to LTO6 in the next few years. That said I did a several hundred TB LTO1 to LTO4 migration five years ago. Anyone doing large scale archiving should have a tape robot so they can just load the new tapes, set the software off and forget about it. Took several months but so what.

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IANA starts handing out recovered IPv4 addresses

jabuzz

IPv6 before CGNAT

Personally I would like to see a law that means ISP's have to provide IPv6 *BEFORE* they are allowed to implement carrier grade NAT. That would force the ISP's to get off their backsides and actually implement IPv6 rather than putting it off.

I would also like to see a law that forces equipment manufactures to offer firmware updates to things like network printers to offer IPv6 if they don't already. Say anything produced in the last five years.

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6TB - big? Pah! Seagate plans to put out 8TB and 10TB MONSTERS

jabuzz

RAID6 even with 4TB drives gives rebuild times that are bigger than one would wish. Fortunately there are solutions to this, Google for "dynamic disk pools" to see one fix, it is like 8D+2P RAID6 but is done at the block level. Of course this is for large numbers of drives.

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Go ahead and un-install .Net, but you'll CRIPPLE Windows Server 2012

jabuzz

Re: Time to Migrate.

Lets get past this no GUI by default is total rubbish. Server core is the Linux equivalent of running an X11 server with TWM and some xterms, except they are newer and prettier. You still need a video card, with appropriate driver and you still get a graphical interface. It is by no stretch of the imagination a text interface that could be redirected over a serial port for a headless configuration.

Anyone that claims that server core has no GUI has absolutely no concept of what that actually means.

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Sony Xperia Z2: 4K vid, great audio, waterproof ... Oh, and you can make a phone call

jabuzz

Not first Sony with IPS screen

The Z1 Compact has the IPS screen as well and predates the Z2.

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Projector on a smartphone? There's a chip for that

jabuzz

Re: This one *is* different

I was surprised as well. LIDAR is surely a much more useful application than a smartphone projector, and to go mainstream my self driving car is going to need something a bit more compact than the current mechanical scanning LIDAR variants that Google and the like are using.

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In spinning rust we TRUST: HGST slips out screamingly fast ... HDD

jabuzz

Re: Price?

Given it is a SAS drive and HGST's 600GB 10,000rpm drive is ~200GBP, then a lot lot cheaper than the equivalent 400GB or 800GB SAS 2.5" drive which for 400GB is north of 1000GBP at the moment.

Yeah SATA drives are cheaper but you don't get a dual ported interface or Data Integrity Field (DIF) 520 byte sector sizes. If you don't know why either of these might be important you are not qualified to comment.

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Traditional RAID is outdated and dying on its feet

jabuzz

Re: broken RAID

LSI and presumably now NetApp have patents covering that. So potentially the whole array has to go offline because just reporting a bad block on the ones with the parity errors is not possible do to patent restrictions.

Note I have personally suffered a parity error on a RAID5 rebuild on an LSI/NetApp Engenio array. It was an interesting case, involved some maths to work back from the block on the RAID array that was duff, through the LVM and then the ext3 file system to find the effected files. Able to then mark the blocks as good again in the array controlled (which left them as zeros), delete the files and restore them from tape.

Anyway don't blame Dell as that is covered by a patent.

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jabuzz

Re: Interesting if cheap ...

GPFS native RAID is not going to be cheap because it is only an option if you buy your servers, disks and shelves from IBM who are not known for selling cheap disk arrays. Last time I looked you even had to buy IBM's racks. Plus it only really works if you want file system with your storage. If you want block storage go look elsewhere. A Dell MD3x00 will be much much cheaper and with the DDP give you all the same benefits.

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jabuzz

Re: Eh?

The way to think of it is you take say a 4U 60 disk enclosure stuffed full of disk, but instead of doing RAID6 over a whole disk you break the disk up to say 1GB chunks and then do a 8D+2P RAID6 on the chunks which you scatter over all the disks. You then LVM treat the RAID6 chunks as PV's and throw then into a VG and carve LV's out of them. Every disk is then left with some of the 1GB chunks free, enough to cope with however many "hotspares" you specify. When a disk then fails all 59 remaining disks are involved in the rebuild of the damaged RAID6's of disk chunks. The rebuilt bits then get scattered over the remaining disks. Obviously you need to keep track so no RAID6 has more than one chunk on a single drive.

NetApp have something similar in the Engenio/SANtricity range called Dynamic Disk Pools. IBM's XIV also did something similar but using RAID1 which is a bit rubbish for storage density. Of course none of this comes into play until you have a large number of disks. As such traditional RAID is not going anywhere fast for most people.

http://i.dell.com/sites/doccontent/shared-content/data-sheets/en/Documents/Dynamic_Disk_Pooling_Technical_Report.pdf

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King Kong's dangling cluster cut loose

jabuzz

Interconnect

My guess is that the real problem with a render farm hand off is the interconnect. Rendering frames for a movie is trivially parallel; each frame can be rendered utterly independent of any other frame, so while a node is rendering a frame it has no requirement to communicate with any other node, till it gets to the end when it needs to upload the frame to a central storage area. You can happily do this with gigabit ethernet.

However for a real HPC cluster that would not cut the mustard and you need high speed low latency interconnect, either Infiniband or something similar. Retrofitting this into an old system is simple madness.

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Office 365 Microsoft's fastest growing business, ever - Microsoft

jabuzz

Universities and campus agreements

Something not mentioned is that in the U.K. at least a University with a campus agreement (that's all of them as far as I can tell) get Office365 thrown in for free. Quite a few have given up on student email at least and stuffed it all into the cloud. Some have pushed all their email into Office365. The value proposition is very very compelling.

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Tech titan Bill Gates: Polio-free India one of the 'most impressive accomplishments' ever

jabuzz

Re: Nice to see

So he is spending illegally gotten gains (remember Microsoft is a convicted monopolist) to rehabilitate his image and I am supposed to like him for doing that?

My personal feeling is that the Muslim bastards who are hindering the Polio eradication program in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria as some sort of Christian/Western plot are utterly evil and should all be rounded up and tortured to death for crimes against humanity.

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I've seen the future of car radio - and DAB isn't in it

jabuzz

Re: spot on...

"What would really be truly revolutionary would be for the car manufactures to agree a standard for car "entrainment" systems with an open API so tablet/phones can link in seamlessly and be controlled from the steering wheel/stalk controls whether you have Andriod, iOS, Win8m or even Blackberry via an installed app"

It already exists and guess what it is called bluetooth. Your car stereo and phone need to support the correct bluetooth profiles for it all to work, but I can assure you that when they do it does indeed work.

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HP clampdown on 'unauthorised' server fixing to start in January

jabuzz

Re: I should say so!

Except it does not appear to have been adopted by Dell in the slightest. I have for example just downloaded a BIOS update for a PowerEdge R810 released less than two months ago.

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Spinning rust and tape are DEAD. The future's flash, cache and cloud

jabuzz

Cobblers

For any large amount of data doing it in house is hugely and I mean hugely cheaper. Over a five year period 500TB in the cloud will cost over two million USD. For that sort of money you can buy the storage build a data centre and pay the staff and still have a significant amount of money left over. Then for the next five years the data centre comes free.

Then there is the simple fact that there is insufficient manufacturing capacity for flash to change the equation radically in the near future. It takes at least a couple of years to bring a fab online so capacity is known for some time ahead. Flash manufacturing capacity is only a couple of percent for hard disk capacity let alone tape.

Also where are the cloud providers going to store this data? Magic pixie dust or something?

In short neither disk or tape is going anywhere fast.

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OHM MY GOD! Move over graphene, here comes '100% PERFECT' stanene

jabuzz

Re: pfff

Actually I think you will find that the boiling point of water has not been 100°C for nearly 60 years now. Since 1954 it has been under standard conditions 99.9839 °C, and if you use the ITS-90 calibration it is even less at 99.974 °C. Kids of today eh.

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How your data loss prevention plan is killing your business

jabuzz

Answer use better backup software

If you want to use joke backup software then yes you are going to be storing loads and loads of copies of the data at silly multiples. Back in the real world you could simply select better backup software, specifically TSM and ONLY store a primary and secondary copy of every version of a file and radically reduce the data retention multiple and have "virtual" backups going back to however far you want. Then if the file is a database or similar where the file changes every day, you just dedupe it.

Whoever wrote this article is either not a storage administrator, or an uninformed twit who should not be let near any storage again.

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The REAL JUICE behind leaked BlackBerry OS: Android apps to slip in without protection

jabuzz

Symbian and Nokia

Personally I think Nokia should have followed a similar strategy. That is fitted a Android compatible interface to the best of class hard realtime OS Symbian. It can't have been a worse strategy than going for Windows Mobile.

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Server, server in the rack, when's my disk drive going to crack?

jabuzz

Re: Obviously not for laptop drives...

Laptop drives in 24x7 and/or array operation are a massive no no in my 15 years of experience. You will only see 12-18months before they kick the bucket, 24 if you are lucky. The Hitachi 24x7 rated ones work better though they have a nasty habit of replacing failed drives with ones that are not 24x7 rated. The only reliable solution I have at the moment is to buy enterprise drives, Seagate Constellation drives seem to work well, but are 15mm deep.

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Why Bletchley Park could never happen today

jabuzz

No war

Basically what has changed is we are not in a life and death fight where tens of thousands of people are dying against one of the most evil regimes in the history of mankind. The current war against terror really does not qualify.

Also anyone surprised by Tempora has a really short memory. It is not that long ago that towers where built to intercept the phone calls between ROI and the UK during the troubles.

http://www.lamont.me.uk/capenhurst/original.html

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What's the first Kinetic Ethernet hard drive? Psst, it's the 4TB Terascale

jabuzz

Rubbish stats from Seagate

There are a number of 60 drives in 4U of space storage devices available from a range of vendors today that can be fitted with 4TB drives. As such this gives nothing extra in storage space, and given there is no form of RAID then the usable space offered by this system is worse than say a bunch of MD3660f/DCS3700 devices using dynamic disk pools.

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Big Blue's storage performance badly bitten by pack of mid-range canines

jabuzz

Duh

The days of being able to have a list price for a 1TB SATA drive of £1500 are long gone, that is storage of spinning disks is much more mature and as a result margins are lower. Rather than tracking revenues it would be interesting to track number of shipped drive slots for example.

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TWELFTH-CENTURY TARDIS turns up in Ethiopia

jabuzz

Re: Rubbish

Assuming the prints where being handed down a long chain it is entirely reasonable for all or a large number of the prints to end up at one place, namely the end of the chain. That said these rumours have been going around for a while now, and until they are confirmed by the BBC I would take them with a bucket load of salt.

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Behind the candelabra: Power cut sends Britain’s boxes back to the '70s

jabuzz

Re: Power Cuts

The other option is to very carefully select your microwave oven not to have a clock. I am resigned to having to set the time on the oven but every other clock in my house either knows how to get the time from a radio signal or is now in the bin.

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Xerox copier flaw changes numbers in scanned docs

jabuzz
FAIL

Re: Aircraft designers

Photocopies do go up to A0, it is just you are not used to such machines.

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Microsoft morphs HPC efforts into 'Big Compute'

jabuzz

License costs

Windows based HPC will be a minority sport until Microsoft sort out the licensing. It is from personal experience a total nightmare and not cheap.

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Dead STEVE JOBS was a CROOK - Judge

jabuzz

Re: Common sense prevails

Not only is he a common crook, he as been that way since the early 1970's when he was selling blue box phone phreaking devices.

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jabuzz

Re: @ David Neil Article title

Actually it is already a well known fact that Steve Jobs is a crook, he committed perjury in court by swearing in court documents that it was impossible for him to be the father of Lisa Brennan-Jobs. To give you an idea of just how serious a crime perjury is, in England and Wales it carries a maximum sentence of seven years. In the U.K. Jobs would have almost certainly served time for what he did looking at the CPS website he could have expected three years for that stunt.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisa_Brennan-Jobs

Then there is the phone phreaking where he was selling blue boxes. The short of it is that there is absolutely no liable in calling Steve Jobs a crook, because he most emphatically was one. Hardly surprising then that even with huge wealth he would continue to break the law to add to his wealth.

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Play the Snowden flights boardgame: Avoid going directly to Jail

jabuzz

Re: the problem with boats

Actually I think you will find that the USA is quite capable of shooting down a passenger airline, and it does not even need to be in international air space for them to do that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_Air_Flight_655

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