Feeds

* Posts by Raumkraut

241 posts • joined 12 Aug 2009

Page:

Amazon buys Comixology for content crossover capers

Raumkraut

Render unto Apple what is Apple's

Perhaps the fact that Comixology bills through the iTunes and Play app stores is worth noting. Amazon seems unperturbed by the fact Apple won 't let users of the Kindle app make in-app purchases.

I thought the issue was that Amazon didn't want to switch to billing through iTunes, and so pay Apple a 30% cut of all sales through the Kindle app (not to mention the price-fixing clauses in-app purchases must obey). I'm sure Apple would be happy to allow them to have in-app purchases, if only Amazon added/switched to using iTunes for processing the payments.

2
0

Organic food: Pricey, not particularly healthy, won't save you from cancer

Raumkraut

Re: Agenda here?

> Just like if you announce you are a vegetarian, meat eaters immediately launch into attacking you, "well you eat fish don't you?", "and eggs, and milk, they are from animals". They feel threatened and have to justify their meat eating.

I suspect in most cases they're not attacking you, or trying to justify their meat eating; they're likely just trying to work out what *kind* of vegetarian you are. The term "vegetarian" is used by a huge variety of people to mean a huge variety of things, from "I don't like the taste of some meat products" to "practically vegan".

12
1

Artists install Monty Python silly walk signs in Norwegian town

Raumkraut

Walk on, bye

The actual sign is already pretty cool:

https://secure.flickr.com/photos/ianstacey/375977327/?rb=1

Alas, this version appears to be in the process of being phased out for a more... neutral (read: generic, inoffensive, boring) sign:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Norwegian-road-sign-516.H.svg

Though judging by the occasional story in the local rag, I'm not alone in being dismayed with the new sign.

0
0

Microsoft frisks yet another Android gear maker for patent dosh

Raumkraut

Re: Microsoft's influence within a private Dell?

> It would be nice to see one of these agreements challenged in the courts.

Didn't Barnes & Noble do just that, some time back? Then they took a big wodge of cash/investment from Microsoft, when it was eventually settled out of court.

4
1

Microsoft issues less-than-helpful tips to XP holdouts

Raumkraut

> Just don't visit any dangerous websites

So any website which hosts third-party advertisements is out, then?

3
0

Women! You too can be 'cool' and 'fun' if you work in tech!

Raumkraut

Re: Open your fucking eyes.

> Did you actually look, or did you assume that because you don't see such campaigns on a tech blog, they don't exist?

He didn't say they didn't exist, he said he didn't see the campaigns. And frankly, neither have I. Meanwhile, the "we need more women in x" campaigns are getting plastered across the (inter-)national media practically every week.

So if the "we need more men in x" campaigns exist, why aren't they getting as widely publicised as the female equivalents?

14
1

Newsweek knocks on door of dad-of-six, tells him he invented Bitcoin

Raumkraut

Re: The American press strikes again

> And yet here we are, the public, commenting on the story.

There's a difference between "in the public interest" and "interesting to the public".

10
0

Beta tasting: The Elder Scrolls Online preview

Raumkraut

Re: Congratulations

> Seriously, how does one manage to say for sure either way when it's only just been opened for beta?

How much do you seriously expect to change with just two months before release? The answer is usually none at all, unless the game is so horrendous that it would be reputation-ruining for the publisher to push it out the door.

MMO betas aren't usually betas in the traditional sense. If there is already a release date set, then it is absolutely not a beta in the traditional sense. It's a free(?) preview; a taster; a demo. AFAICT what you see in a "beta" is more than likely what you're going to get at release.

5
1

NHS England tells MPs: 'The state isn't doing dastardly things with GP medical records'

Raumkraut

Re: One big database

> just how much IT do you think a surgery has to do this

Don't most local surgeries outsource their IT already?

> You would need some kind of AI to work it out, or someone in the surgery who would spend their time reviewing and releasing data requests.

I'm not so sure pre-reviewing every request is entirely necessary. Decent security, restricted authentication tokens, comprehensive logging of every request, a clear audit trail, and stiff penalties for misuse, should be enough to deter most ne'er-do-wells from mucking about.

How often would such requests be done, anyway? Surely only when a patent's status changes - they move home, visit a doctor on holiday, require emergency treatment, etc. We're surely not talking 1,000 requests per second which need reviewing.

0
0

Silk Road admins: Sorry for the hack, we're sorting out refunds

Raumkraut

Re: Ponzi scheme tactics

Nothing Ponzi about it.

It's a business pledging to refund customers for a loss of company assets due to theft. AFAICT they're acting just like any regular small business startup would do if they lost assets in this manner - either make good as best they can, as soon as they can; or go bust.

2
0

Tata says USA rejecting HALF of Indians' work visa requests

Raumkraut

Damn americans, staying over there, working their own jobs

While hiring US workers may slightly increase costs for the business, it also means that more US workers will have more money to spend, and so expand the market for goods pretty much across the board. Unless your business is entirely export, it surely makes long-term sense to hire locally.

33
0

Object to #YearOfCode? You're a misogynist and a snob, says the BBC

Raumkraut

This, exactly this.

It seems to me that there could be quite a lot about writing contracts and laws that is similar to writing software. Definitions, symbols, conditionals, GOTOs, etc.. I've thought for a while that it would be a good thing for a country or organisation to hire/contract a group of security professionals to parse, deconstruct, and analyse new laws or contracts *before* they go into force.

1
0

Incantations used to summon Magic Quadrants revealed

Raumkraut

Alpha Quadrant

I have no idea what this article is about.

Yet I somehow feel that knowing this would not actually enrich my life in any way.

1
0

Life support's ABOUT to be switched off, but XP's suddenly COOL again

Raumkraut

Re: "none of them have had any security problems"

Or possibly "none of them have noticed their security problems yet"?

13
3

Tell us we're all doomed, MPs beg climate scientists

Raumkraut

Re: Thing is, we *are* all doomed.

> Do you really think you will live forever?

This isn't about you and me living forever, this is trying to reduce the chances of our proceeding generations dying en-masse from famine and disease.

> Getting all paranoid about the inevitable is counter-productive.

Yet if the changing climate is due to human activity, it is not necessarily "inevitable". Just as it is not "inevitable" that you'll go out for beers tonight.

> How about instead trying to figure out how to survive?

When you're captaining a cruise liner, it's generally a better idea to steer away from the rocks in the first place, than to be the first one in the lifeboats. No matter how impressed your mates might be by you sailing so close to the shore.

8
5

UK internet filtering shouldn't rely on knee tappers, says Tory MP

Raumkraut

Rats in a sack

> The worst thing politicians can do in this space is fight amongst ourselves...

I believe that, in the normal course of parliamentary activities, the usual term is "debate".

14
0

Globe grabbin,’ sphere slammin’, orb-tossin’, pill poppin’... Speedball

Raumkraut

Re: Best. Game. Ever.

I always used to farm Revolver matches. Score a goal or two, then just grab the ball with your fastest player, and run round collecting any cash that shows up. If you're practised/cocky enough, you could do the same with the second-worst team, but I forget what they were called.

2
0

Cryptocurrencies now being pooped out by cartoon cat

Raumkraut

Re: Many coin, very whimsy

So a few people get rich; those who had the best idea (created the most popular/valuable option), and those who supported it the earliest; and most people just get a modicum of value from its existence. That's pretty much the way capitalism seems to work AFAICT.

Don't let jealousy or envy of the fortunate cloud your judgement of what could be a good thing for human society as a whole.

And by that I mean Dogecoin.

2
0
Raumkraut

Many coin, very whimsy

I still hope that it's Dogecoin which wins out overall, and becomes the global standard transaction/exchange currency.

4
1

Chrome lets websites secretly record you?! Google says no, but...

Raumkraut

Re: Dodgy?

I'm guessing this was changed to allow the use case of; people continuing to use mic input (having a conversation, etc.) while browsing other web pages. Like how you can talk to someone on Skype without having to have the Skype window visible and in-focus all the time.

Perhaps browsers should prevent cam/mic input starting on non-focussed pages and, once active, ask the user if they want to continue sending if the input-receiving page is de-focused.

10
0

Nokia's Android? It's not for the likes of us…

Raumkraut

Windows everywhere, and not a fire escape in sight

> It's the lack of a Plan B, C or D that resulted in the two-year vacuum - and this was the consequence of complacency during the OPK* era.

Really? It was my understanding that the problem during the OPK era was that they had *too many* plans, all fighting for resources and supremacy - Maemo/Meego/Symbian/Meltemi/etc.?

Was it not during Elop's tenure that all the existing plan B, C, D, etc.operating systems were scrrapped, and in an entirely unexpected bout of nepotism, the "all or nothing, bet the farm on a three-legged foal" plan A of Windows Phone was initiated?

14
3

'Leaked' iPhone 6 pics will make cool fanbois WEEP - it's a PHABLET

Raumkraut

Re: highly dubious

> Except when you have it in your jacket pocket or shirt pocket or strapped to your arm when jogging or in a rear pocket when riding a bike, it is the wrong way up.

Who gives a monkeys which way up it is, when it's in your pocket and nobody can see the screen anyway?

2
3

No sign of Half-Life 3 but how about FOURTEEN Steam Machine makers?

Raumkraut

Re: Also, that Alienware console is gorgeous.

Really?

To me it looks like the whole console industry's industrial design departments have been calling it in for this most recent generation.

0
0

One-minute Koch-blocking earns attacker two years, massive fine

Raumkraut

Re: Here come da' Judge;

> So, you won't call the authorities if I screw all of the doors and windows of your house shut in the middle of the night?

He probably would, and he might also push to have you pay to replace the doors and windows, but I don't think he'd also push for you to pay for a professional structural survey, a new all-encompassing 6' wall topped with razor-wire, 4" thick steel security doors, and a 12-month contract with a local security agency to patrol his property 24/7.

And what if you only tightened one screw, and two dozen others were also involved? Should you be expected to pay the entirety of the redress, just because you were the only person to be caught?

8
2

'I WAS AN ADMIN FOR SILK ROAD': Alleged hit-man target tells all

Raumkraut

Dread Libel Ulbricht

> In his affidavit, he said that while at Silk Road he "could also view administrative Bitcoin accounts controlled by Ulbricht" – which, if true, might provide a source of potentially damning evidence.

Except:

> he claims he never knew Ulbricht's true identity. To Green, Ulbricht was "Dread Pirate Roberts,""

So how could his affidavit truthfully claim he could view Ulbricht's accounts, rather than DPR's accounts?

Since Ulbricht outright denies that he is the DPR in question, and AFAIK the only information we have are accusations/hearsay from the FBI, etc., surely it behooves people, and news outlets especially, not to so casually conflate the two identities at this stage.

I believe that it is only after either a confession, or having the evidence produced and an affirmative judgement made in court, that it stops being libel.

1
2

Apple handed Samsung-busting nuke after Steve Jobs patent U-turn

Raumkraut

Re: Hang on a minute ....

One shouldn't judge a book by its cover, and nor should one judge a patent by its summary.

If you want to know what actually has been patented, read carefully all the claims in the patent (particularly the independent claims). More than likely the implementation actually patented is far more specific than any news article is likely to take the time to explain.

Then again, this is the US patent system we're talking about.

8
0

Apple's Steve Jobs was a SEX-crazed World War II fighter pilot, says ex

Raumkraut

Re: Past lives

Clearly, if you don't remember a past life, it just means it wasn't very memorable.

If you previously spent hundreds of hours in the air, shooting down the Hun for King and country; don't you think that those events might be *sightly* more memorable than shovelling shit in a stable 364 days a year?

5
6

Gates, Zuckerberg to deliver free coding lesson

Raumkraut
Headmaster

Re: They should focus on two things ...

"in the math world, dividing by zero yields infinity, which is a perfectly acceptable result. When you're programming, dividing by zero yields a crash. Or an exception. If you don't know what's going on in the hardware, you probably don't even know what an exception is."

$ node

> 1 / 0

Infinity

> "blah" / 0

NaN

> ^D

With modern programming languages, especially interpreted ones, for 99% of programming tasks the hardware is irrelevant - you program to the virtual machine, not the electronic one.

That's not to say that knowing how the hardware works and performs is never helpful, but the number of real-world projects where that need even be a consideration is comparatively minute.

2
4

Ex-Valve engineers raise begging bowl for 3D holographic-like goggles

Raumkraut

Release valve

> Valve can't have been that impressed with the technology, as though it was developed at the company, an "opportunity presented itself" in early 2013 to let the two inventors acquire the tech and strike out on their own.

From what I can tell, this kind of thing just wasn't something Valve wanted to focus on. It seemed they were casting around for a while for really workable "next gen" ideas to drive them forward, hiring all sorts of people from all over the place. Then I guess they found the most appropriate avenue for the company, and decided to focus on a more traditional evolution of their current platform: Steam machines, etc.

So I don't think Valve's "rejection" of the idea implies that they didn't think it worthy enough, just that they didn't think it "Valve" enough.

2
0

Facebook RIPS away your veil of privacy, declares NO MORE HIDING

Raumkraut
Black Helicopters

Re: Facebook and I have a special privacy agreement

> They never use my PI.

Do you have any friends on Facebook? Are you sure they've never mentioned you, or uploaded a picture including you?

Or have you ever visited a website with a facebook "like" button?

Your naivety is showing. Facebook probably already have a "shadow" profile for you.

8
11

Be prepared... to give heathens a badge: UK Scouts open doors to unbelievers

Raumkraut

Re: Nice to see them catch up with the girls

> Atheism is a religion thats core tenet is that "There is no God" this is a belief as it cannot be scientifically proved.

No, I'd argue that "Atheism" is no more a religion than "Theism" or "Deism" are. It is certainly a belief, but "religion" implies a level of organisation, custom and dogma.

> The scouts are allowing all religious beliefs, the Guides have come down on the side of one religion that cannot tolerate any other belief but their own (Atheism).

What? You mean Guides swear an oath that there is no God or gods? I suspect not. I was under the impression that they just didn't mention religion - just as the Scouts are planning to do.

27
2

It's official: Steelie Neelie is a triple-triple-TRIPLE win digital woman

Raumkraut

Earning motivation

> Kroes said she wants to attract more women to IT jobs and highlighted incentives such as greater earning potential and the fact that there is apparently lots of work opportunities in that market.

Studies have shown that "earning potential" is indeed a great incentive - for men.

If you want to motivate women into a particular industry, you're better off implementing and emphasising better work/life balance, and flexible, pleasant, working conditions. Unfortunately, these are not common characteristics or expectations of IT work.

2
1

AT&T takes on Google fiber, fixin' to give Texans GIGABIT GUNS

Raumkraut

Doff my cap

As I understand it, AT&T's current highest-speed U-verse service has a data cap of 250GB. That's about half an hour of full-throttle usage at 1Gb/s.

Also, according to the U-verse FAQs, if you persist in breaching the cap:

> ...You'll be charged $10 for every incremental 50GB of usage beyond your plan.

So that's about $12/minute...

1
0

BitTorrent trialling P2P secure messaging

Raumkraut

Re: This is nothing special

AIUI there would be nothing (patents aside) to stop Bittorrent Inc. from creating client software which uses one of their own servers for the "out-of-band" exchange. Nor anyone else who wants to run such a service, or create such a client.

That key exchange and directory services are not built into the communication protocol is probably a good thing, overall. "Do one thing, and do it well."

1
0

Full Steam Ahead: Valve unwraps plans for gaming hardware

Raumkraut

> Not quite. If you're a PC gamer you've probably got a decent PC, so why not move your PC to the TV rather than buy a new machine?

PC gamers probably use their PCs for more than just games. Even if they don't, not all games are best played on the living-room TV with a gamepad. Do you really think people will be willing to move their PC to a different room, every time they want to play one of a certain subset of their games? That'll get old, fast.

1
0

Boffins debate killing leap seconds to help sysadmins

Raumkraut

Re: If only there was a way for computers to send data to each other...

> I think you should go look up GPS clock PCI cards. You'd only need one on a closed network to keep everybody on that network in sync.

Yes, in sync with a spoofable signal originating from outside the network.

0
0

Cisco email accidentally sent to 1000s of employees causes message list MAYHEM

Raumkraut

Re: size

> I make that 94Mb per email.

I blame the top-posters.

6
0

Phil Collins' daughter 'will give you A VIRUS' – security bods

Raumkraut

Re: Personally if i was spreading a virus

Perhaps one of the reasons Lily Collins is high on the list, rather than more tempting targets like Bieber, is the amount of noise (from the perspective of malware distributors) already existing around those search terms?

There are likely to be 100 trillion-gazillion search results for Bieber - some of them possibly even of a higher quality than malware sites. But for Lily Collins, far fewer relevant results. Hence meaning it's probably easier for malware pages to rise to a more prominent position for somewhat lesser-publicised celebrities.

1
0

ZTE Open: This dirt-cheap smartphone is a swing and a miss

Raumkraut

Re: Battery life

I've had my Open (one of the Spanish models - black, not orange, alas) for about a week. Despite (or perhaps because) I'm a tech geek, this is my first smartphone. As such, I still don't really use it much, apart from the alarm to wake me up on the morning.

With my usual pattern of minimal use (though there was a fair bit of messing around because it was brand new to me), I got about four days out of the battery over last weekend. That was with Wifi on, and no SIM or memory card in(!), so YMMV.

Running a Youtube vid non-stop (10-hour HD Nyan cat, FWIW) over wifi got it down to 33% charge in about four hours. Not including the time taken to restart the video because it had stopped prematurely, for whatever reason.

Overall, I'd say it's definitely a v1 product.

2
0

Modular smartphones floated by Dutch designer chap

Raumkraut

Re: Saying nay

Slimness is overrated IMO. There's no reason I should need to be able to shave with my edge of my smartphone. I'd rather have a device which feels steady in my hand.

PCs have been pretty successful, and still are, without everything being soldered to one board. They achieved this success through modularity, upgradeability, and the use of standard interfaces.

The cost benefits of scale would come from mass-producing the modules. Individual modules can be used far beyond just in a single device or brand, so scale even better than all-in-one devices. Think CPUs, flash drives, wireless chips; all parts of smartphones which often scale - in terms of units manufactured/sold - far beyond the numbers achieved by any single device.

That said, I can't see many phones of the proposed variety being sold either, not while Jobs-envy still permeates the industry.

4
0

Verizon finally drags FCC into court fisticuffs to end one-speed internet for all

Raumkraut

Re: One can only hope Verizon doesn't win.

> I can't think of another industry where a net neutrality rule would be considered fair and equitable.

Can you think of another industry where most markets have local monopoly or duopoly providers?

The fundamental problem with the US ISP market is a lack of competition. With three enormous companies between them having almost totally locked up all the markets, and constantly lobbying to maintain their stranglehold (and massive profits), there is rarely any motivation for them to to improve, innovate, or even deal fairly with their customers.

The current situation is not a result of over-regulation.

1
0

Headmaster calls cops, tries to dash pupil's uni dreams - over a BLOG

Raumkraut
Facepalm

Anarchist vs authoritarian

> Szemalikowski told the Camden New Journal he decided to try to destroy Zaloom's chances of attending a good university because he was worried the potty-mouth blogger "could be developing into an anarchist”.

Because if there's one sure way of encouraging a person with anarchist tendencies back on to the "straight and narrow", it's a figure of authority vastly overstepping and abusing their powers against said person.

26
0

Jury reckons Motorola wasn't 'fair and reasonable' to Microsoft

Raumkraut

Re: M$ would never extort money out of other businesses in this way.

Microsoft indeed do not "extort" money in this way.

What Microsoft do is sell or license their patents to non-practising third parties, who then - completely independently and with no prompting from Microsoft whatsoever - sue Microsoft's competitors for patent infringement.

7
3

Four ways the Guardian could have protected Snowden – by THE NSA

Raumkraut

Re: We need Plausible Deniability (i.e. What No TrueCrypt?)

> Such as person provides "outer" password, officer decrypts "decoy" data, officer then re-encrypts "decoy" data, officer then notices that the two encrypted files do not match in file size.

Truecrypt encrypts volumes, not files. You pre-create your truecrypt volume at a specific size on your drive, and can then fill that with whatever files you want, up to that size. If you have a hidden volume, you can use that's password to see a whole different set of files within the same volume.

1
0

Just add creepiness: Google Search gets even more personal

Raumkraut

Re: @Martin

> "Just use double quotes around the terms. That'll AND them."

> no it doesn't, it just makes them search for the specific string enclosed by your quotes.

Actually, it does both things at the same time. Quotes can be used to group individual words into a single search string, and they also make a search term *required* - even for single words. It's not exactly AND (and never was IIRC), it's more of a statement of importance.

It was google's specific advice, to use quotes around search terms, when they changed the + to be google-plus specific.

1
0

Top Mozillans dream of quarterly Firefox OS updates ... and users, too

Raumkraut

Re: APIs

> What about having the system divided into two parts?

As I understand it, this is exactly how Firefox OS is designed. The core, hardware-interfacing part is the same as Android - which is well understood by handset manufacturers. The parts on top are Firefox-specific, and can indeed be updated independently from the core.

0
0

Firefox OS mobilises HTML5, without the added Steve Jobs

Raumkraut

Re: And how does a developer make money from this?

> Can you write Angry Birds as an HTML5 applet?

Been there, done that. It's been in Google's Chrome store for ages.

16
0

NSA Prism: Why I'm boycotting US cloud tech - and you should too

Raumkraut

Re: But where to go? Where to go?

* Email server of your choice (postfix, exim4, etc.)

* OwnCloud for contact/calendar/file sync

* GreenQloud for hosting (based in Iceland)

You could even start a business selling such a service to other paranoid^W informed Europeans.Or just find someone who has already done this, and is willing to resell the service.

2
0

Forget phones, PRISM plan shows internet firms give NSA everything

Raumkraut

Re: WTF???

I was running with the assumption that the $20M figure was just the NSA's direct costs, since the actual cost of data collection, etc. would be part of the operating expenditure of the collaborating private companies.

3
0

Page: