* Posts by Oliver Jones

691 posts • joined 14 May 2007

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If your smart home gear hasn't updated recently, throw it in the trash

Oliver Jones

I don't think so.

My 2012-model 47" and 42" Panasonic Smart TVs have not received an update since about late 2014 - and yes, I do check every six months or so. It might, however, come as a big surprise to the security community that I will continue to use them for the remainder of their useful life, rather than trashing them.

On the other hand, I'd welcome regulations that mandate regular and quick (within 1 week of CVE) security patches for all IoT products manufactured within the last 10 years, and what I mean by this is strictly security-related. I do not, for the sake of argument, think that manufacturers should be forced to backport functionality - other than what is required to keep the product as functional as it was on day one (e.g. Youtube API updates.) But that's another argument for another time.

A fine balance has to be struck between forcing manufacturers to support their products for a reasonable approximation of the product's useful life (not just the warranty period) - but also allowing them the ability to innovate, without crushing regulatory burdens. However, it's obvious that leaving this up to the manufacturers clearly hasn't worked: Many use security updates (or the lack of them, to be more precise) as a sales tool to coerce consumers into buying a new model.

A hidden benefit of this would be that vendors will be forced to start harmonising their build process. Much modern IoT development is still very Wild Wild West in nature, and not very standards-driven at all.

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Hackers waste Xbox One, PS4, MacBook, Pixel, with USB zapper

Oliver Jones

To be fair...

...we've been here before, haven't we?

The first thing I thought of on reading this article was a certain BOFH episode.

"Is it D.E.A.H.T.I.H.S compliant?"

Okay, the interface is different (USB, not SCSI-1) - but the idea's still the same: Letting the magic smoke out! :)

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Russia accuses hostile foreign powers of plot to undermine its banks

Oliver Jones

Re: RE: modern warfare is fun

I would expect the average American to say that war is a hoot - they have never had to deal with one on their own territory: It is always someone else who has to deal with the loss, damage, chaos, and the depleted uranium. If only wars could be so convenient for everyone, we should surely have more of them.

(And no, 9/11 doesn't count: A real war involves much, much more than the loss of a few buildings in a limited urban area - and usually occurs over a protracted timescale that implies extensive humanitarian and economic costs as a result.)

The moment the first nuke is dropped on the US, however, I expect that tune to change pretty sharpish. Problem is, by that point it will already be too late.

If the West is truly determined to turn Russia into an enemy, I don't think anyone will be disappointed with the outcome. Whether any of us will survive to see that outcome is, of course, another question: Be careful what you wish for.

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Windows cmd.exe deposed by PowerShell

Oliver Jones

Re: Yet another Windows 10 annoyance

Microsoft hires a lot of people like Joel Spolsky, who think that offering the user a choice is merely a symptom that the UI designer has failed at their job.

This attitude has really permeated everywhere, and it's software Communism: Our way or the highway!

It's not just Microsoft, either: I have also seen this approach taken with many open source projects, too. KDE 4? Gnome 3? It's not for nothing that Mint was born - there were simply enough people fed up with having "cool stuff" shoved down their throats that they neither wanted nor needed.

For my part, I like PowerShell. But it's unsuitable as a default command line, for exactly the same reasons that UNIX / Linux systems still have a statically-linked (and therefore less dependent) subset of binaries in /sbin.

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Gone in 70 seconds: Holding Enter key can smash through defense

Oliver Jones

Re: @Homer ... Missing item in the series?

It doesn't require physical access to the machine if your Linux box is hosted in a VM, or the "cloud".

Of course, if your VM is accessible by an attacker, that already means you're doing something wrong, but a premise of good security is that one should generally design layers that don't assume unbroken security in outer layers.

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UK.gov has 18,000 IT contractors on its books due to dearth of skills

Oliver Jones

IR35

Not long after IR35 came into force, I took the hint and left the country in 2004.

To those contractors who don't flinch at the idea of keeping their skills up to date (and learning another language), I would highly recommend it.

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Trump's taxing problem: The end of 'affordable' iPhones

Oliver Jones

Re: I have no problem with gearing back the corrupt H1-B program

Nothing an EMP won't fix.

Too many people forget how quickly available technology levels can go down, as well as up. I just hope Trump is serious about maintaining decent relations with the Russians: War isn't in any of our interests.

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Getting your tongue around foreign tech-talk is easier than you think

Oliver Jones

Re: Courriel

Actually, the "eu" syllable maps fairly consistently as "oy" in German, viz:

"Deutsch" - "doych", not "dewch"

"euro" - "oy-ro", not "ew-ro"

"zeugnis" - "zoy-gniss", not "zew-gniss"

Et cetera.

By the way, if you try to buy a Lufthansa ticket from, say, Cologne to Frankfurt, you'll get a train ticket also: There is even a designated Lufthansa coach on the train, where they serve you the "in-flight meal". But it makes sense: Cologne to Frankfurt is about 63 minutes by ICE - by the time you have spent 30 minutes checking in, and another 35 minutes buggering around to get a take-off slot on the runway, the train would already have arrived at the destination.

Swiss public transport is fantastic. Central Zürich is one of very few places in this world, where:

a) You see a lot of Lambourghinis, Ferraris, Maseratis and Teslas, on the road, and they're a familiar sight at any time of the year - rather than a surprise.

b) You actually find yourself thinking "You poor bastard", every time one of them passes you.

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Oliver Jones

@flokie

I thought Russell Crowe depicted the French attitude to customer service quite accurately in A Good Year, thusly:

"McDonald’s is in Avignon, fish and chips in Marseilles… Allez!"

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Oliver Jones

Re: Courriel

I initially picked Germany, instead. Better women, better cars, better beer - and the trains don't smell. At least, not as much as the French ones do. :)

Still, even after ~8 years in the Fatherland, my (German) wife and I decided that Switzerland was more to our liking, even though the locals always sound like they're trying to bring something up from the back of their throat whenever they speak. (Depending on the region, it can sound like anything from quite mild to downright scary.) I suspect that if I'd paid more attention to learning Dutch instead of German, I'd probably have been better off. Still, ende gut, alles gut.

One thing I don't miss here is my car: Driving in central Zürich is more painful than a root canal. Anyway, considerable transport infrastructure has been built, so you don't have to worry about driving. That lends itself to more nights on the town, without having to worry about quaint old concepts like designated drivers.

I learned this important lesson in Germany: Always use a tax advisor (called Steuerberater - ("shto-ya-ber-ah-ter") - in German). Even if they cost you 1000 euros, they will save you more than the cost of having them do the paperwork. Here in Switzerland, I continued with the same practice, although the local word for that is Treuhand - ("troy-hand") in Schwiizerdütsch. Gotta love red tape!

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Hack us and you're basically attacking America, says UK defence sec

Oliver Jones

Re: warning them not to target Blighty

The SS-N-19 is even due to be obsoleted: It will be replaced with the 3M22 Zircon within 5 years, and that will be capable of Mach 5. Good luck intercepting one of those. In the meantime, the 3M-43 Klub is a more modern alternative, and the Klub-K variant can even be launched from a cargo container.

Then there's the VA-111 Shkval, which exceeds 200 knots underwater (it's a supercavitating rocket-powered torpedo). These have been in the Russian navy for yonks (the Kursk was sunk in 2000 by a bunch of these torpedos leaking propellant chemicals, due to lack of maintenance.) Of course, the Russian navy was in dire straits back in 2000 - but things have changed considerably, since.

Iran also has its own variant of the VA-111 Shkval (named the Hoot), too.

Perhaps this is why the anti-Russian rhetoric is being stepped up to hysteric proportions: The US knows it cannot afford to wait until Russia has weapons in place that make its entire Navy obsolete overnight.

But a war with Russia will be unlike any war the West has ever fought.

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May blocked plans to bring in more Indian IT workers – Vince Cable

Oliver Jones

Re: As a British IT worker....

This has nothing to do with thinking the world owes anyone a living. It does, however, have more to do with the fact that many outsourced workers enjoy substantial tax benefits not available to British workers.

I like working in Switzerland, because I work on a level playing field - and I compete very well, here - despite having had to pull my socks up and learn German to a level I can usefully work with.

We don't subscribe to overcrowding, either: Indians are invariably shocked when they come here and think they can cram a family of 3 into a 1.5-room apartment (by Swiss standards, that's a studio flat), and the landlord simply shakes his head and says "No. For a family of 3, you will take at least a 3.5-room flat, and if you don't like it, I have 80+ other people waiting behind you - and they are more than willing to accept my terms."

Try finding a flat in Zürich, and by the time you have experienced your first Besichtigungstermin, you will understand the true meaning of competition.

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Linus Torvalds says ARM just doesn't look like beating Intel

Oliver Jones

I *wanted* an Acorn Archimedes when I was at school...

Couldn't afford one on a paperboy's salary. Got a Commodore 64 instead, which I later traded up for an Amiga 500, then an Amiga 1200.

Of course, when I saw the opportunity to buy a brand-new in box A5000 Alpha in 2006, I jumped at the chance, and haven't regretted it since - but Torvalds is right: More needs to be done to make the ARM platform a serious contender, and that starts with building workstations. Unfortunately, too many vendors are keen to restrict programming information, and that just ensures ARM will be restricted to niche (if popular) segments, like mobile phones and embedded devices.

The ARM segment looks rather like the home computer segment did in the 1980s: Take the 6502 CPU, one I'm probably way too familiar with - and look at the different implementations, from Acorn's BBC and Atom, through to the Commodore PET/C16/+4/C64/128, the Atari 400/800, the Apple II series, et cetera. All have different boot code, different ways of interfacing to hardware, different system calls (only the Commodore series attempted a serious effort at making certain system calls portable across their range via their 0xFFxx kernel jump table, but the C128 used a Z80 to boot the system!)

IBM's Project Chess was, to the PC, what ARM needs right now. Failing all else, I'd settle for an MSX, metaphorically speaking. :)

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Mercedes answers autonomous car moral dilemma: Yeah, we'll just run over pedestrians

Oliver Jones

Ahem...

That subject (Adolf) has already been addressed, here, just in case you thought Germans couldn't possibly have a sense of humour regarding Der Führer. :)

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BT Yahoo! customers: Why! can't! we! grrr! delete! our! webmail! accounts!?

Oliver Jones

Re: I wonder

I actually went full Clinton since at least the late 90s: The problem with having ISP e-mail is one more dependency than I need. If I was at all concerned about secrecy, I might not host it in the Yew Ess Aye, but rather closer to home (not in my bathroom closet, though.) But that's another project for a rainy day.

As far as I'm concerned, an ISP is a data pipe - that's all it ever will be to me, and if they don't provide the service I expect, they should expect to have their business swiftly replaced by a competitor. I can't very well hold their corporate feet to the fire if I have an e-mail account that relies on them, can I? :)

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Ofcom: Legal separation will force Openreach to eat more fibre

Oliver Jones

Re: Premise or Premises

Real world, as you define it, may vary from country to country: All three properties I rent have FTTH, with two properties already enjoying symmetric gigabit internet (the other slumming it with symmetric 100Mb internet).

But then again, I don't live in the UK - so your real world may vary. :)

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MPs tell BT: Lay more fibre or face split with Openreach

Oliver Jones

Re: If you REALLY want change...

Show me the last mile for fibre infrastructure in the UK, and I'll admit you might have a point. Or are you saying that, just because you have copper for the last mile, there's no point bothering with anything else that might compete with it?

Unfortunately, this kind of thinking is typical in Britain. It's also why you have been left in the dust! It's a miracle you're not still using Morse keys to communicate...

By the way, CityFibre is exactly the kind of setup you describe at the top of your last paragraph: They are a wholesaler, and other companies (even including BT, in theory) are the ones selling services, running on CityFibre's infrastructure, to the customer.

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Oliver Jones

If you REALLY want change...

...place a large contract order with CityFibre for all government offices, and make it worth their while to install FTTP, as has been done in a few cities already. Wherever open competition to BT does not exist, create it: Set up crowdfunding in cities if you have to - I'm sure you'll find plenty of people who would be interested in pre-ordering faster internet services.

Make it clear that monopolies will not be supported with taxpayer funds. In the end, if you keep on supporting BT, you will just make it easy for them to continue refraining from investment in fibre. The beast needs to be starved: Only then will it start to care about improving value for money.

And 80Mbps is pathetic, by the way: Here in Switzerland, symmetric gigabit is a reality for many (Fiber7.ch) - and we're just a pathetic little country with 8 million people. Britain should have managed 1Gbps for the mainstream yonks ago.

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Web meltdown: BT feels heat from angry punters

Oliver Jones

Attention, UK-based technology businesses

Aren't you tired of living in the past? Wouldn't you like access to affordable and fast first-world technology infrastructure?

Move to Switzerland: We have it all - low regulations, loads of pretty mountains for storing your data in, and more symmetric Gigabit FTTH connectivity for SOHO than you can shake a stick at.

The rest of the world moved on from this, ages ago. Stop punishing yourself: Isn't it about time you joined the rest of us in the present day?

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Chinese hacker jailed for shipping aerospace secrets home

Oliver Jones

Amusement value?

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Bad blood: US govt bans bio-test biz Theranos' CEO for two years

Oliver Jones

Easy to predict...

I wrote off Holmes when she said "The minute you have a back-up plan, you've admitted you're not going to succeed." Or, in other words, the "put it all on 18 black" school of business strategy.

Kind of ironic, really, considering the circumstances Theranos now finds itself in.

Still, I do hope her investors have an "easy come, easy go" attitude regarding their investment - and a good sense of humour: They're going to need it.

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Microsoft: Give us better staff

Oliver Jones

Supply and demand meet at a place called "price".

If you are unhappy with the level of supply, the tried and trusted solution is to raise your bid. If you're of the opinion that supply is just fine as it is, then don't do anything - including complaining about supply. ;)

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All this Brexit talk derailed UK tech spending, right? That's a big fat NOPE

Oliver Jones

Re: The referendum is not legally binding...

Well, it seems the electorate decided by themselves, Farage notwithstanding.

Not that it matters, though: It seems that your political class are desperate to make the UK look like the next banana republic - and simply ignore the result - because it wasn't the "right" one. This is going to be a real popcorn moment, given the global publicity of Brexit.

(I DID tell you not to hold your breath about the referendum, did I not?)

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Oliver Jones

I'm more of a technical bod, but I (obviously) can't do my own research...

Watch Brexit The Movie, then. It's all nicely explained in about 90 minutes. (It's also freely available to watch on YouTube, at no cost.)

Sometimes, when someone posts something on the Web or forum, these days, everyone seems to expect them to provide an encyclopaedia's worth of links to back up their arguments. Totally unreasonable, in my book: Take some bloody responsibility for informing yourself! We live in the Information Age, with unprecedented (and rapid!) access to information, after all. It is NOT the responsibility of posters to educate you. I mean, what next - will I have to provide multiplication tables whenever I make a point using simple math? Frankly, I'm beginning to wonder.

If you are at all mildly curious about what's being said, you Google material that satisfies you, or not. If you aren't curious, then why bother even replying? It makes you look like a cow waiting to be fed. You DO know what eventually happens to cows, don't you?

There is actually plenty of information out there that shows that the only elected positions in the EU, namely the EU Parliament, actually has no real power at all. (Nigel Farage has also said as much - and he'd know: He holds a seat in that Parliament.) Laws are created by offices in the EU that are not elected, so no EU nation state actually has a say in the creation of legislation. That, to any rational, intelligent being, says what needs to be said.

But don't take my word for it...

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Oliver Jones

The referendum is not legally binding...

...so don't hold your breath. The result, even if 100% Leave, is purely advisory, from a legal standpoint. Probably one of the most-overlooked pieces of small print in the whole campaign.

I voted with my feet: It's the only way to get real results in a timely manner (put another way, I have already been "Out" since 2012: Greetings from Switzerland!)

Still, I will miss Nigel Farage's amusing outbursts in the EU Parliament: With the referendum over on Friday, either way, his crusade will finally be at an end - and one of the UK's most entertaining (and straight-talking) politicians will probably be stepping down for good. So enjoy him while you still can.

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UK's education system blamed for IT jobs going to non-Brits

Oliver Jones

Re: Why I left the UK

I have to admit to the same: I got the hell out of Dodge and left the UK for Germany in my late twenties. Met a very nice young German girl a couple of years later, and we married a few years later, just after she earned her doctorate. In 2012 we had a Brexit vote of our own, of sorts - with our feet - and we're now enjoying our fourth year outside the EU in beautiful Switzerland.

(That's why I'm not holding my breath about the referendum: When push comes to shove, I've already feathered my nest, and I won't have to live with the consequences - whatever Britain decides to do. I am already "Out".)

Technical work is respected here, by the way - and salaries are decent, even if the cost of living is eye-watering. Best of all is the sound of church bells (usually in Surround Sound (R), from several churches) when you wake up, and the realisation that most of the immigrants who you bump into here (and you WILL bump into a few!) are here because of their skills, not just because of their price.

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Lester Haines: RIP

Oliver Jones

Jesus. 55 is far too young.

Rest in peace - or, as my late grandfather would have said (especially with regard to LOHAN and the idea of cremation), "Rest in pieces".

You'll be missed. :(

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Google Research opens machine intelligence base in Zurich

Oliver Jones

Actually...

...in these here parts, that would be Chäs, not that fancy High German-sounding stuff they serve in Hannover and places like that. Just imagine the "Ch" as a fairly guttoral approximation of white noise, and you'll get it. :)

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PC market sinking even faster than first thought, thanks to Windows 10

Oliver Jones

Re: False premise

This suggests that sales should pick up once Microsoft ends its magical upgrade offer. If so, why are sales projected to decline even more?

Well, I certainly can't wait for Microsoft to end its magical upgrade offer. The moment it does, I will be able to tell my friends and family that it's now safe to enable Windows 7 automatic updates, without fear of running into the (repeatedly-hidden) KB3535583 scourge.

So said that smug bastard still running XP x64 on Ivy Bridge...

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Dedupe, dedupe, dedupe dedupe dedupe... Who snuck in to attack Microsoft Edge?

Oliver Jones

Re: Awaiting a "fix" from MSFT...

All operating systems are affected by this, because Rowhammer is a hardware exploit, not a software exploit. Running on a computer system without ECC memory is what makes an operating system most vulnerable, and the Google team who documented Rowhammer made a veiled comment that Apple equipment seems to be particularly sensitive to this. They also mentioned that server-grade hardware with ECC memory wasn't so vulnerable, because ECC simply caught and corrected single-bit errors as they happened. Non-ECC systems simply do not enjoy this level of protection.

In other words, if you visit untrusted Web sites on any operating system running on a computer without ECC memory, you may as well go full Hillary Clinton and forget about using a password. ;)

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GCHQ is having problems meeting Osborne's 2020 recruitment target

Oliver Jones

The civil service will eat you alive - it just takes a few decades to digest you.

I bumped into a few "patriotic" types at a certain weather forecasting arm of the Civil Service, about 15 years ago. One guy there even ostracised me because I eventually quit for what was a ~50% raise to work for Sun Microsystems.

The irony he could never know was this: What prompted me to leave was a very bitter conversation I overheard in the kitchen: One guy had been a lifer in the organisation, and was lamenting what the return on his time had been, and how things could have been so much better if he'd put his own interests first. I remembered thinking to myself: "Good point!" - I was still in my twenties, then.

(To me, the scene in The Great Exotic Marigold Hotel, where those two civil service workers were being shown around the pitiful retirement accommodation they were just starting to realise was the only thing they were going to be able to afford in their old age, was particularly poignant, because it was exactly the same tone of anger and regret I had witnessed in that kitchen so many years earlier.)

The other thing is that I could never bring myself (or my wife) to live in the UK: It's getting closer and closer to African living standards every time I visit to see my parents, and I would know: I was born in what is now Zimbabwe, and I have many relatives in South Africa. I enjoy internet access speeds most of you won't see in the UK for at least another 10 years, and a general quality of life here in Switzerland that simply can't be had in the UK unless you're a multi-millionaire.

It was worth learning German for.

My beef with GCHQ is their supposed role in looking after UK interests: Exactly how does that work when the same UK government is practically falling over itself to allow as many immigrants (many of whom will be terrorists with EU passports) into the country as possible? I can understand Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the US. But I don't get why the UK is the only member of the Five Eyes that seems to think that the individual merit of applicants has abolutely no place in a modern immigration policy.

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Brits unveil 'revolutionary' hydrogen-powered car

Oliver Jones

Re: Sounds great !

Shopping will fit. But fit the dogs and kids with a leash, crack the whip - and claim all that green energy!

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BT broadband is down: Former state monopoly goes TITSUP UK-wide

Oliver Jones

Well, now we know:

BT = Back Tomorrow.

(ducks)

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Evil OpenSSH servers can steal your private login keys to other systems – patch now

Oliver Jones

Re: Languages other than C @Passive Smoking

Yup.

It's for this reason that C89 is still alive and well -.and long may it continue to be. I have a subscription to the Intel compilers for Windows, Linux and FreeBSD - and I've noticed that even the latest standard for C has become horribly complex and C++ - like.

As for C++, that has become a clusterfart beyond all recognition - and for those who are still blissfully unaware of its unmitigated horrors, I would recommend a shufti at the following presentation:

http://www.fefe.de/c++/c++-talk.pdf

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You ain't nothing but a porn dog, prying all the time: Cyber-hound sniffs out hard drives for cops

Oliver Jones

Re: Sounds Expensive

I think Benjamin Franklin was more succinct:

"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."

It's still as true today as it was when it was first written in 1755: Human nature has not changed.

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'Unauthorized code' that decrypts VPNs found in Juniper's ScreenOS

Oliver Jones

Juniper probably saved a lot of money avoiding security audits of its code. A shame, however, because I would say it's probably going to cost them what they saved (and a whole lot more) in lost customer loyalty.

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One Bitcoin or lose your data, hacked Linux sysadmins told

Oliver Jones

ZFS is looking more and more attractive...

As is FreeBSD (particularly the idea of running Linux-based apps like these in FreeBSD jails, with access to a ZFS volume loopback-mounted over NFS.)

SELinux isn't much protection against an attacker with root access!

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Startup founder taken hostage by laid-off workers

Oliver Jones

Re: Sir

These days, they will just disable your badge - and you won't get past the automated barriers.

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How Microsoft will cram Windows 10 even harder down your PC's throat early next year

Oliver Jones

As a user of Windows XP x64...

...I'm having the last laugh.

Who would have thought that "continued support and updates" would turn out to be such a liability?

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Huge, absorbent iPad rumours recycled – and this time it's REAL. True

Oliver Jones

Killer feature:

Will it include the ability to visit Web pages without the message "A problem occurred with this web page so it was reloaded" constantly appearing?

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IT jargon is absolutely REAMED with sexual double-entendres

Oliver Jones

Re: this one must crash too

I always liked Haiku's (formerly BeOS) error messages, viz:

---

Three things are certain:

Death, taxes, and lost data.

Guess which has occurred.

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Australia cracks tech giants' tax dodge code

Oliver Jones

Flat 20% tax on international currency transfers

Pay 20% up front, and a recursive tax return is required to prove what profit is taxable. (Easily enough done with modern technology. It's one of the prime jobs computers were invented for in the first place!)

If the money happens to pass through a tax haven, where profit and cost can't be conclusively proved, then there is no eligibility for a tax refund on the 20% advance paid - and the tax would therefore be 20%. Quite soon, tax havens would find themselves going out of business, because the black holes in corporate accounts would instantly turn from being a huge asset into a huge liability, overnight.

Companies automatically respond to financial stimulus (that's capitalism for you), and if you make something more profitable, you can bet that companies will end up taking that route. Make opaque accounting hideously expensive, and firms will stop doing it.

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Run Windows 10 on your existing PC you say, Microsoft? Hmmm.

Oliver Jones

Re: I think all my laptops ( bar one) and PCs would run Win10

They only have themselves to blame, because they aren't producing kit that people want to buy. Just cheap crap for the consumer market.

I have a 2009-vintage Fujitsu Celsius H270. It was one of the last models they made with a sensible screen resolution (1920x1200) - pretty much all their "workstation" laptops are now with "consumer" screen resolutions with a 16:9 ratio. I don't know who in their marketing department approved that decision, but they must have been snorting something pretty good at the time. From a workstation user's point of view, It's pretty crap - as even if I wanted to edit HD video, I'd need extra vertical resolution, so the buttons and menu bar would fit on the screen alongside the footage.

So, instead of replacing it with a faster model, it got a new 1TB Samsung 850 Pro SSD. My god, what a difference it made! I'll probably get a few more years of life out of that laptop, yet. Fujitsu's loss became Samsung's gain.

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I cannae dae it, cap'n! Why I had to quit the madness of frontline IT

Oliver Jones

Two quotes that apply here:

"IT is so expensive because the labour is so cheap."

"An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure."

Security is almost a zero-sum game, but it's asymmetrical: What you do not spend on security will be taken out of your wallet by the hackers, but you will lose more to hack attacks than it would ever have cost you to spend on defences.

The problem for managers and beancounters is that security risks are a latent threat, and they do not appear on balance sheets, where they can easily be seen and budgeted for.

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So why the hell didn't quantitative easing produce HUGE inflation?

Oliver Jones

Re: It's simple, really.

Please tell that to the good people of Sheffield, Liverpool and Hull.

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Oliver Jones

It's simple, really.

Inflation has been restrained because Western countries have pursued heavily deflationary policies, like offshoring jobs to the Far East, et cetera. Even today, an Indian coming from India to work in the UK has a huge tax advantage over a native Brit, because the playing field is stacked in their favour: The Indian gets to use tax structures and benefits not available to local Brits, and while it means they can be only in the UK for a total of 51 weeks, most UK employers are quite happy to chop and change every year, if it means they get cheaper staff.

Manufacturing has been totally decimated, and many services positions are in the process of being offshored as well. When this is finished, there won't be anyone left earning money with which to buy any of these "cheap" products or services from overseas.

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Windows 10 won't help. The PC biz is doomed, DOOMED, I TELL YOU

Oliver Jones

Re: Lack of trust: re 4K sectors

4K native drives won't work on XP, period, unless you run them through a RAID controller that presents the raw disk blocks as 512-byte blocks.

512E (4K emulation) drives will work on XP (but are not supported officially), and they will work even better if you use Diskpart to align the first partition to a 64K+ boundary before installing the operating system (however, that requires extra buggerment factor, because you need to boot with a Windows OPK to prep the system before you boot with the CD media to install the operating system itself.) But it does work very well.

Windows 7 does take the aforementioned buggerment factor out of the equation by automatically aligning the first partition to a 1MB boundary. However, like XP, Windows 7 does not support 4K native drives - so, as far as 4K native drives are concerned, Windows 7 users are in the same boat at XP users.

See this page:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2510009

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Oliver Jones

Re: Lack of trust

They will stop selling them, because Microsoft will lean on them to stop selling them, just as they have leaned on Intel to make it extremely difficult to find drivers for XP x64 and Windows Server 2003 x64 for Ivy Bridge kit, which *is* officially supported on that platform.

What's the commercial advantage for Intel to reduce demand for its kit?

The drivers *are* out there, on Intel's site, but you won't find the latest ones with a simple search. Using the search will get you drivers from 2008, which certainly won't support Ivy Bridge. Yet it one knows the version number to look for, Google finds the requisite page quite easily - even if Intel has done a slap-up job of trying to hide it.

If it's being done to XP x64 and Server 2003 x64 now, it's not too much of a leap of the imagination to figure that it'll also be done to Windows 7, when the time comes.

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Facebook: Your code sucks, and we don't even have to run it to tell

Oliver Jones

I hope they ran the tool on itself.

Just... well... you know, in case. :)

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