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* Posts by Stu J

83 posts • joined 5 Aug 2009

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Death of the business Desktop

Stu J

Licensing is the killer

As the chap above said - even if you want to roll out a thin/zero client VDI infrastructure with a 1:1 mapping between thin clients and VMs, you have to pay $100 per endpoint, per year - you can't get SA on a thin client that isn't running Windows.

So a half-decent thin client costs $300, then you have to pay $100 a year - so over 5 years, that's $800. And you could buy an equivalent fully licensed desktop for $600. So to the beancounters you're having to justify the additional expense of $200 per endpoint, on top of the storage, servers, and hypervisor licensing to run the back-end, which is, realistically, another couple of hunderd dollars per VM.

On top of that, someone who does standard desktop support and deployment probably doesn't have the first clue about managing a virtual infrastructure, so you either have to spend on consultants, send your desktop team on training courses, or hire someone with the right skills, which actually increases your spend on that aspect as well.

Where this works well is getting the economy of scale on the back-end and have someone else manage all that tin for you. Unfortunately, Microsoft also expressly forbids using the same servers OR SAN for different customers in a VDI deployment (presumably to stop people chucking their desktops into EC2).

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Backup software for HDD and Cloud

Stu J

Re: Backup software for HDD and Cloud

Cloudberry Lab - local and cloud backup in one, $30 for the desktop edition. 14 day free trial.

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New iPhones: C certainly DOESN'T stand for 'Cheap'

Stu J

Same old delusional overpriced shite

As for the price, I got an HTC One free of charge on a 2 year £32/month contract. And you're telling me I'd have to pay a wedge up front, as well as an extortionate contract for that gaudy plastic piece of 5C shite?

They really are a cult, aren't they?

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Boris Johnson floats idea of 'London visa' to attract tech talent

Stu J

Three words

Fuck. Off. Boris.

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Hypersonic 'scramjet' aims for Mach 8 test flight

Stu J
FAIL

Re: Ok what have I missed

Dont know where the hell you got 8600000 from, it's close to 2700 - so a bit less than 5 minutes...

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VMware goes after biz critical apps with vSphere 5.5

Stu J

"The vSphere HA feature is still, as far as we know, limited to VMs that span only a single core"

You're getting HA (high availability - auto restart of VMs on a failed host) mixed up with FT (zero-downtime "migration" of VM from a failed host to a live host). Apparently multi-core FT is in development, but is a far trickier beast than single-core FT to get right...

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Sony coughs up £250K ICO fine after security fears

Stu J
FAIL

So...

...relying on security by obscurity then? Bad, bad Sony...

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Are driverless cars the death knell of the motor biz?

Stu J

Anyone who suggests this doesn't have young kids, as the mess they make is fucking horrific. I don't want to have to clean up after them sufficiently for a complete stranger to use the car at the end of every single journey...!

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Not so fast with the bubbly, RM: IT biz faces £40m schools-sized hole

Stu J
WTF?

Re: Bad news for RM - but is it bad news overall?

"schools own In-house it staff"..."real talent being lost"

You're having a fucking laugh aren't you???

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EU chucks €18m at research for stupidly fast networks

Stu J

Japan?

Why is the EU sending EU taxpayer funds out of the EU when there are plenty of companies in the EU who could take on more staff and benefit our combined economy if they were awarded the gig?

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Apple dodged all UK corporation tax in 2012

Stu J
FAIL

Why don't we just...

Declare that:

using anything *deemed* to be a tax avoidance measure, such as (but not limited to):

> artificially induced debts

> paying over the odds for goods from subsidiaries located in other jurisdictions

> paying over-the-top license fees to subsidiaries located in other jurisdictions

is illegal and will:

a) result in the CFO going to prison if the evaded liability is >£250,000, and

b) will result in "tax avoidance" measures not only being treated as though they're not there, but as though they had the *opposite* effect when calculating tax owed

Corporations can protect themselves by being completely honest, open, and up-front with HMRC about any schemes which might look even slightly dodgy, and HMRC can audit them up-front to determine what the effect on the tax liability is, and whether or not it's a legitimate transaction, or if it's designed to avoid paying tax.

That way, anything that isn't declared up front is entirely subjective, and HMRC can go around nobbling corporations left, right, and centre.

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Nominet sacks freshly-hired exec implicated in hospital 'cover-up' scandal

Stu J

Most probation periods in contracts merely result in an increased notice period, if that.

Gov changed the law last year - provided it's not discriminatory you can dismiss anyone up to 2 years service with no reason, and no right for them to claim unfair dismissal.

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IT mercenaries and buy-to-let landlords are my HEROES - here's why

Stu J

Re: Time to get nuclear on some behinds

You'd need to take into account the following costs as a bare minimum, as well as mortgage interest:

buildings insurance/maintenance charges

landlord's insurance

general maintenance (drip feed fund to pay for redecoration, replacement of fixtures and fittings etc...)

Of course, you pay for most of these as a homeowner anyway, it's just not the headline cost of the mortgage.

As for the homeless thing, that's bull. If someone isn't paying the bills, they should be evicted - private landlords aren't charities, and if they invest in a property, whilst I don't agree on them making a whopping profit up-front, they shouldn't be forced to make a loss.

I fully intend to rely on bricks-and-mortar as my pension - a property you own outright that gives you a regular monthly income is far safer than most financial instruments, IMO.

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Silicon Valley digiterati to brainstorm at 30,000 ft

Stu J

130 people on a long-haul BA flight?

Either they're all in Economy Class, or there's going to be a bun-fight for the First/Club/Premium seats...

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Charity chief: Get with it, gov - kids shouldn't have to write by hand

Stu J
Flame

Re: In some regards, he has a point though

"Bollocks! It's very important to understand how you got there, if I am testing someone for their ability in my subject area I am more interested on their thought processes rather than the end result."

Agreed. And in all of my mathematical and scientific exams, proof of working was key, and was what got you most of the marks. But to an examiner marking an essay, they have no real proof of the thought process; essay plans and rough notes don't get handed in and marked. All they mark on is the end result, ergo for those exams, that's what actually counts.

"That kind of suggests you missed the point of OOP. If you find you having to duplicate lots of code (copy/paste/ditto) then you've got your model wrong, especially in an academic exam!"

As I've mentioned elsewhere, a lot of it was the structure of the questioning. I'm extremely capable of OOP, and I find it mildly amusing/insulting that ignorant commentards on here should start pointing the finger at me, rather than the insane format of the exam and the questioning. I wasn't the only one who came out of that exam swearing, and trying to hunt down the academic in question so we could throw him off the nearest tall building. The exam was so crap that the mark distribution from the 30th to 70th centiles was 5%, meaning that one mark cost you a degree class on that paper.

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Stu J
Flame

Re: In some regards, he has a point though

Your reply tells me that you clearly missed my point, and are sufficiently foolish to jump to conclusions and bandy insults around based on your misinterpretations. I can think outside of an equation, could do then, and still can now. I got a high B grade in General Studies despite not being able to finish the paper properly.

For two years of study at A-Level, I had not had the *need* to write anything other than equations, formulae, and the odd sentence, because that was the demand of those subjects. Two years of low-level usage of the muscles in my hand needed to write. I didn't spend my evenings at home practicing writing, beyond doing my A-Level homework - I was 16/17/18 - I was down the pub, chasing girls. But, all of a sudden, you are expected to spend 3 hour exams doing solid writing. It's not something you can just switch on...

If you jog 3 miles a day, 5 days a week, for 2 years, and then I ask you to run for 3 hours solid, do you think your body could do it? Muscles are trained over time. The people who had been training their hands to be able to write for 3 hours at a time (generally arts students) produced 2-3x more output than the scientists in the General Studies exam. It's no co-incidence.

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Stu J

Re: In some regards, he has a point though

The 20 sides was all of the questions in a 3 hour exam, and includes brackets, variable declarations, and so on.

And given this is academia, I'd go with the first explanation - the examiners didn't have a clue. We were all equally disadvantaged, so I'm not whinging about it being explicitly fair/unfair, just that a hand-written exam where you're asking people to produce hundreds of lines of code is a ridiculous way of examining programming ability.

And some of this was just repetition from one question to the next, to be honest; e.g. "Define a class that does X and Y". "Now define a class that does X slightly tweaked, Y slightly tweaked, and Z" - mindless repetition and copying that would have been a doddle if Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V had been available...

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Stu J

Re: In some regards, he has a point though

Completely agree - diagrams and equations, hand-written all the way.

Even now at work, I draw diagrams on whiteboards, and photographs of the whiteboard go into draft documents. I get someone lower paid who's not a thinker, but who's actually good with Visio or A.N.Other tool to actually turn them into digital diagrams.

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Stu J

In some regards, he has a point though

At A-Level, I studied Double Maths, Physics, Chemistry, General Studies.

My performance in General Studies (the exam I took involved 3 hours of solid essay-writing) suffered dramatically because I just couldn't write for that length of time. I was crippled with cramp for the last hour of the exam - I got to write only a fraction of what I wanted to, and my grade undoubtedly suffered as a result.

The people who were studying English Lit, History etc, who were used to writing for that period of time, had a huge advantage over someone who was used to scrawling equations and formulae, and very little prose.

Granted, there is an art to essay-planning when you are hand-writing an essay, but I don't see how that is actually a relevant skill these days. If you've got 3 hours to produce some content, it's the quality of the end result that matters, not how you got there. With a computer you could effectively spend 2 hours vomiting ideas all over a page, and an hour tidying it up, and without the constraints you have to set at the outset of a hand-written essay, you may arguably end up with a better outcome.

Anyway, fast-forward 4 years to my University Finals, where, in an Objected Oriented Programming module, I found myself having to write about 20 sides of code on A4 using pen and paper. It turns out I got marked down for using ditto marks to speed the job up and avoid the cramp that had crippled me in the past. Bonkers. If I'd been on a computer, I'd have copy/pasted a bunch of lines and made the relevant changes. Instead of marking me based on what I knew and what I could produce in terms of working code, I was marked on the basis of being able to write it using pen and paper, which is a completely meaningless exercise.

Similarly, when was the last time, at work, I was appraised on something handwritten? Never.

I have to say, BYOD for exams is a bonkers concept though.

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Uni profs: Kids today could do with a bit of 'mind-crippling' COBOL

Stu J

Re: Learning a language at uni for a job?

To extend your analogy, most employers dream of candidates walking through their door who have a motorbike license, an HGV license, and an F1 license. Because we know then that it doesn't matter what vehicle we give you to drive, it will go bloody fast and you probably won't crash it.

Very few candidates actually demonstrate anything even approaching this level of generic ability and understanding though; and the time-cost of interviewing candidates who don't look qualified on paper, in hope of unearthing a gem is enormous. So most employers are generally limited to looking for people who can hit the ground running in Technology X (e.g. HGV driving).

I've said it before, and I'll say it again - there is an unfilled niche in the recruitment market for an agency that actually understands developers, and screens them properly to make sure that those that turn up for interview actually have shit-hot brains, rather than just "5 years experience in Java (for some shitty little software house with tons of bad practise and actually no real idea of OO, SoA, Design Patterns, or any other useful skills)".

I've lost count of the number of hours of my life I've lost interviewing complete fuckwits who are either braindead, or completely fucking incapable of articulating to me how brilliant they actually are.

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Nursing watchdog fined £150k for confidential unencrypted DVD loss

Stu J
FAIL

Penalties

The only way to ensure that public sector and NFP organisations invest in due process and rigour to protect personal data is for the ICO to be able to hand down jail time to Senior Management.

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iOS 6.1 KNACKERED our mobile phone networks, claim Vodafone, Three

Stu J
FAIL

Re: Problems with iOS6.1? nah!!

Technically what Apple have done is completely illegal, that is they have facilitated users turning their phones into jamming devices.

Undoing that SNAFU rapidly is the LEAST they should do, and no, they don't deserve any fucking appreciation or thanks for unborking the network.

If Ofcom had any balls they'd take Apple to the cleaners over it, not least to recover some damn revenue from the tax-dodging fuckers.

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How to build a perfect private cloud with Windows Server 2012

Stu J
FAIL

@Eadon

Who the fuck do you work for, so I can make a note never to employ them to do any Solutions Architecture for me?

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US Patent Office seeks public input on software patents' future

Stu J
FAIL

USPTO is underfunded?

Bollocks. Just up the amount they charge to examine a patent so that it actually reflects the fucking cost of PROPERLY EXAMINING the patent.

Goddamn morons.

As for Software Patents specifically, either:

a) get rid of them, or for patents more generally

b) implement some kind of proportionality arrangement where the length and maximum monetary benefit you get from a patent claim is directly proportional to the effort required to develop the claim.

For example, pharmaceutical patents that require real R&D get protected as they still do today.

Patenting rounded corners on a phone gets protection for about 1 month, with a maximum benefit of $0.01 per unit (in other words, you'd spend more on patent attorneys than you would gain from the patent claim).

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Senator threatens FAA with legislation over in-flight fondleslabbing

Stu J
FAIL

What a dumb fuck

The main reason is absolutely f**k all to do with interference, it's to do with having passengers not being distracted (or distracting others) during the critical phases of flight.

Aside from the projectile effect, that's why they make you power stuff off and take off headphones for take-off and landing - it's so that if the shit hits the fan the passengers might actually be able to hear and understand the cabin crew instructions. Otherwise John Smith blasting his eardrums out listening to dance music whilst sat in the exit row would be a hazard to all and sundry around him.

Why don't you think they start the (fixed) in-flight entertainment until you've been airborne a good 10 minutes?

On her dumb head be it, the first accident where people perish unnecessarily because they couldn't go without their phones, laptops, fondleslabs, and iPods for all of 10 minutes...

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FCC urges rethink of aircraft personal-electronics blackout

Stu J
Meh

The problem below 10,000ft is distraction

The reason they want electrical equipment turned off below 10,000ft is so that if there's an emergency, they know that you a) can hear the cabin crew announcements and b) are more likely to pay attention to them than if you were playing Angry Birds on your Fondleslab. Hence the no in-flight entertainment until the flight's underway. The electrical interference thing is just a cover...

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McKinnon will not be extradited to the US, says Home Secretary

Stu J
Go

Re: Right decision for the wrong reason

Just because the "victim" is in the US, doesn't mean that the perpetrator is. It's the location of the perpetrator that matters. If Gary wasn't in the US when he committed the crime, and likewise hasn't set foot in the US since, then I'm sorry, they have fuck-all business with him.

Sure, the US should hand over the evidence to the UK and ask us to prosecute him if he's broken any of our laws. But he should never have been considered to be under US Jurisdiction.

In the same way that if I tried to start a reasoned debate on an Austrian website about whether or not the Holocaust actually happened (for the record, I'm pretty damn sure it did), I would not expect to be extradited to Austria under their Holocaust denial laws, to spend years rotting in prison there, because I've never been to Austria. On the other hand, if the UK CPS deemed me to be grossly offensive, and that it was in the public interest, then they could prosecute me under whatever UK law I happened to fall under.

Or, say there's a server hosted in a devoutly Muslim country that's hosting porn. If I access that porn, should they be able to extradite me to their country and inflict whatever punishment they see fit?

Top and bottom of it is, you don't always know what the nationality of the server is that you're accessing. And enough people don't know the laws of their own country, let alone the laws of countries hosting websites and servers they may end up accessing, maybe without even realising it.

On a slightly related note, there was talk of the UK government making it illegal for British citizens to have sex with under-16s in foreign countries where it would not normally be illegal. Now, although I thoroughly accept and condone the good intent of this, in my eyes, the same principles apply: the law applies to physical location of perpetrator, not to nationalities of perpetrator or victim, nor to location of victim. It's a slippery slope. Jurisdictional creep has already gone too far - it needs to be pushed back on by all civilised society.

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BT to fibre up another 163 exchanges, coy on exactly where

Stu J
FAIL

For fuck's sake

Still not on the list. It's like living in the dark ages.

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EE screams UK iPhone 4G exclusive, rest of pack sobs quietly

Stu J
FAIL

Dear EE

Please sort out my 2G coverage before dicking about with 4G.

Much love

PS - No, I don't live in the sticks.

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Patent flame storm: Reg hack biteback in reader-pack sack attack

Stu J

Patent life proportional to investment in innovation

Here's a suggestion.

The lifetime of a patent (and hence the revenue you can reclaim from it) should be directly proportional to the amount of time/effort the innovation took, based on critical peer-review.

"Sure, Apple, you can patent the rounded rectangle for a smartphone. Your patent is valid for 20 minutes, and has already expired, because any reasonable brainstorming session could have come up with that."

"Sure, [Pharmaceutical Company], you can patent the cure for all cancers, your patent is valid for 50 years, because you've been working on it for that long, and you've ploughed billions of dollars into getting there".

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UK: 'We're legally bound to arrest Mr Assange'

Stu J

Surely

Just diplomatic-crate him the hell out of there, but fill in the paperwork properly this time...

i.e. a bit like this, but do it properly:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dikko_Affair

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UK data-blurt cockups soared 1,000 PER CENT over last five years

Stu J

Re: Damn

If the IT managers highlight the risks and issues in writing to their superiors who control the purse strings, and the superiors ignore them, then I would guess that would be a pretty tight defence in court.

Rule #1 - if bad shit is going on, make sure Senior Management are crystal clear as to the potential consequences (in writing), and make sure you've got a copy of what you sent to them...

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Speedball 2 Brutal Deluxe

Stu J
Thumb Up

Cheating

And if you wanted even more fun, you could use a disk block editor on your save game to up all of your attributes to insane levels. Awesome.

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Microsoft takes on tablets with keyboard-equipped Surface

Stu J
Flame

Re: Fire?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4DlUUZxFvs

The fact I mentioned lithium batteries should have made you realise I wasn't talking about normal "hot case".

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Stu J
Flame

Fire?

Not mentioned in this article, but elsewhere (BBC) - it's got a magnesium case.

Given the propensity for lithium batteries to spontaneously combust, does anyone foresee a slight problem? I can't see airlines being too happy letting these things onboard...

*fondly remembers arsing about with magnesium and thermite in school chemistry lessons*

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New UK MVNO offers white list calling for kiddies' mobes

Stu J
Thumb Up

Re: SIM Swap

Yep, frankly I'd be sorely disappointed in my kids if they didn't think of that.

Then again, I'm sure you could superglue a SIM card into the phone, just to be that bit more bastardly... Your move, son.

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NHS 'pays up to THREE times over the odds' for IT gear

Stu J
FAIL

Hmm

Why don't we implement something similar to what I've come across in parts of the US, where as a supplier to public sector, you are obliged to disclose your best price for the same/similar equipment orders that you have shipped to the private sector in the past 12 months (or something like that), and the public sector will pay at most that price for the goods in question.

Oh, no, wait, we're in the EU.

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Death to Office or to Windows - choose wisely, Microsoft

Stu J

Re: Re: The Curse Of The 21st Century: MS Office

You can prevent them from using VBA, there's a Group Policy setting. Oh how frequently I've been tempted to turn it on...

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Ebuyer knocked out by own £1 deals site

Stu J
FAIL

BOFH will be on the rampage

Whichever smart alec in Marketing thought of communicating that promotion without informing their systems guys first had better check their network switch under their desk isn't smoking in a suspicious fashion......

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Apple gets patent for ‘unlock gesture’

Stu J
WTF?

Oh for fuck's sake

Shite like this should just not be patentable. Fucking useless USPTO, keeping all their lawyer buddies in business. Wankers. Steve Jobs will be laughing in his iGrave...

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Apple: 4m iPhone 4S handsets sold, thank you very much

Stu J
Stop

Fucking sheep with more money than sense

That is all.

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High-frequency traders attract regulator’s interest

Stu J

Emperor's New Clothes

Dare I suggest that most of the practices in the Financial Sector should be banned, as they inherently do nothing to add any value to underlying assets? Markets should be to encourage investment in listed companies, nothing more. If you buy shares, it should be for the long haul - day-trading should effectively be outlawed. As for derivatives, swaps, short-selling and so on, these should be illegal to operate as investments, as they are nothing more than pure gambling, which can have a devastating effect on the underlying share and commodity prices.

PS - I used to work in the "industry" until last month. It's not worthy of being called an industry, all it makes is smoke and mirrors...

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NHS claws back £170m refund on duff IT system

Stu J

WTF???

So they conned the NHS into giving them £200M, and they've only refunded £170M.

So actually, they're £30M up. For lying.

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Boffins invent miracle pill that counteracts effects of booze

Stu J
Thumb Up

Mandatory injection for chavscum

That is all.

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IDLENESS sees Brits haemorrhage cash to mobe firms

Stu J

Orange = Blacklisted

Orange are blacklisted in my house as they demanded our original marriage certificate be sent through the post (a certified copy taken by a member of Orange's staff in an Orange store wasn't deemed sufficient proof) in order to change my wife's name on her account. And then they lost it (we sent it registered post, so we know they received it).

O2 are also blacklisted after they failed to send me a final bill 8 years ago, then sent debt collectors round demanding £250, then (when I challenged them) went quiet, marked my credit record as defaulted - still without sending a final bill, or contacting me, or proving that I owed them £250 (which I'm damn sure I didn't).

Vodafone saved themselves from being blacklisted after they got back in touch, were genuinely helpful and remorseful, and honest - they told me that the deal I'd been offered was amazing, and that they couldn't do anything to match it, so it would be in my best interests to take it. Fair enough.

The deal I've gone for gives me a phone worth £400, truly unlimited data, and more texts and minutes than I'll ever use, for £25/month. So ~£8/month for the contract once you take the cost of the phone into consideration. Bargain.

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Cabinet Office shuns open-source in IT-tracking deal

Stu J

Alfresco

Thank f**k they shunned Alfresco. Biggest waste of time and money I've ever had the displeasure to support.

Open Source does not automatically equal Good

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Google lands patent for, um, estimating shipment time

Stu J

Idea

Ship all of our looters and rioters to the US. Lie to the US authorities about their criminal records, naturally. Then direct them all to torch the USPTO, and to beat and rob any "patent examiner" they come across.

For the price of a couple of charter flights to the states, this would solve us some enormous problems.

1. It would (temporarily, at least) stop any more stupid patents from being granted.

2. It would move the problem of the feral youth out of our jurisdiction, into one where......more extreme punishments are available.

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Glaswegian arrested for pro-riot Facebook posts

Stu J
Thumb Up

On a similar note

From the Northwich Guardian (www.northwichguardian.co.uk):

"A MARSTON man has been charged with encouraging public order offences by allegedly posting an event on a social networking site, in the wake of riots across the UK.

Jordan Blackshaw, 20, of Vale Road, appeared before Vale Royal Magistrates Court on August 10.

The court heard that Cheshire Police discovered a Facebook event, entitled Smash Down Northwich Town, created by Blackshaw.

The defendant was not asked to enter a plea.

He has been remanded in custody and will next appear at Chester Crown Court, on September 19."

Remanded in custody for his own safety, or as part of the show of strength against these c**ts?

In fairness, there'd be barely anything to loot in Northwich, most of the shop units are empty :-/

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