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* Posts by QuickRecipesonSymbianOS

6 posts • joined 4 Aug 2009

Motorola making Android 3.0 tablet

QuickRecipesonSymbianOS

correction

Could you correct the end of the article?

Nokia sells way more smartphones than Apple worldwide.

Maybe explicitely restrict your observations to the U.S. market...

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The software licensing minefield

QuickRecipesonSymbianOS

To be fair with the French

That expression is meant sarcastically.

This is a comment one makes when discovering something that is needlessly difficult to understand.

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Smartphone app botnet experiment blows up a storm

QuickRecipesonSymbianOS
Happy

Sweet sweet revenge

Mock how difficult the Symbian Platform Security model makes life for developers all you want but this has yet to happen after about 5 years of being deployed in the field, AFAIK. :-)

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Symbian shares the source

QuickRecipesonSymbianOS

mostly, yes.

From what I gathered at last year's SEE2009 conference, the point is that you can download the source code, compile it and make a firmware, all for free using only open source tools (I don't quite remember if you can already avoid using a windows computer for development but if that's not already the case, it will be soon).

That doesn't stop ARM from having a closed-source commercial compiler for Symbian development because it is supposed to be better than the open source one.

Now, the problems you need to solve once you can make a firmware are base porting and deployment.

The foundation doesn't have drivers for every piece of hardware you can imagine. I'm sure it is entirely possible to find an existing mobile phone containing hardware that simply won't work with your firmawre without having develop a driver yourself.

Most mobile phones that have firmware upgrade capability simply won't accept a firmware that hasn't been created by their initial manufacturer. You would need serious hacking to bypass that kind of protection. What would be interesting is to see a Symbian firmware work on the Google ADP and ADP2 phones.

The reference platform for Symbian OS is the Texas Instrument ZOOM OMAP34x-II Mobile Development Platform. The reference platform is a piece of hardware that specifically solves these 2 problems.

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QuickRecipesonSymbianOS

anyone can build the source and install it *A* "phone"

From what I gathered at last year's SEE2009 conference, the point is that you can download the source code, compile it and make a firmware, all for free using only open source tools (I don't quite remember if you can already avoid using a windows computer for development but if that's not already the case, it will be soon).

That doesn't stop ARM from having a closed-source commercial compiler for Symbian development because it is supposed to be better than the open source one.

Now, the problems you need to solve once you can make a firmware are base porting and deployment.

The foundation doesn't have drivers for every piece of hardware you can imagine. I'm sure it is entirely possible to find an existing mobile phone containing hardware that simply won't work with your firmawre without having develop a driver yourself.

Most mobile phones that have firmware upgrade capability simply won't accept a firmware that hasn't been created by their initial manufacturer. You would need serious hacking to bypass that kind of protection. What would be interesting is to see a Symbian firmware work on the Google ADP and ADP2 phones.

The reference platform for Symbian OS is the Texas Instrument ZOOM OMAP34x-II Mobile Development Platform. The reference platform is a piece of hardware that specifically solves these 2 problems.

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INQ launches 3G Twitter phones

QuickRecipesonSymbianOS

Let's hope these actually work

The INQ1 was never really able to play music properly from a Java application.

Please let them use a proper CPU this time around.

There were only a couple major issues that prevented the INQ1 from being a phone developers could target.

Fix those and they got a hit.

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