* Posts by batfastad

724 posts • joined 1 Aug 2009

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Beleaguered 123-reg customers spot price hike

batfastad
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Namecheap

+1 for namecheap.

IIRC 123-reg still charge a fee for outbound transfers though. Mid 90s registrar mindset with a control panel to match. Even before their recent mega-fail I was surprised to hear they still existed. Even worse than Fasthosts IMO, and that is saying something.

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Blighty's Virgin Queen threatened with foreign abduction

batfastad
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Re: One of those auctions ...

> "It will be liable to capital gains tax (20%), not income tax."

Like fsck it will! Bahamas much?

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Sick of storage vendors? Me too. Let's build the darn stuff ourselves

batfastad
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Re: No one said it was easy but...

Is the mirror driver actually available as a thing to use for real-time SAN mirroring now? Been a while since I was a VMwarrior. This tells me that it was used internally for svMotion... http://www.yellow-bricks.com/2011/07/14/vsphere-5-0-storage-vmotion-and-the-mirror-driver/

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A UK-wide fibre broadband investment plan? Don't ask awkward questions

batfastad
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Promises

> "it had already promised to build FTTP lines for a large number of the one million new homes planned to be built by the end of this Parliament."

Make a promise to a regulator on the back of a promise by the Government which they are never going to achieve. Genius!

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batfastad
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Do it. 20 years ago.

Gov pays for it. BT (probably) builds it. Charge BT etc a nice lump to use it. Profit for the people!

At the very least I'm amazed that there hasn't been some sort of rule that requires ducting and last mile infrastructure to be in place in new builds/estates for some years.

With a two-party system where debate consists of childish bickering, you are never going to get a strategy for anything longer than 5 years in the future. With each government just trying to look busy for their term and hoping to not screw anything up too much so they get back in for another go at the buffet.

Infrastructure investment appears to have fallen way behind other European nations consistently for at least 30 years... rail, road, air travel, energy, telecoms etc. At the risk of creating a new quango/buffet, maybe infrastructure decisions and strategy should be a separate commission, independent of political parties and their agendas. Might exist already, I don't know.

What I do know is the sooner you have it, the sooner it pays for itself.

Or just buy new shiny nuclear death weapons with our money instead. Fsckers.

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Hold on a sec. When did HDDs get SSD-style workload rate limits?

batfastad
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Headmaster

some some

> Unless we some some magical breakthrough

Yes, I have nothing better to do.

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Finance bods SWIFT to update after Bangladesh hack

batfastad
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Headmaster

's

> Hackers lifted the Bangladesh central bank key’s

Sigh.

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How to overcome objections that stop your enterprise from adopting DevOps

batfastad
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Unsubscribe

Please remove me from your mailing list.

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Storage with the speed of memory? XPoint, XPoint, that's our plan

batfastad
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Your SAN...

... sucks if you're seeing 200ms latency!

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Thunderbird is GO: Mozilla prepares to jettison mail client

batfastad
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> This would be a terrible blow. I know many real world business that use thunderbird as an alternative to outlook.

Not so sure about that. Look at what Mozilla has done to Firefox - I'm thankful they haven't dedicated as much UI tinkering resources to Thunderbird over the years. Though the carnage already happened when they introduced a tab bar, which IIRC could only ever have a single tab!

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It's a good time to be in hyper-converged, eh, Pivot3?

batfastad
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Headmaster

starup

See title.

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Furious customers tear into 123-reg after firm's mass deletion woes

batfastad
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123-reg

I put these bozos in the same bracket as Farthosts. I have migrated many customers from both providers over the years. Not so much for reasons of reliability (although both have been shaky at times) but the customer service was always dreadful and lack of many technical features.

I definitely understand choosing cheap providers because of cost - if you won't die over a day or so of downtime then thats a perfectly valid decision to make. But if downtime is going to cost your business serious money, it's probably better to not be using budget mass-market web hosts where you are one account of 10,000 and instead have a managed service, or better still run from multiple providers. Compare the loss due to downtime vs the cost of improving availability.

One thing I would say is separate out your DNS hosting, domain registration and web hosting. Easier to juggle things around in times of brownout. And if the data is important to you, sort your own backups.

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UK web host 123-Reg goes TITSUP, customer servers evaporate

batfastad
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Bozos

I put these bozos in the same bracket as Farthosts. I have migrated many customers from both providers over the years. Not so much for reasons of reliability (although both have been shaky at times) but the customer service was always dreadful and lack of technical control.

I definitely understand choosing cheap providers because of cost - if you won't die over a day or so of downtime then thats a perfectly valid decision to make. But if downtime is going to cost your business serious money, it's probably better to not be using budget mass-market web hosts where you are one account of 10,000 and instead have a managed service, or better still run from multiple providers. Compare the loss due to downtime vs the cost of improving availability.

One thing I would say is separate out your DNS hosting, domain registration and web hosting. Easier to juggle things around in times of brownout.

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Google broke its own cloud AGAIN, with TWO software bugs

batfastad
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Trollface

Automate automate automate

So Google Cloud is following Azure's "Downtime As A Service" approach in automating even downtime now?!

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WordPress pushes free default SSL for hosted sites

batfastad
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Trollface

Pwnd

So 90% of the web's SQL injection will be happening over HTTPS now instead. That's something I guess. Go Wordpress!

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Ubuntu plugs code exec, DoS Linux kernel holes

batfastad
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Headmaster

The flaws...

... is fixed.

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Only 0.1% of you are doing web server security right

batfastad
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Joke

Re: Store the keys on the web server...

I'm not sure Dorpbox even give away enough space to store a private key do they?

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Enterprise revenues power Red Hat past $2bn barrier

batfastad
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RH

Every time I have had to deal with RH support they have been excellent. So good on 'em I say.

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Bell done: Nokia delivers super-speedy 100Gbps links fresh from the Labs

batfastad
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What is

> were the genesis of 100Gbps WDWM systems.

What is WDWM in this context? My Google-fu is failing me.

I'm assuming this is a typo and article just means (D)WDM... but just checking.

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Mozilla will emit 'first version' of Servo-based Rust browser in June

batfastad
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Re: Yaya yada yada

> If they let users install crap extensions from crap developers then I feel that might still be a no.

I should clarify that I'm not saying Firefox should bin support of extensions. Quite the reverse. I've always considered the memory issues as the trade-off for using a browser with massive extensibility. But I would say most memory issues with FF are most likely down to extensions rather than the core browser itself.

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batfastad
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Re: Yaya yada yada

> ...but did they fix the megagig memory leaks at all?

If they let users install crap extensions from crap developers then I feel that might still be a no.

What's a shame is so many of those crap extensions are needed to replace features that have been removed in their great quest of making it like Chrome.

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Dropbox slips 500PB into its Magic Pocket, not spread over AWS

batfastad
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Coat

Easy

Well it's easy to build an in-house storage infrastructure when you give only 50MB for free.

Mine's the one with an HDD in the pocket, connected to owncloud, rsynced offsite.

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Crap IT means stats crew don't really know how UK economy's doing

batfastad
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Office for National Statistics

You had one job.

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Going on a thin client diet

batfastad
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Thin?

I'm not sure there's much of a cost saving with thin clients. I've seen teams of engineers wrestling with endless app packaging and registry keys to remove OS features/customisation. Then for infrastructure you've got UCS chassis costs, virt host licensing etc. And then Wyse thin clients that cost the same as a mid-range PC.

The whole lot comes crashing down, quickly, if there's even a minor blip in any of AD, DNS, network, storage etc.

More hassle than it's worth?

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Brocade intros FC switch for flash fans with the need for speed

batfastad
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Coat

> There is the potential for external NVMe fabrics, using PCIe or fast Ethernet, to begin substituting for Fibre Channel in latency-sensitive, short distance SAN applications.

NVMe over fast Ethernet?

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Linode: Major cuts to several submarine cables to Singapore

batfastad
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Re: I live in Cairns

Pics or it didn't happen :)

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One-third of all HTTPS websites open to DROWN attack

batfastad
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> We know SSLv2 is insecure. It's been on the bad-boy list for many years. So why do people still have it configured?

I would reckon most of these aren't just web servers where even your local bobby tables web dev can disable SSLv2 in Apache. But appliances, admin interfaces, vCenter servers, iDRACs, NetScalers and who knows what else that have been left exposed by half-wits, never been patched, and never will be patched because support has elapsed and firmware can't be found and etc.

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Investigatory Powers Bill to be rushed into Parliament on Tuesday

batfastad
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Ask

Well at least they ask all those who will be affected by this, so all UK citizens, first. Oh...

Anyone who thinks democracy in this country isn't broken, then ask them when the referendum for this change in legislation is taking place.

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Gov must put superfast broadband along HS2 rail line, says Parliament

batfastad
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Sigh

It looks like we'll be buying a new train set that noone wants or needs. And noone can do anything to stop it because... democracy dear boy.

Let me summarise the business case:

"£35bn. It's not maglev. It won't even be high-speed relative to the French high speed upgrades planned to be completed by 2035. Helping people get from somewhere that's not London, to London, 15% faster. £35bn."

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Black Monday: Office 365 down and out in Europe

batfastad
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Exchange

Still going to say it's less aggro than running on-premise Exchange. Noone wants to see that in this day and age.

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Go full SHA-256 by June or get locked out, say payments bods Bacs

batfastad
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Headmaster

Not TLS?

> Bacs is adopting the new security, called SHA-256 SSL.

Great idea. But dude, if you're going to try and sound knowledgeable at least get it right. SSL (2 and 3) are deprecated per RFCs 6176 and 7568.

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Xen forgets recent patches in new maintenance release

batfastad
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"Is this any way to run a supposedly cloud-grade hypervisor?"

>"Is this any way to run a supposedly cloud-grade hypervisor?"

Pretty shoddy, sure. I suppose you get what you pay for.

Or maybe not... http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/02/14/vmware_re_issues_patch/

Not dissin' just sayin'.

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HMRC is to tax OpenStack cloud with UK citizens' data

batfastad
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Megaphone

Awooga

Attention contractors, attention! OpenStack skills urgently required by HMRC to patch up the nightmare we've been dumped into by some no-name integration outfit, who didn't have the skills in-house to start with. Please apply in 3... 2...

Get on it people :)

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Dell PowerEdge R730: Reg rack monkeys crack smiles over kindness of engineers

batfastad
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Re: R720xd

I don't want to totally diss Supermicros at all. But they're always a bit, you know... "GET... ON... THESE... EFFING... RAILSSSNNAAARRRGG! There, phew."

The Supermicro IPMI is clunky but I agree, does the job. The Dell iDRAC license thing does hack me off massively, particularly these days when it's built in to the board. Fair enough when it used to be a separate BMC addon board.

My home kit is always Supermicro.

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batfastad
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R720xd

Wasn't the R720xd the one with 24 drive bays across the front and 2 at the rear?

Is the R730xd the same?

Always liked working with R720s. Apart from when you find that one iDRAC that isn't licensed (or some other bullsh1t) and it's the one you really really need.

But compared to that old cabinet of Supermicros that everyone seems to have, working with Dells is typically great.

Mobile app and NFC sounds intriguing, however I've found connectivity for emergency/personal devices is always a total mission in data centres.

Wish I could do more kit wrangling - anyone got any jobs going? Clicking around AWS/vSphere isn't exactly why I got into computers. Would prefer to play with bits all day (ahem)!

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Getting a grip on Puppet: A guide for beginners

batfastad
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Puppet

I like Puppet. Massively prefer it to Chef, having found Chef Server to be so incredibly flaky on RHEL. Puppet just works. Throw in Passenger and it's quick enough in a 400 node environment. Start getting into loads of exported resources though and it starts bogging.

Most of the time I find using Puppet modules to be a complete PITA, making something as simple as an Apache configuration across 50 web servers turn into 10 separate layers of Puppet/Ruby manifests and inheritance. An haproxy configuration, ~700 lines using the Puppet module with the config structure almost unreadable, or a simple config file of half the size that you can read and compare against the haproxy docs. I hate abstracting this stuff into Puppet/Ruby and moving it away from the project's docs. Most of the time I find it easier to just dump some config files and have a service subscription on that, still conditional on facts etc.

Also there's so much snobbery in the Puppet community, "IT SHOULD BE DONE THIS WAY AND I REFUSE TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTION UNTIL..."

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UK taxpayers should foot £2bn or more to adopt Snoopers' Charter, says Inquiry

batfastad
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Re: Digital Powerhouse!

And presumably the Digital Powerhouse will be centred around the same place as the Northern Powerhouse... London.

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batfastad
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Digital Powerhouse!

Digital Powerhouse!

Wait, how much do we have to pay in arbitrary back taxes that wasn't enforceable at the time?

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batfastad
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Re: Democracy

> We live in a representative democracy so.. 2020? Slight issue - basically all he parties agree on essentially this issue because they're all equally clueless - not sure what the fix to that is.

>Good news: this committee seems to essentially agree with the sensible arguments against on definitions/funding etc.

>IIRC the Greens are opposed to surveillance.

>The Lib Dems acted as a brake on it in the last parliament.

>Whilst Labour was definitely pro-surveillance under Blair, Brown and Miliband and most of the current PLP including Burnham are also in favour of it don't be surprised to see the Corbynites come out against it.

So just in the nick of time then, after the Gov has done whatever it wants. Sigh.

How about people actually voting or vetoing changes in their legislation, with exact diffs presented with plenty of time for analysis and consideration. Maybe a separate legislative cycle every 2 years, or something, I've still got to hammer out the exact details for my plan of Democracy 2.0.

User Blair+Dave+Theresa is requesting permission to merge the following changes from branch "neoconlunatics:snooperscharter2018" into "legislationgovuk:master". Accept or deny?

Sadly for most peons the choice is either vote for who your parents voted for or for who your newspaper tells you you should vote for. Because they've seen the film before and it's sh1t.

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batfastad
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Democracy

So when do UK citizens get a say in all this, considering it affects all their lives?

Or is it more along the lines of... "Don't worry your little head about it, tax payer #154192574. Mummy and Daddy Cameron-May will look after you!"

That's not how democracy works dear boy... See you later at the golf/private supper club what!

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batfastad
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> everything Britain stands for

sed 's/stands/stood/g'

Sigh.

Are we there yet? I want to get out.

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Home Office lost its workers' completed security vetting forms

batfastad
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ICRs

But we can keep your Internet Connection Records (whatever the fsck they are) super-safe and private... Truth!

Or maybe we'll just flog 'em.

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Reg readers speak out on Thin Client technology

batfastad
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Hmm

From what I've seen of VDI, I'm not sure there's much of a cost saving at all. A team of engineers wrestling with app packaging, registry keys to remove features and customisation, UCS chassis costs, virt host licensing etc. And then Wyse thin client terminals that cost nearly the same as a mid-range PC.

The whole lot comes crashing down, quickly, if there's even a minor blip in AD, DNS, network, storage etc. More hassle than it's worth?

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UK.gov plans to unveil a new Digital Bill

batfastad
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Get elected and do what you want

At least all legislation is fully announced in parties' manifestos, with the exact diffs to existing legislation presented BEFORE the election. So the people affected by changes in legislation can make an informed choice between the red or blue Oxbridge blazer-eunuchs.

Or just get elected and do what you want for 5 years.

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Boffins celebrate 30th anniversary of first deep examination of Uranus

batfastad
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Uranus

snigger.

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Microsoft struggles against self-inflicted Office 365 IMAP outage

batfastad
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Exchange IMAP outage?

7 day outage? More like 13 year outage!

I don't know about anyone else but I have found IMAP under Exchange to be pretty much non-functional from at least 2003 when I first did a bit of Exchange wrangling.

In fact it was the reason we canned M$ altogether at the time being a publishing company with a load of Macs and the Exchange connectivity options were Entourage if it worked, IMAP or the basic webmail.

Mind you I don't begrudge anyone moving their Exchange into O365. The last thing I want to see these days is on-premise Exchange.

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Containers! Containers! Containers! And RHEL 7.2. Employ as you wish

batfastad
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Re: Gnome

+1

XFCE, Cinnamon, MATE are all better suited to being both a server desktop and a daily-use workstation desktop and would all be worthy defaults over Gnome 3 IMO.

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Eight budget-friendly 1TB SSD data packers for real people

batfastad
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Hello darkness my old friend!

An article about modern storage tech with a bonanza of default HTML table styling from 1996.

Lovely juxtaposition of old and new. Great stuff El Reg.

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Europe's satellite laser comms system set to shine

batfastad
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Joke

That will be one heck of a trip to replace those GBICs.

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Oracle drops 248 – count 'em – 248 patches, to fix ... something

batfastad
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>Sure it is. Worked so well for say Open SSL across 18+ years didn't it?

Eventually found, fixed and disclosed.

Potentially found, exploited and not disclosed for 18+ years.

I'm not sure your suggestion of relying on the vulnerability disclosure policy of governments is a particularly great idea.

Corporates, hmmm, it would be interesting to know how many corporates have audited the source code of SQL Server. Having theoretical access to audit is a long way off having the technical skill set, time and money to do so.

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