* Posts by batfastad

767 posts • joined 1 Aug 2009

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Ordinary punters will get squat from smart meters, reckons report

batfastad
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Dumb meters!

It turns out all these dumb meters monitor is the total energy consumption of your house. Larger consumer savings could be gained by buying smart sockets or by spending the money on modern and sustainable energy generation capacity, not just chucking some windmills about and installing remote kill-switches in everyone's houses.

Is there an API accessible by the home owner? Am I able to programatically switch provider/tarriff based on spot market prices etc? Unfortuately these are better described as dumb meters.

We've not had a meter reading meatbag around here for years, because it turns out I am a human and able to read some numbers off a screen and type them into a website or write them onto a form and put it in a free post envelope.

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BBC to demand logins for iPlayer in early 2017

batfastad
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BBC

Whenever anyone complains about the quality of the BBC's content vs commercial/subscription output just point them to Sky One's Friday night schedule... 9pm: A Day In Greggs!

You think educational/intellectual quality of the BBC has gone down? Unfortunately I feel they're just mirroring the general standard of society.

I'm amazed it's taken so long for them to start trying to lock down iPlayer use to be honest. The costs must be pretty significant. I know a few people who complain about the License Fee and that they don't own a TV but are happy enough to gorge themselves on the latest Dr Who/Strictly/whatever.

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batfastad
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My first thoughts as well about get_iplayer. I have a feeling it's doomed.

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Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

batfastad
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Potato

If it sounded better than my last DAB experience which had the sound quality of a potato underwater then I'm all for it!

The problem with DAB is that a high proportion of annual radio listening time is when the receiver is moving around or in remote locations, an order of magnitude higher than with DVB. And DAB is pretty terrible at coping with either of those things.

If anyone can point me in the direction of a portable pocket-sized DAB radio that can get through a whole test series of Test Match Special on a pair of AAAs then I'm sold! But until then, LW it is!

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Unimpressed with Ubuntu 16.10? Yakkety Yak... don't talk back

batfastad
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XFCE

That'll do.

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Half! a! billion! Yahoo! email! accounts! raided! by! 'state! hackers!'

batfastad
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So...

So everyone still employed by Yahoo! at this stage may as well get their coats with the last person turning the lights off on their way out.

Delaying this announcement for two years will have given any execs with a decent shareholding ample time to get rid.

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What's Chinese and crashing in flames? No, not its economy – its crocked space station

batfastad
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test docking procedures

Snigger.

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WTF is OpenResty? The world's fifth-most-used Web server, that's what!

batfastad
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Re: lighttpd..

> That Microsoft IIS is now way ahead of Apache by market share of sites is surely of rather more note?!

Nope. It means that the main use of IIS is ad funnel sites and domain parking pages that noone ever looks at. I remember M$ did a deal with GoDaddy a few years ago to give them all they could eat M$ licenses if they switched their domain parking pages to IIS.

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Bad news: MySQL can dish out root access to cunning miscreants

batfastad
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Recent versions of MariaDB are diverging away very quickly from the MySQL/Percona/Facebook/WebScaleSQL pack.

As much as I dislike Oracle, I would stick with Percona or upstream (Oracle MySQL) for now.

Oracle to be fair has done some outstanding work with MySQL 5.6 and onwards, it just seems like it took a few years for it to be fully Borged.

How long it will take before it's fully Borked though!

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Spinning that Brexit wheel: Regulation lotto for tech startups

batfastad
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Sigh

Brexit is now the focus and excuse for failing politicians and policies for the next 20 years. Brilliant.

If someone presented Brexit to our change board they would have been absolutely fscking torn to shreds. Brexit means Brexit means Brexit? CALL THAT AN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN??!!!!

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Brexit must not break the cloud, Japan tells UK and EU

batfastad
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Re: Jesus wept

> "Being out the EU means we can subside strategic industries once again!"

With what exactly? £350m of magic Unicorn droppings?

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What do microservices do to data stores? Netflix is built on them and had no idea!

batfastad
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Re: containers != microservices

> Also worth pointing out that Netflix only adopted containerisation recently, previously they were on AWS EC2 exclusively.

You can't run containers in a VM?

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Physicists believe they may have found fifth force of nature

batfastad
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Coat

Sixth surely?

Because... bacon!!

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NVMe over Ethernet startup flashes 'system' as it preps for decloak

batfastad
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Malwankar

Snigger.

Apologies, my inner child made me post. I'm on my way ----------->

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VMware: We're gonna patent hot-swapping your VMs' host OS

batfastad
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Re: Glee!

I can agree with that. It blows my mind that I can run almost 4,000 VMs in 6U of UCS chassis and still have CPU to spare.

My point is:

- Webapp running in a single 64GB VM

- Webapp running in a single 64GB physical host

- X hundred containers of your webapp running on a 64GB physical host

You might improve your CPU utilisation but your webapp throughput will not improve as much as you think just, because, containers.

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batfastad
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Glee!

> I can gleefully run 5000 containers on a standard 2 socket server today.

Yes. 5000 containers. Doing fsck all.

Chuck a bit of work at all of them and send us a picture of your glee!

I bet your typical webapp would get maybe 10% more req/s throughput contained vs VMed... if that. Benefits of containers are rapid spin up/tear down and full stack of microservices/endpoints on a single host. Not improved throughput.

Seriously though, happy to be proven wrong of course.

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HMRC's IR35 tweaks have 90% of UK's IT contractors up in arms

batfastad
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> just to be devil's advocate but technically Apple and Amazon et al comply with the law. doesn't mean it's right, just shows that the law is sometimes insufficient

Yes, legally, they comply with the law, in a completely legal fashion. They have done nothing illegal, nothing against the rules and therefore nothing wrong. That's my opinion anyway, as someone who abides by the law and therefore does nothing wrong :)

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batfastad
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As a contractor myself, I do pay my fecking taxes. I pay the fecking taxes that the fecking law requires me to. Not a fecking penny more, not a fecking penny less.

Do you pay more fecking taxes than the fecking law requires you to? I bet you fecking don't.

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Domain name bods NetNames netted by CSC Global

batfastad
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Mad

I've never known anyone in this post-dot-com-bubble-burst era charge such high fees for domain registrations, renewals and transfers. The fact that they have lost so much money when their markup on wholesale registration fees is in the 1000% range is, well, impressive!

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Zero-day hole can pwn millions of LastPass users, all that's needed is a malicious site

batfastad
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Re: Why?

I have several hundred online accounts too. And re-use a base password for most of them that don't really matter, forums etc.

But on top of that I have a memorable and repeatable method of mixing extra characters, numbers and symbols into my base password. So I end up with a site-specific password of at least 25 characters, mixed in with all sorts of pseudo-random. The hash (assuming the site is hashing - grr!) will be different on every site and I only have to remember the base password and my "salting" method.

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batfastad
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Why?

Why would anyone, ever, give their passwords to anyone else?

Me? For most general sites, non-e-commerce, I have a resonably long and complex base password as a salt then add a salt permutations and patterns of characters from the URL to pad the length. For anything a bit more sensitive, with payment or address details, then I have a more complex base and more rounds of my salting.

Unique and complex password for each site and memorable/repeatable, for me at least.

Secure enough now? Probably. Secure enough in 10 years' time, maybe not.

But at least they're not stored on someone elses servers using unknown reversible encryption.

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Docker and storage – solving the problem of data persistence

batfastad
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Re: Containers

But where's your postgres data? And how does a 64GB container compare to a 64GB VM?

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batfastad
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Containers

For me containers are for serving code, not for data. If you end up running database or document/file/object store instances in containers then you're doing it wrong. I still believe it's easier to have your data in VMs instead of containers.

We have several applications that are pretty scalable running on ephemeral AWS nodes, created when that was the only option, and it's so much simpler operationally. Data backends are not as elastic as frontends, true, though we try to use object/file stores when possible so the scaling is not our problem. Patching and application upgrades have always been a case of just blowing away the VMs and deploying new, so you phase rollout. You also avoid all that legacy and cruft that people dump into directories and never clear up.

I don't see the advantage of running 5x database containers in a VM vs 5x database VMs. Though if someone can explain that to me then happy to reconsider.

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Trial to store benefits claimants' personal data on blockchain slammed

batfastad
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Why?

Shiny.

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4-day Fasthosts outage: Customers' sites go TITSUP

batfastad
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Re: Same ole, same ole...

^ ctrl-c ctrl-v

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batfastad
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DaaS

123-reg & Farthosts. Downtime as a service.

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Backblaze hopes to melt Amazon Glacier customers' hearts

batfastad
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Regions? Availability zones?

Been using Backblaze for a while and testing B2 for a more scripted backup. But they're still only in a single DC I believe.

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Our man pops the hood on Intel's v4 engine: Broadwell Xeons

batfastad
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Ouch

Imagine the Oracle licensing cost for one of these!

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Mozilla emits nightly builds of heir-to-Firefox browser engine Servo

batfastad
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Re: doge

still love that meme

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400 million Foxit users need to catch up with patched-up reader

batfastad
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SumatraPDF

SumatraPDF.

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Amazon twangs its Elastic File System at on-premises filer rivals

batfastad
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Good!

Having shared and managed persistent file storage available to ephemeral EC2 instances has been needed for a while. I always ended up hacking together EC2 NFS servers but having the scalability handled by someone else is great. We've been using it in preview for almost a year and it's been very solid.

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Europe's UK-backed Unified Patent Court 'could be derailed'

batfastad
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Re: Sigh

There are many valid reasons for voting Leave.

But my point is that I am certain more than the 1m majority voted Leave because they were under the impression that not only would immigration immediately stop. But that Farage would unveil a time machine and all foreigns already here from the last 30 years, including those with British-EU citizenship, would be immediately rounded up and shipped back to whereever they bl00dy well came from. I do not equate this to the active racism we have seen since the vote, sadly that is a vocal and angry minority.

But I wonder what gave people that impression? Hint: check a montage of the last few years' of Sun/Daily Mail front pages, and that nasty fsck3r Farage.

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batfastad
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Re: Sigh

Indeed and agree. It should have been Remain's to lose, by a long way, and somehow they managed it.

A change to something as fundamental as the citizenship and right to work of 17m people (more if you include future spouses, descendents etc) should not be ultimately triggered by an opinion poll showing such a small margin though.

It seems though that >1.1% voted Leave, because, well, foreigners and in the misguided assumption that what is printed on buses is scientific fact, without realising that an extra £350m (£150m after rebates) is a sausage down an alleyway when it comes to NHS budget (~£5bn/week IIRC), or Offence (~£1bn).

What I'm most annoyed about is that people ultimately think that things will be any different for them. Economy, probably no real difference in the medium-long term. But the amount of hot-air, column inches, legal/consultancy fees and simple political time that's going to be expended on all this over the next 10+ years just seems like such a waste. The UK will negotiate almost similar terms, maybe with some notional wordage to stop new foreigns to appease a few Ukippers which won't even work in any practical way anyway, at likely a much higher cost per person than the current Mega Chicken Bucket EU package. Not to mention all the other spending which will have to increase. And then there'll be 20 years of building schools, power stations, train sets, airports etc to catch up on.

And the UK will be run by... yep. Either the Oxbridge Blues or the Oxbridge Reds. Achievement unlocked - 200yr old establishment restored.

I don't care which way people voted, so long as they don't vote on lies. It's clear that many people who voted Leave are not going to see anything like what they are expecting, if they are even around in 10-15 years' time to see the full conclusion.

You think Ofcom would stand for this? Leave should have just said "up to £350m", sorted.

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batfastad
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Sigh

What a fscking mess. There'll be plenty more of these over the next 5-10 years.

Thanks 1.1%

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Brexit government pledge sought to keep EU-backed UK science alive

batfastad
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Re: Boris Gudonov?

> really need a Mr Churchill to surface and lead the country, delivering unforgettable speeches and generally behaving as though things will be all right

Maybe he would start with this speech... http://www.churchill-society-london.org.uk/astonish.html

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Fedora 24 is here. Go ahead – dive in

batfastad
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Xubuntu/Mint+XFCE

I last used Fedora quite a few years ago and since then have been switching between Mint+XFCE and Xubuntu. Hardware support on laptops just always seems to be better with Xubuntu in my experience.

XFCE is my preferred desktop but MATE and Cinnamon are decent too. I just don't need/want all this cruft of Gnome 3, Unity etc.

Have been using Fedora Rawhide for servers in my lab for a couple of years. Great and very stable despite being considered "unstable".

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Boffins map Netflix's Open Connect CDN

batfastad
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wow amaze

Cower before this magnificent advance in science! What an age to be alive!

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Cold space gas? Sure, supermassive black holes can eat that. Nom, nom, nom

batfastad
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Wow

> three massive clumps of cold gas flowing toward the supermassive black hole at a speed of about a million kilometres per hour. Each cloud contains as much material as a million Suns and is roughly the size of tens of light-years across, and were observed by the billion-light-year-long "shadows", they cast on earth.

Sometimes it just has to be said... Space is just mad.

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Firefox 48 beta brings 'largest change ever' thanks to 'Electrolysis'

batfastad
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Re: "We have all the knobs"

> And that should make us feel good?

Hmm, quite. Sounds like a kill-switch to me.

Despite all the negativity around FF over the last few years, Chromification and tweaking for tweaking's sake. This is actually a very cool feature so I look forward to them getting it dialled.

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Bloke flogs $40 B&W printer on Craigslist, gets $12,000 legal bill

batfastad
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Crowd fund

I'd chuck this Costello chap a fiver to counter-sue that :Pile of Poo:

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SELECT features FROM bumf... What's new in MS SQL Server 2016

batfastad
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Re: I'm sure it's lovely but

@Cheesy

> Postgres and Maria do pretty well these days too

They really do, for several years. Facebook, Twitter, Google etc global installations of these will make your MSSQL deployment look like a hobby lab.

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batfastad
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Re: Select what?

As well as AC's excellent point about HAVING requiring GROUP BY.

"new" is a reserved keyword, in MySQL/Maria land anyway, so better put that in backticks.

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Your WordPress and Drupal installs are probably obsolete

batfastad
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Durpal

Drupal is an absolute pile.

Well really all generic CMS are cr4p IMO compared to something built specifically for the job using a proper framework. But Drupal is absolutely the worst.

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Beleaguered 123-reg customers spot price hike

batfastad
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Namecheap

+1 for namecheap.

IIRC 123-reg still charge a fee for outbound transfers though. Mid 90s registrar mindset with a control panel to match. Even before their recent mega-fail I was surprised to hear they still existed. Even worse than Fasthosts IMO, and that is saying something.

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Blighty's Virgin Queen threatened with foreign abduction

batfastad
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Re: One of those auctions ...

> "It will be liable to capital gains tax (20%), not income tax."

Like fsck it will! Bahamas much?

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Sick of storage vendors? Me too. Let's build the darn stuff ourselves

batfastad
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Re: No one said it was easy but...

Is the mirror driver actually available as a thing to use for real-time SAN mirroring now? Been a while since I was a VMwarrior. This tells me that it was used internally for svMotion... http://www.yellow-bricks.com/2011/07/14/vsphere-5-0-storage-vmotion-and-the-mirror-driver/

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A UK-wide fibre broadband investment plan? Don't ask awkward questions

batfastad
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Promises

> "it had already promised to build FTTP lines for a large number of the one million new homes planned to be built by the end of this Parliament."

Make a promise to a regulator on the back of a promise by the Government which they are never going to achieve. Genius!

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batfastad
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Do it. 20 years ago.

Gov pays for it. BT (probably) builds it. Charge BT etc a nice lump to use it. Profit for the people!

At the very least I'm amazed that there hasn't been some sort of rule that requires ducting and last mile infrastructure to be in place in new builds/estates for some years.

With a two-party system where debate consists of childish bickering, you are never going to get a strategy for anything longer than 5 years in the future. With each government just trying to look busy for their term and hoping to not screw anything up too much so they get back in for another go at the buffet.

Infrastructure investment appears to have fallen way behind other European nations consistently for at least 30 years... rail, road, air travel, energy, telecoms etc. At the risk of creating a new quango/buffet, maybe infrastructure decisions and strategy should be a separate commission, independent of political parties and their agendas. Might exist already, I don't know.

What I do know is the sooner you have it, the sooner it pays for itself.

Or just buy new shiny nuclear death weapons with our money instead. Fsckers.

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Hold on a sec. When did HDDs get SSD-style workload rate limits?

batfastad
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Headmaster

some some

> Unless we some some magical breakthrough

Yes, I have nothing better to do.

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Finance bods SWIFT to update after Bangladesh hack

batfastad
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Headmaster

's

> Hackers lifted the Bangladesh central bank key’s

Sigh.

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