* Posts by Terry 6

1460 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

CBI: Brexit Britain needs a 'sensible and flexible' immigration programme

Terry 6
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Re: "All he had to do was to turn up on time, arrive sober and do a day's work."

Morning after the vote I found myself chatting in a Tesco car park with someone overjoyed at the vote. British jobs etc. When I pointed out that these were mostly low paid, hard jobs his response was that the bosses would have to pay more now and so on. Did he fit John Smith 19's description? I'd say so..

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Terry 6
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Re: @AC: Employers have called for a "sensible" immigration programme

Thing is that it was a small majority of those who turned out who voted to change the status quo, Leaving things as they are is not an easy thing to motivate voters to do. And so the ones who did vote to leave were the ones who were motivated to make this change. Which leaves the question as to where that motivation came from. Maybe it was

1.) a significant number who took a balanced and thoughtful view that the UK would be better off economically, all things considered. Or

2.) a significant number who don't like foreigners/ believe that we pay vast amounts to the EU for nothing (that we could spend on the NHS) / think we are subject to strange,imposed, foreign "human rights" laws that we don't want.

Well, we can all take a view on which we think most likely. I hope it really is a full Brexit. Let them have what they deserve.

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Nielsen, eat your heart out: TiVo woos admen with prediction engine

Terry 6
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Really

Is there any correlation between what people want to watch and what they buy?

I know marketeers think they can segment markets and all that sort of stuff. But there is a big difference between watching a programme because there's nothing better on, actively wanting to watch a programme ( even on TiVo), being prepared to sit through an advert, being interested in the advertised product and so on.

There's a big difference between getting a large group of a relevant demographic and punting a product at them, and this apparently magical system that makes people who watch a certain programme go out and buy a certain type of product because it happens to appear half-way through Corrie.

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Promising compsci student sold key-logger, infects 16,000 machines, pleads guilty, faces jail

Terry 6
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Disingenuous

He wasn't flogging this stuff for any legitimate use. If you sell burglary tools to burglars you, at the very least, need to think of a way to pretend it is being sold for a legit purpose ( with plausible deniability of the type of customer buying it.).

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Maps and alarm clocks best thing about mobes, say normies

Terry 6
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mark 85

As to that, voice phoning while you are out and about where you can be seen, rather than safely indoors, with a small handheld device that can't be close to the mouth and ear at the same time (or needs a wire stuck in your lug 'ole) in public, with ambient noise and usually lousy sound from a tiny speaker is no encouragement - but even so there are very few days I won't see a few people ambling along either doing just that, or quite often apparently talking to themselves. So people clearly do make voice calls, despite the significant disincentives. And lets be honest, it's a small minority of times that people in the street really need to make a call so urgently that it can't wait till they get home

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Terry 6
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FAIL

The comparison site asked Joe Public to name their favourite smartphone features

"favourite"

And there's the FAIL. Wrong question = wrong answer. GIGO

1.) What's a favourite?

2.) How well does this correlate with most/ how often used

3.) Is favourite even related to routine, regular of frequent use in any way?

4.) Do we even like ( let alone treat as favourite) our most used or most important things?

So. I use my everyday watch and wear my everyday shoes most days - my "favourite" watch and shoes sit in a cupboard waiting for special days. My favourite computer is an i7 box with 16Gb ram, graphics card and so on - well overpowered for my routine needs. My routine computer is used daily, lots.and it's an i5 laptop. If I had a favourite programme it certainly wouldn't be WORD which is the one I've used most over the years.

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Microsoft's Blue Screen of Death dead in latest Windows 10 preview

Terry 6
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CCleaner has an option ( in tools) to remove most of the WIN10 (Cr)apps. Or it can be done with powershell commands ( need to google them). Can't get rid of bloody Cortana/Edge/"Contact support " in either of those ways though

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Terry 6
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Re: Dead, but only temporarily?

Yes, a Bullsh*t headline on this article and no mistake. "Released versions of Windows 10 will continue to have the classic blue color, including the final release of the Windows 10 Creators Update."

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Corrupt NHS official jailed for £80k bribe over tech contract

Terry 6
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Re: Having seen the latest NHS IT Software in action

The poor frontline staff see possibly hundreds or more people through their doors on a daily basis.

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TV anchor says live on-air 'Alexa, order me a dollhouse' – guess what happens next

Terry 6
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@Ian Mason

But then again, there's HAL.

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Soz fanbois, Apple DIDN'T invent the smartphone after all

Terry 6
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Re: I am puzzled by the premise of this article

That's what this article is saying( though whether anyone thought Apple invented the smartphone is another matter - a bit of a strawman to launch the nice little story maybe.

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Slim pickings by the Biggest Loser: A year of fitness wearables

Terry 6
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Re: left handers

You are right. I hadn't thought of that, being right handed when it suits me.

These aren't great..

http://www.anythinglefthanded.co.uk/cgi-bin/ss000001.pl?page=search&SS=watch&PR=-1&TB=O&ACTION=Go!

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Terry 6
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The book

I read the section you had linked to. It was very good and I may well be able to try to track down the volume. It's not often that El Reg ties together the main part of my career ( sorting out literacy and learning issues) and the minor part ( sorting out computer issues*). It's sad that it should be in these circumstances.

*Very similar except that computers' behaviour isn't as logical.

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Terry 6
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Re: You can stick it ..

There is ( rather was) a magazine for it too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tit-Bits

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Terry 6
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left handers

Do those designs mentioned come from companies that don't know some people (~10%) are left handed? FFS!

(I'm ambidextrous, but wear my watch as a left-hander out of solidarity).

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Google nukes ad-blocker AdNauseam, sweeps remains out of Chrome Web Store

Terry 6
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Pale Moon with Latitude

Just saying.

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Terry 6
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What would you expect

It seems like forever that Google has been using its assorted "free" services as bait to get the public to give it access to our behaviour, interests, purchasing habits and just about everything else. Yet still there are people who should know better recommending Chrome as a browser. In effect making Google into the spider at the centre of our individual bits of the web. Of course they are going to do their best to stop users blocking the very reason Chrome exists. Chrome is not there for our benefit any more than a worm is on a hook for the fishes' benefit. It is there for exactly the same purpose. And they are not about to let anyone grab the bait and swim off with it.

Chrome should be treated as the spawn of Satan. And the almost ubiquitous Android is no better - yet we don't get anything like the level of bile aimed at Google on El Reg that we get if Microsoft is even so much as mentioned.

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Those online ads driving you bonkers are virtually 'worthless for brands'

Terry 6
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Re: Puzzled - A Case Study

Surely though there's a difference between familiar brand ads that are spread around the town/TV and the sort of stuff that infuriates web users. Case in point. I was watching someone, this evening, browsing the web. All the time there was a noisy video playing to advertise some idiot get-rich-quick scheme, with exhortations to click into the ad. But whatever it was for it won't have done more than annoy the person. There wasn't a brand to recall, as such. Do enough suckers click on that sort of thing to make it all worthwhile? If so they're the ones to blame. I just hope the money they lose is enough punishment.

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Terry 6
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Puzzled

I am out of my depth here. I just don't understand this.

The ad flingers object to us using ad-blockers. But if we use ad-blockers we are presumably not going to be willing viewers of their stuff. In fact, if they prevent ad blocking we are likely to be down right hostile. So why do they think it sensible to persist in sending us nasty, invasive ads or using anti-ad blockers?

I used to allow ads, when they were still civilised. Just as I sometimes sit through them when I watch ITV. I even used to click on some ads just to feed the content providers. But these days I sit behind half-a-dozen add-ons to hold back all the flashing, floating, video playing, intrusive, time-wasting and annoying ads that infest web pages.

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Folders return to Windows 10's Start Thing

Terry 6
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Re: With the exception of the Master Race...

Office, maybe not. Though I've had formatting issues in LibreOffice that have sent me scurrying back to Word from time to time. (Can't remember what it was).

Outlook held me for a long time. Most recently because I have and love my Windows phone - but even before Outlook's integration was really useful. Thunderbird with Lightning does seem to be good enough now. Though even that is an afterthought by Mozilla. I don't get why it wasn't in there all along!

As to the 'phone. The one good thing you can say about Microsoft is that they aren't Google. I never understand why the commentards don't make the fuss about Google/Android that they do about MS/Windows. Dammit, Google are practically sitting on our shoulders when we use their phones/search/email.

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Terry 6
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Re: With the exception of the Master Race...

It's Outlook which has kept me docked on Windows for so long.

For once this is not a moan about Microsoft . There has been nothing, certainly nothing "mainstream", to replace Outlook. Email programmes, with address books, lots. Calendar programmes, squillions. Programmes that integrate the email with the calendar, and syncs it across various devices, adding appointments into the calendar when required. Not much - if anything.

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Terry 6
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F****ing Windows 10 F****ing Microsoft

Sorry ( not sorry actually) F***ing Microsoft B***ards.

I've been posting quite calmly about the truly annoying nature of Win 10. Then not an hour later I get an urgent summons to the computer room from my wife.

We have a shared family PC. A partition contains the family photos. Ditto documents. Then each of us has our own partition with our own stuff. Including folders for photos, documents etc.

Nice, simple organised.

Microf***ingsoft has taken upon itself to reorganise the folders and links to them back to some kind of default - restoring the default hidden and buried folders, so that suddenly in the "My Computer" window an icon pointing to folder C:\users\buried-two-levels-down\photos appears under the w:\photos icon. Suddenly wife in panic because all the work photos she's just saved have apparently vanished. Not actually vanished. They've just been saved buried in this newly recreated f***ing folder that has an identical default icon and name that has appeared below the correct one in the folder tree. In effect Microf***ingsoft have decided to try and make us all use their stupid c:\user\username\.....\stupid location for our data and no other places. Presumably because they want us to use their f****ing stupid "libraries". F****** B***rds.

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Terry 6
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Re: I see the Xmas spirit has run dry...

A point we forget, and Microsoft seemed determined to ignore, is that even if Win 8+ had been as good as they should have been, for most users Win 7 was already more than good enough, so there was no real need to change. And since for those that jumped in and made that change (fanbois or experimenters ) it turned out to be awful, another change was hardly going to ignite any enthusiasm without a really, really amazing offer. There was no such offer.

Microsoft seemed to have decided not to offer anything that users would want enough to take the jump - maybe they are incapable of knowing what users want, maybe they didn't wish to supply it because it wouldn't make them any money, and have decided to use brute force instead of persuasion.

Which is also, of course, why SaaS is so attractive to software companies, it's the gift that keeps on giving (to them).

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Terry 6
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Re: Windows Key + Keyboard

This thread is sort of blending into this one;

Twas the week before Xmas ... not a creature was stirring – except Microsoft admitting its Windows 10 upgrade pop-up went 'too far'

And the same comment there applies here, as John Brown (no body) points out, frequently used programmes are easy to find. Occasionally used ones less so. And, as I pointed out in that thread, too many software publishers think that their own unhelpful names are more important than the programme's actual name ( e.g. Hornhill Stylepix) let alone providing a descriptive name. So finding that useful programme that you last used six months ago isn't going to be quite that easy.

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Programmer finds way to liberate ransomware'd Google Smart TVs

Terry 6
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nor known to its customer support technicians.

This seems to be more and more an issue all over the place. 1st line support are usually well meaning, and some even have good tech skills. But too often their own employers seem to think it's OK to keep them in the dark about, for example, known faults. Instead they make them take users on a run through the usual scripts. Scripts which are never going to work in this situation....... And Virgin are my candidate for the worst of the bunch, though from the sounds of this LG could give them a run for their ( or our) money.

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Twas the week before Xmas ... not a creature was stirring – except Microsoft admitting its Windows 10 upgrade pop-up went 'too far'

Terry 6
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Re: The weirdness that is Microsoft

The other truly annoying thing is that I happily use a Windows phone because it a) isn't Google's and b) works really well. I have no concerns or annoyances from it. I like using it, as it seems do all the tiny group of us who do use one. The one decent thing that Microsoft has produced recently and they well and truly f***ed up their marketing and pretty much put it out of business. At every turn they seemed determined to make the Winphone non-viable. They even managed to screw up the market positioning - jumping between high-end over-expensive might as well get an iPhone and low-end-with-important-bits-missing. without ever covering the middle ground for ordinary users who want function without expensive bling. So, for example, my original had, among other things, no front facing camera. Who'd buy a phone like that in the age of Skype and "selfies". And they failed to make it attractive to devs of the usual "apps" that the competition supported and failed miserably to make alternatives that users might accept instead.

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Terry 6
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Re: Microsoft has been getting it wrong with user interfaces

Thank you cutterman

I had begun to think I was the only one who needed an organised start menu

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2767594/2016-12-29%2022_10_23-Greenshot.png

And wanted my data on a different drive, or at least partition(s) from software and settings...On the main family machine I have partitions for family documents and photos which are shared for all of us. I want them to simply be there for us all to find. Then we have partitions for backup1 and individual family members' stuff. I do not want these buried in c:\....\username. Or even on the hdd that contains the OS. If that gets corrupted, my data isn't on there. I just like all that precious data where I can find and secure it easily, and keep it safe.

To me having everything on a family/SOHO PC on one hdd in one partition, with so many files that we have in common - not just the holiday photos but also correspondence etc. buried away in a system folder is just plain crazy.

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Terry 6
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Re: Microsoft has been getting it wrong with user interfaces

Updraft102

Yes.

Pre Win 8 I was quite happy with Windows.

And I'd even tolerate telemetry if it was just accumulating machine statistics and analysing crash data etc. ( i.e. what telemetry is supposed to be as in this definition http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/telemetry )

But not when it really means monitoring my computer so that they can get valuable marketing information, push crap "targetted" ads in places where there shouldn't even be ads or sell my data to the highest bidder.

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Terry 6
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Re: Your devs were told to specially code that window control to fool your users

Yes. That X to install thing didn't happen by accident.

It was a choice, and one determined by its intended outcome. It has no other reason or purpose. It does nothing else. There is no positive interpretation that can even bye spun for it. A choice that works in a cynical and duplicitous way because the development was directed to be duplicitous by people who are are cynical.

Is there any saving grace for Microsoft? At best, by saying that they're all at it in big business/IT? Which is no saving grace at all. Well no, not even that. Maybe they are all at it in the IT marketing world. But that is never any excuse.

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Terry 6
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Re: Microsoft has been getting it wrong with user interfaces

For a start, many/most installed programmes place themselves in the Start menu in alphabetic order, often as a folder rather than even the programme link. But since many programmes have remarkably unhelpful names, since the publishers think that their company name is more important than what the programmes do ( e.g. Hornil Stylepix, Abbyy Finereader and so on) it's likely that you are only going to remember what it's called if you use it frequently which makes locating, say, a graphics programme that you only need from time to time much more difficult. But Microsoft, in their "wisdom" have made reorganising the start menu slightly more difficult than eating porridge through a straw. The menu itself can't be accessed by right clicking on a folder where they've been installed, only on one of the links inside the folder. The menu itself is stored across more than one place, and the locations of the various items managed through a database that doesn't always seem to realise that a programme link has been moved into a different folder unless you actually edit the name. It will continue to display the icon for the original folder, with the programme link apparently still in it and functioning, even though when you explore it is in the new location. Of course this also makes removing programme links that you'll never start from the menu (like the pdf reader that will only ever be started by clicking on a pdf) very difficult. And if that isn't complicated enough, they also have their own apps' links in the alphabetic list, unmovable. So that if you want to keep a Microsoft app in the same folder where you've placed programmes that do a similar job - tough sh*t. It can't be moved. Camera, for example, will be there filed under "C" no matter how much you want to move it and file it with other photograph related programmes that you have neatly placed in a folder called "photographic".

Or to put it another way; they've made sure that for most users the Win 10 Start menu is a total Horlicks. Completely cluttered with an alphabetic list of often obscure programme names and useless obscure folders containing their programme names, with any other crap such as links to other software they want to try and sell to you) that the publishers choose to stick in there, whether you want or need them or not.

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Terry 6
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The weirdness that is Microsoft

The thing is, even setting aside the general anti-Microsoft tendency, it's impossible to argue away the fact that Microsoft don't ever seem anymore to build software that intuitively suits the ordinary user and makes life easier, or even makes any kind of logical sense. Instead since Win 7/ Office 10 it's so often over-complicated, difficult for ordinary users to manage and often contradictory.

Why did they think that Win 8s hidden away controls that would randomly appear if you moved the mouse too abruptly but then couldn't be found when you wanted them was a good idea? Why do they think that having every damn Office control in the "ribbon" so that the user is stuck in a forest of menu items they'll never use is better than some kind of customisable menu ( with a simple way to bring everything back if you need it).

Why did they think it a good idea to default user work files to a deeply buried folder alongside the settings, so that they were really difficult to get to, reorganise, copy or to move to a better place?

Why did they thing that a desktop full of stupid tiles (many for junk and unwanted links) was better than a manageable list, such as (but not necessarily) the Start menu (win 8)? And why did they think that a forced alphabetic Start menu/ list of programmes, no matter how obscure and unhelpful the programme name, is better than a list that can be grouped into folders according to function if the users so wish. (8.1 onwards)? And if they are going to have such an alphabetic list of individual programmes, why allow install routines to do what the users can't and place a folder of links in that same list no matter how much crap is included within it?

Why the immovable "apps" even when users decide they don't want them in the list,or on the computer? Why make these rather basic "apps" suddenly become ( and frequently revert to ) being the defaults even though the users have opted to use a more appropriate programme of their own?

Why provide a disk management tool so limited that it only lets you shrink or expand a partition on one side,so that you can't use it to move spare capacity in one to an adjacent partition? Why have the various setting controls split up into several different places? Why hide System restore?

The list goes on. All the things that make Windows really difficult for an ordinary user to manage. I could understand having some of these things controlled through system policy for corporate use. But for SOHO use they are at best stupidly annoying and at worse a fu***g nightmare

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Support chap's Sonic Screwdriver fixes PC as user fumes in disbelief

Terry 6
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Re: Magic hands

Fair point. Though being on the back out of sight or touch means it might as well not exist. And even then, maybe it shouldn't be there either. Unless that does a forced switch off more safely than pulling the plug out, which wouldn't apply to a monitor..

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Terry 6
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Re: Clothing related malfunction

I shared a teaching space with new colleague who couldn't get on with the computer. It always went wrong when it was her day in there and I was out in the local schools. On the days I was in and she was out I had no problem and there was nothing she'd told me that helped me to diagnose the issue. Until one day we were both in for some reason. I was on the computer when she walked past and it crashed. Just as she passed. It did the same thing about three times more that day. My only conclusion was that it was static from her really really fluffy jumpers.

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Terry 6
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Re: Magic hands

Magic hands sounds fun. But behind that stands a piece of truly mindless crap design, by the sounds of it. Why the f**k make even turning the damn thing on and off that much more complicated for the poor bloody infantry ( i.e. users)? Who thinks of these things? Two different types of on/off switch in two different places!!!

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Itchy-fingered OnePlus presses refresh, out pops value champ 3T

Terry 6
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Re: Would love to get one...

Trixr I think Samsung covered that one for you.

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Terry 6
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Re: 'The capacitive buttons ... make it vastly easier to operate the phone in the car'

a_a

Was that just trolling or do you really think that a copper who has to clear up the mess when some idiot causes a nasty pile-up because he/she can't stay off the phone while moving a heavy chunk of steel along a crowded road is saying these things for some kind of personal gratification? FFS. It's dangerous, illegal, unnecessary and totally self-centred to be focussed on a phone instead of driving. And a copper who catches you at it ought to damn well throw the book at you.

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Why does Skype only show me from the chin down?

Terry 6
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Re: Cable degradation

Duh! If there are too many electrons they all bunch up at one end. You'll see the bulge.

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It's round and wobbles, but madam, it's a mouse pad, not a floppy disk

Terry 6
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Re: Insert a new disk and press Return

No worse than the nut stand that was in Brent Cross until a year or so back, which had the sign saying, ( have you guessed this?) "product may contain nuts".

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Terry 6
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Re: If I could have a dollar for every time…

No what this typifies is a very common issue for people who are problem solvers by nature or training. Sometimes we fail to identify the initial problem state correctly, especially if it's while we're in off-duty mode (we're only human) or not in our own field of expertise. But then we automatically follow our problem solving strategies to the bitter end. The incorrect starting point leads inexorably to an incorrect solution.

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Terry 6
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Re: Insert a new disk and press Return

...to server connection problems

More to the point, perhaps. A non-techie user may not understand/know about the existence of servers, local or remote, let alone comprehend what moving remote data implies. Usually it's just there.

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Terry 6
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Re: I ain't Spartacus

Also, even if the user didn't learn on a manual tripewriter, they may have been taught their job by an old-hand who was. It's just the old "This is the way we do things here" problem.

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Terry 6
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Insert a new disk and press Return

We've had so many threads here on El Reg that come down to this. Just because something implicit is brain numbingly obvious to the knowledgeable and IT confident ( not just engineers btw) doesn't make it so to the anxious and unaware. If it's implied it isn't stated, by definition. And if something is for general consumption it has to be stated explicitly. Like looking both ways on a one way street (above) better safe than sorry.

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Kids, look at the Deep Learnings! (We’re just going to slurp your data)

Terry 6
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Already left after last trick

I don't use this kind of service for anything confidential or personal. I'm wary of putting anything like that on someone else's server. So when Evernote limited the number of devices we can share across it, a few months ago, I moved to Onenote 2016. Because I want to share odd jottings, reminders etc across a phone, two PCs and a tablet. And anything there Microsoft are welcome to read. (I have a nice list of restaurants I have visited on it- if Microsoft staff want a nice lunch..........)

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WINNER! Crush your loved ones at Connect Four this Christmas

Terry 6
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Is there really an

International Gaming Research Unit Psychology Division at Nottingham Trent University, ?

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Kentucky pried chicken: Fried grease chain's loyalty club hacked

Terry 6
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Unhappy

KFC loyalty card

KFC Loyalty card. No. Just No!

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Sysadmin told to spend 20+ hours changing user names, for no reason

Terry 6
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Re: I for once, love Skype.

As far as I can work it out, my firstname.surname@gmail addy doesn't seem to go to the American who shares my name. But I do get some of her firstnamesurname@gmail.com messages from time to time - unless someone is just assuming that she has that address (which has been mine since gmail was invitation only) or, as suggested below, that one has a digit that gets forgotten. And though I do like to get my own name for any account I would never choose a user name with an add-on number - I'd rather find something original.

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