* Posts by Terry 6

1185 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

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The Windows Phone story: From hope to dusty abandonware

Terry 6
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Re: Pocket PC

Yes, my Windows pocked devices were incredibly useful to me in the days of the basic mobile phone. This was my pocked computer, a portable extension of my office when I was out working. But even then there were a few shenanigans, like removing networking capacity somewhere along the lines.

And even then, there was a feeling that Microsoft was half-hearted about it.

Maybe they just don't "get" mobile computing.

Or maybe they just generally don't "get" what ordinary people do want. Something that Google do seem rather good at, and Apple seem to have been able to master.

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Terry 6
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Re: Windows Phone FAIL

That could be true.And also maybe that the demand for fun apps is a fight back against the workaday seriousness of a WinPC. It's a good point you make.

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Terry 6
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Mushroom

Re: Not wedded to my winphone but...

Dadmin

I didn't specify what it was that people wanted on VHS - you may well be right for all I know or care. But it was VHS that supplied it. It's too long ago for me to remember details ( I was a teenager) but at the time they just talked about the available content. And seemed to mean all sorts of films, not just the naughty ones. And VHS was good enough - no matter if the opposition was better.

I note that you didn't actually list, in your rather aggressive sounding reply, what "apps" you need that are missing from the Winphone - or indeed whether you had actually tried and failed to find a needed programme ( or valid equivalent). or not..

In fact, behind the aggression CAPITALS and sweeping statements you say *nothing*.

You use words like " convenience" but fail to specify what these convenient things are. Let alone what things can be done with the available apps on Android/iOS that can't be done as well or better with the range of apps on Winphone.

And do you have any reason to think that the majority of the buying public do actually use their smartphones in this way? or even any suggestions as to what they might use it for?

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Terry 6
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Not wedded to my winphone but...

.....I don't want an Android with all its forced apps, spyware, advertising and general exploitation and I don't want to pay the premium for Apple. The Winphone apps business doesn't make any difference to me. I don't play many games and any programmes I need on my phone are readily available; camera software, note taking, communication (Twitter/email/ etc. )

BUT to be a mass market device you need to have the mass market "apps" of stupid games and the like. For a very simple reason - other than for these things very few people actually do need a smartphone for anything. They have no reason to buy one. Without all the stupid games Android phones would have no use whatsoever. A smartphone is a "computer in your pocket". Most people do not need a computer in their pockets. Or at all for 16 of the 24 hours in the day.

So when they look at a Winphone and say "Where are the apps" they're really asking "What do I do with this box?"

Winphone is/was a grown up phone in an industry built on selling toys. The fact that Microsoft can't find a winning formula without stripping out the good stuff and adding extra dross in its place is just further stamping on the idea.

VHS beat Betamax because VHS was good enough , but gave people a use and justification to buy it. Betamax may well have been better, but who cared?

When my new 640 dies I guess it's back to bean tins and string. :-(

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HR botches redundancy so chap scores year-long paid holiday

Terry 6
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Private sector

The thing is if this happened in the public sector there would be headlines in the Daily Fail and, as they say "Deputy Heads would roll".

I'm sure these cock-ups happen in both sectors from time to time.

Errors and covering of the rear are probably just part of human organisation.

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Microsoft's Windows Phone folly costs it another billion dollars

Terry 6
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Re: The irony ???

My only experience with the WinPhone .....

Hmmm.

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Terry 6
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Re: Total fiasco

Nice trolling, but......

Anyone who defines themself by a phone is a failure in every sense.

It's a phone.

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Terry 6
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The irony

They are really nice phones. The OS is pleasant to use. It isn't as costly as Apple devices. It doesn't (or didn't) track everything we do like the GoogleDroid.

It really does work well with the PCs that most people use.

It should have done well.

But Microsoft's inability to move its feet without shooting itself in them has meant that the Windows phone has absolutely no credibility.

For a start the Windows Phone 8.x ran parallel to the incredibly ( and rightly) unpopular Windows 8.x

So they couldn't exactly market it as the ideal accompaniment to your PC.

That probably was what they would have wanted.

But it would have been like [ was like] branding bottled water as being just like raw sewage.

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Three UK: Our MMS prices are up. Get around us with WhatsApp or Skype

Terry 6
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Except

Like Capn. Scarlett, I only ever sent one MMS, an error. A few months back I replied to someone with an image they needed. I hadn't noticed that their request had come as a text, not an email. (I was busy ) . So I added the image to my reply. Never gave it moments thought, until I noticed the small additional charge on my bill.

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SHOCK: GM crops are good for you and the planet, reckon boffins

Terry 6
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Spindreams

This has been one of my concerns too. GM crops that are owned by Monsanto rather than ones that produce seed which is readily available. Putting our (world's) food supply in the hands of a giant agri-business. Then when they have an economic stranglehold they can charge what the want.

Also, GM crops developed by the scientists for the greater good is very different from GM developed by companies for the greater profit.

They will invest in lines that benefit themselves. Not us.

Compare the extent to which large drug companies spend vast amounts on R&D for the rejigging out of copyright products, but don't want to invest to develop anything that only benefits the poor and needy or find other uses for cheaper products that have lost copyright protection.

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IBM invents printer that checks for copyrights

Terry 6
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What's to patent

I know this happens all the time, but allowing a patent on a vague idea, rather than an actual working device seems to be absolute lunacy. - even with pretty pictures this is no more than a pipe dream.

"Hey guys - wouldn't it be good if we had a machine that....." *

At best this sort of patent is bonkers.

At worst it allows someone can't or won't to block someone who can design a device.

Imagine telling the first 'plane designers that they can't do that because "we already thought it would be a good idea and got the patent. No, we don't know how, but that's beside the point."

*Irrespective of whether this copier is a good or bad idea.

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Destroying ransomware business models is not your job, so just pay up

Terry 6
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Re: Price of an education...

Not even just the pros. That folder of family photos needs to be kept backed up, safe.

Yet we still hear of distraught people who have lost all their precious piccies because they lost their mobile phone, let alone a HDD. This is 2016 and too many of us, individuals and businesses, still trust to luck that our data will still be available where we left it.

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UK needs comp sci grads, so why isn't it hiring them?

Terry 6
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Employer responsibility

Even 30 odd years ago part of the problem was that some employers stopped hiring inexperienced graduates or training and sponsoring school leavers and instead chose to poach the ones that had served their time.

Which meant that the remaining employers also stopped, because there was no point spending years and money bringing someone to level of usefulness only to see them leave and go down the road to earn an extra few quid from companies that hadn't spent thousands on trainees.

A professional degree - CS or anything else - is only the start of training, not the end point. A good one will provide the transferable skills that make a person ready to develop practical skills. A very good one will stick the student in to a workplace for six months in the first year or two then bring them back into college with an idea of what the skills will be used for. Lawyers do pupillage before they are qualified. Teachers do teaching practice and an NQT year ( probationary year in my day). Doctors spend years walking the wards. Even bloody politicians with their PPE degrees ( used to ) have to get elected and serve on a council for a few years before they get a chance at fighting even a no-hope seat.

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Nuisance caller fined a quarter of a million pounds by the ICO

Terry 6
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Sorry, but if ever there was a time to ditch your landline this is it.

No. My landline has caller ID. It just doesn't get any useful information from withheld numbers, which the scum usually are. But at least my landline isn't with me everywhere I go.

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Terry 6
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Re: Lovely, lovely publically available information.

They can be banned, but wife/partner/in-law/off-spring/sibling/dog/cat/etc will open a rather similar sounding company the very next day with someone looking very like Mr. X now the "Office manager". Think of those BBC consumer programmes where Mr. X's company has gone insolvent owing a small fortune to customers, and the premises opened up immediately on the same site, with the same staff and the same dodgy used cars etc.

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Microsoft boots fake fix-it search ads

Terry 6
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Also, web sites don't help

Since I first used the interwebs,donkeys' years ago the beancounters and marketing idiots have made things rather more complicated to use. Too often now an apparent link on a site's web page will take users to the part of a site that the Droids want you to see, rather than the one you wanted to go to. Whereas Google/Bing et al will often take you to the bit of the site you actually need. To put that another way, if you navigate to Acme Widgets' web pages to find an updated Widget driver you could spend ages going from page to page desperately trying to find the sodding Widget driver, because the front page doesn't have a "downloads" link and the Support link on the front page takes you to a page of FAQs, one of which might say something along the lines of "Where do I find updated Drivers" which will take you to a link that says "Find your product" which will take you to a link that says "Support" that takes you back to the FAQs, etc. ad infinitum.

If you do a Google/Bing search you'll have a reasonable chance of seeing a link that says something like www.acme-widget.com/support/devices/downloads/drivers.

Unfortunately, you might also find yourself at a site URL www.acme.widgets.ru/scam-me-rotten/download-a-virus

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Microsoft phone support contractors told to hang up after 15 minutes

Terry 6
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Not just the IT world

Some companies try to shortchange their clients, or even themselves. That's just the way it is.

Two stories.

My late father was in quality control for a coat manufacturer, supplying M&S as their sole client.

The failure rate was about average and QC intercepted those - but the company decided that to save money they would send stuff through that didn't meet the M&S standard and dad had rejected. They really seemed to have believed that no one would notice. Of course it came back. But more to the point - M&S got pissed off with the high reject rate and dumped the contract. Business closed down.

I took a job in the Summer after uni at Great Universal Stores, as a filing clerk. We had to file away, in alphabetic order, little vouchers people had sent in. But these had to go into little plastic envelopes <1cm thick that had been packed.as tightly as possible The company insisted that these were packed so tightly that it was at the limit of physical possibility, to save storage space, and the cost of the envelopes, so the chance of getting a thin slip of paper into the right order was close to zero.And they cut into our fingers as we tried. It was immediately obvious from the state of the files than no one did even try after the first few days. And that also told me that none of us would be there in three months time ( and of course I never intended to be), because the files had strips of relative order, then became random, then ordered again.......

But one day they needed one of these slips. Of course it couldn't be found. I learned from chatting to one of the managers that retrieving these bits of paper was pretty much impossible, so if there was a dispute they just had to surrender. I still don't know which was the worst wast e of money; paying us to (not) file the slips, or making the system unworkable in the first place.

For my part I gave up even going into the files. I took the piss, and waited to be fired. My favourite thing was to grab a clipboard and wander round the building looking busy and concerned.

And when I did get fired it wasn't because of that. No one had even seemed to notice or care. When I went it was a few weeks later as part of the latest mass culling. There were about six of us started when I started and the same about six of us booted out when I was booted out. I assume another bunch were shipped in that afternoon.

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Ooh missus, get a grip on my notifications

Terry 6
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Pint

Yay

Also be aware that he never responds to messages that fail to employ adequate punctuation.

Good for you Dabbsy. There's no excuse for sloppy writing just because it's sent through a phone.

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Blocking ads? Smaller digital publishers are smacked the hardest

Terry 6
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Re: My heart bleeds

I did not start using ad-blockers the minute I discovered one. Nor for a long time after. I even click(ed) on ads to help the sites gain revenue, and sometimes because the ads were actually interesting*.

But when the flashing, moving, inane and obstructive ads started to get in the way I grabbed ad-block+

The right to earn money through a website is one thing. Eating bandwidth and making a visual assault on me to the point that the site ceases to even be accessible is another.

*n.b. "Interesting" is not the same as marketing droids' idea of "relevant". What they consider "relevant" appears to be something I've already searched for, so their poxy ads are pure annoyance. "Interesting" would be something I hadn't already thought of. And I don't think I'm that unusual in this matter.

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ICANN knifes Africa's internet: New top-level domains terminated

Terry 6
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Re: They CANNT

Well, this is the point. Most users seem unable to even install a programme without accepting yet another browser "helper", don't realise they should change the default password on their internet box thingy and don't know you can enter a URL without typing it into Google. The chances of almost anyone doing something to a thing called a DNS which is something to do with connection to the GooglerNet seem remarkably low.

And if Google did take over (which pretty much is what does happen when users do bypass using URLs and type into the search bar) they'll own us completely.

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Terry 6
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Re: They CANNT

"People need only configure their DNS server to one of these providers to enable an overlay of non-ICANN domains, which falls back to ICANN if there is no match."

Which people?

Big ISP companies? Why would they bother?

Individuals? How would they do that?

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Brits who live in 'smart cities' don't really know or care

Terry 6
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Re: I'm sick of smart

Yes, and Camden's parking penalty appeals have to be submitted online, but when they fail to respond within the required time period you can only contact them online, and when they fail to respond to that you can only contact them online.

There is an automated phone system. But unless you belong in a couple of very specific categories it tells you it can't answer you and that you have to contact them.......online.

That's Smart Cities. Automated systems saying .........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARJ8cAGm6JE

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We will end misleading broadband adverts, thunders ASA...

Terry 6
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ASA - Lap dogs

A few years ago I complained about this to ASA. OK I'm only one individual, I didn't expect them to launch a task force, with helicopters and infantry. But what they did was to write back that they couldn't see anything wrong with broadband ads that were overtly misleading. Ads that offered a very low price in big print with the "first three months" bit in tiny print, tucked out of sight.

ASA seem to work very hard not to see problems at the very least until the damage has been done.

Typically banning an advert months after the campaign has already finished.

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IBM's quantum 'puter news proves Big Blue still doesn't get 'cloud'

Terry 6
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Sorry but...

This sounds a bit like the super high-tech multibillion dollar equivalent of putting a a CPU emulator on a website. ie. a demo of a toy.

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Iranian cyberspy phishing rod pulled from the waters and exposed

Terry 6
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Gmail?

....compromised............ Gmail account

Is there any other sort?

Or, with less irony, is anyone really sending Gmail messages for anything serious? Or is the Israeli who sent this a low level individual and/or sending a casual email.

i.e... It's presumably an Israeli's personal or very small company Gmail account rather than an Israeli (which is to say official ) account.

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Are state-sponsored attackers poisoning the statistical well?

Terry 6
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Re: The sky is falling!

And if you can't scrape up some evidence, you do it anyway.

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Terry 6
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Since the whole basis of the Austerity Programme was an error in a giant spreadsheet, but is still with us, who needs foreign hackers to change the data?

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2013/apr/18/uncovered-error-george-osborne-austerity

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Google AI gains access to 1.2m confidential NHS patient records

Terry 6
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Big Brother

Re: Its

Data grabbing Sledgehammer to smash hypothetical nut?

Do we have even a hint of how many kidney problems are missed, that could be found by blanket data mining? Or even any evidence that it would work at all?

Or is this just an excuse grabbed out of the air?

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Terry 6
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Re: Welcome to the BRave new EXIT (of your personal information)

You got there before me.

At least one motivation behind BREXIT is that, with no effective English or Welsh opposition, leaving the EU would let ideologically bound, free market, Devil take the hindmost, politicians and their big business backers do what they want. Stuff data protection for the ordinary folk, alongside independent protection for human rights, safe working practices, reduced roaming costs, controls on utility charges and so on. (aka "Red tape" hindering business).

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Windows 10 handcuffs Cortana web search to Bing and Edge browser

Terry 6
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Bing is reliable

I'd started to write a sarky comment about how reliably Bing will serve up useless ads rather than useful information.

But in fact when I gave it another try first its results on a few searches had improves and were pretty similar to Google's this time.

So I guess you don't pays your money and you takes your choice of who grabs your data.

Maybe the best plan is to switch between a range of searches so that no one gang gets a full picture.

(With Duck Duck Go as much as possible).

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Microsoft fingered for Western Euro PC tragedy

Terry 6
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Follows the pattern

Microsoft do seem to have lost the ability to provide the public with what we want. Preferring instead to try to give the public what they think we should want.

Maybe they lost it when they failed to spot the internet coming?

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Windows 10 Anniversary Update draws nearer with Inky preview

Terry 6
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Re: All apps

Yup. Exactly that.

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Terry 6
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All apps

Having a list of all the apps in the Start menu would be ok, even good, if it was possible to keep the list uncluttered and organised. Which starts with preventing installation scripts from dumping what they want where they want

Currently organising the list, removing unwanted links ["Our programme on the net" etc..], or grouping software according to function is convoluted and time consuming, since Microsoft have made accessing the files and folders into a labyrinthine process.

We can't just access a start menu folder from the list. Instead we have to select the link from inside the folder and right click on it, then choose "more" to go to the file location, which will then give us access to the folders. (We can't even just navigate to c:\programme data\Microsoft\Windows\start menu\programmes if we have the knowledge to do this, because it isn't any less cumbersome and might not even be there when we arrive)

Further TIFKAM "apps" are fixed, so they can't be moved.

All of which leave the All Apps list as a total dog's breakfast.

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Thunderbird is GO: Mozilla prepares to jettison mail client

Terry 6
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Re: Still around?

AC "Beside that, there's still people who like to access mails......etc "

That's me ( and my family) to a T. All of those things.

Why would I want to check each of my email accounts individually?

Why would I want to log in to a (selection of) web page(s) every time I want to see if there's any new mail?

Why would I want to access a web page every time I want to check an old email?

And why would I want to be tied to Outlook? I use it on one computer, because I need it to manage my diary. Even then, if I didn't have a WinPhone as well I'd probably dump it.

Meanwhile, I used to manage my diary cross platform through Google to Outlook. But they removed that functionality. What else might they take out if it suited them?

And also, yes I use it in 'nux when I boot to Mint.

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Ad-blocker blocking websites face legal peril at hands of privacy bods

Terry 6
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Re: snooping my machine

raving Angry.... I'd agree with that, and add that web advertisers seem to have a strange, naive and frankly insulting view that it is acceptable and necessary to bully and shout their ads at us. And when you are faced with bullies you have to fight back.

And FWIW the content belongs to the web site hosting the ads, but the internet that hosts the content doesn't. So it's not as simple as "Don't like the ads, don't view the site". If essential content is provided ( or commandeered ) by a site for profit ( which is fair enough) they have to behave responsibly as citizens of the net.

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Terry 6
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Happy

Re: snooping my machine

Voyna Well put.

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Terry 6
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Re: Publishers could simply

Safe Not disruptive ads I'd accept.

I watch ITV, sometimes. I accept ads. But TV ads don't flash across the screen while I'm watching the content. Don't interrupt too often ( and provide opportunities to put kettle on or visit the loo when they do) and don't intrude by flashing stupid colours on and off, bounce around or present stupid come-ons that are just there to lead you to somewhere totally different.

It's not the ads that bother me. It's the disruption.

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Terry 6
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Re: Click here to view this title.

£5/pint. Still worth it for this. Get him a keg.

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Ten years in the clink, file-sharing monsters! (If UK govt gets its way)

Terry 6
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she'll be damned if public opinion or reasoned argument is going to change her mind.

This does not differ significantly from many of the other things this gov does.

e.g. Evidence that privately run chains of Academies do better than Locally Managed schools? None.

Public support for making schools become academies? Little.

Decision- make all schools join academy chains.

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Game over for Xbox 360

Terry 6
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Windows

Another Microsoft issue?

Yet again it seems as if Microsoft have taken their eye off the ball. Gaming seems to be going strong, yet they are giving up on their share of this market. Apparently because they aren't up to date.

I never was much into gaming myself, I lose interest at the (early) point in most games I've tried where you are stuck in a room and have to randomly dick about trying endless combinations of something or other until you happen to find the right one. But since they are all much the same, and since one consol does much the same as another it's a sad reflection on Microsoft that can't even keep a toehold in this area.

It's a sorry catalogue.

Windows - V8/8.1/10 each pissing loyal users off in their own sweet ways.

Phones - somehow never having the magic, the quality/price point or the attractiveness to take users away from Apple or Google's offerings even though the phones are really good.

Office - with it's unloved Ribbon and attempts to drag us into the software rental model.

And now the Xbox.

It seem like an uncanny ability to spin gold into straw.

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Idiot millennials are saving credit card PINs on their mobile phones

Terry 6
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Re: And pre-Millienials were tech savants?

massivleySerial You are SO wrong. We store our pins on post-its on the back of the credit card, because no one would look there.

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Obama to admit Moon landing was faked?

Terry 6
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Pint

Spot on

Chris Miller. Well put. A million quid, even if it were true, is nothing compared to the value of the publicity and getting more suckers to throw good money into the pit. Anyway, they will probably have hedged the bets if it looked like it was getting too tasty for them.

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Apple assumes you'll toss the Watch after three years

Terry 6
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Re: not a real watch anyway

My Seiko Kinetic is supposed to get a £70 service every year. About three or four years back the storage cell started to lose its effectiveness, so that I have to wear it most of the day to keep it running, which the service would sort out. But so far I've used it for eight and a half years without a service, which is near enough £600 I've saved, far more than the cost of a replacement.

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Terry 6
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Support cycles

As a matter if interest.

BBC Radio 4 (You and Yours) has been covering the way that some connected technology ( e.g. Samsung "Smart" TVs) can be dumped at the whim of the makers after a few years.

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Windows 10 Mobile races to summer with useful facelift

Terry 6
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Not yet I won't

I'm keeping Win 8.1 on my 640 until the loss of Here Maps is replaced with a good Satnav option. And until I hear what other users think of it.

Meanwhile I'm really puzzled about the comments related to the Win 10 next version ( insider preview) because they so often don't seem to differentiate between the stable version just starting to appear as an update in the last week or so and the "insider" betas that are intended to be ropey, buggy and rough round the edges. It would be strange if they were not.

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The future of Firefox is … Chrome

Terry 6
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Re: Vivaldi

PaleMoon ?

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Microsoft goes titsup

Terry 6
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Re: The Cloud

Not replying to myself (sorry) so much as tying this to today's story. This time it's Google's cloud that burst. Same comment, but raised.

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Terry 6
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FAIL

The Cloud

And we still think it's a good idea to stick our data (and programmes) in the nebulous vapour?

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'Bring back xHamster', North Carolina smut watchers grumble

Terry 6
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Re: Detail?

This is NOT a news site in the general BBC/SKY/Daily Fail etc. sense.

It's an information site, yes. And that includes IT and Tech news. But that's the limit we can expect. It therefore assumes that readers have a decent understanding of what's going on in the world and an even better understanding of Tech.

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El Reg forces NSA to act

Terry 6
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Transparency

From Freedictionary; " permitting the uninterrupted passage of light; clear....."

So obviously you can't see them. Duh!

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