* Posts by Terry 6

1259 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

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Facebook's billion sheeple

Terry 6
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Agreed, it comes under the heading of being clever/funny once, briefly, when originally coined. But then left well alone.

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Hacker shows Reg how one leaked home address can lead to ruin

Terry 6
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What kind and level of privacy do we want or need?

There is the privacy that says, "I don't want everyone in the neighbourhood knowing my lifestyle".

Or there's, "I want to protect myself from identity theft"/ "Don't want the burglars to know I'm on holiday".

Then there's, "I'll be damned if I'm going to help these companies bombard me with adverts".

Beyond that there's "I don't want anyone to know anything about me, not now not ever, not in this life or the next".

Beyond that there's paranoia.

And finally there's commentards on El Reg.

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Schrödinger's cat explained with neutrinos

Terry 6
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Re: Wrong

Well yes, in the thought experiment the lethal act would be reliant on the quantum event triggering the release of the poison. Until the quantum event is observed to have/have not happened the release of the poison also has/hasn't happened. So the hapless moggy would also be dead/alive. But would probably have a nasty headache through trying to think about this.

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Windows 10 a failure by Microsoft's own metric – it won't hit one billion devices by mid-2018

Terry 6
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Re: "run MS Office"

Since my post I just hit a biggie for compatibility. I was sent a WORD document that needed to be opened in editable mode, it was read only. Which I could do fine in WORD.

But initially I tried to open it in Libreoffice and clicking the button to open it in editable mode didn't work. They must both lock documents in a different way.

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Terry 6
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Re: "run MS Office"

And LibreOfficedoesn't have an Outlook equivalent that handles email and calendar across all my devices.

Or a Notes equivalent, like Onenote ( or Evernote, sadly now reduced to 2 devices for the free version, no good to me). Sometimes its formatting can be quite quirky still, especially in tables.

It use it for most of my everday stuff - but have to keep Office 2010 as well. ;-(

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Terry 6
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Re: Bet they assumed Windows Phone contributing a few hundred million

The thing is, and often said, that people who actually use a WinPhone do actually like them, a lot.

Microsoft haters will never accept that, so saying it on El reg is probably just wasting the wear on my keyboard.

BUT, Microsoft seemed to have done their level best to undermine their own brand; delayed launches, strange ranges, with no phone that isn't either too cheap and nasty or too big and expensive for an ordinary user, negligible marketing, trying to use it as a gateway to the Xbox rather than providing fun stuff that a phone user might want, failure to engage with developers or develop their own fun stuff ( aka "apps") and of course a seriously ham-handed attempt to bring out a "universal" OS without making it fit for platforms that people used, that just made everyone angry with them

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Terry 6
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Perfect Storm

Microsoft replaced the fully functional Win 7 with the gobsmackingly unusable Win 8. Not a good way to create love and support in the population.

They replaced that with 8.1, because they had to, but didn't make it friendly enough to win people back.

Then when they brought out Windows 10 they managed to keep some pretty nasty bits of usability, like turning the control panel into a mish mash of different interfaces with some controls inside places you wouldn't expect to find them and others so well hidden you're more likely to find a Pokemon. Or the Start menu that is full of unremovable "apps" that you might never want, and programme links (some that you'd never directly launch, like PDF readers) that are installed within folders of crap that an ordinary user would never be able find and (re)move.

But in case that wasn't enough to put users off they then went to massive lengths to force this on to users with Win 7+. (OK if it was just Win 8.x they might have a case).

Meanwhile, they just didn't try to market the phones in any sensible way. Neither in advertising nor in range ( cheap or expensive with nothing between). Maybe because they had lost interest and wanted to flog Tablets instead. Since, "it's not a popular OS with vendors," they needed to get the public onboard directly, but couldn't be arsed. It's a great phone. It doesn't have Apple Tax. It isn't an outpost of the Google advertising agency. It is very usable. But now it's tarnished by both the Win10 debacle and the taint of failure.

Massive stupidity.

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Opera sells open-source Chromium browser for $600m to Chinese bods

Terry 6
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other chrome alternatives are available

http://www.srware.net/en/software_srware_iron_download.php

Or if not Chrome why not use PaleMoon? Doesn't have to be FF.

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Kotkin on who made Trump and Brexit: Look in the mirror, it's you

Terry 6
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Re: Really?

Just a passing comment since this is now an old thread (>2 days since last post). How many UK parliament members get a chance to even suggest, let alone propose, new legislation?

They have to win a little lottery to even try. And then rarely get as far as a vote.

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Terry 6
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Re: Much simpler than all that

I'm not totally convinced I've caught your meaning. But if I did, then I'd point out that Blair was and remained highly popular until claoe to the end. Certainly tarnished by his decisions about taking us into war and feuding with Brown.

But until then a good centre-left politician. It remains to be seen whether Labour becomes a more left wing party, with Corbyn staying in charge, or dumps him and reverts to a more electable centre left Or even if there would be a new party formed to fit that gap.

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Terry 6
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Much simpler than all that

Labour, pre-Blair, was on a loser.

The traditional cloth cap and clogs ( forgive stereotype for brevity's sake) working class, lead by newspapers that many of them didn't even realise were right wing, just didn't seem to vote for the party that represented them. Lots of theories seemed to be around at the time to explain this. My two favourites ( which doesn't make them true) were that a.) The Working Classes all believed the illusion that they could become wealthy - with hindsight I guess just like all the yoof who think they will win X-factor's Got Talent or some such- and so wanted a country that favoured the well off.

b.) That the old habits of subservience and inverted snobbery meant they voted for the Toffs' party

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Smartphones aren't tiny PCs, but that's how we use them in the West

Terry 6
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Waste of time

Most of the damned things were just used to get us to scan in URLs for some stupid bit of marketing.

Why the f*** would we want to do their work for them and jump into their marketing s**t?

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Wannabe Prime Minister Andrea Leadsom thinks all websites should be rated – just like movies

Terry 6
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Re: @Thondwe From the Great Douglas Adams

My experience in education tends to make me think that it's more than Peter Principle. There are also some people who enter a profession with an intent to get promoted out of it.

So they tend to be good at doing and saying the things that get promotion - rather than being good at the job or the management they aspire to.

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Terry 6
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I think we know that. Unless the Scots do leave. In which case we could have a Hadrian's Firewall for England and Wales.

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Cycling paramedics in epic rush to save patient who ate stale sandwich

Terry 6
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Tromos

My heart agrees. My head says that the problem is there are also too many of the other sort, elderly (mostly) people who already don't call an ambulance when they should - and would be further frightened off by the prospect of a big fine.

Or the people who aren't sure if they are having a heart attack, when they get chest pain.

And OTOH there are the ones who won't give a toss because they haven't got any assets.

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Terry 6
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Sarcasm

You highlight the idiots that waste the time of paramedics. Good.

But mostly it reads like you are taking the piss out of the "First responders" ( as the Americans call them) themselves, because they get through the city on bikes.

I wonder if you'd be quite so chippy if you were stuck out of reach of an ambulance with a broken limb or some other nasty injury.

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Australia's ABC suspends presenter over 'Wi-Fi is dangerous' claims

Terry 6
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Re: WibbleMe

I was thinking more about the distribution of Primes. And if I got that wrong, well, yes there are other examples to choose.

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Terry 6
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Re: Indeed

A PhD doctorate usually means that you did a bit of original research supervised by an academic, in a university somewhere. That is not any guarantee of authority beyond ( at most) the specific field in which you did that research. A PhD who'd specialised in the effects of WiFi or statins or vitamin deficiency or whatever has some authority within that area alone.

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Terry 6
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Re: WibbleMe

There are a few bits not provable there either. Think of prime numbers for example.

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Terry 6
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Re: Light

Probably, since they prefer the dark of ignorance.

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Terry 6
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Devil

Re: But WiFi is dangerous

FWIW my poxy Sony Bravia does, supposedly have WiFi. except that it barely ever works.

The TV will see the WiFi hub. But won't admit it and will refuse to talk to it until it's been reset.

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Terry 6
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Re: But WiFi is dangerous

Er No. those Kardashians, apparently not from Star Trek*,sadly, get on my TV through the wire that goes into the back of the TV.

Ditto Trump.

And even my Win 10 came through a wire.

*https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ny7tgulzNsc

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FBI won't jail future US president over private email server

Terry 6
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unlikely to quieten the conspiracy theorists

Nothing would. See Snopes for latest madness.

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Prominent Brit law firm instructed to block Brexit Article 50 trigger

Terry 6
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Re: Oh come on

One example means nothing, but on the morning after I was chatting with a Leaver in the Tesco carpark. He voted leave because he ( "And the people I talk to in the pub") believed that when the immigrants go away the low paid jobs that the English don't want would become higher paid because the employers would have to pay more.

I aint convinced.

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Terry 6
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Re: What a horrible waste of time and money

VulcanV5 as often now reported, it was a leaver who set up a petition to parliament for a vote to require a bigger majority to be valid. When they thought they'd lose by a small margin. And Farage himself who'd said that a +/- 2% vote would need a new referendum, in that circumstance.

But yes, I'd have to agree, more of us should have thought about this beforehand. On both sides.

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Terry 6
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Re: What a horrible waste of time and money

I could even go further. If only 52% had voted to remain I'd reluctantly have had to accept that we would need to revisit this issue. Perhaps after the dust had settled a bit and rational discussion take place, because we'd have had the luxury of waiting a few years (no action being required to stay the same).

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Terry 6
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Re: Result not significant

AC your comments, "draconian shitpile attempted superstate" don't lend support to the view that you are making a well balanced and thought through judgement here. Rather more it suggests that you'd seize any route to leave, even this pathetically insignificant majority

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Terry 6
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The honourable way

The Right Thing, surely, would the MPs to wait until there is an exit agreement to put before the nation and then go to a general election with that as the outcome. It is the single biggest issue and so worthy of a political commitment.

If the nation's happy to vote for that concrete, specific future they'll still be in charge.

If not, then parliament will reflect the will of the nation and reject Brexit.

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Terry 6
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Re: "No, No, No. Let me resign..."

Well Labour is another kettle of fish.

A leader supported by the "members"; a useful number of whom joined so that they could support Corbyn, rather than having any affinity with the Labour party as such.

It is not the first time that "entryists" have taken the reins of the Labour Party and made it unelectable. But these people don't care about being elected into power. They are waiting for the masses to rise up and take control of the means of production. They want to "raise class conciousness". And anything that gets the workers stirred up is grist to their mill. Come the revolution they expect to be marching at the front carrying the banners. It's the Marxist view of History.

Unfortunately the normal view of history tells us that if the moment did come they are more likely to be among the first hanging from the lampposts.

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Terry 6
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Re: What a horrible waste of time and money

And by the time it happens the 16-18 year olds who couldn't vote this time will be able to. And may well be making their feelings felt. Added to the 18-24s who will have grown up a bit and may be more prepared to make their votes count at the next election.

And at the other end of the age range quite a few of the current Brexiters may not be voting anymore.

Come to think of it, I wonder what proportion of Brexiters either don't normally vote but did this time or vote for the more extreme minority parties, because "immigrants" .

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Terry 6
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Re: Reg readership

inmypjs

If you'd ever read the usual BBC comments ( or maybe you do, but don't see the problem) the usual comments there would be enough to make Attilla the Hun seem like a Trotskyite by comparison.If it's only 4:1 in favour of Brexit that's practically a vote of confidence in Angela Merkle.

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Terry 6
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Re: The only true winners in all this:

AC Please be fair. Other winners will be Yacht builders, stockbrokers, Horse breeders/trainers, Michelin star restaurants, High end cruise companies, jewellers, Wine and caviare importers, luxury estate agents, Sports car builders and many others.And of course all the jobs for legal clerks, (wine-) bar staff, etc.

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Terry 6
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Re: Vote Again and get it right this time

Let me remind you that the petition was started by a Brexit campaigner pre-referendum in case his side lost by a couple of percent the other way. And that Farage was the first to suggest a second referendum if his side were to lose by a couple of percent.

So Leave campaigners wingeing about people wanting this to this happen when the vote went the other way are being, to say the least a bit hypocritical. Especially when that small percentage majority to leave is made up of people who had been told, wrongly, that it would give millions to the NHS every week, though not that this would be a tiny proportion of the NHS budget or the loss to the economy that pays for the NHS, even if it were true. Or that we'd be able to send home lots of foreigners, whose presence they resented and still keep trading the way we used to. Or that industry would be free of "red tape" without being told what that "red tape" was or that it's largely here to protect us. Or that we'd be able to get rid of those European Human Rights, as if they weren't our human rights too.

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A trip to the Twilight Zone with a support guy called Iron Maiden

Terry 6
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Re: @ Esme where the Remain side got things so horribly wrong

Dr. Syntax. The petition to parliament made that argument. That also, as I'd mentioned, started pre-referendum by a Brexiteer who thought that they'd lose by a small margin. But taken up by Remainers.

Sauce for the goose.

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Terry 6
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Re: @ Esme where the Remain side got things so horribly wrong

You don't need to assume that all the Leave voters chose that route for flawed reasons to see the referendum as terribly flawed.

There only needed to be a shift of two percentage points to reverse the result.

So a noticeable percentage being deflected by appalling misrepresentation of the costs of the EU, or false promises of being able to have our immigration cake and eat our Free Trade agreement etc. is a very good reason to invalidate that referendum.

It was Farage who had said that voting figures like those ought to lead to a second referendum - when he thought he'd lose. Likewise the petition about voting came from a Brexiteer, before the result, because he thought they might lose by a small percentage.

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Terry 6
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Depressing

It wasn't the Leave vote that depressed me,so much as these "reasons" that people gave/are giving and that so many seem to rely on just one reason without any clear lack of thought about or interest in any other consequences.

There's the "We don't mind immigration, but we want to control it" ( But they haven't though through if it's possible) And they don't care about any other effects of leaving.

Or the "We want that 3XX million pounds a week to spend on the NHS" (Did they really think that it will go to the NHS even if it's true) but no interest in where the money is going - like the money being spent in their own town to rebuild their own town centre. or how much difference it would make.

The there's the one Dabbsy mentions. The one about "control". Er sorry, but how much control do we have over Crapita when they are given all our public service to run ( read "milk"). And as it happens we won't have voted for the next PM. And possibly not the one after either, since our voting options are looking pretty limited at the moment.

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Office 365 falls over in US

Terry 6
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Cloud

The idea that we can just keep everything in "the cloud" just like that has always struck me as rather silly. Dependence on someone else's complex, widely shared, systems working to allow us to work, seems to be too much a hostage to the normal effects of Sod's law.

And let's not get too Microsoft Hatey about this.

It's reliance on this white fluffy vapour that's the risk - whoever you rely on.

Especially if you rely on only one supplier. And of course the beancounters are looking at cost savings so why would you have redundant systems?

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Evernote riles freetards with two-device limit

Terry 6
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Follow up

Since I posted below I've switched to OneNote on the four devices I use regularly.

It's not brilliant. Some versions of it, particularly the WIn10 "app" are really grim ( no surprise there). The Office 2010 version is actually pretty good. Luckily you can use Ccleaner to remove Win10 app and download the Office version if you have that option.

And it's not costing a shed load of cash to do a very basic job - like Evernote want to.

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Terry 6
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value for money

That's the thing about all these cost-per-year items, especially the ones with a restricted free option.

Is the free version useful to me as a non-corporate individual user? -Yes.

Would I pay a few quid to extend it's basic usability to, in this case, a few more devices? Yes.

Is it worth tens of quid per year to me, every year, with or without extra unneeded functions? No absolutely not .

The amount isn't too onerous, in absolute terms, any given year. But hard to justify paying for what it would give me ( bit of convenience) or what it actually provides ( a tiny bit of online storage and some simple software) and over the years I'd be using it I definitely could never justify those hundreds of quid it'd add up to.

It's not the only service or product that uses these sorts of model.

My car satnav (Pioneer damn them to Hell) wants more to update the maps than it'd cost to buy a whole new device. Something the Honda garage omitted to tell me when they fitted it.

And my TomTom device will only update the one extra service I want updated ( traffic reports) if I buy into an expensive annual package of services and updates I have no use for.

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PAC slams UK.gov for lack of evidence-based science investments

Terry 6
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Damn it

There is already too much interference in research (at least in the areas that concern me) by people who think they are there to pick winners and/or make sure that the research followed is good for the economy or popular with commercial organisations or at least is good politically.

This is not going to help.

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Tesco Mobile does what? Hahahahahahaha. Sorry customers

Terry 6
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Re: What a shame

My guess, based on how "professional" manager types think , is that they see CS as being a pure expense and don't recognise it as contributing to the value of the product. SO they think that it can be provided cut-price without harming the "core" product,

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Medicos could be world's best security bypassers, study finds

Terry 6
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Real world

Even in ordinary environments password security can put people under that little bit of extra pressure. Mostly it makes no difference, it's just one of those things that have to be done.

The more pressure there is the more problematic it can become.

Sit in a school staffroom at 08:20 and you'll see password sharing, As in, " Oh God it made me change my password yesterday - What the hell was it? X ( insert name) what's your password, I need to print off...... etc....."

Move that into an overstretched hospital department with patients on trolleys and ambulances queuing outside and it isn't surprising if they don't even bother to keep passwords.

It's not just emergencies, it's time pressure. If it takes an extra half minute per patient to change mental gear, ( especially if tired or rushing), recall and enter the password then by the end of the clinical day enough time for a number of slots have been used to type passwords - and that's assuming it works well, there's no need to retype the password and they don't get locked out.

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Dell tempts hordes with MASSIVE DISCOUNTS on PCs

Terry 6
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I suddenly remembered a couple stories from years ago.

Before computers were the commodity item they've become they were particularly expensive and uncommon in the UK for a while. (Might have been early '80s). According to the computer magazines of the time the story goes that US manufacturers tried to kick start a market in the UK by dropping their export prices to us.

But the importers simply hiked the prices of the boxes they were selling back up and held on to the bigger margins for the same low level of sales.

At the time I'd told my father about this and he'd said he'd worked for clothing firms that took the same attitude. They absolutely wouldn't drop their margins for greater sales, even when they weren't selling enough to make money. In his words, "They'd rather sell 200 with £10 profit on each than 2000 with £5 profit on each".

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Terry 6
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Re: Used to be great quality, now "meh"

And yet mine ( mentioned above). has been great.

I've had no problem slapping in a second HDD and DVD writer.

It has worked fine for a year (desperately finding wood to touch).

Hard to judge performance in the real world, because I don't really need an I7 with 16gb ram. But no complaints from me.

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Terry 6
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Tech sellers seem to offer illusory discounts and promise more than they intend to supply on a regular basis. Overpricing items even though they aren't selling, offering the premium or wholesale customers prices that turn out to be higher than they can buy the stuff in the local computer store and selling items that sound good but have been subtly (or not) downgraded are all common.

That being said my Dell a year ago came with a spec I've not seen at anything like the price I paid, from any supplier since, including Dell. I don't know if I caught them on a good day, but they've been almost a couple of hundred quid more, since then.

And to show that it's not just tech suppliers, when my local pet shop closed down last week they had lots of signs saying "Everything must go/SALE/Clearance" and so on.

Was anything actually cheaper?

Not even in the last hour of trading.

All I'd wanted was some gravel for the tank.Maybe I'd have been tempted by a few bargains, if they'd been evident. But that guy would rather have had his teeth pulled out that let anything go cheaper.

And in fact I got all the things I needed cheaper than him by going to Pets At Home.

So maybe it's not just tech sellers.

Maybe there's a certain kind of seller that would rather bury stock than sell it at a smaller margin.

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I want to learn about gamification but all I see is same-ification

Terry 6
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Repetitious

I don't think we can just blame yoof for having repetitious retread games. They've always had a sameyness about them.

I dearly wanted to get into playing games, ever since they were in text only.

But every game I tried would start or quickly arrive at a random dark location where you had to randomly discover an exit by repeatedly trying, dying and starting again until you got the right sequence.

And long before I ever reached that point I'd just think Stuff it. There are better things to do with my life.

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Cloudian clobbers car drivers with targeted ads

Terry 6
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Re: Why Billboards?

Or TV channels that only show commercials (is there such a hell?).

Yes, the ones that show "pop videos" (i.e. promotional ads for the latest records).

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Telia engineer error to blame for massive net outage

Terry 6
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Re: Thus is revealed...

Yes.

This is way outside my area of competence.

So I'd always assumed that at this top level of function there was a top level of error checking. Both human and digital.

Systems for checking that what is meant to go to x actually goes to X and systems that make sure humans don't press the wrong button. Or at least if they do that it's spotted PDQ.

Engineers in other system critical areas seem to have this, usually. e.g. Aircraft engineers.

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