* Posts by Terry 6

729 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

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100s of Virgin Media customers hit by handset repair glitch, telco admits

Terry 6
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Ghastly bunch

I used to really like having a VM phone.

But in the last few years they've got horrible.

The broadband/TV/Landline service I get is still great.

But the mobile service became expensive and terribly bureaucratic.

But they won't negotiate a better contract for a good loyal customer anymore - just giving a standard, small, discount that still leaves the price higher than the opposition - presumably they see loyal customers as suckers

When things go wrong they don't want to know.

And they don't seem to care.

When you ask for a reasonable resolution to something they've got wrong they just say no. And of challenged you get a "We can't do that". Which I personally find really annoying because of course they can. At least saying "won't" would have been honest.

Most recently they c****ed up transferring the phone number from my daughter's phone to her new supplier. And then wouldn't answer the emails from that supplier to them. Until I had to contact them myself and threaten going to the ombudsman. And it still took them a couple of days to respond.

But they never used to be like that.

And the other VM services I have are great.

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Apple Watch rationing caused by the MOON GOAT, not quality

Terry 6
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: Oh BS

As 6 degrees noted, creating fake shortages is an old trick.

This is just an iTracey iSland/iCabbage Patch Watch for the older children.

(Actually, probably the same ones, just that they're a lot older now).

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EU wants a panel o'boffins to replace solo science advisor

Terry 6
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Re: So

Hmm,

Yes you are probably right.

The think-tank game is already quite a clever one.

A "think tank" is set up, which argues strongly for a given approach or belief.

They make lots of arguments that are logical, but without any solid evidence.

Which they then establish by repetition.

And once they've done that they publish a report that is well argued and measured, but built upon the same unproven assumptions, with maybe a small, poorly designed study that appears to support them,

Then another group starts up," independently" to lobby the Powers That Be to implement those approaches. And they produce "evidence "to support themselves. The evidence of course being the rather dodgy research and recommendations of the first group.

Other equally independent groups stand up and demand to know why such a well supported and obvious course of action hasn't been followed up. Making great reference to all sorts of apparent evidence, that all lead back to the one dodgy study and the various reports that have been published by the previous two lobby groups based on this, and so on.

Except that these groups all seem to share the same pool of supporters and members, in various permutations.

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Terry 6
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Re: Evidence based policy

Precisely,

The best case in point, (IMHO)

When HM Govt. decided to appoint a panel of independent experts to decide what is the best way to teach reading they selected a chair with very well known strong views supporting a particularly populist approach, easy to sell to the electorate, with a team to support him that were supportive, and they went and took "evidence" from the institutions that were particularly successful examples of the same approach.

All "independent" of the govt. of course.

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Tesco tries to talk Tesco Mobile up from 'Value' to 'Finest' ahead of sale

Terry 6
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Re: @ Terry 6

@ Arristotle's.....etc.

There's no fine nuance here.

I am stuck on a contract that I chose to pay Tesco for, but is being sold off to a supplier that I did not choose, potentially the supplier I moved away from.

At the end of my contract I can certainly move.

That is in the realm of the bleedin' obvious.

But there is nothing in my contract as far as I can tell which lets me tell the new owners to sling their hooks. Until it ends in about 18 months time

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Terry 6
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Dammit

Only a few months back I went from Virgin Mobile to Tesco, because Virgin's customer service had been dire ( for mobile, I love my other Virgin Media services), and expensive.

I like my Tesco service.

I absolutely don't want to be thrown back to VM.

Is there a chance I will be allowed to exit my contract early?

I have more chance of sending messages attached to a flying pig.

Am I the only customer getting pretty pi**ed off by being sold on by people I chose to buy services from?

I have to emphasise this.

I made a consumer choice to leave Virgin Mobile and go to Tesco Mobile. ( And not to TalkTalk!)

But my choice is about to be stolen from me.

And there is f**k all I can do about it.

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Lies, damn lies and election polls: Why GE2015 pundits fluffed the numbers so badly

Terry 6
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Re: Poll effect

As it happens, it turns out that Labour's own polling company had seen this very thing, according to today (Tuesday's) BBC web site.

To the extent that they are even suggesting that polls showing Labour being behind in the last few days would have been to their benefit.

As it goes, then, there does seem to be a strong suggestion, at the very least, that the polls had an effect on the outcome

It was a Heisenberg election.

(Ok technically for the purists, it's the Observer Effect, but why spoil the image).

With Mr. Cameron as Schroedinger's PM.

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Terry 6
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Re: Registration bias

You miss the point.

They can't do that anymore.

It's individual registration now.

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Terry 6
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Poll effect

I wonder, we may never know, whether a great many potential LibDem or Labour votes were diverted by the threat of those close opinion polls in England and the overwhelming showing for the SNP leaving them holding the balance of power and pulling Labour's strings - as they claimed they would be. Which left voters going into the booths and choosing to vote for the safer choice of a Tory party that won't be dependant on the Scottish MPs.

In effect the SNP shooting their own fox.

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Get ready: 'Critical' Adobe Reader patches coming on Tuesday 12 May

Terry 6
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Wait!!!

You mean you can also use an Adobe product to read PDFs?

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Keurig to drop coffee DRM after boss admits 'we were wrong'

Terry 6
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Crazy Ops Guy

That seems a lot of effort to recreate a tea bag.

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Sorry, Windows 10 early adopters: Microsoft Edge WON'T block ads at launch

Terry 6
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FAIL

Re: @Russle

And I'm not sure he posted in English either.

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Terry 6
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Re: Answer: The hosts file.

Kevin

It's not all about you, it's about ordinary users.

Who think a hosts file is a list of who will give them dinner.

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UK exam board wants kids to be able to Google answers

Terry 6
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Re: No, it's just the opposite

I agree. Some stuff has to be learnt. Particularly concepts and methods.

But that's not the same as saying all/most of what we assess has to be rote learned facts.

Too many of the arguments in this thread are based on reductio ad absurdium and "straw man" arguments.

Attacking the concept that we should use open book/internet sources as if this was proposed as the only exam type.

But maybe that's because those people are the ones that got where they are through rote learning and so aren't very sharp in the fields of reasoning and judgement.

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Terry 6
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Summary

Unusually I've posted several times in this thread.

Because I'm a teacher, and a parent of teenagers.

But, also because I believe quite passionately that the "dumbing down" is not prevented by mechanical rote learning; it's caused by it.

Creating a generation who slog along, marching in step, learning their lessons by heart and regurgitating them without thought.

Yes we need to learn and know stuff.

But that's not the same as building our education and exam system on great mounds of memorised facts that can be forgotten as soon as the exam is passed

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Terry 6
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Re: Bah!

@Fink-Nottle

>"The purpose of an examination is not only to quantify your innate intelligence and understanding, but how well you can apply yourself in your chosen field. The person who can apply themselves to rote learning is likely to be the person who will apply themselves in their career."

So you equate being able to memorise, regurgitate and forget with "applying themselves". And consider that this is the key skill.

That doesn't hold water.

To start with, slogging away for a couple of years is not the same as growing and developing for a lifetime.

Then in that group of rote learners are those who are just naturally good at recall irrespective of other abilities such as understanding or indeed preseverance as well as those that do indeed have perseverance and can apply themselves, slogging away until they master the subject, but it does not include those who have aptitude, insight, creativity or even many who have genuine interest or commitment, but who just aren't good at churning out preformed answers to artificial questions.

Further traditional exams are a peculiar form of pressure that some deal with bettter than others. And while there are definitely some roles that routinely require you to find answers under pressure most do not and will give you time to think, reflect and investigate solutions.

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Terry 6
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Re: Surprised no-one's suggested this one yet

As opposed to now. Where you have to buy them in advance and try to memorise the answers, hoping that you can recall the ones that do come up.

or just use;

http://www.cliffsnotes.com/

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Terry 6
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Re: Bah!

No, it's just the opposite. Short term rote learning is very much still what the exam system is about.

But those under and over 50 who did well and got good jobs are quite often the ones who promptly forgot everything they learnt as soon as they put down their pens.

What is important, Google or no Google, is that the students should be able to apply knowledge.

So the exam questions would need to be written to test understanding.

In a sense the factual information could even be provided on the test paper, if the question was taxing of ability to use it.

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Terry 6
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Re: Exams?

Well said. Sandman. But sadly it's also the same people who have done well out of short term rote learning who slide into positions of authority. And they are not going to give up on, or argue against ( unlike your good self) what made them successful.

The pointy haired bosses want to stay as bosses.

And no politician ever got elected by arguing for a creative answer.

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Terry 6
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@Ledswinger

God Yes!!!

We've rewarded those who can learn by rote and parrot facts, and then probably forget them as soon as they leave the room.

Those who can integrate information, draw conclusions and understand implications of data are the ones we need. But the exam system penalises them. And it starts very early on (<11).

The biggest joke ( for the younger kids) is that the current govt. want them to rote learn their 12x table for SATS.

I can remember 12d to the shilling.

And 12 inches to a foot.

But I don't need to calculate them anymore.

And labelling a kid a failure if they can't remember that 7x12=84, when being able to work out 7x12= 7(2+10) is much more useful amounts to sheer lunacy. But it's a touchstone for how we use the exam system.

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Give me POWER: How to keep working when the lights go out

Terry 6
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Avoid the bureacrats getting involved

I used to have a business continuity plan - on two sides of A4- that covered just about every scenario that we could think of.

E.g. Staff working from a either home or a set of partner sites that would be prepared to lend us a bit of space (quid pro quo).

Access to essential files and confidentiality arrangements. And so on. All planned for.

Then the corporate people came in on the act.

They bought a massive web based business continuity database system (anyone see the weakness there?). Which was so fiendishly complicated that it wasn't only just about impossible to populate all the fields and sub-fields, but it was totally impossible to actually get any action plan out of it.

There were sections and sub-sections all of which had incomprehensible names and no recognisible logic to the structure.. Compulsory fields that made no sense in our context. Nowhere to put other genuinely essential actions that were core to our continuity (like those partner spaces, because the designers hadn't thought about distributed working. At least that we could find,)

In the end the trainers who had been hired to help us set up our plans had to go round and set them up for all the (council) departments. And while they were doing it they told us that in a real crisis we should just have available.......... can you see this coming? A plan on two sides of A4.

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'Use 1 capital' password prompts make them too predictable – study

Terry 6
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Setting password rules requires two sets of skills

One is the mathematical, knowing the cryptography rules that make the p/w "strong".

The other is psychological.

Knowing what can reasonably be expected of a reasonably sane user. And that doesn't mean what they could or should do, but what they would do.

So, if you insist on a capital letter mathematically reasonable it may be but a user will place it where they can remember they put it - which is largely where they would expect to find it.

So they might use "Password", possibly "PassworD" if they think they're being clever, but never "pasSword".

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Why Box and not SharePoint? 'Everybody doesn't hate us' says Box engineering veep

Terry 6
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Re: I hate box.

Ironically then, I hate Box because of ( how they implemented) that sync tool.

I had it installed on my home PC in my log-in.

My missus has her own log-in to same machine.

But Box sync insisted on popping up every time she used the computer.

Because it automatically installs as an autostart registry item, for all users. With no options.

I temporarily solved the problem by removing it from the registry and putting it in my start-up folder instead.

But every few days there'd be a minor update, and it would use the opportunity to load itself back in to the registry again.

Cue earache from herself.

Eventually I just gave up. And dumped it.

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It's official: David Brents are the weakest link in phishing attacks

Terry 6
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Re: Bad Grammar

"Send As" should be abolished as well. Wake up execs everyone knows you dont send your own email...its pointless trying to hide it."

I wish.

Admins log in to the account with the username and password that the exec should be using. And if said admin is busy/on leave/ill/ having lunch etc. someone else is given the credentials to use.Unless they're already on a post it note next to the screen.

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What's 'appening with WhatsApp? '800 MEEELLION LOSERS* actively use us', says boss

Terry 6
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Re: Why "chumps"?

Standard SMS messages are limited and images are "off-plan" so cost real money.

I'd much rather pay a small amount each year for messaging that works across 4G/WiFi with all that rich content.

For domestic use, round the family and friends it is brilliant.

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Let’s PULL Augmented Reality and CLIMAX with JISM

Terry 6
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Re: That reminds me

ANY presentation taking place in a school, on school equipment is going to be a sad mixture of tedium and disaster.

The presenters will have limited IT skills in most cases. And certainly won't actually know how to make any kit work other than the one he or she used to prepare the presentation.

The only person in the school who understands the equipment will have long since given up attending any event that includes Powerpoint for the obvious reasons that a. he or she will end up working as an unpaid engineer and b. having been there, done that for any number of such occasions has long since lost any interest in attending anyway.

The equipment itself has been cobbled and bodged together over a number of years and has a complete set of incompatible cables attached to every possible place in or near it. Many of these are the wrong size or type and if actually required to work, will fall out at crucial moments, because should the right cable be in the right place it will not have the little screws that hold it in ( or alternatively will, but there won't be any little screw holes for them to go in to). The system will work with either the USB lead or the lead that should have had the little screws, but not both. However, no one has been told this, so the system only works when one of these falls out, which fortunately, as noted above, is pretty often.

The school is still using MS Office from 1980 something, but the presenter will have written everything in the latest geewhizz version, including some pretty slick effects that rely on the software being the latest version and having a good internet connection, which they never did get round to installing in the school hall.

The school computer will have been tied down and configured so that nothing, absolutely nothing, can be run from a memory stick without entering the password into three different places. Nobody there knows the password.

The bulb in the ageing projector has long since given up trying to produce light and simply sits and glows gently. Anyway the remote went missing years ago, and each time the button on the projector is pressed it goes a little more out of alignment. No one knows how to calibrate it.

No one has ever worked out how to make the speakers work.

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BOFH: Explain? All we need is this kay-sh with DDR3 Cortexiphan ...

Terry 6
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Re: Kaysh

FWIW

I got older child to show me the correct phonetic spelling of "cache". The appropriate English pronunciation for the word still remains what it was. She's at uni. Learning about speech and stuff.

kæʃ which is English

keɪʃ which is American

I told her about the kæʃeɪ (cachet) version and she said, "Oh My God that's terrible".

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EU says dominant Google ILLEGALLY FIDDLES search results

Terry 6
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Sadly...

.....lots of people think the internet *is* Google.

You know the ones I mean. The ones who don't know how to use the URL and type the page name into....... Google.

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Terry 6
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Re: Dog food eating

@John Liburne

It said,

"Try finding this page in Google Search

http://mywikibiz.com/Naval_architecture_in_the_Industrial_Age".

So I said that BTW I did try.

So your point was.....?

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Terry 6
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Re: Dog food eating

I have to disagree. While Google's results are usually about 50% crap the other alternatives are either 80% crap or too limited to provide the results, or both.

BTW I looked for "Naval_architecture_in_the_Industrial_Age"

Came top of the list. In Google.

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Microsoft cramming free stuff into Galaxy S6es? Not so fast – US telcos

Terry 6
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Re: If you can't beat them ...

The thing is I feel torn about this ( to be fair, in as much as I give a monkey's which isn't much).

On the one hand if every one else is doing it, then yes good luck to Microsoft.

But on the other hand, it pi**es me off no end that phones come with so much preinstalled cr*p that usually can't even be removed.

If mobile phone companies sold cars you'd have to drive past their shop at the start and end of every journey and the radio would always turn on to their station.

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Microsoft uses Windows Update to force Windows 10 ads onto older PCs

Terry 6
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Devil

Re: Strange

As a footnote to this;

https://www.dropbox.com/s/655xn9u3hd3bk8x/Screen%20Shot%2004-11-15%20at%2007.26%20PM.JPG?dl=0

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Terry 6
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Trollface

Re: Only 1337 downvotes?

Have an upvote. I'm in a good mood tonight.

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Terry 6
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Re: Strange

I'll trump the "Exactly the same text".

There are also the " more information " links that just go to a generic page (This is what drivers do....) and at the top of the list is the "Page not available" messages. ( Are they really too badly managed to realise that that they have to get the information pages out at the same time as the download link?)

All of which with the subject of this thread just add to the evidence of Microsoft's strange deathwish-like ability to shoot itself in the foot even when it seems to be trying to get things right.

Dammit, I like Microsoft. And if they piss me off like this what do they do to less positive users?

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Microsoft Lumia 640, 640XL: They're NOT the same, mmmkay?

Terry 6
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Re: Why the same number?

And I suddenly realised we've been going backwards for years.

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Terry 6
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Re: Come on Microsoft

Personally I'd have ALL marketing departments rounded up and taken round the back of the building.......

Show me a marketing "executive" that can't find a good idea and f**k it up until it's useless.

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Operation Redstone: Microsoft preps double Windows update in 2016

Terry 6
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Re: Subscription model?

There are some people who like to rent stuff. True.

But most want to own their stuff if they can.

And if it's the stuff that makes my other stuff, like my computer, ( which I own) work I'll be damned if I'll pay rental for it.

Monthly payment for consumption ( fuel, bandwidth even water) is one thing. But for a product. No.

I'll be out the windows and into Linux.

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Streaming tears of laughter as Jay-Z (Tidal) waves goodbye to $56m

Terry 6
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Bank Holiday?

Usually Dabsy does humour.

So why is this weekend's offering just a straight documentary?

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Virgin Media goes TITSUP, RUINS Tuesday evening

Terry 6
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VM service

"They could at least have put something on their service status page which all the way through declared a perfect service!"

It's a long standing issue with VM.

They don't tell the truth on the web page, and often don't tell their front line support staff what's going on so they go through the whole switch it off and on again routine.

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700,000 beautiful women do the bidding of one Twitter-scamming man

Terry 6
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Be fair

If it wasn't for the gullible most of the internet wouldn't be financially viable.

Think of it as a mug tax. Install the usual blockers and enjoy it for free.

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UK call centre linked to ‘millions’ of nuisance robo-calls raided by ICO

Terry 6
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get the paymasters

Sod the call centres.

It's the PPI companies and other filth who use them who need to be taken round the back and sorted out.

(And some medical treatment for anyone who falls for this stinking bait! Who are these suckers who make the sh*t worthwhile?)

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Apple slips out security patches while world goes gaga over watches

Terry 6
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Hype and cover

All the hype and publicity for the iWrist thingy is brilliant cover for slipping out anything that might take the shine off their products, like bug and security fixes.

And boy! What hype there has been. Even the BBC seems to be infected, An article on their news website today that purports to be questioning whether there is a market for this stuff is just one long puff, with no attempt whatsoever to find out if anyone wants the ithingy, or what they might really use it for. Just a final jokey comment at the end, saying that kids don't wear watches, to justify the whole item.

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'Why Digital?' Seriously? You plainly don't Get It enough. Or at all

Terry 6
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Re: The "Digital" Shortcut

"the thing covered in scribbles..someone, the night previous took the whiteboard bit to mean 'I can use the markers on it.."

Usually, in my experience this happens when the hapless supply teacher needs to teach by writing on the Digital WB because "going digital" has meant that there is now no ordinary board to write onto, she doesn't realise that you can't use a normal pen on these things, and hasn't been given a password to the aging lappy that serves the board, and which has been set to time out after about 10 minutes. i.e as soon as the staff member who has set it up for her has vanished and the kids are about to come in.

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Terry 6
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Devil

Re: The "Digital" Shortcut

That's the real point. Middle managers with ambition, but usually little knowledge in their own jobs ( whatever these happen to be, it doesn't have to be "arts graduates" ) jump on to the latest new thing and promote themselves (both senses of the word) It's kind of like the employment version of playing Mario.*

Each new buzzword, fad, invention or whatever it is that has appeared over the horizon has to be jumped on to help them move further and higher. The new fad has to be grasped.

By the time to poor sods who have been landed with making the current pile of manure work have reached the point of despair those b******ds have moved on to a new title, a new power base and of course a newest, bestest fad.

* The only thing worse than being in education or IT for this kind cr*p is working with education IT.

Teachers are told they have to use the latest digital whatever it is. Tons of hardware bought, with no planning before, or training after purchase. Purchase being of course made on their behalf by someone who has no idea how it needs to be used, being neither a teacher nor a field tecchie.

The teachers are left floundering trying to make the stuff work educationally and the IT support is worked into the ground trying to sort out all the issues when it goes wrong for an almost unlimited range of poor practice.

Favourite example? Interactive White Board.

Teachers end up using it as a hitech blackboard with Powerpoint, because no one has paid for training, so they don't know what software is even on the system, let alone how to use it.. Tecchies end up sorting out such things as problems with calibration because the remote control vanished months ago and each time the physical "on" button on the badly sited projector is pressed the dratted thing moves slightly, as well as error messages about projector maintenance ( such as "the filter needs cleaning") that seem to appear randomly., or sound mysteriously not working because no one knew what the annoying wire that keeps falling out is meant for. Though even the poor teacher has worked out that the bit that goes on to the computer has screws to hold it in place, but the place it goes in to hasn't got any holes for the screws.

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Tulsa woman bludgeons man mercilessly with laptop

Terry 6
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Go

Don't you mean....

The damage caused *to* the laptop was not detailed.

After all this is El Reg.

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MELTDOWN: Samsung, Sony not-so-smart TVs go titsup for TWO days

Terry 6
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Sony Bravia

Mine seems to routinely lose its connection, refusing to connect to the wifi hub, which it can see, but refuses to admit it can see.

I only become aware of this on the odd occasion that I actually look at the internet through it, which is pretty rare.

I think I resolve it by restoring factory settings. I think that's what I do.I can't actually remember how I resolved it last time. There isn't anything in the instructions.

But it shouldn't need that sort of TLC.

It;s a TV, ffs.

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MP resigns as security committee chair amid 'cash-for-access' claims

Terry 6
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Re: The Superman defence

Yes, that's the really, really depressing thing.

It was a sting, but could equally have been a dodgy government, dodgy oligarch, HSBC, anyone.

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Leaky battery attack reveals the paths you walk in life

Terry 6
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Re: My answer to your question.... the majority of the technically illiterate numpties on the planet e.g. world and dog."

Yes, most of the apps offered in the Googlestore seem to grab all sorts of permissions that have no relevance to their function. Not the least being call data.

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