* Posts by Terry 6

611 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

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You have a 'SIMPLE QUESTION'? Well, the answer is NO

Terry 6
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Re: Lost train passengers

You've been to Watford Junction then.

No arrivals board, but there's a tiny monitor that is supposed to show arrivals. They use it for generic messages instead, most of the time. Even though there's another enormous screen showing even more useless messages, nearby. Staff behind the counter sometimes know how long the delayed train will be. If you actually know it's delayed and if you can face waiting in the queue. And the guy on the barrier is really nice, but knows nothing.

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New fear: ISIS killers use 'digital AK-47' malware to hunt victims

Terry 6
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Re: modernity

It's not modernity they reject, it's modern civilisation. They seem to want the 14thC but with technology. They seem to have made very good use of the interwebs to get their foul messages across.

.

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Terry 6
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Opposition

This might be a crude attack, but it's aimed at opposition fighters, not techies. Possibly people with limited understanding of the internet and its risks.

And may well be stage one. With more sophisticated stuff to come.

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Soon EVERYONE will be doing it with a strap-on: The Reg's 20 festive wearables

Terry 6
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Re: Useless junk

OK. I'll take it that you are one of the ones who thinks he/she really needs this thing. And I'll leave it to the commentards to judge..

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Terry 6
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Useless junk

Who actually needs an exercise tracker?

Pro/elite athletes have a team to analyse their performance, properly. Because they have performance targets.

Anyone else has no need for this stuff. If anyone wants to get fitter they just need to do more than they already doing. And you don't need a shiny wrist ornament for that.

Which means that the only possible punters to buy these gadgets are going to be the Lycra posers.

Are there enough d***heads to make this stuff viable?

I doubt it.

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30,000 people buy a box of BOVINE EXCREMENT

Terry 6
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Just looked this game up

I hadn't heard of it before.

Thank God I don't know anyone in Islington anymore.

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Ofcom mulls selling UK govt's IPv4 cache amid IPv6 rollout flak

Terry 6
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Re: Does anyone trust Ofcom to handling any IP addressing?

CABvolunteer

Well yes, judging by London phone numbers, OFCOM and Bodge are close synonyms.

To implement the London 8x and 7x numbers OFCOM had a changeover period where you still had to dial the old number [ 123 4567 ] within london, but 0208 or 0207 outside - even though the 020 was the new dialiing code for London and the 8 or 7 bit was part of the new internal number . Which means businesses dealing outside the 020 areas had to print stationery with (0207) prefixes for their phone numbers on, and then reprint them with 020 prefixes when the 7123 4567 form came on-stream properly

Years later you still see printed phone numbers with the intermediate form. Often even now newly printed vehicle and shop signs may have (0207) 123 4567 instead of (020) 7123 4567. Most Londonors just get on with it, but it still causes confusion when, for example, giiving your phone number to someone who is coming to London or dictating a phone number for someone who is on the same exchange.

And then they added 020 3x numbers, which pop up pretty much randomly..

And how they could have allowed the way that London's phone books are (or were, who bothers with them anymore) organised is a total mystery. I live in a London postcode. But in a borough that has a lot of Outer London codes too.

So do I get the London Directories matching my geographic postal district?

Or do I get an Outer London one?

More to the point, do I get to choose?

What do you think?

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Brit boffins debunk 'magnetic field and cancer' link

Terry 6
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Negative research

One of the big discussions about science research last year ( e.g. in the pages of New Scientist etc) was the fact that negative results tend not to get published. No one gets a research grant for not proving something.

So it's good that this one did appear. Even though it's probably an exception for a very obvious reason.

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Terry 6
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Coat

Re: Physical Vs Perceived

I knew there was something they were hiding from us!

Ban those sheep I say.

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Sacre block! French publishers to sue Adblock maker – report

Terry 6
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Re: advertising are getting increasingly peeved

There's an App on my Lumia phone (Jack of Tools) that has banner ads on the bottom. Which would have been fine except that the ads themselves were horrible.

So I contacted the app's owner. He didn't know what the ads were like, and asked for a screenshot or two.Then he found a new adserver. And these are much more acceptable ads. No flashing,no casinos, no fake competitions.

So it can be done.

Sometimes I click on an ad.

I don't know if he gets paid per ad or per click.

It doesn't matter. Either way, If I click they'll pay.

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Terry 6
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Re: @Terry 6

@Ted

Sorry and in the late 50s myself there aren't many I'd want to see flashing up on the screen.

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Terry 6
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Re: How much value to users put on web sites

@inventor of....

Yes Yes Yes, I have no problem with static ads. I even click on some of them from time to time, to pay my "dues".

But I don't get advertising that turns a web page into a swamp of flashing lights, sliding banners, unfeasable offers and so forth. It just makes the sites unusable. So Adblock Edge it is.

I assume there must be a tribe of idiots that spend money based on this sh*t. But even they can't really think they're the 10,000th person to look at that banner every time they see it. Can they?

And how often do they really feel tempted to see their friends naked? ( especially since I doubt very much that they will).

I just don't understand how the bastards that spawn this stuff make their money. Or who from.

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BOFH: Santa, bloody Santa

Terry 6
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Re: Wonderful, just great

@Joe Zeff

November!

Where were you in September/October?

Never mind. Only a couple more weeks and the Easter Eggs will be in the shops.

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How HAPPY am I on a scale of 1 to 10? Where do I click PISSED OFF?

Terry 6
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Re: A word of warning

Actually, it starts at a more basic level- the supermarket checkout.

There are some people ( I use the word loosely) who will stand in line, watch all their goods being scanned through, pack it all into bags and only then will they start to fish through their pockets/handbag to find their wallet/purse. The idea of having the cash or card ready and accessible just doesn't occur to them.

(They are probably the same ones who go to fill-up and won't use the "Pay-at-pump", but insist on leaving their car while they trudge inside to use the clone-me counter.)

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Terry 6
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Leading questions

The point is they only ask questions that elicit what they want to hear.

If they know four aspects of the product/service that are reasonably good, and one that is absolutely terrible they will ask about the 4 OK ones.

There will be questions about, say, the colour, weight, packaging and power of the widgit, but will make sure there is nowhere to record that the "on" button can only be operated by an octopus.

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Terry 6
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Re: It's articles like this..

Before we took my 8 year old to the USA a few years back, to visit our cousins, she heard us talking about airport security. We explained that Americans don't understand sarcasm

So one of the first thing she said to Cousin was "Americans don't understand........"

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Terry 6
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Re: Why would anyone bother

".....trying to find out what Kerbal Space Program merchandise I would like to buy."

The products mean nothing to me, but the quoted question suggests that they weren't asking what you thought of the stuff,or whether you in fact did want to buy it/thought it over priced/ or whatever.

In fact it's a beautiful example of a loaded question.

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Terry 6
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Re: Although a fairly accurate and amusing portrayal of LHR security...

@ P.Lee

Marmite.

Maybe they are just working for the Marmite makers.

They have a thing about it being brought in and out of different countries from where it was made.

So some strictly religious Jews in the UK can no longer get guaranteed kosher Marmite (some change in the manufacture proccess here), but it can (could) be obtained overseas and imported.

But no, Marmite stepped in, went to court and stopped the small stores who'd imported it.

Same stuff, same company. And a tiny number of people in the UK who would go to these lengths to get their toast covering - but who would not, under any circumstances now eat the UK product. So Marmite would rather lose them as customers than let them buy and bring in their tiny supply.

It seems to be some sort of obsession with them.

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DeathRing: Cheapo Androids pre-pwned with mobile malware

Terry 6
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impossible to remove because it’s pre-installed in the system directory,

This is the underlying aspect of Android that seriously pisses me off.

My device, that I purchased with good money comes with crapware ( or just plain unwanted software), OK. That's business. Annoying, but that's part of the price we have to pay.

But making it permanent so that nothing I can* do will stop it clogging up my list of apps is just a stupid piece of work. If I'm going to use something, I'll use it. If not then making it impossible to shift out isn't going to change that.

The fact that a bunch of crooks has gone one step further is hardly a surprise.

*taking the view as an ordinary user, because I don't want to invalidate my warranty by rooting the device.

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RIP Microsoft Clip Art – now you can fill your slides with web cat pics

Terry 6
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About time

Dire, glib, pointless, cliche'd, uninmaginative images. Only value was to warn you early on that the whole presentation was going to be even more crap than usual.

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Vodafone eyes up Liberty Global – report

Terry 6
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Re: retail communications

second footnote.

This time I asked to speak to a supervisor. 20 minutes holding a silent phone. Soon it will be time to hang up, I have to go out. And a fomal letter.

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Terry 6
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Re: retail communications

Footnote.

Today I am on the phone to VM again.

The first call agent took my explanationof the problem, then cut me off.

The second left me on hold for 20 minutes (before I hung up and called back again) after she said she was checking my account.

Still waiting in a queue now.

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Terry 6
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retail communications

In the UK it seems like we're just here to be fucked over, and made to pay for it.

This comes on the evening when my daughter discovered that Virgin hadn't sent her the promised text as her monthly data allowance was running low. Then when it reached zero and we tried to buy a bigger allowance weren't able to do anything because their systems were off line until Sunday midday.

Mobile, cable, POTS. It doesn't matter which.

We're just the meat in a corporate buffet.

I had no say when Virgin Mobile (which I used to like) became part of Liberty, even though I had a contract with Virgin. And which I have already started to loath, as the deals have become so much poorer and the customer service worse. Two of our family phones are now elsewhere and a third about to move. A year ago I would never have considered this.

I had no say when my cable company (Cable London), which I liked, was swallowed up by C&W, (which I didn't) which then became NTL, and is now Virgin; which to be fair I do like. So far.

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TalkTalk email goes titsup FOR DAYS. Cheapo telco warns: Changing password WON'T fix it

Terry 6
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Re: Oh gawd...

"Worse still, they were repeatedly nagged to enter their email password."

There is very little excuse for allowing a service to fall over, but leave the users trying to log in to a failing web page, then allowing a message to run telling them, or implying, that it is their own fault. .

But they all seem to do it.

It seems to be an industry wide delusion that the users will somehow not figure out that it is the ISP's fault, so that they can get away with suggesting that it's only that user having a problem.

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Go festive this year with Christmas carols, baby Jesus and CLITORAL STIMULATORS

Terry 6
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Email

By Wednesday I'd added the phrase to my filters - send to junk, of course.

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Ten excellent FREE PC apps to brighten your Windows

Terry 6
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Re: Antivirus

Microsoft's AV stuff is ideal to force a bit of protection on the low end user, someone who doesn't get being careful out there, let alone maintaining their PC and paying for updated AV software.

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I need a password to BRAKE? What? No! STOP! Aaaargh!

Terry 6
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Re: Negative view on Sat nav

We switched from TomTom to Garmin because to get the traffic update renewal you had to buy a whole (expensive) package of stuff we didn't want. But now we regret this. Garmin has, as Dabbsy says, a lifetime update. But it doesn't seem to actually be any good. Months of driving in traffic jams while the Garmin looks at us and promises "NO traffic ahead" and we've had enough of it.

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Terry 6
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Re: Sorry

When the kids were little a Citroen Berlingo was perfect. (Peugeot are also Citroen, and do the same vehicle slightly higher specced, possibly).

It's not flashy, far from it. It's not speedy, or smart. But absolutely perfectly functional. It does exactly what it was designed to do, and does it well. Tons of storage in any spare space. Lots of power outlets for the DVD players. Seat back tables for the kids to colour ( and eat) on.

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Terry 6
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Dabbsy come back.

You're meant to write witty, human pieces for us. The clairvoyance stuff has to stop .Get rid of this Kelly Fiveash and get back to work

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BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?

Terry 6
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Re: In the old days

The pulleys might have changed, but the sales technique is still the same.

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Terry 6
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Aargh, this reminds me of our multifunction printer

Oh God. The nightmares are coming back. Managing an education team that was run as part of the council, but was not a council office, and being responsible for the day-to-day IT work, with the schools' IT team, not the council's corporate team for back-up.

Our first multi-function printer/copier was fairly simple, but we couldn't get the go ahead from management to network it straight away. I don't know why, but I'm guessing that they just didn't understand the concept.The engineers from the copy company said it wasn't a problem, we can do that later.

There then followed about three years of me and the education IT team calling in engineers from both the copy company and corporate IT to come to look at connecting the thing to the network and going away again. But without ever connectiing it.

Eventually I got one to admit that it had been installed without a network card, and that would now count as an upgrade at some incredible cost. So we carried on printing from our various stand-alone inkjets, at ridiculous cost in ink.

Then we got a visit to ask our requirements for a new machine, on the new contract. I went through our needs with great care. All the cost saving and efficiency requirements like security ( we were working with reports on vulnerable kids) print on arrival and so on to be set up, staff trainning etc. All was agreed. The Education IT team sat in on the meetings with me so that we all knew what part of the set-up would be their's, what part the supplier's and what part would be mine.

And then the thing arrived. And someone in the council had decided that we didn't need any customisations, so the machine was set-up in a generic form, replicated for all council departments and totally failing to meet the requirements we had, in an off-site teaching service. Training consisted on a half hour with a rep, for a few managers and admin staff who happened to be around. Nothing about the advanced features that we needed, even if we'd been able to absorb them when we were still learning basic opeations. I tried to do my bit and set up the mail boxes, secure printing and print on demand codes. And none of it worked. For the next year we had our engineer from education IT liaising with the copy company, and and eventually finding a couple of work arounds to help slightly. But we never got any of the features we needed. Not even the print on demand, which was supposed to save the hundreds of waste pages per week and ensure confidential documents weren't lying around.

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Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads

Terry 6
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Re: Obviously...

Absolutely,

If they had to pay themselves, ( or had any ethical standards) they'd want to know which was the most economical.

Since it's a shiny toy they want the coolest, best known device that they can flash around.

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BOFH: An UNHOLY MATCH forged amid the sweet smell of bullsh*t

Terry 6
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Re: "Like money on expensive consultants?" I ask

@dan1900

The classic example of this is in education.

The then government, already wanting to see "phonics" as the be all and end all of teaching reading. (It being simple, cheap, easy for the electorate to understand, popular with the big publishing companies who could sell schools lots of cheap kit expensively and a good sound bite) appointed a "commission" to decide the best way to teach reading. Chaired, of course, by someone who had already made clear that he believed that phonics was the be all and end all of teaching reading.

You'd never have guessed his conclusion (would you?).

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Terry 6
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Re: Consultants eye view

"Usually to find a justification for getting rid of people."

Even when they aren't firing there's still an alternative. Covering their backsides.

A consultant's report is management's way of justifying their own role and blaming someone else.

At either juncture, I've been through several episodes of consultant disease over the years.

Consistently, at the end of it we find there are fewer frontline staff doing the work and more beancounters. Even when there are cuts being made the number of higher managers goes up.

Where previously there were too few frontline staff and even more limited numbers of support staff behind them, after the consultancy there are often many fewer of the support and admin staff who had freed up the frontline staff to do the work, because consultants never seem to get the idea that filing reports and adding up hours takes time that could be better used with the clients. Yet, the number of suits always increases. And they somehow always need additional staff to support them. (But their's aren't called admin - so disposable- but "assistants" and are essential parts of the management).

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Terry 6
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A lot of organisations ignore their own staff's expertise

@localzuk

I don't understand what you are saying here. Are you in a position to employ the consultants yourself?

Or one of the frontline staff who get consulted on from a great height?

If the former, be very careful. The consultants you hire may well decide that there is more butter for the bread with the people upstairs who you are trying to influence. You can't simply trust them to say what you want them to, if there is a better offer available. Or to put it another way, you might find that you become the meat in the sandwich.

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Terry 6
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But yeah

In every field there are these types, usually coming from big named companies, who vacuum up a big chunk of the budget to issue a bullshit report based on a mythical expertise that is often invented by the company that employs them. It's all smoke and mirrors, but with the force of the big consulting agency wafting them onwards. There never seems to be any real evidence to support the underlying assumptions and any "research" is usually created by themselves to justify their own claims.

Management consultants are the worst, since they are all, by definition, NOT managing anything if they are out being consultants. And, I should add, education management consultants are the worst of the worst ( I know, I've done the training). They aren't managing *or* teaching. I wouldn't leave any of them alone in a room with the silverware.

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UK urged to stop bigging up startups, feed 'growing' firms

Terry 6
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The system

We've built a political system around *them* taking credit for new stuff. So no one has any interest in keeping existing stuff going on. That holds for businesses, education, even the NHS, which they keep messing about with because they don't dare say they want to scrap it. (Even Farage had to backtrack on that one).

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Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up

Terry 6
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Re: Once again

Didn't actually happen in my bit of London, see above.

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You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes

Terry 6
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Re: When you assist aunty to buy a computer I suggest you also

Yeah, and not just aunty, of course.

My late mother took up computers in her 80s- without, of course. asking me what to buy etc. Trusting a crony to tell her what to get. (Expensive, full of crapware, and with lots of optional stuff that she'd never use). So as soonas I got teh chance I did all of that, and added some remoting in software, too. So that I could sort stuff out from 200 miles away. After the same crony used it ( suppsedly said crony was helping her, but that's another story) but who allowed all sorts of malware in, as well as messing the PC up big time.

Good free AV software, with automatic updates. No Admin rights. And a button ( icon) marked "help" if she was having problems.

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DEATH fails to end mobile contract: Widow forced to take HUBBY's ASHES into shop

Terry 6
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Annoying solution

There's something particularly irritating when companies caught out by the media screwing over one of their customers suddenly put their hands up, sort out the problem and apologise to *that* customer, when they don't actually take any action when anyone else not lucky enough to get the attention of Watchdog, or even El Reg, needs their equally ghastly experience resolved

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Poll: Yes, yes, texting while driving is bad but *ping* OH! Hey, GRAB THE WHEEL, will ya?

Terry 6
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Re: is this anything new?

@wikkity

Ditto

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Terry 6
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Windows phone

My Lumia reads and takes voice replies to texts over the Bluetooth hands free. I don't know about Androids and iThingies only read texts with difficulty. But I would only use even this system when stopped. There are too many road users out there trying to kill me to let me surrender concentration.

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Terry 6
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Re: This is the same reason..

Yep, I know people like that, though I estimate that the threshold is about 80% charge.

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Eye laser surgery campaigner burned by Facebook takedown

Terry 6
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Re: If a service is free...

Well, yes. But I do make a point of showing the ads and clicking on some of them from time to time,

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Terry 6
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To be fair, she is running it on her own site, but that won't get the coverage that F**book gets.

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Me GIVE you $14 SQUILLION gadziddly-DILLION

Terry 6
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Re: My Dear Mr. Dabbs,

"semi-accurate stereotype"

Err

1.) It's a stereotype

2/ Most Jews don't work in these areas, even if a lot do; it's a stereotype. Like Irish Cops, and so on.

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Terry 6
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Re: My Dear Mr. Dabbs,

Shylock.?

And for Dewey,

see

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zhI-tHoxG4

Even the American pronunciation

http://www.pronouncenames.com/pronounce/dewey

is, to say the least, ambiguous in this matter.

And "Schuster" outside of German speaking communities is largely identified as a Jewish name.

So maybe the references were only unintentionally offensive, except for Shylock. Which rather does suggest not.

Casual racism has to be challenged.

And it's amazing how often the response to that challenge is in the form of denying that anything was intended. When so often the context suggests it was.

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Terry 6
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Re: My Dear Mr. Dabbs,

Dewey, (pronounced JEWY) Shylock (Jewish character in Shakespear) and then Shuster.

Crude Racist Anti-Semitism.

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Bona-fide SCIENCE: Which forms of unusual sex are, um, mainstream?

Terry 6
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Psychology

*Sigh*

"It's pretty plain that if you regard the function of scientific research as pushing back the frontiers of human knowledge, this could all be regarded as rather a depressing waste of money: but if instead you view the psychology departments of the world primarily as a source of entertainment, they are in fact excellent value."

Is shooting yourself in the foot a recognised fetish?

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