* Posts by Terry 6

658 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

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Planning to upgrade your Lumia to Windows 10? NOT SO FAST

Terry 6
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@AC

It's not about the phone itself. I like my 635. It's about how we are treated.

The phone is reasonably new. If it won't be updated then I'm not happy.

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Terry 6
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If...

......Microsoft don't upgrade the 635 I will never, ever buy one of their phones again. I refuse to be blackmailed into getting a new phone. Which is what it would be,

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'People ACTUALLY CONFUSE Facebook and the internet in some places'

Terry 6
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Re: Most tech types would get it wrong too.

Who do you point it out to?

Techies know.

Public still think, as already noted, that the internet is another word for Google.

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Terry 6
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The email is broken etc

Of course they think FB is the net.

We all surely have had my experience of staff calling me to say that "The internet/email is broken" and found that the whole machine was blue screened/frozen/dead. It's the same thing.

And needless to say they've never asked the person on the next desk if they had the same problem.

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Beam me up, Scotty, And VAPORIZE me in the process

Terry 6
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Re: Hmmm

The sheer lack of logic in this is actually quite mind numbing.

It assumes the object existed in solid, 3D form, not just data. And was scanned to make a one-off transmission copy of something that has been made.

The originator, who presumably would own the rights to this widgit, and has the original design data anyway, destroys his own (unneeded) copy in a rather extravagantly complicated way. (A hammer is cheaper and a blowtorch easier).

The recipient, i.e. the person who may wish to breach the copyright, has exactly what he would have had with a conventional 3D printed or even shipped product. So for them nothing will change.

Further, if the object can be reproduced from a 3D scan of the original, it can also be reproduced by a 3D scan of the product. The sort of things about the design that would prevent them scanning a copy would prevent scanning the original.

Have I missed something? Was this written for publication on 1/4/15 and sent out in error?

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UK Scouts database 'flaws' raise concerns

Terry 6
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Re: CRB

Absolutely, I've never though of CRB/DBS/Whatever they will call it next as being anything but a protection for the authorities, not the kids, other than as a by product of the main purpose. Which is the usual one of the people with suits making sure that they don't get blamed for stuff that goes wrong.

All DBS/... means is that the person hasn't been caught yet.

It's a good idea to have background checks. But these are really no more than a minimum.

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Terry 6
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Re: UK Scout Database

@Baldie

These are volunteer scout leaders. If you worry they may not be up to your standards, then volunteer yourself.

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Microsoft will give away Windows 10 FREE - for ONE year

Terry 6
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Re: like for like?

If there is a 32bit.

And if not will 32bit Win 7 devices be included, or just left to vista, sorry, fester?

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Terry 6
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Re: Options...

I'm thinking of my missus' iThingy with its SIRI. It'll be sitting harmlessly charging its little batteries, when suddenly Siri will pipe up* and tell us that he/she is searching for something or other. I assume at some point or other it will phone someone at random.

*Always when the TV is on, so I guess some phrase coming out of the ether made him/her wake up.

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Tat bazaar eBay confirms: THOUSANDS of workers will be AXED

Terry 6
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Yesterday's idea

It was good when it was a way to sell off stuff that you didn't want to people who would give it a good home. Or find items that weren't in the shops anymore.

But now it's too much cost and hassle for the used stuff market - with better alternatives.

And too much of the new stuff is cheap ( as in nasty) knock offs or plain fakes.

A few weeks back the Beeb had some programme on in which various collectors were showing items they'd bought off Ebay, often for substantial cost, and found they were fakes.

Which was sad for them, though I for one wouldn't have trusted any of it in the first place.

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Turn your head and cough (up your details), HealthCare.Gov has sprung a leak!

Terry 6
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NHS then?

This does nothing to boost my confidence in the plans for the NHS' to put all our personal details on Facebook so that the Pharmaceutical and Insurance companies can "like" it.

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That dreaded syncing feeling: Will Microsoft EVER fix OneDrive?

Terry 6
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Belated footnote

Just noticed that pictures from my phone camera WP635 are not uploading to One Drive. It says it is. But the pictures aren't there.

And there isn't anything I can find to fix this.

(To be fair it's a computer thing - not even just Windows - that sometimes software claims to be working and it just isn't.)

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Evernote says goodbye to Hello, shuts lid on Peek

Terry 6
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Proffessional?

I use it for my personal use. It's brilliant for keeping notes, ideas, even web links across my assorted devices. It's a good general purpose, personal tool.

But for work?

Recommended to clients for transferring confidential information - or anything that is "mission critical"?

No there are better, safer , easier methods for each or any of these tasks.

On the other hand, it's much more intuitive than OneNote, which I personally found muddled and confusing.

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Brain-train kid game settles with FTC over 'unsupported' claims

Terry 6
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Research

In fairness to these guys, the lamentable quality of their study isn't too far from what actually passes for educational research.

The scientific method where education is concerned tends to be;

Think of an outcome that you want.

Set up an activity that will produce this.

Publish something in a friendly journal.

Write a press release.

My favourite example is discussed here;

https://community.tes.co.uk/reading_theory_and_practice/b/weblog/archive/2014/06/01/how-secure-is-the-clackmannanshire-study.aspx

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Windows 10, day ZERO ... Will Nadella be the HERO?

Terry 6
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Re: MS's phone problem isn't an OS problem or an Apps problem,

But that does cut both ways. One reason for me having a Winphone is to get out from under Google. I had an Android phone. I have an Android tablet, I still use Google's mail etc.

So I have Outlook email, too.

And Bing search, too.

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Terry 6
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Re: vicious circle but irrelevant

@AC

"You don't understand fashion and "cool" do you?"

On the contrary; I think it's pretty clear that I do..

I just want none of it.

Sadly, MS's phones are only a good device for people like me.

The people who buy expensive phones are largely the ones who aspire to cool. SO *they* aren't going to buy Winphones.

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Terry 6
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vicious circle but irrelevant

There won't be more of these apps till there's more phones. But, the mass market is the public who have a phone as a fashion item - its use as a way to talk to people in other locations is not the most significant part. So they all want, ideally, an iPhone.

The second priority is playing stupid games - and most of these are shortlife, latest new thing games that will be forgotten by next year at the latest.

Either way, Microsoft hasn't got the flashy bling appeal of an iThingy or even a Samsung Galaxy. Even the name sounds worthy, dull and workmanlike.

Which is what the Windows phone is.

It does a good functional job. Which means that there's no point paying for a high-end phone. If you have that kind of cash to spend on a phone you probably want the fashion models.

And there's no point getting a really low-end one, because you'll be disappointed that it doesn't do what you expect, its too cut down, there are plenty really cheap Android phones with all the silly games.

The mid-range phones are worse. Neither particularly cheap, nor having the full range of facilities that make the high end ones good.

I love my WP 635. But I'm aware of its deficiencies. However the models that were just a little bit better were a lot more expensive.

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Give ALL the EU access to Netflix, says Vince Cable

Terry 6
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Politicians

Cable's idea might be a good one. But it sounds suspiciously like one of those grand announcements that politicians make quite often, because they sound good, irrespective of whether or not they are any good or practical, useful or even needed.

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‘Whatever happened to Vladimir Putin?’ and other crap New Year prophesies

Terry 6
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Re: Y2k

My big boss, in one of her few sensible decisions, had a few of our older machines hidden away to avoid the blanket cost of Y2K proofing every damn machine, whether they mattered or not.

(Local Authority orders, every machine had to be patched!)

I few years back I found one of these. It booted perfectly, ran its Windows 3.1.and worked.

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Spammers set their sights on WhatsApp – that's that ruined then

Terry 6
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One reason to use Watsapp is good old traction.

I can Watsapp the people I need to communicate with.

Threema? When there are 5 more people using it that I know, I could consider using it; because then there will be five.

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Terry 6
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Whatsapp: I can't begrudge them their quid. They have to eat too.

So when it becomes due I'll pay.

I don't see why anyone would say they think it's outdated. It's an IM system that works. It allows longer messages than SMS with pictures and stuff too. Without incurring MMS costs that are outside my contract.

Except for the types that think because there's a newer system on the market everyone has to jump ship.

Why isn't there a holding-head-in-hands icon?

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Bloke in Belgium tries to trademark Je Suis Charlie slogan

Terry 6
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Denigor

Yes!

I notice that the BBC report this morning warned that they would be showing the image: Then didn't.

Hypocritical bastards.

As to the other point. Everyone has the right to feel offended. Even the right to sue in some circumstances, such as slander/libel/pornography etc. that are outside legal permissibility.

But that's as far as it goes.

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Terry 6
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Re: WELL DONE

",,,,or some people even images of notable Rabbis are problematic."

That surprised me as a comment.

Haridi ( the megafanatical, black-coat wearing types) are forever showing pictures of their particular favourite "Rebbe". I've even watched their kids swapping "Rebbe cards".

I've never even heard of any complaints about images of Moses. And here is one of him used in a synagogue.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Moses_bush.jpg

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Terry 6
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Re: Brave, or stupid?

Not as big as the target on the guy who tried to claim "Allah".

Even if well intentioned, (and not just stupidly greedy), If a Shi'ite he'd be dodging Sunni bullets and if a Sunni , Shi'ite. At the very least.

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Preserve the concinnity of English, caterwauls American university

Terry 6
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Re: Don't shoot the messenger

Ahhh, that's because the correct shortening is: "she shoulda been shot"

Isn't it "shouda bin shot".

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Terry 6
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Apparently this form has superseded the old way.

No it bloody well hasn't!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

[I'm a teacher - if semi-retired now.]

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Windows 7 MARKED for DEATH by Microsoft as of NOW

Terry 6
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@J.G.Harrison

God yes. What a pain that little feature is.

Copy or move a whole bunch of files, and for some reason one can't copy.

Whole bloody job falls over.

Did it report the problem , skip and continue, no.

Did it report the problem and ask if you want to continue, no.

Did it stop, report and give you the option to decide what to do next, no it f****ing didn't.

Just bloody fall over.

What a f****witted bit of design that was.

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Cash-burning Box makes yet ANOTHER IPO promise

Terry 6
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Re: Investing in data centers

Tim11

You'd have thought so. After the initial start-up cost at least.

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Last year was utter rubbish. Thanks for being part of it!

Terry 6
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Re: VATMOSS

@ Alistair D

Isn't that what PCworld used to do, anyway.

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Terry 6
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Gosh

I was giggling for ages after this one.

Well done that Dabbs.

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Microsoft patch batch pre-alerts now for paying customers ONLY

Terry 6
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foot shooting

I like Microsoft as a general principle. I'm old enough to remember trying to make computers usable before MS came along.

But FFS. It's as if they don't have enough to do, so they find new ways to piss people off.

(BTW WIndows Phone 8.1 and Denim firmware update were promised for last quarter 2014 - so far it's only been put on new phones, pissing off users with existing phones. So if they want to try to compete in the phone market this is clearly yet another potshot in the toe area)

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Terry 6
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Re: Although I don't agree with this...this made me smile...

linicks

Quote

"I reckon he's been here:

http://www.sciencegeek.net/lingo.html

"

Thank you, a thousand times thank you.

If only I'd had this when I was working for the LA.

+1 and a pint

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Reg man confesses: I took my wife out to choose a laptop for Xmas. NOOOO

Terry 6
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Re: Look, it's quite simple!

Pity anyone who says that to my teenage daughters. They might want a blingy device, but it has to a be a good, fast, blingy device.

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Terry 6
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Re: Snobbery bollocks

My Tesco Hudl (version 2) does anything I can think of wanting it to. I can take it on holiday or carry it round with me to meetings if I need a bit of cheap, light IT, just in the way that I used to use a PDA, but much better.

And I can read books, use the interwebs, watch iplayer and even play a simple game if I have the time.

No it probably can't play a high end game, but then neither can I.

So no, it's not a device for a geek with a video game playing fixation. Happily these are a small subset of the human species.

(My previous one, BTW is now used by older daughter to carry to lectures).

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Terry 6
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Re: Not so hard

I never thought I'd agree with such a comment. But if it has to be a laptop as a gift for a non-techie ( male or female) a Mac is always a safe option.

They look nice, have street cred and will do what they want.

It's tech as a commodity.

It's the opposite pole from a Linux box

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Terry 6
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Re: Her choice

@jonathanb

.

Otherwise;

That sort of depends on whether she sees a lappy as a desirable object or a way to get dull or simply essential jobs done.

If the latter, it's just a digital ironing board.

Come to that, I wouldn't buy an ironing board for daughter moving to her own place, either.

Vase maybe. Even kettle or microwave.

But a drudge tool - computer or ironing board. No.

And so, yes, in the sense that they are both drudgery tools they *are* in the same category.

It could be you were being ironic, I suppose.

(BTW after writing this I asked my undergraduate daughter, to check if I was right. And she said exactly what I exactly I'd expected. That they would both be on the list of things she'd need if she didn't already have them - but wouldn't want them as a regular gift.)

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Terry 6
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Her choice

The real issue here may well be that he chose to buy her this as her gift.

Not that she'd said she wanted this as her gift.

She may not have wanted a geeky Christmas gift at all. So naturally chooses something gifty.

As opposed to something practical. It's a bit like bringing home a gift wrapped ironing board.

(Is the writer one of those types who buys people what he thinks they ought to want?)

If it really was what she wanted, ideally you should make a list of what she needs before hitting the shops. And then preferrably go to the shops with the list but not her.

Otherwise it has to be. "OK, that's what you want. It is what it is, I don't think it will ever meet your needs. It can't do (as required). But that's your choice."

After that the response has got to be, within reason, "Sorry, but this kind of machine won't really do that."

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Users shun UK.gov flagship digital service

Terry 6
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Holy Grail

Organisations, not just the gov, seem to have the idea that they can save costs by shifting everything onto a website.

Which is fine, except that too often this leads to a site that is far too dense in printed words for people to comprehend properly.

And, perhaps more to the point, too inhuman.

People like to feel they are dealing with people - and with good reason, people interact and meet you halfway. Web pages don't.

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NHS refused to pull 'unfit for purpose' Care.data leaflet

Terry 6
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Re: "must try harder"

Currently, if I go to my local out-of-hours "drop-in" centre they don't have access to my medical records.

So if a patient can't remember what medication they are taking, or the dosage, they can't just look it up.

A sensible system for integrating NHS records would suit me fine.

Sending my records out to their pals in big business is totally another situation.

And I really do object to that.

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Renault Captur: Nobody who knows about cars will buy this

Terry 6
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Re: Built to appeal to its market, which is not you

@HarryB Damn it, you got there before me.

Anyone who isn't already going a noticeable amount faster than the vehicle ahead shouldn't be in the lane to the right failing to pass it.

I spend a good part of my life on the stretch of the M1 between junctions 2 and 6. Most of it behind cars poodling along in the middle lane when the lane to the left is either empty, or with a car ahead actually going faster than they are.

I hate overtaking on the left. I actually put some effort into not doing it.

But when I'm approaching my exit point in an empty left lane and some d***head is going down the middle lane at a leisurely 60...

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Terry 6
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@BongoJoe

I'm with you. When the kids were small we had the Citroen Berlingo.

Just totally functional.

The very anthesis of a boy racer's car.

But it could get two kids, baby cot, dog, suitcases and all the other stuff you need as a parent down to the seaside. It had lots of places to plug gadgets in, seatback trays for colouring books, snacks, etc.

Storage spaces anywhere you could possibly imagine ( and a few you wouldn't).

The rear seats could be stripped out in minutes to turn it into the van it really was - perfect for when the kids need a new bedroom suite from the local DIY store.

But it wouldn't impress a Clarkson.

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Islamic script kiddies aim killer blow - at Bristol bus timetable website

Terry 6
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Re: Security

I did say.....

"....not for the need to keep out terrorist sympathisers, but at least to protect themselves from practical jokers...............disgruntled employees/members of the public"

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Terry 6
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Security

You'd have thought even a bus timetable site would have had a sensible level of security to keep out intruders wouldn't you. Maybe not for the need to keep out terrorist sympathisers, but at least to protect themselves from practical jokers ( which actually this kind of is) and disgruntled employees/members of the public.

But then, it does seem as if they're in good(?) company - considering the far more serious incidents recently.

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When algorithms ATTACK: Facebook sez soz for tacky 'Year in Review' FAIL

Terry 6
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Actually

I don't particularly want FB to curate my year, or indeed to be shown anyone else's. But WTF, no one makes us open FB.

But I don't post anything of significance on FB anyway. And most of the stuff I see on there would make dross seem good.

I guess it's an issue for the types who live their lives on "social media"

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Ghosts of Christmas Past: The long-ago geek gifts that made us what we are

Terry 6
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Elf and safety

These days Santa just isn't going to be bringing a decent chemistry set, with stuff that burns.

Because the bean counting goblins won't risk risk being sued.

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HOLD IT! Last minute gifts for one's nerd minions

Terry 6
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Re: coffee in the UK

@mikie

Is that Higgins in New Bond St?

I used to buy my coffee from them donkeys' years ago, when I was young, single and probably more of an IT trainer than I was a teacher. It was a regular part of my life, and indeed, I guess part of the equation that sees IT linked with coffee.

These days, a generation along, I get my coffee from Martyns in Muswell Hill.

They still roast their own beans.

Failing that, for anyone round the centre or North of London there's still the Ethiopian coffee roaster in Camden Town. (Parkway). Not a wide range of coffees, but all really good. It's coffee roasting as art.The guy roasts his beans by trusting his experience in his tiny shop on a real Heath Robinson bit of a kit that has probably scared the health and safety types away.

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NUKE HACK fears prompt S Korea cyber-war exercise

Terry 6
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Another......

Whether it was spear phishing or something else in these examples the same question arises; how the hell they manage to leave an access route that wasn't locked down. It's not an IT thing really. That's just the vector. It's a matter of risk assessment and security.

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You have a 'SIMPLE QUESTION'? Well, the answer is NO

Terry 6
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Re: Lost train passengers

You've been to Watford Junction then.

No arrivals board, but there's a tiny monitor that is supposed to show arrivals. They use it for generic messages instead, most of the time. Even though there's another enormous screen showing even more useless messages, nearby. Staff behind the counter sometimes know how long the delayed train will be. If you actually know it's delayed and if you can face waiting in the queue. And the guy on the barrier is really nice, but knows nothing.

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New fear: ISIS killers use 'digital AK-47' malware to hunt victims

Terry 6
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Re: modernity

It's not modernity they reject, it's modern civilisation. They seem to want the 14thC but with technology. They seem to have made very good use of the interwebs to get their foul messages across.

.

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Terry 6
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Opposition

This might be a crude attack, but it's aimed at opposition fighters, not techies. Possibly people with limited understanding of the internet and its risks.

And may well be stage one. With more sophisticated stuff to come.

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