* Posts by Gordon 11

236 posts • joined 27 Jul 2009

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'I don't NEED to pay' to watch football, thunders EU digi-czar

Gordon 11
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Re: I would not watch sport if they paid me.

And is it really necessary for footie commentators to go into screaming mode every time the ball approaches the goal ? It's obviously fake...
Not if you are interested in sport. It's all about anticipation....

And if you don't like it, why are you listening to it?

PS: Cricket on the radio (TMS) is exteremely visual, at least in the imagination (if you have one). It's also legal to listening to it whilst driving (unlike watching TV).

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Gordon 11
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Re: Oh, you mean

"can see his point - it feels a bit like Apple telling me that the book I bought from them in the UK can't be read while I am in Australia.
Possibly,

But when he is in Brussels does he refrain from watching FTA Belgian TV on the grounds that he's only paying in Estonia?

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Gordon 11
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Re: Good luck on that one.

Why not? I don't want to pay for sport that I don't watch...
So you reckon that the entire FTA TV schedule should bow to your personal whim?

I don't watch Eastenders, but I'm more than happy to help fund it for those that do as I will watch other programmes which they don't watch. I don't expect a personal service

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Gordon 11
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Re: Good luck on that one.

I wasn't aware that Scotland played football, certainly never seen them in the world cup play offs
I'm probably older than you, then, as I remember them in Argentina '78.

"C'mon Archie, c'mon" being the memorable touchline coaching from Ally McLeod.

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Under the Iron Sea: YES, tech and science could SAVE the planet

Gordon 11
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Re: Iron is not enough

Phosphate is notoriously insoluble.
Phosphate is an anion, and hence not something that exists on its own.

Monoammonium phosphate (or ammonium dihydrogen phosphate) is easily soluble in water (34.3g in 100g).

It's a common fertilizer...

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TalkTalk email goes titsup FOR DAYS. Cheapo telco warns: Changing password WON'T fix it

Gordon 11
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Re: Oh gawd...

Even explaining I'd tried two routers, both of which has negotiated a good speed with the exchange, but had failed the log on (which occurs afterwards), the problem couldn't possibly be their end...
I had a similar problem, but it was only an issue as the line would go through periods of dropping. So TT changed my line profile from 6dB to 12dB. I now have a slightly slower connexion, but it stays up and hence logged on.

All done via the forum pages in ~1 day, so some people there can handle problems.

Nobody should ever use a TT email account, you're not going to want to stay with them for a second longer than necessary.
I've been using it since the days of Pipex and not had any real problems. So again, different people end up seeing different service from the same supplier.

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Beyond the genome: YOU'VE BEEN DECODED, again

Gordon 11
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Re: Most treatments have no need for either genomic or proteomic diagnostics

And there is a parallel development going on - enabling patients to do their own diagnostics and monitoring with small and cheap handheld instruments.
Why is my leg all black and smelly? Gangrene!!!

[Amputates leg....]

Oh damn, now I remember. I was walking around a pig farm with no boots on....

Self-diagnosis is about as reliable as building your own house from scratch. It might work, but when it doesn't you're in big trouble.

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Technology quiz reveals that nobody including quiz drafters knows anything about IT

Gordon 11
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Re: 10/12

PDF question also dubious - I'm pretty sure there's at least one e-mail client on some device somewhere which can't send an attachment!
It didn't say it had to be readable at the other end, so you could send it as the body, rather than the attachment.

Then again, it's easy to write a mail client which will only take keyboard input (just as some Unix passwd commands only take keyboard input - not command-line redirects) , so couldn't send any file (even a text one).

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Ofcom snatches 700MHz off digital telly, hands it to mobile data providers

Gordon 11
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TV's tend to be large, heavy and fixed in one place. So it would make sense for their content to be provided by cable, satellite or internet, and use the broadcast spectrum for mobile devices.
Whereas each individual set may be fixed in one place, there are many of them, and they are spread over a large area. That's why broadcasting to them is efficient - certainly more efficient than trying to use the Internet to provide the same coverage.

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Mozilla, EFF, Cisco back free-as-in-FREE-BEER SSL cert authority

Gordon 11
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Re: A major obstacle to encrypting everything

In order to provide SSL to a server, it needs its own IP address

No, it doesn't. It needs it's own DNS name.

(I have self-signed certificates with not an address in sight anywhere.)

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Bible THUMP: Good Book beats Darwin to most influential tome title

Gordon 11
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What about, "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare"?

Just like The Bible it contains many sub-books, and a lot of it retells the history of people's based on handed down myths twisted with the prejudices of the author and contemporary politics.

And both have had a large influence on the English language.

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All but full-fat MS Office to be had on iPads, Droidenslabben for NOWT

Gordon 11
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Re: compatible Android tablets

it's not compatible with my tablet, the latest Nexus 7 running Android 4.4.
It is compatible with my ~3 year old Galaxy S-Advance! Perhaps MS hasn't heard the KitKat is out yet (judging by other comments about non-compatibility).

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Gordon 11
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Re: I remember

I remember when my parents told me about Microsoft Office and how they all used to have to use it, as it was the only thing available.
Oddly, my children take that view and I'm the one who uses something else instead.

Blame the teaching of product-specific IT at schools for that.

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Not even 60,000 of you want an ethically-sourced smartphone

Gordon 11
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Re: Name change Please

Please, do not call a phone a "FairPhone".
They could try the FlairPhone then. But does the name really matter. What about the Moto G2. If they got to G7 would it be boycotted by all anti-capitalists?

My wife has one. It's pretty good - if what you want is a mobile 'phone.

Of course, if you have to have the latest iPhone of Samsung S5 then you won't like it, but only because it doesn't have the right logo on it.

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Poll: Yes, yes, texting while driving is bad but *ping* OH! Hey, GRAB THE WHEEL, will ya?

Gordon 11
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Happy? More like Grumpy...

...every time we get an update through text, email or social media, we experience an elevation of dopamine, which is a neurochemical in the brain that makes us feel happy," Greenfield said.
Really. Any time I get one from my wife I'm equally likely to wonder what she's going to be complaining about me having forgetton to do. "happy" is not the feeling...

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Gordon 11
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Re: Dopamine.

They can't fight their jones. Any more than alcoholics or heroin addicts can.

Driving laws should reflect this simple fact.

So we just should let serial killers get on with what they feel compelled to do as well and make it legal for them?

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Manufacturers SLAM UK.gov: 'High speed broadband' rollout is TOO SLOW

Gordon 11
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Perhaps if the telcos didn't insist that you had to take their telephone offering in order to get their superfast broadband there would be more interest?

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Bona-fide SCIENCE: Which forms of unusual sex are, um, mainstream?

Gordon 11
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Re: "view the psychology departments of the world primarily as a source of entertainment"

But statistics is not subjective...
It needn't be. Choosing what to measure, how to measure it and then what to actually publish can be very subjective. Ask any political party...

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China set to be buried under mountain of surplus robots, warns biz chap

Gordon 11
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Neither do they demand human rights, democracy, etc etc.

Yet...

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Samsung turns off lights on LEDs worldwide – except in South Korea

Gordon 11
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Re: much better light quality?

LED source is simply too long a wavelength to have the decent mix of phosphors.
I have one of these:
https://www.any-lamp.com/philips-ledbulb-d-12-60w-b22-2700k-a60-master
in an Anglepoise lamp, and the colour is much better than that from the CFL which I had there previously (and had to remove as my wife complained about it).

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Microsoft EU warns: If you have ties to the US, Feds can get your data

Gordon 11
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Re: It's not "where" it is

The relevant thing is the company that holds it.
How long will it be before some enterprising seller comes up with the novel idea of selling disk storage that companies can run themselves, on their own premises?

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Routine WHAT NOW? Bank of England’s CHAPS payment system goes TITSUP

Gordon 11
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Re: Legacy system ?

It almost sounds like the IT bod Chap who actually knew what he was doing left years ago.
left was off-shored a few years ago.

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Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch

Gordon 11
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This patch was for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008R2
It was KB2949927, which seemed to need BitLocker activated to install. So it failed to install for me. Sounds like this failure was a bonus.

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Microsoft, Docker bid to bring Linux-y containers to Windows: What YOU need to know

Gordon 11
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Coat

Time for coffee?

You're still left with MS WIndows Containers and Linux Containers, and apps can only run in one or the other.

What you really need is a type of app that can run in either container.

When will someone come up with Java containers‽

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It's 2014 and you can still own a Windows box using a Word file or font

Gordon 11
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The Updates don't (all) workm(properly)....

On Win7 x64: KB2952664 only installs at the second attempt; KB2949927 fails to install unless you have BitLocker running.(and hence the system has to reboot - again - to unravel this).

And on Win8.1, \Windows\system32\MRT.exe (i.e. the Malicious Software Removal Tool) gets flagged by the AVG Virus scanner.

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One Windows? How does that work... and WTF is a Universal App?

Gordon 11
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Windows is based on a more advanced hybrid microkernel model - meaning that kernel and other modules (not just drivers) can be loaded and unloaded dynamically.

That would be "hybrid microkernel" as in "not a real micro-kernel at all"?

I remember going to a presentation about this back in the mid-90's. The presentation was by DEC - as at that time Windows NT was going to run on multiple CPU architectures and DEC were keen to be involved. That turned out to be a useful and relevant as the "micro-kernel".

The only really useful thing from that day was a cotton bag they handed out, which is still doing sturdy service to handle my Waitrose shopping. Now that is good re-use of "soft"-ware.

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Gordon 11
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One Windows? How does that work
Probably like HTML and @media-based style-sheets.

You write the content, and the system libraries have various presentation methods dependent on "mode". It's not rocket science.

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DVLA website GOES TITSUP on day paper car tax discs retire

Gordon 11
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Re: I concur

You get the reminder about a week to 10 days in to the month.
I think it was earlier than that when you needed to have physical tax disc posted to you.
And there's very little incentive to pay the gov any earlier than you need to, particularly if the whole amount is going on a card.
If it's going on a card, and you pay the card off each month, then you might as well pay it the first day of "next month's" bill, rather than wait.

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Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really

Gordon 11
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Re: So...

"We will carry forward all that is good in Windows,"

Interesting to put that alongside "we’re not building an incremental product".

So there was nothing good to incrementally build on?

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Gordon 11
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Re: cynical remark

Should've just gone all the way to 11.

Since it's only ever the odd-numbered releases that are any good?

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Bash bug: Shellshocked yet? You will be ... when this goes WORM

Gordon 11
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Re: Stupidest bug ever

For example, under what circumstances does Perl's system() function invoke a shell?
When it is passed a string containing active shell characters.

Which is why you should always invoke it with an array, as that will always fork()+exec() and, of course, read documentation, which is where this is mentioned.

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Gordon 11
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Re: Oh $!#t.

Running bash scripts to process requests on a web server is 1980-era software design
Given that the ability didn't start until the early 90's it will be 1990-era software design.

Some of us can still remember when CGI handling was first added to the NCSA httpd code (and also when the entire source code first passed 1000 lines!).

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spɹɐʍʞɔɐB writing is spammers' new mail filter avoidance trick

Gordon 11
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Re: This is the other way round

However any mail scanner worth anything is going to actually scan the file to find out what the content is rather than relying on the extension.

Probably, but I remember an attempt to send a file called "example.com", which contained a textual dump of a DNS zone and was sent with a MIME type in the header of application/text, being bounced by Outlook as it was an executable (because of the .com extension).

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Gordon 11
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Headmaster

"spɹɐʍʞɔɐB" isn't backwards. It's rotated through 180°.

Which is why you can read it standing on your head.

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Blighty's mighty tech skills shortage drives best job growth in years

Gordon 11
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It's competent yet cheap IT staff we're short of, I'll bet.

Bet we're not short of incompetent yet expensive tech managers, though.

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DEATH TO TCP/IP cry Cisco, Intel, US gov and boffins galore

Gordon 11
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Re: What essentially saved TCP/IP?

Was that it worked and it was good enough for what people wanted it for, whereas OSI gave infinite interoperability problems.

Indeed. OSI was still developing theory - and being developed by committee....

Also I'm bloody glad I've not needed to wage war against X.400 in the last 16+ years.

Ah, yes. I once had to dissemble an X.400 message by hand to determine that HP would not let you pass a message between two MTAs in one organization unless they claimed to be from different organizations. HP themselves didn't seem to know they'd set it up this way.

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Don't bother with Apple's 9 Sept hype-day: Someone's GONE AND BLABBED IT ALL

Gordon 11
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Guessing here...

So, could there be an iPhone6 and an iPhone6C?

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Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts

Gordon 11
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Re: Real coding!

We can't have something like that because Microsoft won't build it into their clients :-(.

Even when they do have support for file-systems, they may not have support for it in the way you want to use it.

I wanted a file-system that would be recognized on MSWindows and Linux. With full-write support etc. udffs looked a good idea, as I knew MSWindows supported it (since it's what DVDs use). However - it only supports it if it is on an optical disk! If it's on a hard-drive then it doesn't want to know about it.

This was a few years back, so it may be different on Windows8, but I can't be bothered to check...

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Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws

Gordon 11
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Re: Not surprising

Every time you hear about a buffer overflow error in software, realize that it's due to a fundamental design flaw in the C language that leads to the same error repeated over and over.

I disagree. I reckon it's down to a lack of fundamental design by the implementer, who should be using a library function or macro to check sizes and/or use proper typedefs to ensure that things remain the same size.

The problem is that too many coders reckon that the language is going to avoid problems, rather than assuming any responsibility for it themselves.

A bit like saying that when a joy-rider rolls a car by driving too fast that he's not to blame at all as it's the car's fault for not preventing him from speeding.

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iPhone owners EARN MORE THAN YOU, says mobile report

Gordon 11
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Re: Writer paid per word?

Thanks for using eleven words when one would have done.

Or perhaps he was practising for "Just a time it takes for my second hand to complete one revolution"?

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Red Hat: ARM servers will come when people crank out chips like AMD's 64-bit Seattle

Gordon 11
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Walk before you run.

No talk about development platforms?

Are they thinking about an ARM64 desktop, or laptop?

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Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows

Gordon 11
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Re: Standard Windows timings

Wait, you've done one Windows install (two if you count the repeat), so you feel qualified to generalize how it installs on any hardware?
No. I was only comparing my times to those quoted for this low-powered device and noting that they were similar.

And, to others, my timings didn't include running the updates. That came later, and at least I could walk away while they ran knowing that the only reboot would be at the end.

Installing the OS required reboots at apparently arbitrary times during the actual installation so I had to hang around and wait...

But, to be fair, this was Vista.

And the AHCI was not the default motherboard setting, and it was only the next day when talking about it at work that a friend suggested I check it...hence the re-install. Followed the next day by the same friend having dug up some info on how it could be changed without a reboot (via some undocumented changes).

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Gordon 11
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Standard Windows timings

Putting Windows on the Galileo microSD card can take between 30 minutes and two hours. Booting Windows once loaded will take up to two minutes.

So a bit like any other hardware.

The only Windows install I've done (on a quad-core system with lots of memory) took over an hour, with ~4 reboots involved. And it wasn't a one-off, as I had to repeat it all the next day having discovered that you couldn't switch the SATA to AHCI mode without doing a fresh install (unlike the Linux install I'd done at the same time, in 15 minutes, which just looked for what setting was there and behaved accordingly).

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Take the shame: Microsofties ADMIT to playing Internet Explorer name-change game

Gordon 11
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Where will this end?

Internet Explorer could be getting a new name as Microsoft tries to escape the browser’s troubled past

So, given the troubled present of 8 (8.1, 8.1U1) and Surface will they be changing the name of Windows as well?

Will the next release be Windows Nein?

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Govt control? Hah! It's IMPOSSIBLE to have a successful command economy

Gordon 11
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Command and Control DOES work. BP, HSBC, Ford etc all perform over decades

However, that doesn't mean they work with any great efficiency (if you think that you've never worked for a large corporation). They are just marginally better than others, and will be slightly better than a large government.

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Simian selfie stupidity: Macaque snap sparks Wikipedia copyright row

Gordon 11
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Re: Who takes the picture?

If I get some passing stranger to take a picture of me, using my own camera, who owns the copyright?

I'd expect that to be me. And I suspect that the legal system has already tested this at some point...

[5 mins later..] And indeed. I've just tracked down this!!!

http://www.ipwhiteboard.com.au/who-owns-the-copyright-in-your-family-holiday-photographs-what-about-a-selfie-the-answer-is-not-what-you-would-expect/

(albeit for Australia or New Zealand), which would seem to support Wikipedia and not me.

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Brit kids match 45-year-old fogies' tech skill level by the age of 6

Gordon 11
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Re: Using pre-made services doesn't represent a skill

Just like turning on a TV isn't much of a skill.

Although, judging by complaints to the Daily Mail, switching it off is beyond many people.

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Microsoft KILLS Windows 8.1 Update 2 and Patch Tuesday

Gordon 11
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Re: "allow you to leave your touchpad active even when a mouse is connected"

You what? I never even considered that that might be a problem needing an update.

Neither did I, so I've just booted my laptop into Win8.1U1 (not something I do all that often - I mainly do it to ensure it gets the monthly updates...) to see that I already have a checkable option to "disable internal pointing device when external USB pointing device is attached".

I also have the ability to "select whether right-clicks are allowed on the touchpad, and enable dragging by double-tapping." (although since I hate tapping - far to easy to do it accidentally - I turn it off.

So Microsoft is going to give me an update to enable something that is already possible. Don't they actually know what their OS can do?

Or is it that this is currently done by the Synaptics driver, rather than Windows? In which case I predict I'm going to have fun sorting out the resulting dog-fight with conflicting options in different parts of configurations menus (nothing unusual there for Windows).

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