* Posts by ql

349 posts • joined 22 Jul 2009

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India's heavy launch rocket passes flight test

ql
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Re: At last a British funded rocket takes off

> but it makes me mad

Ah, is that what it was....

Presumably the Indian givernment has to get your and other Daily Fail readers' approval for any long term programme of technological development to establish their economic future? Or wa sit only the US, and others on its coat tails that could use a space programme for long term econopmic good?

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EU VAT law could kill THOUSANDS of online businesses

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Re: This is entirely UNreasonable

My wife is in the same position. She's doing her best to keep up with this issue, but virtually daily HMRC's position changes. That idiot Cable said at opne point that it wouldn't afffect many businesses! The latest from HMRC is indeed that if you receive an order and then send the pattern by email rather than an automated donwload, then the new regs don't apply to you. But they'll change their minds in a few days time. It's a fiasco. HMRC also claimed they;ve been making businesses aware of this for 18 months. They have, but only the big businesses which are already in the VAT schemes.

Oh, Cable also suggested that small businessed would have to sell through intermediaries who would in turn be liable under the new regs. For pattern sellers, for example, at a couple of quid a time, and a low turnover, how exactly will that be feasible?

Re the VAT reg comment, that's no use at all. ANYONE selling into the EU is liable for this, including non-EU sites, for example, US sites. So VAT registration has nothing to do with it.

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UK flights CRIPPLED by system outage that shut ALL London airspace

ql
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Interesting watching in real time

At these times flightradar24,com makes for interesting browsing. Looks like the 14:15 LHR-JFK has just taken off. A flight from Oslo to LHR made two huge circles in the north sea off Lowestoft (you can see the track if you click on a plane) while two Falcon 900s are at high altitude (40k feet) approaching the Thames. Guesses as to what they're up to on the back of a black helicopter...

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This Christmas, demand the right to a silent night

ql
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Re: Other people's pressures/expectations

>That guy felt neglected. He was uncomfortable with neglect / had ADHD.

>And it personifies someone so unfamiliar with the reality around him that

>he is unable to deal with it.

He's now CEO, so you're right on all counts ;-)

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ql
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Other people's pressures/expectations

Real life example. Early one morning. Phone rings. Exec at airport, waiting in lounge.

Exec: There's something wrong. I've been here an hour and no email's come through. There must be something wrong.

QL: Get a life <CLICK>

(And no, there was nothing wrong with the email system or his phone, but the pressure he felt he was under always to be accessed and accessible meant it was a genuine concern of his, poor sop.)

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Plusnet customers SWAMPED by spam but BT-owned ISP dismisses data breach claims

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Re: Part of a bigger problem?

> You could do a breach of contract claim in the small claims court

Interesting, and worth researching. As it happens, a neighbour moved to Zen, and they are taking the issue seriously. They asked for pings to be enabled on a few of our routers and claim to be building a case to take to BT wholesale.

No fibre in our area, and no plans either. That whole "market" thing that's supposed to sort all the arrogance of a residual monopoly just doesn't seem to be working.

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ql
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Part of a bigger problem?

PlusNet used to be great for support - you could easily speak to real people who knew what they were talking about and knew what to do about it, and when you needed support, you'd get it quickly and in an unpatronising manner. But my latest support call is a classic - I logged a call about poor upload speed, which for what I use my ADSL connection for is important, very poor latency, up to 250ms at times and dropped packets - over 10% on occasion. I got a response containing boiler plate links and saying my download speed was within acceptable levels. I replied patiently, saying that my download speed was not the issue, and repeating the issue. Eventually I got a response saying that it's not a problem they can do anything about and they;re not prepared to raise a call against BT wholesale (the problem is almost certainly our local exchange. 4 neighbours, on different ISPs all have the same problem) I will definitely be leaving PN after 12 years with them, at the earliest I can. They seem to have forgotten that it takes more than telly marketing to run an effective ISP.

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Trevor contemplates Consumer Netgear gear. BUT does it pass the cat hair test?

ql
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"The prejudices... need revisiting."

Agreed if the prejudices are your own, but what if they're someone else's, in particular, auditors or other box-tickers? I recall replacing a ludicrously expensive Sun+Checkpoint firewall (nearly £20k, if I recall with a generic multi-ethernet mini-ITX debian box as a firewall, and having to spend ages with an auditor to explain why it was better. Later, at a pan-Euro company, I used IBM pizza box desktops in the same role and for OpenVPN, but one French company we bought, they were horrified that we didn't supply them with a PIX or similar. They were convinced that the box would fail, so I ended up giving them two, one of which, years later, was still in its box above the system rack.

The perception is that the safe, meaning insurance against fear of retribution and comeback, option will remain well-marketed "enterprise" brands. Cynics and realists would call this lunacy and uncreative, MBAs and PHBs would call it "business sense."

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Hi-torque tank engines: EXTREME car hacking with The Register

ql
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Re: IT angle? Who cares?

The number of IT techies I've come across who are also Landie owners, which implies continual fettling, is surely statistically significant. And I thought Landie fettlers were a daft lot, but this lot take the biscuit.

By the way, I found that modern Bentley owners don't take too well if you ask how their Volkswagen is going... ;-)

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Big shadowy orgs should stop scooping up everyone's personal info – say Google, Facebook

ql
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Re: Hahaha - oh, you're SERIOUS!?

> government is by Mega-Corps

And Cameron is wetting himself to sign TTIP which legislates that laws must be made for mega-corps benefit.

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THERE it is! Philae comet lander FOUND in EXISTING Rosetta PICS

ql
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Re: Next time, Gadget, next time!

> can I make the following suggestions

Oh sure, but what colour should we paint it?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkinson%27s_law_of_triviality

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DRAMA in SPACE: But Philae KEEPS TRYING to HARPOON COMET

ql
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Facepalm

Standards problem

The BBC reports that the lander is the size of a washing machine. Now is it a fridge, or is it a washing machine? This is the type of sloppy standards problem that lead NASA's Mars probe to land on Jupiter, you know.

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Italian appeal court clears seismologists of manslaughter

ql
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Re: And if I understand it correctly

There's nothing to be smug about here. This story, that happens to be in Italy, is simply an extension of the "Something Must Be Done" and "Someone Must Be Blamed" culture that's now endemic. :-(

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Reg mobile man: National roaming plan? Oh UK.gov, you've GOT to be joking

ql
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Where was this piece written?

In my part of the world, in an area of 200 sq miles, there are about 1500 people living. Exactly how much does the writer think that the big phone companies are "competing" for 1500 people? The only reason there are masts here at all is because it was mandated. Some networks don't bother with any service at all from some masts. Even in the main village, you really need three networks to get service all through the mile or so of the village. To people like us, where the rules of the city simply don't apply, the gov's idea sounds just wonderful.

As I understood the proposal, it's not a universal concept, just areas like our which are badly provisioned by the magic "market".

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EU cyber-cop: Dark-net crooks think they're beyond reach (until now)

ql
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MilInd complex

"Among the 414 websites shut down were those selling weapons and drugs, and advertising contract killers"

So they shut down government websites?

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OpenSUSE 13.2: Have your gecko and eat your rolling distro too

ql
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Re: testing...

> filesystems are a thing of beauty and tragedy-about-to-occur

Amen to that. Over the last 17 years of as a Linux user, I've lost data with the all the ext's, reiserfs, and xfs, jfs being the only honourable mention, which I still use by choice on Debian servers. I know I should be trying it, but potential data loss is not something that you choose, and btrfs seems very complicated. Glad it's here and maturing, though.

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UK superfast broadband? Not in my backyard – MP

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Re: Lack of ambition

Any indication that the gov think that this is about service provision and not about shovelling money to a post-parliamentary career directorship would be an interesting observation.

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BAE points electromagnetic projectile at US Army

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Re: Wrong platform?

> link it with the mobile sized fusion reactor that Lockheed are proposing

Aha, so it's really a pie-in-the-sky gun?

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Want a more fuel efficient car? Then redesign it – here's how

ql
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The figures speak, but....

I had a Range Rover 3.5 V8 auto for some years, which I loved dearly. It returned 18.6mpg over the years I had it, dropping to a worst of 12mpg in deep winter snow, along with frequent stopping to pull lesser cars from snowdrifts. The best was just over 25 mpg. This was achieved on a run from Winchester to Birmingham (the old Networks shows) with four hefty techies on board, on a hot summer's day, air con on full blast, and a fastish motorway run all the way. I concluded that the engine was being run inefficiently when you tried lighter loads, etc, and that it actually preferred to be dong some hard work, but otherwise have never been able to understand that result.

(PS - This Rangie was the cause of the most delightful bit of English I've heard. I was planning to fit a stainless "sports" exhaust system, which apparently improved fuel consumption, but was concerned that the V8 would roar, when I preferred understatement. I phone Rimmer Bros, and asked about any change of exhaust tone. The bloke thought for a moment and said, "No, it's not louder, just a little more..... urgent." I thought that was a delightful way of describing it, meaningless and poetically meaningful at the same time. He was right too.)

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EU Competition chief: So what if I didn't tame Google? You're all 'irrational' anyway

ql
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Amateur

> That earned Almunia a telling-off from MEPs.

Really, this is amateur league; the EU should look to the UK for what unelected politicos are able to do. Their lordships would never stand for a ticking off by the other house, even for the most banal soundbites..

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/10/15/martha_lanefox_yeuch_the_internet_is_made_by_men/

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Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'

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Re: He's a good leader

Must agree. In fact, how many CEOs or CIOs do you know who would be happy to talk about their perceived weaknesses, or the things they would prefer to put right in hindsight? These are the remarks of someone with human foibles but with the humility to admit them. His style has proven effective.

The cultural aspects of moral stances, as has been pointed out, should also not be underestimated. In one transnational for which I worked, there were two countries (I'll not say which) with whom the British contingent really disliked working, largely because their cultural norm appears confrontational to us. I do not believe it was - it was just a style, along with language barriers, but meant making allowances for others for behaviour at which we've become accustomed rather to take offence.

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Microsoft, Docker bid to bring Linux-y containers to Windows: What YOU need to know

ql
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Half admirable

In a begrudging way, you have to admire this attempt. MS typically engages in catch-ups like this by adding yet more layers to their products, and sometimes somehow gets them to work after a fashion. This contrasts with Linux's ability to strip down for purposes such as running containers, which really is a far easier achievement. I know which I'd prefer if I could think of a use case for containers, which I suspect is more limited than the hype would suggest, but from a application vendor's point of view, I suppose it sounds attractive.

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NASTY SSL 3.0 vuln to be revealed soon – sources (Update: It's POODLE)

ql
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"...tech community already reeling..."

Or

For military applications, please see the Dashing White Sergeant..

OR

Is the tech community reeling because when the vulnerability was announced they all said "Oh, fox-trot."?

OR

For full cover, make sure you strip the Window(s)

Strictly not IT, but it's that kind of day - a tweet this morning from RPi said "I'd tell you a joke about UDP but you may not get it" so blame them.

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Son of Hudl: Tesco flogs new Atom-powered 8.3-inch Android tablet

ql
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Tin foil? That'll be the third aisle

I wonder how much personal data Tesco collects via these devices, or is my modern-era derived cynicism getting the better of me?

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Hardened Hydrazine the source of Galileo satnav FAIL

ql
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> at the beginning of the ballistic phase

I would have thought the ballistic phase started when the satellites ended up in the wrong orbit...

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10 Top Tips For PRs Considering Whether To Phone The Register

ql
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Confession

Oddly enough, before the grindstone of IT appeared against which to rasp my nose, I actually trained in PR and practised for a while, before getting better. We were taught always to provide information your target journo wanted, always to make life easier for the journo and so on. This worked so well, I once walked through the foyer of an hotel in which a journo I knew was interviewing David Essex. When he saw me, the journo actually interrupted the interview to ask me something. Can't recall what it was, as the occasion got the better of me, but the style must have been about right.

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To Russia With Love: Snowden's pole-dancer girlfriend is living with him in Moscow

ql
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Re: Keep Drinking The Kool-Aid

>If I was looking for people to blame for the current state of affairs in Syria and Iraq, I'd start with

> the US and UK governments.

Indeed. A repeat on Radoi4Extra today was priceless. A comment from Linda Smith, during Blair and Bush's war, saying something like "It's all the fault of the Iraqi leadership being so sneaky they put all their civilians into residential areas."

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White LED lies: It's great, but Nobel physics prize-winning great?

ql
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Nobel Committee may have wider views in mind...

This was the Physics Prize, not the economics one, so the narrow understanding suggested by the article may not be the entire picture.

Also, take the context. In the 80s and 90s, companies like BP were producing vast amounts of simple 70w solar panels, which along with a lead acid battery, and a fluorescent light tube with built in inverter, were installed throughout Southern Africa in rural areas. Areas like these previously either did without light, or use paraffin lamps. Paraffin for cooking and lighting often spelt disaster. Flourescent lamps were better than nothing, but they buzz, are prone to failure, and the cost of the entire shebang is quite high, even discounting the PR for which undoubtedly the exercise was done.

Now take the potential of LEDs for enabling sight during the hours of darkness You can go to a tat store in the west and buy half a dozen "garden lights" for a fiver. These are mere trinkets to us, but in the rural third world are transformative, providing safety in flammable dwellings and general night-time safety too. A few offcuts of solar panel material, a few NiMH AA batteries, a few LEDs with diffusers are now all that's required, at hugely reduced cost, no high voltages to cause danger, no buzzing or flickering to cause headaches, no lead acid to cause more danger and much longer lasting.

Yes,I would say the prize is very well deserved, but maybe not so much from a narrow, western economic viewpoint.

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Look ma, no hands! The machines are speaking our language

ql
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Re: Minutes of meetings

> 'acting minutes secretary'

Mmm, serious AI required for this. An example of valid minuting may be simply "Vigorous discussion ensued, the outcome being an agreement to declare Pimlico independent." A transcript of an hour of various people talking, often over each other, do not minutes make.

I have recently used Android speech recognition to fairly good effect when a group of elderly people in our community were supposed to bring in some reminiscences to a meeting. Three brought word processor files which we uploaded to an Xwiki. The fourth brought a hand written note, which I simply read into my Cyanogenmod Samsung. It had trouble with local Scottish place and people names but was generally good enough for a one-pass proof read.

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ql
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Keystroke loggers on steroids?

The fear must exist that the traditional online data slurpers (MiApGle) get juicy amounts of info about you when using their speech recognition systems. I know that Android's system is tied to downloading the Google Search app. Not sure about this, mind you. but that's the style of these companies.

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'A motivated, funded, skilled hacker will always get in' – Schneier

ql
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> Kinda weird seeing such a naive comment emerge from Bruce. He must have been asleep in the 80s, 90s and 00s.

Quite. I wonder what exact audience he had in mind, as he's usually more thoughtful than this. As long ago as 15 years we regarded recovery as more important than discovery, but you do still get views that the militaristic adversarial approach of "keep 'em out" is still prevalent, as indicated in comments below. But that means that any intrusion means strategic failure, and almost certain subsequent paralysis.

The big problems with Bruce's statement, though, are the decisions regarding the severity of attack. Rather like disaster recovery being used in instances short of full scale disasters, at what point to you kick in recovery processes.

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Report: HP to SPLIT OFF PC, printer biz from enterprise wing

ql
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OTA (Obligatory Titanic Analogy)

Not so much re-arranging the deckchairs on the Titanic as sawing the Titanic in half in mid-ocean and hoping the engine room powers both halves

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Hiss-hiss! GIGANTIC SOLAR FILAMENT snakes around Sun

ql
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Re: That's about 100 times the size of Earth

At least give it to us in mega-campbells - some measurement we can imagine anyway. I make that about 420 million elephants stacked end-to-end. African elephants, mind, not including trunk/tail contact points.

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HEVC patent prices are out. Look who's NOT at the codec party: Microsoft and Google

ql
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Just one more step required...

If all these companies are involved in this, why not just add one more step which is to free the use of the codec. That way, everyone wins. That 20c will only just pay admin and lawyer fees, so the companies are almost certainly not gaining financially from the arrangement. Go on, corps, let the codec go.

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Bash bug flung against NAS boxes

ql
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Smoke, yes, but is there a fire?

I don't want to belittle this issue, but a lot of reports from security firms have spoken about "actively exploiting" but what does that mean? Is it that they have seen network traffic or honeypot attacks, or that the attacks have succeeded? It still seems to me that while the potential for shellshock to be severe is great, the actual typical implementations of how bash is used reduces that potential significantly.

Definitely not belittling the issue, but it would be interesting to see info on successful attacks rather than traffic attempts, and interesting to see data from relatively dispassionate security researchers rather than companies with magic bullets to flog.

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So long Lotus 1-2-3: IBM ceases support after over 30 years of code

ql
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Re: Back in a time where...

> I lived the day,

Yeah, I'm also feeling my age... In its heyday, Lotus123 WAS personal computing. I eventually ceased to be amazed to find beancounters writing their letters in 123, using rows as lines, all done because 123 was their universe. You messed with this at your peril, and 2.1 was the absolute pinnacle, with reasonable memory demands and a wealth of add-ins. I recall the wonder of seeing for the first time the rows and columns populated from an Oracle database running on a Sequent, a miracle of integration at that time.

Then came the dog that was version 3. A half hearted attempt to be graphical, a memory hog and oh, so slow.

It was also a time when others were trying to get in on the act. There was a brilliant shareware clone of 123 called "As East As" which was equally fast, used less memory at a time when every byte of the 640 in the machines was important. But it didn't say "Lotus 123" so was unacceptable. Borland tried with Quattro, again, technically superior, in my opinion, but Lotus could do little wrong, so the users rejected these.

We were heavily invested in 123, but then we thought that Windows was looking like the future. My boss and I set up meetings with Lotus development and Microsoft to develop our own strategic approaches - this in the days when mere users really could set up meetings with software companies. We came away from those meetings with the understanding that Lotus was going to wait to see how things panned out, and had no real Windows strategy, while Microsoft said "Yes, we know we need to catch up, but here's what our plans are." To a large extent, they did what they said they would do. Lotus simply thought they'd be able to control the future and dropped the ball. After those meetings, we went to Excel and Word in spite of a very shaky start, and really never bothered with Lotus after that.

The one exception was Lotus Agenda. It's still available for download. It was a hard-to-describe piece of brilliant personal management software which Lotus thought they'd put into Notes, but never did.

I miss my youth....

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Canberra drone team dances a samba in Outback Challenge

ql
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Should have been given a disk, not a grid, to search....

Is it true that they modelled the water drop algorithms by studying the accuracy of FourEcksian dropbears?

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Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week

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If there's been an outbreak of truthiness, and as the last one was such a dog, how about

Windows K9

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Apple 'Genius': iPhone 6? We've had NO COMPLAINTS about our BENDY iThing

ql
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Happy

> Mostly women from my informal survey.

Did the judge believe you?

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MOM: CHEAP Mars ship got it right first time. Nice one, India

ql
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Re: Excellent job!!!!

As it happens I was re-watching Michael Wood's excellent programmes on Indian history last night. This seems to be the latest in a very long line of amazing ideas coming from that area. Much respect.

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Microsoft vs the long arm of US law: Straight outta Dublin

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Failed Business/IT model

Given all this and the other cases we know about, the obvious way to route around it is to give "the cloud" a miss. We all know it's mere marketing-speak for rented services anyway, and nothing that cannot be pulled in-house. Unfortunately, it's not until a non-US company gets bitten on the bum and it's a demonstrable risk that the average corporate suit will take any heed to this.

Meanwhile, I pity the many universities where students are forced to use US managed services like outlook. This ruling stifles any research where sources need protection, and I'm sure other use cases with similar jeopardy will occur.

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THE DEATH OF ECONOMICS: Aircraft design vs flat-lining financial models

ql
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FAIL

One factor left out - The System

> it doesn’t matter who wins the next election

The reason why it doesn't matter who wins the next election, and why economic issues are not going to be any different, is that we are now cottoning on to the fact that it doesn't matter what colour is in charge, because their ideologies are exactly the same. The king is dead, long live the king. What's worse. the article left out one significant positive feedback loop - that the gap between rich and poor is growing and that more of us are on the poor side of that gap.

Over the past 30 years, those in government have shown they have a scant understanding of international law, let alone the complexities of the economy, and every hue of government has simply delivered more of the same. Douglas Adams was right - those who want to govern are the least capable of doing so. Maybe it's time we stopped playing their game, take our ball away (it is our ball after all) and played a game to our rules.

Anyone know of a political party with differing ideologies these days?

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Lumia rebrand begins: Nokia's new UK web home is Microsoft.com

ql
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Re: Finally

> If they advertise it right,

The current range of ads really is appalling, unless their target audience is the class of male, jaded, exhausted one-dimensional corporate bods, in which case, good work.

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JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!

ql
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IT Angle

IT angle?

I do have a vote tomorrow, and I do not believe I am alone in taking much of what the politicians on all sides are saying with a large pinch of salt. The most recent proof of that is the outrageous "vows" (their word) to do this, that or the other, which have already been the subject of "oh really?" comments by back-benchers.

But in the IT and business world, if you were, say, looking at outsourcing your entire IT or moving it to the cloud, you'd look at the nature of the business, the outcomes you believe you and the business wish to achieve, the short term risk factors and the longer term likely outcomes, amongst other things. Unless you're very inexperienced, you would not go to two vendors, and believe their salesdroids when they tell you why your business is the very thing that's tailor-made for their offering, how they're losing on the deal, but it's worth the prestige to them, and all the other marketing-speak that lasts right up to the moment you sign on the dotted line. You have your own standards and your own views about how best to deliver IT, and you choose the model to fit.

I would suggest that many people are using such an approach to the referendum. We really have been discussing this in day-to-day situations, amongst each other for 2 years or more. There's clear understanding here that the referendum is a fork in the road, not a short-term political choice, and all this with a backdrop of party political promises which have a long and nasty record of being empty, especially in the Scottish context such as the 1979 referendum on devolution.

The issue is one of aspiration, not one that's amenable to totting up the pro's and cons. There's nothing unique in two countries that once were together re-establishing themselves, the Czech Republic and Slovakia being the most obvious that spring to mind. There's also no way anyone can claim that Scotland is not a productive enough country, even a rich one. And I think there are few who would claim that on Friday, in the event of a Yes vote, things will suddenly be different. In other words, if this comes about, it's not a unique change, but will be an expression of the will of the people regarding how they wish to be governed, Simple democracy, that's all.

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SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn

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Re: This announcement worries me

> Now I am *really* worried - does Micro Focus actually have any commitment to Linux

You have a point, and I suspect only time will tell. Poor SuSE does seem to have had a rough time with buyers not really getting what a Linux distro is and does, but on the whole it's not gone too badly. Novell started badly and ended not too badly, Attachmate realised quite early that SuSE should remain separate. MicroFocus should understand the mainframe/mini world and its specialisms, but may commit a marketing foul.

The mine canary will probably be MF's relationship with OpenSuSE. If it continues to allow autonomy for that project, but still support it, all should be well. Meanwhile, test your systems on Debian... Just a pennyworth of opinion.

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Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces

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Happy

Re: There was a Programme on this

Is that the programme where they revealed that x-ray spectroscopy found the Greek letters "ZX-81" etched into the corroded metal?

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Scottish independence: Will it really TEAR the HEART from IT firms?

ql
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Re: It will be business as usual.

Exactly so - the tl;dr of the article is "Political change is happening. Business doesn't like change not of its own choosing."

To my mind all the "issues" like the currency, oil, defence* and all the rest are current unknown in the UK let alone in an independent Scotland. So the issue comes down simply to governance, and I've not heard a single argument for why Scots should want to be governed by Westminster. To put it differently, if the referendum was for an independent Scotland /joining/ the UK, what would the aspirational reasons, not short-term political promises, be?

* - Remember when the Royal Navy wasn't able to get any surface crafts into the Moray Firth when a Russian Fleet sheltered there a few years back? It took more than 48 hours to get a ship into the area.

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Satellite weather forecast: Cloudy with a chance of p0wnage

ql
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Suomi NPP and exploitable flaws?

Brings a whole new meaning to Finnfisher....

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Forget silly privacy worries - help biometrics firms make MILLIONS

ql
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> Biometrics are usernames, not passwords.

No, usernames are usernames. Biometrics are a set of intrusions too far. Just last week there was an article in El Reg about how fingerprints are so yesterday. All that was said of fingerprints suddenly becomes less so when some new biometric device becomes available. I honestly can't see biometrics becoming the norm this "growth" firm seems to wish.

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Microsoft tells judge: Hold us in contempt of court, we're NOT giving user emails to US govt

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Re: Was everyone born yesterday?

> Or the original criminals for potentially having their email accounts read?

What criminals? If this is to do with a crime, then there are plenty of internationally acceptable ways of law enforcement agencies in the US to obtain these data from Ireland, many of which could be completed very quickly if time was of the essence. We do not know if criminals were involved in this or if crimes have even be committed, let alone who may have done them.

It's not unreasonable to wonder what is being staged here, as the snippets of information do appear to be about some larger issue than a criminal investigation. It's also not unreasonable for readers of a tech rag to wonder about a large tech company's motives

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