* Posts by Tom 38

2519 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

Report: UK.gov wants to legislate on comms data BEFORE next election

Tom 38
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No, because this isn't about GCHQ intercepts, which apparently are all legal (dubious: discuss), but instead about ordinary plod being able to request warrants to request the same sort of data from ISPs.

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EPIC FAIL, FACEBOOK: FTC complaint against creepy mind games filed

Tom 38
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Re: Not the apology I'm looking for

Yep, "whoops, too bad" is about the worst apology you can give.

A couple of days ago a company I've bought e-cigs from decided that the best way to market their crap to me was to give Twitter my email address and full name, so that Twitter can invite me to register and subsequently follow my retailer... it took multiple email exchanges before they figured out that I was upset that they had spaffed my personal details to a 3rd party, not that they sent me a marketing email every 2 days.

Their subsequent "apology" was along the lines of "Well, we've done it now, can't really take it back". Fortunately, they are a UK subsidiary of a US company, I only dealt with the UK company, so I'm seeing how toothless the ICO actually is in dealing with idiots like this. Accidental data losses are one thing, this was wilful.

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Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Facin' IT

"Facin' IT" is surely a pun.

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You 'posted' a 'letter' with Outlook... No, NO, that's the MONITOR

Tom 38
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My favourite was the PA whose monitor was "broken"

She'd turned the brightness down to zero.

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Google right to be forgotten 'looks odd and CLUMSY'

Tom 38
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Re: Asking for a court order

50,000 people might fill in a web form, 50,000 people won't instruct a solicitor.

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Tom 38
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Re: Of course it's clumsy

And they've just now announced that all the links they've removed in the past couple of days - they've added them back again. Guess too many people saw through it.

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Tom 38
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Re: Of course it's clumsy

Plus they are going that little bit further - they didn't email "webmaster@bbc.co.uk", they emailed the journo directly in order to trigger the follow up story.

The first thing google should say in response to any request is "Sure, no problem, where is the court order". They are entitled to do so, but they don't because they want to make a story out of it and spin it their way.

If our courts are overwhelmed because of one of our laws, we'll deal with it. I doubt they will be.

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Comet-chasing Rosetta spies SWEATY prey

Tom 38
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There are two reasons why it will take so long:

a) The comet isn't sitting still - it is also going very fast.

b) Generally when you approach an object you want to land on, it is advisable to be going significantly less than 30000 MPH or parking dings may occur.

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Tom 38
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Re: Re Bootnote

Surely this is more elegantly expressed in cans of coke per second, viz ~ 1 Cc/s.

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ISPs haul GCHQ into COURT over dragnet interwebs snooping

Tom 38
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Re: Here come the lawsuits.

Parliament is sovereign because it is equal with the monarch, and I have no problem with secret squirrels listening in to her phone calls either.

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Tom 38
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Re: Here come the lawsuits.

Why is it at all important that we reassure MPs that they are, once again, especially privileged?

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EFF sues NSA over snoops 'hoarding' zero-day security bugs

Tom 38
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Re: Im all for bashing the NSA

Not any different the CDC cultivating, creating and keeping dangerous virus and bacterial cultures just in case we ever need to develop an antidote.

In fact, it is very different. The CDC collect and cultivate virii and bacteria in order to develop treatments for them. The NSA collect and cultivate exploits in order to develop weapons based on them.

If the CDC spent their time developing weaponised Ebola, then sure, it's exactly the same.

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Amazon sues former employee who took Google cloud job

Tom 38
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Re: Can't see the gray area here

I think Sales has it's issues too, mostly around customer lists :)

That is straight up corporate theft, and I've thoroughly enjoyed the times that I've been asked to produce logs and evidence of a particular sales bod downloading client lists and corporate data the day before they hand in their notice.

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Tom 38
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Re: Can't see the gray area here

In the UK, your company can put whatever they like in to your contract regarding no-compete clauses, and you are largely free to completely ignore them - your right to pursue legal employment outweighs the contract provision.

Only in specific scenarios can a no-compete be enforced, typically when a company takes out an injunction against another company from hiring their staff - and the High Court agrees - then if the second company does subsequently hire staff from the first company, that company can take relief from the second company (note - not the employee in question).

So that is probably the grey area.

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MONSTER COOKIES can nom nom nom ALL THE BLOGS

Tom 38
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Re: Bingo

No, it is perfect error handling on the part of the web servers. Normal, non malicious clients do not send multi megabyte GET requests to web servers, and thus it is perfectly correct for the server to terminate the connection with a "413 Request Entity Too Large" error.

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Tom 38
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Not really denial of service

The "attack" does not force excess resource consumption, and the service is still available, just not to afflicted clients.

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Sorry, chaps! We didn't mean to steamroller legit No-IP users – Microsoft

Tom 38
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Re: @Trigun "meh" Whilst I entirely agree that Redmond do not seem to be handling.....

You've mis-read the article - the "ISP" referred to is No-IP, she is complaining that MS are clueless when it comes to DNS.

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British and European data cops probe Facebook user-manipulation scandal

Tom 38
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Re: If I was a Facebook engineer...

What are they doing with their life? Exactly the same as almost all other people in the world. Most of us don't change the world with our day jobs, we just get a wage for pushing out whatever IT it is that our corporate masters need.

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GCSE Computing teachers cry victory as board decides NOT to bin tech teens' work

Tom 38
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Re: Kids, parents: don't worry

Significantly cheaper too.

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Tom 38
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Kids, parents: don't worry

A GCSE in Computing is about as useful as a chocolate teapot (or an A level in General Studies).

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New Russian law punishes online 'extremism'

Tom 38
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Re: Vimes This is news?

Plus, she is a domestic extremist. She lives in this country and holds views which are beyond what most people in this country consider proportionate - in other words, extreme.

If the Greens were to resort to direct action, I have no doubt that she would be involved in some shape or form because of the extremity of her views and lifelong devotion to "the cause", and so I can totally understand why people monitoring domestic extremists would have her on their list.

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REVEALED: The sites blocked by Great Firewall of Iraq

Tom 38
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Porn sites are still blocked, [but] social media websites were unblocked in Baghdad

Explains the fighting I guess. Re-block twitter, un-block House of Ron Jeremy, peaceful nation again?

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What is ex-NSA spyboss selling for $1m a month, asks US congressman

Tom 38
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Facepalm

Re: @silent_count

Thanks, I thought it was named after that episode of House.

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Tom 38
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Re: Alan Grayson has no credibility in regard to civil rights

I don't know British politics that well, but imagine if instead of London Mayor if Boris Johnson were an MP given quite a bit more power and time in the media than he has experience or expertise for, but with more paranoia, much more sycophancy toward the Prime Minister (like Grayson acts toward the President), and a shorter temper.

Yep, wrong example - Boris is a rival to the PM, he doesn't go after him directly, his allies regularly send out stalking horses to try to discredit Gove/May/Grieve to strengthen Boris in the party and weaken Cameron.

I think the best analogy would be to Michael Gove - deeply ambitious and sycophantic, will do anything his master wants.

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Hey, Marissa Mayer: Flexi working time is now LAW in UK. Yahoo!

Tom 38
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Re: More "management versus labor" mentality

you do not throw your income away on commuting

Most "work from home" schemes still have you coming in to the office on a regular enough basis that it is still cheaper to buy a monthly/annual rail card than a succession of day returns.

So its like you save on commuting, without actually saving on commuting.

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Indie labels: 5 reasons why we're hauling YouTube before Euro antitrust watchdog

Tom 38
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Re: Message for the labels

Sure the independent labels can do set up their own sites; they are doing so.

Why does that mean that Google are allowed to keep their advertising revenue when illegally uploaded content is added to their site?

Google want to play it both ways;

a) you can agree to our offer, and when your content is placed on our site we will give you what we consider a fair cut.

b) you can not agree, and when your content is placed on our site we will keep all the money we make from it and you can go fuck yourself.

Seems a bit aggressive, don't you think?

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HP in 'serious' settlement talks over Autonomy legal bust-up

Tom 38
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Re: So what about the auditors?

And always remember to take a box of chocolates and misleading signs with you whenever you take on The Auditors.

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BBC: Bumpkins, hobbits need fairer coverage

Tom 38
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Re: I don't get the BBC

I would totally watch a live action version of "The Archers".

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Tom 38
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@Symon - great blog

it’s hardly surprising that the tone of much of the BBC’s political coverage is sceptical. As Jeremy Paxman once suggested, it is based on the suspicion these lying bastards are lying to us.

Good read!

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David Cameron wants mobe network roaming INSIDE the UK

Tom 38
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Re: Whatever the answer may be......

Three currently only have bandwidth at 1800MHz, which is very very poor at penetrating buildings. This is universal to the Three network, all the other networks have bandwidth at 900MHz. Therefore if you are on Three, and have a good connection indoors, you are pretty close to the cell and so your experience is atypical.

Other networks have bandwidth at 900MHz and 1800MHz, and so have better indoor penetration. Three have a deal with (I forget, T-mobile?) to trade some frequency to give them some slots at 900MHz to rectify this, which I think comes in to effect in October.

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Tom 38
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It sounds good, but there is nothing to force operators to provide an adequate service in the zone that they have been allocated.

Could we not just make it more/very expensive for the network to be carried on competitors network where they do not have capacity? If they pass the cost on to the consumer instead of investing in more POP to reduce future costs, then they become more expensive and less competitive than their rivals that do have capacity.

This way, the whole thing becomes a market driven by consumer demand. If you don't provide an adequate network, you will have to raise prices, which will then mean you lose customers eventually to the networks that do provide an adequate service and do not have to raise prices.

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You need a list of specific unknowns we may encounter? Huh?

Tom 38
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Joke

I have instructed my lawyers Mr Dabbs

From this moment forward you will desist from recording my stand-up and planning sessions. If you immediately hand over the previous months footage which you used to write this amusing article as well, I will consider this matter closed.

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Google: Glass goggles are a 'fairly lousy surveillance device'

Tom 38
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No not at all. Individuals work for an organisations.Individuals (working for an organisation) recording in public aren't covered by that code of practice (not law).

Individuals acting for the benefit of an organisation are not individuals, they are agents of that organisation.

One of the clues is in the initialism "CCTV" - it means Closed-Circuit Television. This code is not for individuals (whether they work for an organisation or not) wearing Glass.

lolwut?

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Tom 38
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As for "Paterson added that wearables containing cameras used by Glasshole organisations to capture video or pictures will need to adhere to the regulator's CCTV code of practice, which is currently undergoing a review."

This is false, people do not need to adhere to the "regulator's CCTV code of practice" at all. It's a code of practice (not law) and it doesn't even apply to individuals recording in public.

Clarified? In the UK, organizations do not have the same rights as people.

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App maker defends selling S.F. parking spots as a FREE SPEECH issue

Tom 38
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Re: can't resist

Baby boomers have generally been givers.

Are you trying to be ironic or funny, or do you actually believe this?

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Tom 38
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Re: Taking the piss

Yeah, well, how is that "legal"? Starting from the what one wants to conclude is not a good form of discourse.

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Microsoft tests HALF-INCH second screen to spur workplace play

Tom 38
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And yet another thing to distract from work*. 5 years ago, I could quite easily say "this is a no email/phone day", put the phone on do not disturb and only check my emails at 5pm.

Nowadays, if people don't get an immediate reply to their email, they IM, and my browser beeps and pops up the message, regardless of what workspace I am on. Worst of all is flowdock, which I'm now mandated to be on several flows, most of which are irrelevant but still cause browser notifications to pop up - "@everyone ready for the call?" - not a call I'm on, but thanks for disrupting my thought processes to remind people about a meeting in their calendars.

Then, 3 minutes later, the same message arrives in your inbox and then your phone. Gaaaaaaaa!

* He says, posting on the register....

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Labour vows: We'll pause one-dole-to-rule-them-all for drastic fix-up if elected in 2015

Tom 38
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Joke

Re: Nice idea..

...then one in a million situations happen at least once a day.

Everyone knows one in a million shots come up 9 times out of 10.

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Tom 38
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Re: About bloody time!

I'm fairly certain that Labour intend, if they are returned to power, to choose someone else to serve as Secretary of State for Work and Pensions rather than keeping IDS in the job..

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'I got a little bit upset by that Register article...' says millionaire model. Bless!

Tom 38
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Re: Ok, you've had your fun

See, you've missed the boat again.

The first story was about how a technological nobody can grab £200k of public money. That is one thing.

This story is about her moaning about being called on it. That is something else.

Both deserve derision.

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Tom 38
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Re: Ok, you've had your fun

I think you are showing your own biases tbh. Is it not possible to criticise someone silly for being silly, without being accused of misogyny because the silly person is a woman?

Because the focus and tone of these stories is “lily the silly woman who squandered tax payers money on a frivolous website”

Take the word "woman" out of it, and sure, that is the tone and focus of the previous article - how silly people managed to get silly amounts of public money and do silly things with it. This article is actually about the irony of said silly person moaning about people complaining that their project is silly and a waste of public money. Silly.

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Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: Snooping on foreigners

Did you just wake up from a 13 month coma?

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Shift over, TV firms: LTE Broadcast will nuke current mobile telly tech

Tom 38
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Re: Think motorsport

Imagine being able to see the world feed whilst the cars are out of view, or see the pit stops if you aren't opposite the start/finish line?

It still only solves one problem - "how do people at the event view more of the event". It does nothing to decrease the ever growing on demand traffic, which TFA suggests it will.

The fact that it is cell specific should make improving the experience of people at events easier - they can provide special cells within the stadia that broadcast the content.

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Tom 38
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There is certainly a need for it when massive traffic volumes are generated by large sporting events such as the World Cup. EE has reported that the goal scored by ex-Everton player Tim Cahill for Australia at 5.21pm on Wednesday 18th June resulted in the biggest ever single data spike across the EE network as people took to social media and streaming services to watch replays of the goal.

So this technology would not help - these people were not watching a single stream broadcast to all users simultaneously, they were all individually served the content as they demanded it.

So yes, super cool to be able to broadcast TV within a cell (although, if you're at the game, just watch the game?), but it will do sweet FA with managing the demand of people who are not at the game and want to watch snippets of it at a time that suits them.

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Bored yet? Now there's ANOTHER OpenSSL fork – it's from Google

Tom 38
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Re: When do things really change?

Can there be levels of trust? I don't fully trust SSL, but I trust it more than plaintext....

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Tom 38
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Re: aka BackdoorSSL ?

It's hard to see how why this should be labeled boring when it includes a bunch of patches that "are a little too experimental."

The patches are experimental because they alter API or ABI. BoringSSL is boring because it strips back what an SSL library does from "everything + the very latest in development protocols" to "enough to make an encrypted connection and verify keys".

One of the main reasons heartbleed had such an effect was that almost anyone who offered OpenSSL on their webserver had been forced to upgrade to the newer, "more secure" OpenSSL 1.0 series in order to pass "security audits" which are simply "Is version > x".

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Infosec bods try Big Data in search for better anti-virus mousetrap

Tom 38
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Wonderful, I love paps.

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Australia's eMinister has policy-crush on UK's Liam Maxwell

Tom 38
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COTS is great when you agree that the function performed by the COTS will be what the COTS currently performs.

It's not so great when some dickhead thinks that he can buy COTS (cuz it's cheaper, natch), and yet still thinks he can customize every single damn thing about it, and change his mind constantly about what each customization is.

Consultants don't give a fuck, if the customer want "cheap" COTS, then they send an integrator and make their margin on the customizations, where as if they can convince the customer that you need bespoke, they send the architect and make their margin that way.

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32,000 motherboards spit passwords in CLEARTEXT!

Tom 38
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Re: Eh?

it will sound much more like an IT tech trying to explain why THIS kind of thing is exactly the reason why he/she requested that $500 switch instead of the $200 one that the boss eventually bought from the local store.

What do you think happens in that scenario, PHB goes seppuku-o-clock, or shifts the blame to the vendors/beancounters?

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Crooks use Synology NAS boxen to mine Dogecoin, yells Dell

Tom 38
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FAIL

If you don't open port 5000, then you also probably are unlikely to leave a link to your (closed) port to your NAS on a web forum where it can be picked up by a google search?

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