* Posts by Tom 38

2913 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

RoboVM: Open source? Sorry, it's not working for us

Tom 38
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The company is also offering "every single external contributor" a free, lifetime licence

Again, they are not obligated to do that.

In fact, they are.

They are re-licensing all their external contributors work, which is not legal. To make it legal, they are proposing to re-license it under their new terms, with the consideration being the "free" lifetime license, and hoping that no-one says "No", or worse, says "No" and sues them.

Without consideration, there would be no incentive for the contributors to accept the change of license.

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Experts ponder improbable size of Cleopatra's asp

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Slapper?

For this post I use the appropriate icon. My post said:

Are people from the Americas not Americans?

This drew your ire:

The standard global practice is to refer to people based on the continent they live on. People in Europe are Europeans. People in Africa are Africans. There is no continent called 'America'.

If you're still not getting it, "The Americas" is plural.

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Tom 38
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Re: Slapper?

Are people from the Americas not Americans?

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No VAT on Bitcoin, rules ECJ, but capital gains still apply

Tom 38
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The Register can state that the judgment in Case C‑264/14 does not remove Bitcoin barons' liability to Capital Gains Tax.

Except in tax regimes that treat movable assets differently, like Luxembourg and Germany. Hold bitcoins for 6-12 months, depending on location, and sell with no CGT liability.

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Pimp your TV: Goggle box gadgets and gizmos

Tom 38
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Re: Post-it note

Crumbs! Does this mean I should stop watching Cutie (QT) for taste reasons?

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Tom 38
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Re: Rant: Why so slow, and why such a rubbish UX?

Box shifting hardware manufacturers don't care about how it actually works, just the number of boxes it ticks so that a PFY can sell one using just a spreadsheet.

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Tom 38
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Re: Nice little roundup

Take a look at UK football. A few years ago, "all" you needed was Sky Sports and you could watch everything. Then, "competition" was brought in. You have ended up with several channels across which the games are spread. While techinically it is competition, it does mean that a football fan now needs to pay for Sky Sports, and BT Sports, and any other channels, so it costs them more.

Do I have to look at it, or can we just talk about it? One thing you have neglected to take in to account is that when it was "all" on Sky Sports, only around 10% of games were available to view on subscription services, whilst now a much larger proportion of games are available across more channels. I believe Sky currently have more live UK football than at any point in their existence. The argument is that - yes, you might pay more, but you are getting more.

This is moot though, as no-one really watches "UK football", they watch specific teams - and in order to watch all the available matches for a specific team, you must buy one of each subscription. Almost certainly, that will cost you more money - but it might be of some value to you, if it means you can watch "your team" 5 times a year instead of 3.

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Mars water discovery is a liberal-muslim plot, cry moist conspiracy theorists

Tom 38
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"it lost most of its atmosphere for reasons not yet discovered"

I thought we had the bastard responsible - is it not a combination of not enough gravity and no volcanism? Not enough mass to keep it all from boiling off and nothing to replenish it?

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Siege of Shoreditch was like Stalingrad, but with Froot Loops Bloopers

Tom 38
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Re: Rejected? Really?

You can't start with Mornington Crescent, or it will be a very dull game.

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Tom 38
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Re: Beefy

THREE? No-one can handle THREE!

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FATTIES have most SUCCESS with opposite SEX! Have some pies and SCORE

Tom 38
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Re: Low quality work?

How many people actually know their real waist size, and not just what size the clothes they buy say they are? My US bought Levis profess a "waist" of 32", but a) they sit on my hips, not my waist and b) my hips are at least 4" bigger than that (M&S 36"). "fashion sizing" I think they call it - apparently lying to people about how tubby they are inflates their confidence and makes them more likely to buy..

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It's the white heat of the tech revolution, again!

Tom 38
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Re: oh, boy ...

Nice rant, but two counter-points:

1) Comcast/Time Warner do not operate in a free market, except in a few locations. Because of this, your US-centric arguments make little sense in the EU, where in most places there is a good competitive market. Across most of the UK, you can pay more for a competent, non throttling ISP that gives you an IPv6 /64 if you ask (A&A), or a cheap as chips consumer ISP (most of the rest). Markets that work, work. Markets that are not markets, do not.

2) Consumer ISPs are not the Internet, they are the gateway to the Internet for consumers. The backbone of the Internet is competitive and offers many choices.

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Tom 38
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Re: The value of Google

People don't remember pre-google any more, clearly.

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Find shaving a chore? Why not BLAST your BEARD off with a RAYGUN

Tom 38
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So it lasts 50,000 hours before I need to replace the unit? Lets be generous, and say a wet shave takes me 5 minutes, and that this method doesn't take longer than a wet shave (otherwise, what's the bloody point?), that gives me a lifetime for this laser-razor of 600,000 shaves, or one a day for the next 1,600 years.

Not the best business model I've heard of.

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Managing DevOps in the hybrid cloud

Tom 38
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UrbanCode Deploy

It's obviously a command line tool:

$ urban dev-foo is clappin

> Is it?

innit

> Removed dev-foo from balancer, it totally clutterz

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Vanished global warming may not return – UK Met Office

Tom 38
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Re: @ h4rm0ny

WTF is the point of using AC and then signing all your messages as Brett?

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Tom 38
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Re: Jeremy will save us

Jeremys brother will get the forecast gig (he's bloody good at it)

He claims to be bloody good at it.

WeatherAction exited the Alternative Investment Market in 1999 after reported losses incurred during its time as a public company of £480,000 and its share price dropped from 79p a share to 24p

He's also an absolutist:

... CO2 has never driven, does not drive and never will drive weather or climate. Global warming is over and it never was anything to do with CO2. CO2 is still rising but the world is now cooling and will continue to do so.

So maybe Jezza will restart the coal mines.

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Penny wise and pound foolish: Server hoarders are energy wasters

Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: Pentium 4s really did suck, didn't they?

You've got a bad memory, because the P3 was fucking awesome - so awesome that after P4 was revealed for the POS it was, they went back and re-engineered the Tualatin core that was used in the Pentium 3M and came up with the Core micro-architecture that we are still using today, low power, high speed and super clockable.

Even when P4 came out, the enthusiast with an eye for bang/buck would buy P3-M processors, whack them in a desktop motherboard and overclock them by 50-80%.

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The ONE WEIRD TRICK which could END OBESITY

Tom 38
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Re: Obesity is a reflection of societies illhealth

Read the comment section of the same report:

We did not examine other health problems caused by obesity. A recent population-based study has found that overweight and obesity have a strong and deleterious impact on important components of health status, including morbidity, disability, and quality of life, and this impact is disproportionately borne by younger adults.

Even if being overweight doesn't increase your mortality rates, your life would be a lot better if you were not. Mortality is whether you are alive or not, morbidity is whether you are healthy or not. Why not aim to be healthy?

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Mobile phones are the greatest poverty-reducing tech EVER

Tom 38
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Re: African Products used in UK?

A lot of garden veg and salad stuff is grown year round in Kenya and air freighted to Europe. Kenya also grows some of the finest tea you can lay your hands on.

West Africa, and Ivory Coast in particular, produce over two thirds of the worlds cocoa beans.

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Bible apps are EVIL says John McAfee as he phishes legal sysadmins in real time

Tom 38
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Re: Paranoid?

Yes, some of us still use cheques. They work very well for the purpose they were written for.

Which one: delaying a payment, giving the appearance of having paid or giving a huge wodge of cash for banks to use for three days?

(I once worked as an account clerk for a small company, whenever we paid suppliers I was told to make sure that the cheque was folded smartly in half, because that meant it couldn't be machine processed and so the money stayed an extra day in our account..)

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Uber is killing off iconic black cabs, warns Zac Goldsmith

Tom 38
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Re: Cabs,

I remember one taxi trip in Chicago, going to the airport. In Chicago, the taxi drivers are required by law to always accept card payments - if they can't, I think you get the ride for free. I didn't mention I was paying by card until we got to the airport, at which point the genial polite taxi driver from the past 30 minutes disappeared, and I got called all kinds of names under the sun

He then gets out an old credit card imprinter - the ones with carbon paper! - and scrunches through my debit card. I was going to give him a cash tip, but instead I gave him a literal one - don't call a Welsh man an "English motherfucker", especially when he's hungover.

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Tom 38
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Disruption appears to mean that we ditch a regulated system of drivers that are definitely insured, and knowledgable, for one with far fewer checks, a company syphoning as much cash as it can out of the country, and people working for a pittance.

20 years ago, knowing the best route from Marble Arch to London Bridge was a useful skill. In the days of sat-nav, is it still? People are voting with their wallets to say that it is not.

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'To read this page, please turn off your ad blocker...'

Tom 38
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Re: liability....

All the adverts I see are for stuff I might buy - normally because I bought it yesterday. Yes, Snow and Rock, I would like a new ski jacket - that's why I bought one from you yesterday. Thanks for stalking me all over the internet though.

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Sierra Nevada snow hasn't been this bad since 1500AD

Tom 38
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Re: Reg hack confused by science again

Lucas Silva

Degrees:

Ph.D. Global Environmental Change and Sustainability -

M.Sc. Terrestrial Ecology and Biogeochemistry -

B.Sc Forest Engineering

If he's confused by the claims, is it OK if we are too?

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Let's NUKE MARS to make it more like home says Elon Musk

Tom 38
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Re: Ridiculous

Undersea cities are unlikely any time soon. The sea is just too damn corrosive and violent.

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Plods waste millions keeping their arses covered and ears open

Tom 38
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Re: Not this perennial nonsense again

This kind of nonsense gets peddled annually about government procurement.

Firstly, separate police forces procure separately. If you want everyone to get the same price then procure centrally for all police everywhere.

Aha, you don't understand how this game is played. The purpose of releasing this information is to force central procurement.

The article is based on a leaked/FOI data from someone with an axe to grind (Taxpayers Alliance usually) in order to get "people" to say "huh, what a waste of money, we must have central procurement". zomg, what a coincidence.

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Apple's big secret: It's an insurance firm (now with added finance)

Tom 38
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Spot on

This. Exactly this. It's why all my relatives have apple phones and tablets (with barely a mac between them), because - in their minds - it is simple to use and Apple will look after them.

Apple have a reputation* for actually caring about the device after they've sold it to you, which you can't say about most box shifting hardware manufacturers. In effect, they are a software firm that make their money from hardware, and that unique position means they can benefit in ways that Samsung or HTC simply can't.

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BORN to HURL: Man's shoulders are head and shoulders above apes, gorillas, chimps etc

Tom 38
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Re: Only one thing to say

Two Twenty Two for Two after Twenty Two overs here at the Adelaide Oval....

If you like cricket, and haven't heard of Billy Birmingham, well, you're in for a fun night.

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Amazon, GoDaddy get sueball for hosting Ashley Madison data

Tom 38
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Re: Comments still enabled?

The .co.uk should indicate why comments are locked on a story on an on-going UK criminal case with a specific named individual, and why they are not on a story on an on-going US civil case with no named individuals.

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Tom 38
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Re: ELLOHELL

Yeah, wtf is a John Roe. Are they suing all British mathematicians?

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Laminate this: Inside Argos' ongoing online (r)evolution

Tom 38
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Re: Dying

I ent dead yet...

Not buying the "no value added" argument either. They add value by having a large range of items available for instant purchase at online prices on the high street.

Must be a nightmare for you when you want to make a ham and cheese omelette, you have to tour 3 different farms and a butcher...

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Ashley Madison made dumb security mistakes, researcher says

Tom 38
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Re: So...

Where they went wrong (allegedly) is that the passwords and certs are in the source code repository! zomg!

What they should have done is have puppet/chef/cfengine push out dotfiles so that the passwords and certs are in the role user's environment, and the config files pull it out of there.

Of course, your puppet/chef/cfengine configuration must be versioned and change managed, so that gets checked in to a repository too! Repositories all round!

IMO, this just replaces one source of information leakage with another. Any accidental environment leakage can lead to disclosure of secrets, so you have to scrub it. I've no problem with production config files living in a separate repository, just this "stuff everything in the environment and write complex, hard to read and debug config files that pull it out again".

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US trade watchdog to FBI: 'You think the crims won't know about the backdoor too?'

Tom 38
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Re: MODERATOR, please kill this post...

I miss Eadon

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So Quantitative Easing in the eurozone is working, then?

Tom 38
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Re: Grinding axes ...

This may explain why I have never bothered reading the Telegraph since about 1997.

This runs the risk of living within an echo chamber. I think it is useful to read even the diatribes, as long as you can recognise it as such. When I was a student and had much more time on my hands to read, each of us in the house would have obligations to buy a different paper, so we had all the broadsheets and most of the tabloids at hand to (I think we skipped Star and Sport..)

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Attention sysadmins! Here’s how to dodge bullets in a post-Ashley Madison world

Tom 38
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Depends. If your boss is like mine, and views reading the register as part of keeping technically up to date (even these comment board malarky), then you're fine.

If your boss views it as a waste of time, I'd do it at home (or get a different boss).

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Tom 38
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They must be REALLY competent to do MITM attacks on HTTPS. [...] In Europe, this would be "workplace surveillance" and is a no-no 110%.

You don't have to be that competent to install an extra root certificate via AD. As to legality, it would be a no-no except...

when you joined the company you more than likely signed a contract that effectively stated that the company reserves the right to monitor any and all usage of their infrastructure

which means, if the target agrees to your monitoring of their activities before you monitor them, its not illegal.

Don't forget point 5. Anything you do on a company supplied computer or network is fair game.

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HMRC breaches job applicants' privacy in mass email spaff

Tom 38
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Pint

Re: If only they'd hired a script kiddie

Is it difficult or something to have Outlook say "this email has more addressees than your default allows. Are you really sure you want to send it?"

And then when they click "Yes", it pops up a box saying "Well, you're wrong", and schedules you for re-education.

Happy days.

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Want your kids to learn coding? Train the darn teachers first

Tom 38
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Joke

Re: Cameron and Tories: Do this, do that, no money for you.

Actually, it's fcvking fault of Labor and the local counsels.

Everyone always blames the lawyers!

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Stench of confiscated dope overwhelms Catalan cop shop

Tom 38
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Re: Whoa, Dude you're nicked

a plastic bin liner will not hold the smell of Spanish home grown

You need higher quality bags. Standard "plastic bags" are made from low density polyethylene (LDPE), which is sufficient to hold solids/liquids but will happily allow small odour molecules through. You need much sturdier bags made out of Polypropylene, or my personal favourite, Kilner style flip top jars.

Allegedly.

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West's only rare earth mine closes. Yet Chinese monopoly fears are baseless

Tom 38
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Bad luck Estonia

Sang away Russia over 25 years ago, part of NATO for more than 10 years, has an advanced high income economy with high living standards and personal freedoms but still an evil commie pinko when deciding whether their mines are part of the "Western Hemisphere".

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Prognosticator, for one, welcomes our new robot work colleagues

Tom 38
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Re: Wrong paradigm

Simple, you enforce the working time directive.

Dear god. Your solution is to tell me that I cannot go out and earn money above what you have decided I am allowed to earn?

The most obvious example I can think of is doctors. We don't have enough doctors now, and we'd need to double the number of them we have to reduce their required hours by half.

Not just that, but because they are only working 8 hours a week rather than 80, it's taken 50 years instead of 5 to train each one of them.

Guess how many people are going to go off and learn all that doctoring stuff, when they get the same pay as everyone else for their 8 hours work.

Presumably, you've also worked out how to stop every other country in the world from out competing us, or from appropriating all of our vastly underutilised army of poorly paid doctors (qv Cuba).

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Tom 38
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Re: Wrong paradigm

The problem is more that everyone is convinced that the only way to live is by working 9 hours a day, and employers and politicians are more than happy to perpetuate that myth because it's good for short term gains and no one care about the long term consequences. In a more sensible world the more automation there was the less work everyone would have to do

If work (and the reward for work) is spread evenly amongst the population and we all work 8 hours a week, then how do you solve the problem of an individual attempting to maximise their income by working longer?

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Vodafone UK rocks the bloat with demands for vanilla Android

Tom 38
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Its all to do with risk

This announcement has nothing to do with what consumers want, even if they are coincidentally aligned. This is about avoiding the finger of blame in the eventual outcome that someone's unpatched operator branded OS has a huge security hole in it that they have ignored despite Google releasing patches.

By pushing their handsets to be stock android, and not making any operator modifications, anything that goes wrong they can simply say "Not me guv" and point at HTC.

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Shadow minister for Fun calls for Openreach separation

Tom 38
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Re: Back in the real world

Nope, which is why I think that our government should pay for it out of general taxation and provide a backbone which ISPs can pay for access to users.

IP networks are public infrastructure nowadays, we need to invest in them like we would roads or railways. I would argue there would be a larger uptick to GDP by building a national FTTP network than building a fast train to Birmingham.

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Tom 38
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Re: Back in the real world

I think the key point is that we are currently paying for investment (via subscriptions) in to our key internet infrastructure, and what we are getting is a poor investment that is good at helping BT's bottom line.

FTTP is a clear investment in the future - future bandwidth increases can occur by upgrading transceivers and repeaters. FTTC is trying to squeeze absolutely the last bit out of copper cables in order to maximise return for minimal investment, but the efficiency of the investment is poor and will eventually need to be replaced with fibre anyway - we're just pushing the cost down the line.

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Ashley Madison spam starts, as leak linked to first suicide

Tom 38
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Re: "Something positive"

"That last website turned into an almighty cluster-shag of a nightmare for everyone. You're probably just feeling relieved that it hasn't gone rancid for you, yet. But do you fancy another go where we'll get it right this time, honest, feeling lucky?"

A lot of people (not just men) completely lose all sense of intelligence when there is even the off-chance of increasing global genetic diversity, so it might work.

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Spotify now officially even worse than the NSA

Tom 38
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despotify

On the desktop at least, you can work around most of this tracking if you use a despotify based client like Clementine, which certainly isn't passing this information along.

OTOH, they have to put in their T&C the things that they do. Their newest feature is running music, you start running and it plays appropriate beat music for your speed, which obviously requires tracking how fast you are going, which requires logging where you were and how long ago. If you aren't using the running feature, I don't think spotify will be doing that extra work, but because they might (if you ask them to do it!), it has to be in the T&C.

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Why do driverless car makers have this insatiable need for speed?

Tom 38
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Re: Driverless cars do not need to be owned

Automatic gearboxes (historically) break sooner and cost more to repair/replace. It's not necessarily that we require control, we're just cheap enough to not mind changing gears in order to save money.

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Tom 38
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Mushroom

Re: The end of any driving pleasure

make the batteries hot pluggable and a standard size. Then you pull up to a service station, take yours out, pay, pick up a fully chard module, plug in and drive out

If the module is at all chard, don't put it in the car or it might overload!

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