* Posts by Tom 38

2694 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

Drunk on Friday night? Then YOU probably DIDN'T spot Facebook's privacy tweak

Tom 38
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Re: you won't defeat the object

But they also couldn't offer me their CORE service of sharing my information with MY friends.

Facebook's business is monetizing identity. Providing tools that you find useful is a side effect of that.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: Sizzling sag aloo

Tom 38
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Re: Looks tasty

Er, well, yes. But why deep frying them? Looks like there's half a pint of the golden stuff in there.

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Tom 38
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WTF?

Looks tasty

But why are you deep frying the spices?

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Google boffins PROVE security warnings don't ... LOOK! A funny cat!

Tom 38
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Re: I've seen and bypassed this message.

Install the certificate in chrome? Takes about 30 seconds.

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Does Big Tech hire white boys ahead of more skilled black people and/or women?

Tom 38
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Re: 20 years, near enough...

Seemingly, the fact that the grey haired 40 something had been doing the job commercially longer than the fetus interviewing him had been alive counted for nothing.

Perhaps the interviewer picked up on the fact that his potential new hire viewed him as a "foetus" and decided there would not be an effective working environment between the two of them?

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Boffin finds formula for four-year-five-nines disk arrays

Tom 38
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Re: Real estate costs

A suitable cooling system means a DC that has enough cooling and power per rack to give you what you are asking. DCs are designed with a specific wattage per rack.

Since everyone wants more power and cooling, if you want more than the average, your DC provider is going to ream you for it.

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Tom 38
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Re: Something new every day

Its real world failure numbers for a specific type of load.

If your real world load is not the same as theirs, I'm not sure you can tell too much from this.

Personally, I think their entire premise is bogus - "How many disks do you need to plug in to a server so you can just leave it for 4 years?" is not a question that needs answering because the opex of providing someone to support your boxes is dwarfed by specifying an array of that size (in terms of extra initial cost, extra PDU, extra rack space).

They haven't even eliminated the person to maintain the server - every server needs an admin or two, even if you don't have to go put disks in it occasionally.

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Landlines: The tech that just won't die

Tom 38
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Re: Static IPs

All of this to satisfy the 0.01% of technically savvy El Reg reading (or writing) customer base. Really?

Nope, not to satisfy that - although it is a wonderful side effect. The main benefit is that you no longer rely on DHCP servers for your users to get service, and therefore your users never have no internet because of an overloaded or poorly configured DHCP server.

Be used to have innumerable issues with their DHCP servers; as a static IP customer paying £2 extra a month these never affected me.

Removing components that can fail provides a better service, and is a good thing.

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Tom 38
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Re: Answer me this...

If BT (wholesale) can rent my line to CheapFoneCo for £8.95 a month, which I then rent from CheapFoneCo for £10 a month or whatever, why the hell can't I just rent my line from BT (retail) for £8.95?

Because BT Wholesale are not allowed to offer services cheaper to BT Retail than they do to other providers. If BT Retail only charged you £8.95, their would have to be purchasing it at a lower price than £8.95 to account for costs.

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Tom 38
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Re: Sort of...

Eh? You couldn't order FTTP without having a copper phone line first? You sure you don't mean FTTC?

With FTTP, BT don't even install a copper phone line, the phone line is provided VOIP over fibre and then distributed over your home wiring. They still make you take the "fibre phone line" however.

My flat has the choice of BT FTTP or Hyperoptic FTTP, Hyperoptic charge £2.50/month for a phone line (also VOIP), but at least its optional.

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'Linus Torvalds is UNFIT for the WORKPLACE!' And you've given the world what, exactly?

Tom 38
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Just because a kernel is modular does not mean it is not monolithic. Linux is a modular kernel, but it is also a monolithic kernel. You can load a driver for your TV tuner, but it is loaded in to kernel space - ergo, monolithic.

NT is a modular kernel, but it is not a monolithic kernel (its a hybrid, like OS X).

It gets blurred a bit in Linux, where things like the sound system are partially user-mode daemons if you use a sound daemon like esd or pulseaudio. However, the sound daemon will use kernel mode drivers (ALSA) to communicate with the sound hardware; a true microkernel would provide a mechanism for communicating with (almost) any device, with the device specific bits happening in user mode and not kernel mode.

To go back to the TV tuner example, Linux provides a whole raft of TV tuner drivers. They all run in kernel space. BSD doesn't provide any TV tuner drivers, but provides a kernel mode character driver that can be used to communicate with USB devices. The Linux drivers are then run entirely in user space, communicating using this simple kernel driver. Performance + inability for a TV card to oops your system.

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Tom 38
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Re: Green for O'Reilly

Way back, I quickly learnt to avoid buying O'Reilly.

I found that, too often, their books were full of irrelevant padding.

Without words..

How do you know anything if you don't read O'Reilly?

Sure, there are some duds (I'd avoid "UML in a nutshell"), but in general they are just awesome - and in some cases, irreplaceable. If you did apache module programming with apache 1.3, and you didn't have O'Reilly's "Writing Apache Modules With Perl and C", then you were missing the only documentation of APR that existed for 1.3.

Compared to other publishers, O'Reilly are a by-word for quality. I remember one "book" from Packt that consisted 1/3rd poorly written project diary and 2/3rd (mostly machine generated) Java. It did not teach me XSLT.

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The firm that swallowed the Sun: Is Oracle happy as Larry with hardware and systems?

Tom 38
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2001 called

They want their 3D charts back

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Panicked teen hanged himself after receiving ransomware scam email

Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: Microsoft FAIL

Non-sequitur fail?

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Drinking to forget? OK. But first, eat a curry... QUICK!

Tom 38
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Re: Hmmm...

I remember some research being done by the US army on drugs that would help dampen memory formation or emotive context.

Cannabis?

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Wizard of Oz OFFICIALLY 'most significant movie' EVER, says PNAS

Tom 38
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Re: Bullshit

I wouldn't take "The Bible", but perhaps just one edition of it - the King James Bible ("the most influential version of the most influential book in the world, in what is now its most influential language").

More commonly used idioms were penned by the translators of KJ, notably Tyndale, than any other English author, including Shakespeare, eg "feet of clay", "reap the whirlwind", "filthy lucre", "take root", "the powers that be", "the blind leading the blind", "no rest for the wicked" and apparently 250 more.

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GDS builds UNICORN HERDER, plays with Puppets

Tom 38
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Re: rvm use build gem bundle install... ARRRGH!!!

There is some good stuff.

However, on some level I do wish they weren't spending money inventing the new ways to be cool. No-one's website fell over because it is hosted in httpd and not unicorn.

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NASA probe snaps increasingly detailed shots of MOIST DWARF goddess

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: So-

Dwarf planets are not planets. Planets are objects massive enough to be shaped by gravity (tick), not undergoing nuclear fusion (tick), cleared out all the space around the object of smaller objects (fail).

It's like saying "If Bob is a gorilla, and Bill is a gorilla, how many humans in this room?!"

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Alabama tops US teacher-pupil sex league

Tom 38
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Re: Accused or convicted?

Nor for this lady there isn't. Must be devastating to have a child murdered, but I'm not at all sure what she wanted the police to do, or indeed what they could do, to someone who has not been found guilty of anything.

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Which of UK's major ISPs will let you have exotic p0rn? NONE OF THEM

Tom 38
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Re: Sweet...

There is definitely something wrong with the interconnect between Virgin and Sky.

I get on average 1mb/s (often lower) downloading movies from Sky while a Steam game will come in at 12mb/s

There are so many reasons for getting a slow speed from a particular provider, it is much more likely to be congestion within Sky's network or capacity of their links rather than the connection between Sky and Virgin.

I'm on synchronous gigabit FTTP (Hyperoptic) in Central London, and can only download from Sky at around 8Mbit/s (1MB/s), whilst Steam and other well connected provider's downloads come down at between 400-700Mbit/s (50-80MB/s).

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Amazon's tax deal in Luxembourg BROKE the LAW, says EU

Tom 38
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I still don't understand why this tax haven is permitted to be part of the EU. Their entire country's economy is predicated on fucking over the rest of us by providing low taxation headquarters.

In most countries in the EU, there can be some differences in taxation levels, like Ireland and Netherlands, but even the Double Dutch pales in to what you can do if you are based in Luxembourg.

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GRENADE! Project Zero pops pin on ANOTHER WINDOWS 0-DAY

Tom 38
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Re: The origin of patch Tuesday

Technically, a patch that fucks up more than it fixes is not "ready".

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Should spectrum hog TV give up its seat for broadband? You tell us – EU

Tom 38
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Re: No.

Works for me in principle - until it collides with UK political reality, when...

So we can't have nice things, paid for in a sensible way, because in the past we haven't managed to do it? We might as well stick with our current system and just continue to fade in to insignificance, because cynicism?

Seems like a bit of a barrier to progression.

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Tom 38
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Re: No.

Naive backwards thinking. The answer should be "YES. A THOUSAND TIMES YES", however it has not been phrased properly.

We should absolutely sell off our bandwidth. It absolutely makes sense to use mobile communication frequencies best suited to communicating with mobiles.

It makes absolutely no sense to deliver IPTV via wireless. If you are in a static location, it also makes no sense to use wireless infrastructure for a permanent connection.

Spectrum is valuable stuff. We absolutely should sell our spectrum to whomever will pay the most for it, and use the proceeds to provide a real public communications backbone in the UK. FTTH is what is required, not in towns but everywhere. The 3G auction produced enough money to pay for every home in the UK to be lit.

So, 1) Sell bandwidth, 2) fibre up the country with the money, 3) allow operators to use their newly freed up bandwidth.

In one step, we've paid for the modernization of our internet infrastructure in a way that no other country in the world could match, we've maximised the usage of our spectrum to allow our communications to be more ubiquitous and by making FTTH universally available, we're not limiting the access to information to the rich.

All by flogging some radio spectrum...

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BILL GATES DRINKS 'boiled and treated' POO. Ah, 'delicious'

Tom 38
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Re: Well..

There is a famous French song 'Dès que le vent soufflera - Scélérats" by an artist called Renaud which has appropriate lyrics

Who came first, "Renaud" or W C Fields?

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ICANN HACKED: Intruders poke around global DNS innards

Tom 38
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Re: The end

This is the most concerning part of the whole tale. You'd hope that ICANN staff were a bit more savvy than my grandmother.

You might hope that, but why would it be the case? Because he works for ICANN, the receptionist also knows how to debug BIND?

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Nork-ribbing flick The Interview AXED: Sony caves under hack terror 'menace'

Tom 38
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Re: Not exactly killing

Kim Jong Il was a huge hollywood film fan (over 20,000 DVDs) and, despite being a ruthless dictator crushing his own people, apparently had a sense of humour. He probably enjoyed parts of Team America, given it lampooned America almost as much as the Norks.

Kim Jong Un is a fat spoilt kid in comparison.

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Tom 38
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Re: Grow some balls!

So you think "rogue state after me" is bad, but you then admit that "rogue state is irrelevant to being attacked". So, what, you just don't go outside?

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Beware of merging, telcos. CHEAPER SPECTRUM follows

Tom 38
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Really? The telcos borrowed to buy. The telcos then took the interest charges off their profits, and the tax revenues dropped afterwards.

All Brown did was bring forward taxation

So you're saying that if we had simply given them the spectrum, we would have reaped the same revenue in taxes as we received from the auction? Somehow I doubt it.

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NY premiere of The Interview cancelled after hackers' terrorist threats

Tom 38
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Re: Fight the war against terror!

Point went over your head pal. If you have a "terrorist threat" against an event, and as a response you cancel the event as it "may be unsafe", you're not "fighting terror", but publicising it.

The only way to fight terror is to completely ignore it and go about your life as if it does not exist.

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Tom 38
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Fight the war against terror!

By shooting yourself repeatedly in the foot.

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Microsoft opens smiley-kids jangly guitar doc-maker to all

Tom 38
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Re: @JDX (was: Yet another tens of millions of dollars of programmer-hours ...)

Yes, any other text editor. I used my words so that you can understand my thought process - let me restate it again since it was unclear - no other text editor is better at editing text than vim.

Yes, I am aware of the alternatives. Yes, I have used sublime. It's a really good knock off of many of the best features of vim. It has no features that vim does not have, and has downsides that vim does not have. Hardly compelling, even for my "projects" as you put it.

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Tom 38
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Joke

Re: @JDX (was: Yet another tens of millions of dollars of programmer-hours ...)

Translation; "Why can't they put everything in a text file? We peaked at version 3.0 of vi, so why are people wasting time on anything further? Here's my command cheat-sheet, what more could anyone want?"

Please, enough with the hyperbole - vi 3? The best version of vi is clearly vim 7, but I'd take vim 5 and up over any other text editor or IDE.

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Ofcom's new broom Sharon White sweeps into office

Tom 38
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Re: First job

A monopoly can use its monopolistic position in one industry to increase in size in another industry.

Like, I dunno, using your vast revenues to buy up footie rights and bundling them with your internet.

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Penguin porn? NO! Linux folk in #LCA2015 standoff

Tom 38
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Re: Two sides to each story....

If you read their list archive, this wonderful reply to Cherie Ellis from Russell Coker:

I think going for #LCAAuckNZ is just a continuation of the problem. Much as "server-hugging" is now discouraged[1] I think we need to start discouraging hashtag-hugging. I mean the very point of a a hash function is to prevent collisions.

A quick Google indicates that sha256 is generally[2] considered secure so I would therefore suggest that our official hashtag be:

$ echo "linux.conf.au 2015 in Auckland, New Zealand" | sha256sum

642a96183278655cb7c90e704a42180e68e059c9cda0e4a5dc9c5562a1b38962 -

I am happy to see that this hashtag is unique in both Google and twitter. Now while some people might say that putting a 65 character hashtag on the end of each tweet is excessive I think it is the best way to go forward to avoid these problems.

I would therefore request we go with:

#642a96183278655cb7c90e704a42180e68e059c9cda0e4a5dc9c5562a1b38962

as the official hashtag for Linux.conf.au 2015.

Proper geek humour

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'Critical' security bugs dating back to 1987 found in X Window

Tom 38
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Re: Use the tools, Jules!

How does a large critical opensource project not use free tools?

The answer is that these are not large opensource projects, they are mostly tiny opensource projects that receive little to no attention apart from "make it continue to work". Large opensource projects are the ones that lots of people want to work on.

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Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: No worries...

The moment I got my first ISP account ever, I managed to see people trying to get into my Linux box.

That would be some time after 1987 then?

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'I don't NEED to pay' to watch football, thunders EU digi-czar

Tom 38
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Re: Good luck on that one.

So, why can't we have our international games shown live on free telly in England?

Firstly, for the important ones, you can. It is only friendlies which Sky have the license to. 6N or WC is FTA.

Secondly, the reason you can't watch them is because your union decided to sell the rights to Murdoch.

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Linux software nasty slithers out of online watering holes

Tom 38
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Re: @RAMChYLD - Well...

Any decent company who cares about security blocks Youtube

Generally its about reducing the amount of time people spend looking at cat videos, but yeah ok…

if Java is used on their corporate intranet I strongly doubt they will allow Linux desktops on their network.

lolwut?

Everybody here agrees it is plain silly to run antivirus on a Linux server.

He's right, clients fucking love it when you serve them up virii. Of course they accept it completely when you explain that their users uploaded the virus to your server before they downloaded it, they don't blow their top and go to one of your competitors at all.

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18 million iPHONE USERS HAVE NEVER BONKED to ApplePay

Tom 38
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Re: Re the Need For Standards

Wallets have been routinely targeted by thieves for a while now. Isn't it easier to keep track of one thing than two??

I don't take my wallet out of my pocket on the bus and play with it, I learnt my lesson when I was 7.

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Tom 38
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Re: Re the Need For Standards

replacing several credit cards, loyalty cards, cash, drivers licence, RAC membership and god knows what else with a phone you carry anyway isn't a crap idea.

Yes, replace cards with no intrinsic value with a £500+ gadget that has to be charged every 18 hours and get routinely targeted by thieves. What could possibly go wrong…

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Why, hello there, Foxy... BYE GOOGLE! Mozilla's browser is a video star

Tom 38
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Skype is available on both Apple's OS X and iOS. I Skype with my friends on their Windows machines from my iPad and Mac all the time. Not to mention, use Skype Out to dial phone numbers. Skype is completely platform independent.

Yes, Skype is wonderfully multi platform - you can call SKYPE users on windows from SKYPE on your ipad.

You cannot call Facetime from Skype on Windows though can you, which was in fact the point - well done for ignoring it, have you considered a career in politics?

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Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: eliminates the headaches - does it really?

Sigh....

http://blogs.skype.com/2014/10/27/bringing-interoperable-real-time-communications-to-the-web/

An article about enabling WebRTC using Skype components. So you can call WebRTC from IE.

How does this relate to calling Skype from WebRTC? Do you thin MS will abandon Skype?

Next...

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Tom 38
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That eliminates the headaches that arise if, for example, you've got Skype but your family prefers Facetime and your employer wants everything to happen over Google Hangouts.

Does it? Does it really?

Looks more like this is just yet another wasteground - you can't talk to people on Facetime, you can't talk to people on Skype, you can't talk to people on Google Hangouts.

If all these things were redesigned for WebRTC, then you could use any WebRTC client, of which this is one, to talk to any other client. In reality, none of the people you want to talk to are using WebRTC.

Of the providers I listed, I can only see Hangouts ending up WebRTC enabled. Facetime and Skype are platforms to drive you to purchase related technologies (Apple devices, Windows licenses), you don't drive that by allowing any old client to talk to your platform.

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Gigabit-over-copper VDSL successor G.fast signed off at last

Tom 38
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Re: Physics

…for the last 10-15 years we are still stuck with more or less the same 24 Mbit max offerings unless you live "on top" of a tele station.

You had 24 Mbit internet in 1999? Kudos, I was still on 512k.

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UK slaps 25 per cent 'Google Tax' on tech multinationals

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: I'm confused...

"Gideon". At least troll him accurately.

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Eat FATTY FOODS to stay THIN. They might even help your heart

Tom 38
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Re: Burgers are good!

What do you think the difference between "vegetable spread" and "margarine" is, apart from the spelling?

Having said that, I do prefer "vegetable spread" over "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil".

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Tom 38
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If your intake is reasonable then exercise will reduce your weight, if your intake is enormous so will you be unless your an athlete in training.

Argument from fallacy; if your intake was reasonable, you would not need to lose weight.

Exercise makes you "fit", it does not make you "not fat" unless the exercise tips your intake from a net surplus to a net deficit. Extra exercise accounts for such a small amount of your calorific expenditure, and an even smaller proportion if you are overweight and unfit, as you will find it difficult to do considerably more exercise than you are currently doing.

Exercise is "double good", but if you want to lose weight, cut out food and exercise more. If you want to lose weight, and only have the will power for one of those things, choose "eat less".

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Tom 38
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Exercise is fine for health, but it will do nothing for weight unless you also constrain intake.

To burn off a pack of chocolate digestives you'd be jogging for 4 hours.

You don't need to do exercise to lose weight.

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systemd row ends with Debian getting forked

Tom 38
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Re: Off to a bad start

The whole point of systemd is that it doesn't use init scripts.

No it isn't, that is one of the side effects, and that argument is one of the disingenuous arguments for introducing systemd.

The purpose is to borg desktop services in a way that suits desktops, but only a tiny proportion of linux machines are desktops.

(Replacing a 137 line shell script that calls wierd shit like "start-stop-daemon")

I'd prefer the shell script, because then there is less indirection between "I call this script" and what that script does.

PS: It's only weird if you don't know what it is doing. I find that ini file pretty fucking weird, because I have no clue what "running" that ini file does, or even what program "runs" it. In order to work that out I'd have to read and understand a program that does things based upon the contents of an ini file.

To work out what a shell script does, you need only to read it, or simply run it with "-x".

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