* Posts by Tom 38

2519 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

Lies, damn pies and obesity statistics: We're NOT a nation of fatties

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: A personal experience

I always thought that the BMI stuff was bollocks too, but I think it is largely right if you are of average size.

I wasn't just a little tubby, I was morbidly obese and unfit. I'm a smidgen under 6ft, and weighed over 20 st/285lb/130kg, a BMI of 37, and was massively fed up of it.

I quit smoking (ish), and cut my diet to around 1000 calories per day - 3 satsumas for breakfast, an Eat noodle salad and another satsuma for lunch, more satsumas in the afternoon, and an M&S "Fuller for Longer" ready meal with some extra veg, and lots of cups of tea during the day.

1000 calories a day is damn hard. At the start, I'd keep failing to keep to it, but eventually, your stomach shrinks, and you feel less hungry all the time as a result, and the number of days a week where you fail gets smaller and smaller.*

At the same time, I started doing more exercise. Not actual "put on special exercising clothes" exercise; I walked to the station after work as fast as possible without sweating too much for 20 minutes. If it starts taking less than 20 minutes to get to that station, go a different route.

This diet and moderate exercise has let me lose weight regularly at the rate of 2lb a week; I've been doing it just over a year now, and I've lost about 105 lb, or 7 stone. My waist has gone from 46" to 34" - I have had to buy new trousers and belts almost every other month...

This was about BMI, right? So, the interesting thing about losing so much weight is that I have passed through every BMI stage apart from "Underweight" in the last year. For me, they all seemed pretty on the ball. I was definitely still overweight when I was "Overweight (25-30)", and I still have some more to lose now. When I was 14 stone I was sure that another 7lb would do it, now I am 12st 10lb, and I still think another 7lb needs to come off. I'm not a beanstalk either, I have very broad chest and shoulders.

My BMI now is around 24.5, which puts me in the "Healthy" category, but I'm still dieting to remove the last of my visceral fat and doing some more intensive exercise (couch 2 5k) to try and tighten up my loose skin.

* I changed the diet after about 8 months, as I found a) I was getting slightly bored of satsumas, and b) there was not enough roughage in that diet (Pro tip: do not get dehydrated when eating a diet with poor roughage..). Changed breakfast to two weetabix, a banana and the smallest amount of milk possible to make it edible, and I now mix and match my fruits, satsumas, pears, apples, peaches, nectarines; whatever looks good at the corner store.

3
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Moving the goals?

Obese is defined (in these wailing articles) strictly by BMI.

BMI is not meant to be a personal indicator of health, it is meant to be a way of grouping huge numbers of people for statistically similar outcomes.

For you personally, BMI 30 is not really obese, but for all people with BMI 30, you are a statistical outlier. This doesn't mean that BMI is not a useful macro measurement, but that it is not particularly useful for you.

3
0

Was Nokia's Elop history's worst CEO?

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Bet Who's Farm

Yes, unsurprisingly, people who both own and run their own business have more to lose than someone who simply runs someone else's business.

If Jane and John decide not to actually run their sandwich shop, and ask Bob to do it instead, paying him a wage and live off the profits he produces, then Bob is risking nothing and only Jane and John are risking their business. That's fine though because it is Jane and John's business how they run their business.

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Bet Who's Farm

C level "talent" is hired by the board in order to run the company. The board are given power to do this by the shareholders, who do in fact own the company - it's their farm.

So when Elop comes in and "bets the farm", you are complaining that it is not his farm to bet, how dare he. He is the chosen instrument of the owners, who have chosen to bet their farm via a proxy. If he screws it up, the people who chose him lose their money.

4
1

'MYSTERIOUS PYRAMID STRUCTURE' found on COMET beyond Mars: Landing planned

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Can someone tell me...

Many reasons. Colour requires 3 discrete channels/measurements per pixel, which reduces the resolution of your sensor compared to simply measuring amplitude as you need to pack 3 sensors per pixel instead of one. It also increases the bandwidth required to transmit the image, since you have to send three times as much data back to earth.

Secondly, it's quite dark in space, Rosetta does not carry a massive flash bulb array with which to illuminate 67P, and to get good colour reproduction in your sensors requires incident light of the right colours.

Finally, this instrument, OSIRIS, stands for Optical, Spectroscopic and Infrared Remote Imaging System, so I suspect that the "image" we see is not purely an optical capture from the camera but a computer assisted rendering from several sensor sources, of which only the optical could possibly be in colour. The last one is wild speculation on my part, I don't know enough about OSIRIS.

12
0

No one wants iOS 8 because it's for NERDS - dev

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: works fine for me

Funny that, works fine on the N-1, how about N-3?

0
0

CONSUMERISM IS PAST ITS SELL-BY DATE: Die now, pay later

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Sub-Components consumer ?? try a REAL parts jobber...

Capitalism acts to raise prices for *everything* as high as the market will bear.

You say this like it is a bad thing. The definition of "price" is whatever you can persuade someone else to pay for an item - if you can't persuade someone else to buy it, its not worth what you are selling it at. If you can, well done.

You say that this raises prices, but then with the caveat "as the market will bear". If you raise the price too high, your competitors can undercut you and people will not buy from you.

2
0
Tom 38
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: Thats the point!

a good ol' 200 hundred quid bike

Crikey, £20,000 for a bike?

3
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Thats the point!

Work is ±5 miles door to door from home. Too old and buggered to walk it - 1 hour & 45 minutes at 3 mph (without the rest breaks).

Walk it 300 times and a) you'll be walking significantly faster than 3mph and b) you'll no longer be too buggered to walk 5 miles. I used to be too buggered to walk 5 miles, I now regularly walk 6 miles home from work at ~4.5 mph (takes me 1:15-1:30, depending on how busy Bethnal Green Road is). Build up in small steps, it's easy.

Car is 10 minutes each way and take two litres of petrol - £2.70 say.

Since you are painting this as a straight economic decision, does purchasing the car, taxing the car, insuring the car and maintaining the car amortize down to less than £1 per trip?

3
1

Linux systemd dev says open source is 'SICK', kernel community 'awful'

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Oh please...

Lennart, your programs may be useful, they tend to not follow UN*X philsophy. Buy The UNIX Programming Environment and Software Tools. Read them to the point you have almost memorized them. Then if you still want to do programming, do things that follow in that philosophy.

Lennart has read them.. and then heavily criticised them. His vision is the only way forward.

Fortunately, his vision precludes seeing BSD even exists, so you can still get a UNIX environment without any of Lennart or Kay's bullshit baked in.

19
0

It's not you, it's Three. Mobe network goes titsup across UK

Tom 38
Silver badge
Joke

Re: 3.

Who isn't listening here? The helpdesk person asked Lord Lien 3 times whether they had rebooted their phone, and he just keeps blathering about going in to a different town? Fascinating, BUT HAVE YOU REBOOTED YOUR PHONE?

The first answer to all IT problems is always "Have you tried turning it off then on again?", anyone who comes to me with an IT problem who hasn't done that yet or won't answer whether they have done that...

4
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

OK, companies should provide the service you pay for, but "pathetic" for one single outage? If Three continually had spaffy connections maybe, but generally they are very good.

Raging on the internet because you briefly (evidently) have no internet? #notevensurprised

30
1

Dear Reg readers. I want Metro tiles to replace ALL ICONS in Windows. Is this a good idea?

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: There are lies ...

Simply dividing apples by oranges like that is only going to

…give you the apple:orange ratio?

0
0

That PERSONAL DATA you give away for free to Facebook 'n' pals? It's worth at least £140

Tom 38
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: "Free" if you're paying Compuserve $30 an hour?!

This is hugely valid point, because in the 80s and 90s we paid for internet access and now we don't... oh wait, that's not right....

0
0

A moment of brilliance? UPnP for Internet of Stuff lightbulbs

Tom 38
Silver badge

With UPnP+, devices communicate using XMPP – originally the foundation of Jabber – and can be managed by effectively joining them to a chat room, which would typically represent a room in your home.

Seriously? The best protocol they could come up with is that IoT are IRC bots, and their chosen implementation of IRC involves using XML?

1
0

Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’

Tom 38
Silver badge

Dear Sirs

This Steve Bong article seems to be missing any reference to Garland of Flowers?

17
0

WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Desk Jockey The pimps!

Firstly, I understand it was a freelancer that sold the story to the Mirruh. Whilst the freelancer could be accused of using a shotgun approach, by the time it was presented to the Mirruh he had hit a definitive target.

I don't think so. From what I've heard, he proposed the idea "target Tory MPs with flirty fishing until we get a knob pic", Mirror approved the plan, and then he went after a list of MPs. Pritchard was the 4th or 5th MP that he had tried to get a response from.

It is this lack of target that makes it entrapment for me. There was no story that Pritchard was diddling party activists, no smoke that made them look for fire. They simply came up with a peccadillo that might tempt many middle aged men in to doing something stupid.

0
0

Bendgate backlash: Apple claims warped iPhone 6 Plus damage is 'extremely rare'

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: In other news water is wet

Sorry, you've changed your phone 15 times in 16 years and you think everyone else doesn't take good care of their phones?

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Apple are bloody delusional:

It's fairly common these days for manufacturers to do their own RMA and defect handling post sale. If you order from several UK distributors, they even include a list of manufacturers to whom you should direct support queries at (and not them; if you contact the retailer, they will tell you to contact the manufacturer directly).

Here's a list for overpriced tat merchant overclockers UK:

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/supportdetails.php#opt5

This is a case of the rights you have against the retailer being provided by the manufacturer by agreement with the retailer.

0
0

Hollywood's made an INTELLIGENT science vs religion film?!

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: "cites disproving the existence of God"

Our blind spots alone (due to poor wiring) are a mistake no intelligent designer would make. If God did that, he's unworthy of the title and should step down and call for a new election.

I now bring up "Religion Uber Counter #415": "God's will is ineffable, the blind spots are there for His plan only (presumably something amusing in the 3rd Act.)"

I love the word "ineffable", it falls into a bracket of words that are onomatopoeically pleasing

0
0

SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches

Tom 38
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: Because the flaws were very different

Most people doing things like PHP CGI aren't using most of the features of even the simplest standard shell. I have to wonder if the solution would be a minimalist shell substitute that Apache or Nginx (or whatever) called instead of the default shell and which provided just the features needed.

lolwut?

CGI does not use shells.

Apache/Nginx/whatever do not invoke a shell to invoke a CGI app

The only CGI applications which utilize shells are CGI scripts written in a shell language

0
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Because the flaws were very different

Not sure why anyone would downvote it?

There were several things that are factually incorrect, system(3) has always been uncool for many many reasons, '/bin/sh' was a long time ago "the" bourne shell, not a symlink to bash (which is a Linux-ism, no other UNIX does that), several others. If you are a factual pedant, you might downvote for those reasons.

(I'm not the downvoter!)

1
0

That glass of water you just drank? It was OLDER than the SUN

Tom 38
Silver badge

Actually more than one religion notes this, Genesis has the spirit of God moving over the waters of the earth, pre-creation; the Enuma Elish (Babylonians) has everything coming from a primordial salt water entity

More than one religion or variations of the same religion?

0
1

Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: what else lurks

bash is like a gun - powerful and dangerous, but fairly safe if kept in a locked cabinet ("Authentication"). If you leave it lying around or your kids get the keys to the cabinet, bypassing the safety mechanisms - Then you have a problem!

The problem with shellshock is that this is true, but bash was not being kept in the cabinet - most Linux distros use bash as their shell interpreter "/bin/sh" which means that every single time you invoke a command using the shell, it invokes bash. Most other UNIX like operating systems do not use bash as their "/bin/sh", they use "sh".

The attack vectors for shell shock involve passing spurious environment variables to bash - Linux servers that invoke CGI shell scripts are particularly vulnerable, because the CGI spec specifies that arguments are passed as environment variables, making it trivial to provide a URL argument - without authentication - that triggers the parsing bug (and it is a bug, bash executes commands that it should not. There is expected behaviour for this scenario - ie it is not the result of undefined behaviour - and bash fails to meet the expectation. Classic bug).

3
0

A Norsified Linux for Windows and OS X wobblers

Tom 38
Silver badge
Joke

Re: Bottom Dock/Panel

So presumably, you now "design" interfaces that look just like the ones from the 1980's?

The Apple style is a blatant rip-off of CDE - everyone loves CDE.

12
1
Tom 38
Silver badge

<i<Freya is fast, so fast you might walk away wondering why GNOME 3 and Unity, which both have much bigger development teams, aren't this fast. </i>

Asked and answered? Freya is simpler and does less, GNOME 3 and Unity are complex and do more. Doing more takes longer.

There was a point when Firefox was a fast and efficient web browser - when it was called Phoenix 0.1 and just rendered web pages. Now it has UI magic menus though!

10
0

Xen security bug, you say? Amazon readies GLORIOUS GLOBAL CLOUD REBOOT

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: First BASHing

There's presumably also a bash vulnerability on the host....

Any why would that require a VM to be restarted? Where do you think bash fits in to KVM?

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: First BASHing

Is it not about the BASH vuln? Xen might be a side fix:

Why would a bash vulnerability on the guest cause all the VMs to be rebooted?

0
0

London cops cuff 20-year-old man for unblocking blocked websites

Tom 38
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: even if he did...

how valid is your constitution when you have sedation acts which means the government can do whatever they like to you if you act against them?

They give you Valium and Xanax?

0
0

Move over, Apple Pay: Tesco trials PayQwiq phone-flash pay app

Tom 38
Silver badge

Solution looking for a problem

There is little I want less than contactless payment systems. If my bank send me a contactless card I will cut it up and send them back to them, if they don't catch on I'll switch bank, if no banks will offer non contactless I'll stop using debit cards and go back to depositing my pay in cash and doing counter withdrawals.

For months, TFL have been banging on about "card clash" and ensuring that we don't keep our oyster card near our credit cards - why would I want a system that means I need to have two wallets and with the added fun of easily being charged twice, it is just moronic.

What is the "friction of paying for things"? The only difference between contactless and chip+PIN is that you push the card in to a reader and tap in a PIN - how much friction can happen in 3 seconds?

0
0

Ab phab: Apple is Britain's coolest brand YET AGAIN

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Idiots

I assure you, Android is a brand. Have you never seen the little green android icon? This is called branding. Google even tell you how they want you to use it.

7
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

When things become less exclusive it is time for a change.

Surely it is time for a change when the device no longer does what you want it to do - or to put it another way, doesn't this just show that you valued the exclusivity of the device more than the functionality?

5
0

Half a BILLION in the making: Bungie's Destiny reviewed

Tom 38
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: Why does the Moon have gravity?

Sorry to be an absolute pedant, but my statement "All physical bodies with mass exert a gravitational effect on other physical bodies with mass" does not in fact preclude physical bodies with mass from exerting a gravitational effect on other things, things that perhaps are not relevant to modelling a video game?

0
1
Tom 38
Silver badge
Headmaster

Why does the Moon have gravity?

All physical bodies with mass exert a gravitational effect on other physical bodies with mass. I guess your question is really "why does the Moon have so much gravity in-game?", to which the answer is "gameplay is crap without it".

8
0

India vs America: Earthling invaders in race to MARS

Tom 38
Silver badge

I'm sorry, I think the US should be spending it's cash on bringing the basic necessities to it's provincial population before it piles billions into space.

13
2

Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: A little (bad) math

Well done, you've completely ignored the enclosure cost per bay, which includes many things and varies depending on how many bays you require - HBA controller to support that many drives, enclosures to plug in to HBA, ((140*3)/16)U rack space for enclosures, increased PDU demands....

For a system with 140 drives, you would need to have triple redundancy, because you also need to take in to account a single enclosure or HBA dropping away temporarily, by increasing redundancy, distributing disk arrays across enclosures and going multipath to the disks.

Then, after a year of use, look forward to replacing a hard drive at least every other month.

0
0

iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: WebGL Demo

My favourite is the eye:

http://www.vill.ee/eye/

1
0

A SCORCHIO fatboy SSD: Samsung SSD850 PRO 3D V-NAND

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Return of the Ramdisk?

SSDs (even consumer, especially prosumer like this) have supercaps to handle this, and they do not have large write cache like spinning HDD (its virtually just as easy to actually write it than to store it in a cache, and then write it), so you do not have so many problems with corruption due to "synched" writes actually only making it to the write cache.

Most modern OS have available a COW filesystem, combined with supercaps this makes unexpected power out whilst writing actually behave better on an SSD system than a HDD system.

3
1

Yawn, Wikileaks, we already knew about FinFisher. But these software binaries...

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: BSD

Remind me again what kernel underlies OSX and IOS (not the Cisco one)?

OS X runs on a kernel called XNU, iOS on a kernel called Darwin; both are derived from Mach. Not sure you know what your point is....

0
0
Tom 38
Silver badge
Devil

Multiple platforms (Windows, Mac and Linux) and smartphone OSes (Android, BlackBerry and, yes, iOS) are supported by malware used by police and intelligence agencies around the world

Typical, like everyone else they completely ignore the BSDs ;)

1
0

Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s

Tom 38
Silver badge

Why this fascination on the panel? Selling panels is a mugs game, people tend not to regularly upgrade their panel, people tend not to make impulse panel buys.

If Apple do make a play, it will be if they can get media exclusives/cheap content/pay TV for Apple TV and make a concerted UI, interface and apps push.

Yep, still looking quite unlikely that the TV/film media will willingly throw themselves on the fire.

2
0

Work in the tech industry? The Ukraine WAR is coming to YOU

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Sanctions

Yes, they strengthen the regime's INTERNAL hold on power, but it significantly weakens them with respect to the outside world, especially in smaller cases (Cuba, N korea) with limited local resources.

And it's worked well in Cuba hasn't it? 50 years on, the US's crushing sanctions have.... done fuck all.

1
1
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Sanctions @Vladimir Plouzhnikov @BlueGreen

I suspect they took Crimea out of self interest since the black sea fleet is based there, which sort of begs the question why they ever gave the place to Ukraine in the first place.

Khrushchev, who grew up in Donbas, was drunk one day in the 50s, thought it might be funny and never considered that Ukraine would ever not be part of Russia.

It's like putting your nuclear subs in Faslane, oh wait....

13
0

Moto 360: Neat gizmo – if you're a rich nerd

Tom 38
Silver badge

I can think of one use (a whole 1!): Exercise. If you want to listen to your tunes as you go jogging, you've got several options currently: waistband (eurgh), in your pocket (eurgh + broken phone when it eventually falls out), in your backpack (eurgh) or strapped on to your arm¹ like you are some kind of cyborg (actually, I kind of fancy being some kind of cyborg).

A touch sensitive watch that beams my cheesy 90s eurodance to my headphones would be dead neat. Plus, it would actually be in a place that you can look at and touch, so you don't look like a wally trying to prod your arm because you've somehow put "Scooter" on repeat.

Not sure it is £200 worth of dead neat though.

¹ Interestingly, I was going for the anatomically pedantically correct definition of the "upper arm" (this is The Register after all). Turns out it is "arm" - the bit below the elbow apparently is not part of your arm, but your "forearm". Who knew?

0
1

Video: Dyson unveils ROBOTIC TANK that hoovers while you're out

Tom 38
Silver badge
Alien

Re: 420 patent applications

I think Tom's point was that the way you get 420 patents from a vacuum cleaner that uses a bunch of existing concepts, is to split each any every conceivable 'invention' into the smallest possible parts

No, it was really just about getting baked. Weekend anyone?

Nuke smoking alien from Mars Attacks! --->

1
0
Tom 38
Silver badge
Joke

Re: 420 patent applications

420 patent applications...

"A method of blowing glass to create a system for cooling and diffusing airborne solid and liquid particulates and gasses resulting from combustion of plant matter"

"A method of arranging sheets of gummed rice paper in an innovative fashion in order to create conical tubes of plant matter"

"A method of controlling a heating element in order to keep the contents of a crucible at between 126°C and 186°C in an enclosed container"

9
0

FCC boss Wheeler: Lack of broadband choice is screwing Americans

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Wheeler is right!

Is it? I would have thought that it was clearer that broadband is cheaper and easier to provision in high population density areas like Seoul (45k people per square mile) than Austin (2k people per square mile) or London (13k).

3
0
Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: Monopoly

Mind you back in the day (1999) broadband was defined as 2mb/s, that's all I have in the sticks. Why this focus on high bit rates mystifies me. Yes 25meg is better than 2 meg, but like the joke goes, it's not the size but what you do with it...

"What you do with it" depends really on "What you can do with it". You can do less with dialup than you can do with a 0.5 Mbit DSL, which can do less than a 2 Mbit DSL, which can do less than a 20 Mbit DSL, which can do less than a 80 Mbit FTTC, which can do less than a synchronous Gbit FTTH.

I've had all 6 of those connections throughout my life¹ and the utility that you can achieve from each differs - its not just "doing more at the same time", each step up enables you to do things that the previous grade does not

0.5Mbit -> 2 Mbit enables poor quality but usable skype

2Mbit > 20 Mbit enables HD skype

20 Mbit -> 80 Mbit enables HD video streaming and multi-user scenarios

80 Mbit -> 1 Gbit enables cancelling the data centre servers, running VPNs at home for travel iplayer, consumption of my home media from anywhere, HD home surveillance video - I haven't even barely touched the surface of what I can do with it yet.

The ironic thing is that as consumers we have already paid enough to have covered this entire country in fibre from home to home, but we consider it anathema to have the state spend that money on infrastructure, and rather spaff it over a succession of large corporations who "build value" (in themselves).

¹ Yes, you do have to live in specific buildings in specific areas to get synchronous gigabit home broadband. It wasn't top of my list when buying a house, and they didn't even mention it until I had put the deposit down - although I knew at a minimum it would have BT FTTC²

² BT FTTC is a truly shocking product, 300 Mbit down, 20Mbit up. There is no technical reason like there is for FTTC for the upload speed to be asynchronous, it is only to limit you to a "consumer" connection where all you can do is consume crap like BT Vision. Any of the compelling things I outlined above, that should be possible with such a connection are made impossible so that you continue sucking the BT teats. Plus it's like £70 a month - I don't even pay that for gigabit.

2
0

YES, I have ridden the UNICORN: The Ubuntu Utopic unicorn

Tom 38
Silver badge

Re: so many versions

There are two things, "Linux", which is the kernel itself and "GNU/Linux", which is the combination of the kernel and the userland (programs that the user runs).

Each distribution (Ubuntu, Debian, Red Hat) will take the Linux kernel source, maybe modify it with special sauce (note: NOT secret sauce, it's all out there), compile it, take user software packages, perhaps modify them with special sauce, compile them, package them all up in to bundles that can be installed, and provide an installer to install those packages.

Each distribution is responsible for providing packages of software, and backporting security fixes from that package. Each distribution makes its own choice about that; things like Gentoo will simply provide the most recent version of a package, eg Apache httpd 2.2.29 is the most recent release of Apache httpd 2.2, and Gentoo will provide that.

Other distributions, eg Red Hat Enterprise Linux, will have chosen a specific version of Apache httpd 2.2 to stick to (in RHEL 6, it is 2.2.15), and each time a new version of Apache is released, Red Hat engineers merge back any bug fixes and security fixes back to that version and release a new package.

The contrast to this is the BSD approach. Each of the BSD projects provides at least two things, a kernel and a "world". All of the software is "owned" by the BSD project, even when it is actually "vendor" code (code taken from elsewhere), and is developed and distributed in sync with each other. You can take a single export of source code of FreeBSD and build the entire kernel, userland, installer etc. There is more of a distinction between OS code, and 3rd party code.

Eg, gzip is part of the OS in FreeBSD. The program binary lives in /usr/bin/gzip, its source code can be found in /usr/src/usr.bin/gzip, and it is maintained by the FreeBSD project team. Apache httpd is not part of the OS, you must install a package to get it, and the binary lives in /usr/local/sbin/httpd.

On RHEL, both gzip and httpd are packages you can install (gzip being installed by default) or remove, no different to any other program.

1
0

Forums