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* Posts by Tom 38

2091 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

UK websites: No one bothers with cookie law, why should we?

Tom 38
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Shit laws should be ignored

Dumping this clusterfuck on web developers is inane and shows a lack of understanding of how cookies and the internet function. If cookies are an issue that requires legislation, it should be on the browser makers to provide controls that are suitable for managing cookies (doing the work in one place- well, OK, 5) rather than asking millions of websites to alter how they work.

After all, the website doesn't store or transmit the information in the cookie, it asks the browser to do it.

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Facebook's ONLY failure: Expectations management

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: hundreds of billions of dollars?

Technically, a trillion is still hundreds of billions of dollars.

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Tom 38
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FAIL

Matt Asay in wise-after-the-fact shocker. Could at least have been honest and said "Oh, and I'm one of those irresponsible fools who thought Facebook was worth hundreds of billions of dollars, but now I've changed my mind".

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Marathon

Tom 38
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Happy

Never played this

But the HUD display reminds me of BSS Jane Seymour, an early 90s romp around a semi destroyed spaceship.

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OCZ RevoDrive 3 X2 240GB PCI-E SSD

Tom 38
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Re: The so-called future.

12 x 2TB spinning rust in a ZFS 2x6 raidz would give you ~20 TB of storage for around £780 + VAT. (and controller, although I get away with using onboard SATA and cheap 2 port pci-e x1 adaptors)

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Windows 8: We kick the tyres on Redmond's new tablet wheels

Tom 38
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Adobe Flash is now baked into Internet Explorer 10

There is a catch though: Flash support only applies to sites on a compatibility list distributed by Microsoft.

This project seems like it is being managed by Ballmer. Whilst world+dog move to rid themselves of shitty Adobe products, MS go one further and embed it even closer into their OS - but only if you pay them first.

PS: The user who thought that the ad companies wouldn't get whitelisted for flash - dream on pal.

PPS: Burn in hell Windows 8.

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Hands on with the Intel-powered Orange San Diego

Tom 38
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@¬Spartacus

Way to miss the point fella.

One shouldn't care what processor is in a phone. However, phones using this processor have downsides that make you need to care. The 'first looker' didn't seem to be bothered by this, eulogising the "magic" that the manufacturer's press release espoused and playing it down, and then said it is fantastic value for money.

That's the point right there. Is it fantastic value for money? No-one knows yet, because you would need a full review looking at how this different architecture handles power hungry apps and real life usage. But the 'first looker' doesn't need that; he's read the press release, gone to the launch event and he's already sold on it's "fantastic value for money".

PS: I don't know why buying a Lumia would make you an Intel shill - it, like every fucking phone worth buying, uses an ARM processor. You do seem really miffed for some reason that people do not want power hungry x86 chips in their phones.

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Tom 38
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Re: Oh FFS!

Because it looks like a shitty intel version of the San Francisco, which is half the price, doesn't run its apps in an emulator, doesn't have a washed out camera.

The reviewer actually says "the San Diego is fabulous value for money". Really? I can find a plethora of android based phones at this price point with better features and not relying on emulation to run apps.

I'm not saying he's a shill, but I do think it is a crap review. The only interesting thing with this phone is that it runs on an Atom, with apps running on an ARM emulator, which gives compatibility issues, performance issues and power issues.

When you want a phone, you don't care about what processor it runs, but you do want it to be compatible with your apps, be performant and not chew power, and on that basis this phone is a dog that the reviewer called a horse.

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iLuv Vibro Classic II

Tom 38
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Misleading name

"iLuv Vibro Classic" conjured up a different kind of accessory to me.

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Jeremy Hunt 'sympathetic' to Murdoch's BSkyB bid

Tom 38
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Holmes

Of course he was sympathetic

Remember that this discussion was whether News Corp (NC) could buy a controlling interest in BSkyB. My reaction on first hearing this was "wait, don't they already?", to which the answer is "yes, pretty much, but not explicitly", and on that basis, what's the big fucking deal?

A different question is whether Murdoch is a fit enough person to control NC, but whether NC control 100% of BSkyB or 39% is really nitpicking - he has complete control, as evidenced by the nepotistic parachuting of his son in as BSkyB CEO back in 2003.

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China wants to be techno SUPERPOWER

Tom 38
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HAPPY HAPPY HARDCORE

Finally, I was getting fed up with non-stop German techno.

TO SIBERIA… AND BEYOND!

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Galaxy S III pay-monthly tariffs compared

Tom 38
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Re: "Alternatively, give your current provider a call and try and wangle a special bespoke offer. "

Just a me too, when I went to get my PAC code from O2, they conversation went like this:

Retentions: Why do you want to leave O2?

Me: You stopped giving me unlimited data, and now it is 500MB a month.

Retentions: Yes, but since we did this, you don't use more than 500MB a month.

Me: Duh? You charge me now if I use more than that.

Now I'm with Three, and can blissfully watch the cricket on my mobile without having to buy some extra capacity at tea.

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Fedora 17: Mm.. this stew of beefy source tastes just right

Tom 38
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Re: …Unix disk space issues that were solved decades ago

The best thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from. LSB and FHS are documents about how Linux people want to organize Linux.

Furthermore, they illustrate my point about these directories not relating to disk space issues. From FHS:

/bin

Essential command binaries that need to be available in single user mode; for all users, e.g., cat, ls, cp.

/sbin

Essential system binaries, e.g., init, ip, mount.

/usr/bin

Non-essential command binaries (not needed in single user mode); for all users.

And so on. The need for a standard was to rein in all the various distributions that would install packages in particularly obscure locations like /opt. It is not necessary for proper UNIX OS like FreeBSD or OpenBSD, who have hier(7) that date from V7 UNIX, and already arranged their filesystem in a sane manner. Compare and contrast FHS with hier(7), you will see that FHS is simply a cut down and simplified version of hier(7), with added Linux-isms.

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Tom 38
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WTF?

…Unix disk space issues that were solved decades ago

This has nothing to do with disk space, and all to do with booting, availability and recovery.

Essential programs for using the system live in /bin and /lib

Essential sysadmin programs for fixing the system live in /sbin and /lib

OS installed programs live in /usr/bin and /usr/lib

OS installed sysadmin utilities live in /usr/sbin and /usr/lib

User installed programs live in /usr/local/bin and /usr/local/lib

When you boot up single user, you would typically only mount what is necessary to boot - /. This typically includes /lib, /bin and /sbin, so the programs found in there are what enable you to go multiuser.

I suppose it does make sense that linux would drop all these conventions. Every linux distro I've used has no concept of an "OS", just a collection of packages that get installed that make up the OS. Something that I would consider part of the OS - like OpenSSL - is instead bundled up as a package and installed alongside something utterly irrelevant, like xchat.

Given that they already drop that useful distinction, just sticking everything in one place probably felt natural.

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Assange loses appeal against extradition to Sweden

Tom 38
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Re: Incitement to hatred

Two things:

1) Seeing how he was in Sweden at the time, what they consider to be rape is quite pertinent here.

2) He didn't make himself available for questioning, he told his lawyer to hide him from investigators whilst he fled to a different country.

Actions speak louder than words.

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Tom 38
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Shocked

I'm shocked that a man wanted for questioning by one of our close neighbours in Europe is being allowed to be extradited there to face the music. I thought one of the basic tenets of law is that if you flee the country before you get charged, and then spend millions of pounds fighting extradition, that you should basically get away scot-free.

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Vauxhall Ampera hybrid e-car

Tom 38
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@Steve Ives

I gave him a similar serve, but yours is much much better :)

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Tom 38
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Re: No.

Presumably this would get charged up over night, you know, the time of the day when our power grid is overflowing with excess capacity. You may even get into the situation where there are docking points along a typical residential street with free or subsidized electricity between the hours of 1 AM and 6 AM.

Our excess overnight capacity will increase even more if we continue to splurge all our money on things like windfarms, which produce leccy whenever the wind blows.

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Passwords are for AES-holes

Tom 38
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This is why the world is slowly moving to identity management

SSO is the future, but for SSO to succeed properly, we all need to pay attention to proper identity management. Many consumer facing websites (and almost all 'social' apps) will now support login via OAuth from Google or Facebook. This is good, but limits a user to sites that support their chosen identity provider

What needs to improve is WAYF protocols to allow a site to say "Okay, I need to identify you, but I don't really mind who does it", allowing all identity providers to be amalgamated into one true identity source, minimising the work required for both service providers and identity providers.

SSO - particularly SAML - has been made obscenely complex by tool makers (Sun, MS, et al) who have a vested interest in making the protocols so complex and fiddly that in order to implement them properly, you need their libraries to do it, and their tools to produce the metadata. The tag line should be "SAML - from the same people who brought you SOAP".

SAML also has one of the most bizarre transports known to computer science - PAOS, or 'Reverse SOAP'. Eurgh.

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Ten... Star Wars videogame classics

Tom 38
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Unhappy

No space for Jedi Knight 2?

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Dragon starts final approach to International Space Station

Tom 38
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Now begins the commercialization of space

I'm waiting for Endemol to send up a Diary Room, its only inevitable.

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And the worst film NEVER made is...

Tom 38
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Stop

10 worst films ever made

Its not the '10 worst films ever made', its the "10 worst popular successful blockbuster films ever made", big difference.

True shit doesn't get seen by a lot of people, otherwise The Room would be top of that list.

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Instagram-owner Facebook emits in-house camera app

Tom 38
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You may both use the term 'zucked', but you meant 'sucked', whilst they meant 'fu…'.

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Return to Castle Wolfenstein

Tom 38
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Re: Implication being...

"How palatable do you think a game like Civ would be if for example you could play as Pol Pot and win?"

It's actually harder than it looks. You have to be oppressive to your own people, whilst being introverted and technology resistant. It's bloody hard work to win as Pol Pot, race to Fundamentalism, Railroad and Engineers and then start destroying the other players with Fanatics before they discover Partisanism…

Oh you meant ethically. My bad.

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WTF is... Li-Fi?

Tom 38
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WTF?

I like how this is described as networking

Hardly two way is it? Broadcasting might be a better analogy.

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Fake Angry Birds app makers fined £50k for shock cash suck

Tom 38
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Re: One more time -

The downvotes are because a lot of Android apps ask for a litany of permissions, which are 'necessary' to use the game.

An example of this is the legitimate version of Angry Birds, the most popular mobile game, which (at least at some point) used to ask for SMS permissions:

http://www.androidcentral.com/rovio-explains-why-angry-birds-update-needs-sms-permission

Since the legitimate version of the game asks for similar permissions as the dodgy version of the game, can you understand why 'looking at the permissions' is not relevant - most users simply will accept whatever is put to them, as they have to accept them anyway for a lot of their apps.

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Tom 38
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Re: Reprimanded?

Almost certainly they have obtained money by deception, IANAL, but surely this is a criminal offence?

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Pipex 'silence' condemned punters' emails to spam blackhole

Tom 38
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Unhappy

Very sad

Pipex used to be one of the most technically correct and proficient ISPs in this country. It's so sad they were gobbled up by the shittest ISP in this country and now offer this turgid service.

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Obama orders gov app deluge

Tom 38
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Re: WTF?!

Actually, the current UK plan is to make information freely available, and let 3rd party developers compete amongst themselves to produce the highest quality app using that data.

For things like tube line status etc, this approach has actually worked quite well.

A logical extension of this would be to make services that developers can use to produce apps which actually do things rather than just interrogate data. Your PAYE example would work here - what is needed is a service to allow an individual to enter their PAYE data securely, which app developers can then integrate.

However, 'logical' and 'politics' don't really mesh.

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Google warns against ISPs hard on web filth

Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: Downvote because

"""

if you're a parent who lets your kid watch the odd bit of porn, and it brings its friends around while you're out and they all watch porn are you then guilty of distributing porn to the poor innocent litte shits?

"""

Er, "Yes"? Seems pretty clear cut that one.

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Tom 38
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Joke

Re: Summary

Blimey, I'm going to be spending more time on the mail's website.

Although not at work.

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Tom 38
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"""

Meanwhile, Platell confessed that she visited the well-known PornHub website last night, and the Mail columnist added that she was "appalled" by what she found there.

"""

I know the feeling Amanda, pop onto PornHub for a 5 finger shuffle, and it's just stuff you've already seen. Appalling indeed.

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Review: Raspberry Pi

Tom 38
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Re: "you don't *need* a new machine to code with."

What a load of nonsense. The wannabee kernel mode developer already has a way to do exactly this, by using a vm on their operating system of choice.

I know lots of BSD kernel developers who run OS X on their laptops, and test all their kernel changes in VMs. Very little needs actual hardware to develop upon.

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Tom 38
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Re: Don't see the point..

This is the real problem with ICT in schools - people like this AC. Supporting Python on Windows is no different than supporting python on the Pi.

This makes me think that the educationalists going ape-shit over the Pi probably think that Pi devices will not require maintenance, support, software upgrades etc.

There is nothing you can do on a Pi that you cannot do on any vintage of a RM PC, teachers and technicians simply haven't wanted to do it. I don't understand why having special devices will get around this.

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Tom 38
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Re: "just Linux"

It's not particularly interesting to BSD really - or at least I've seen no interest from the FreeBSD community. See here:

http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-hackers/2011-November/036745.html

The Pi is an ARMv6, which isn't that powerful compared to most other (Cortex based) SoC boards. The video out is controlled by a proprietary, closed source system, with no specifications - so there is zero chance of enabling video on a Pi without using the provided binary blob on Linux.

If you want a cheap ARM on BSD that can't do video out, you buy a sheevaplug, or one of the many derivatives. If you want a powerful SoC, you buy a BeagleBoard or a PandaBoard.

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MPs wrestle slippery bureaucrats in intellectual property Jell-O

Tom 38
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I do love a bit of Sir Humph every now and again. The idiot politicians being led by the opaque mandarins. Classy.

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Chuck Exchange mailboxes into the cloud... sysadmin style

Tom 38
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Re: One little problem

That's not really relevant though. The most important thing is that mail is not delivered successfully to a server that is no longer part of your mail store. This could happen if an MTA (or the NS server it queries) caches NS lookups.

By locking out the server, you don't want bounces, and fortunately, you don't get them. Any MTA that would discard or bounce an email after one failed delivery attempt is moronic.

Most will keep them in an outgoing queue, and attempt to redeliver them at a later date. What you hope here is that when it attempts to deliver it later, it will use the correct DNS name and deliver it to the correct MTA.

Only if an MTA has attempted redelivery multiple times will it contemplate bouncing the email back to the sender.

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Greene King pubs to offer free beer Wi-Fi

Tom 38
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Re: Would be useful, but...

Close but no cigar. When Greene King bought Ridleys (which bought Tolly Cobbold), they continued brewing Tolly Original in Chelmsford at the old Riddle's site.

Anyway, what's wrong with Westgate St brewery?

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Tom 38
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Re: Greene King IPA?

Personally, I prefer their IPA to Abbots Ale, but I'd prefer either of them to anything by Fuller's. All of them are bested by any Adnam's tipple, which you can find just as easily in London.

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Steve Jobs' death clears way for rumoured 4in 'iPhone 5' screen

Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: Used to love my iphone

No, you just can't read. He said adding a larger screen makes Apple evolutionary and not revolutionary.

In other words, the opposite of what you took away.

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Compare The Market can't touch web filth extension - simples

Tom 38
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What a crap judgement

It is clearly a bad faith registration, in fact I'm amazed that they haven't just gone straight for trademark infringement. Stelios can sue anyone using either the word 'Easy' as a suffix or the colour orange, this is far more egregious.

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Off-the-shelf forensics tool slurps iPhone data via iCloud

Tom 38
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"iPhones automatically connect to iCloud network and backup their content every time a docked device gets within reach of a Wi-Fi access point"

No they don't, in order to backup to iCloud, your device must be on a charger, on wifi, with the screen locked and off.

I know, because my wifi is being a bit flakey with devices going into power save, and my iphone keeps telling me it hasn't backed up to iCloud in N weeks, and under what circumstances it will backup to iCloud.

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Graphics shocker: Nvidia virtualizes Kepler GPUs

Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: Latency

Do you understand how latency is measured, 'Technical'Ben? I'll give you a hint, 'RTT' does not stand for "Rodent Top Trumps".

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Tom 38
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Re: I call bullshit

I agree, but I think we're a minority of gamers. I know several people who use OnLive and love it, but I get pissed off in-game if my ping goes above 20*. Thinking about it, they mainly play single player games, which I guess don't rely on beating another humans reactions/ping.

Most UK players on our UK server have pings between 15ms and 70ms (FTTC/LLU ADSL at one end, certain VM areas (Glasgow in particular) and TalkTalk at the other), most EU players between 40 and 90 (apart from the Dutch, who seem to have the most awesome internet connectivity).

* Some commentard above said they never see pings below 150ms, which I find astonishing. You would get banned from our servers with that sort of ping, fucking HPBs.

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Pints under attack as Lord Howe demands metric-only UK

Tom 38
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Re: Point 57 of a litre please.

Down my shop (Tesco, Sainsbury, Morrisons, Asda, corner stores, M&S), you can buy milk in 4 metric sizes, 568ml, 1.134l, 2.268l and 3.40l.

I've never once seen a 4 litre bottle of milk in a country with the Imperial system. In the US you can get a US gallon of milk, which is 3.78l (and sold at that size).

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ASA tuts at TalkTalk over broadband speed estimator

Tom 38
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Re: If its wrong most of the time...

It is trivial to calculate the distance between an exchange and a subscribers premises, but it is almost impossible to determine the length of cable used to connect them, the quality of the copper in that cable, the amount of environmental crosstalk in the cable, the quality of wiring in the subscribers premises, and all the other factors involved in determining your synch speed.

So, given a location, all an ISP can do is calculate a 'best case' and a 'worst case' bounds for your line. Obviously, marketing would prefer that the worst case is as understated as possible, so there will be outliers that have worse conditions even than the 'worst case'.

As an example of this, around Albert Dock in docklands there are some very curious routing of cables. Some locations in that area are extremely close to the exchange, but have 2+ miles of cabling, due to the strange way that the cables are routed around the docks.

Another example is my old man, who lives in the wilds of East Anglia. His line, if you check, says he should get 1MB, just about, because of distance from the exchange. He actually gets 3MB, because the line from the exchange is new, high quality, goes in pretty much a straight line across 7km of fields, and he has excellent in house wiring, including a fitted ADSL filter on the master socket.

With ADSL, you get the physical maximum synch that your line can handle. Switching ADSL ISPs searching for synch speed is inane, the ISPs and BT cannot change the laws of physics. Instead, you should either move, or see if you can improve the situation by improving your internal wiring, or STFU.

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HTC phones held up at US ports after Apple patent ban

Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: I said it before...

Indeed Barry. HTC simply wave a wand and their shiny things appear, no slaves required!

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London's Oyster card website still down after 12-hour outage

Tom 38
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Re: "carrying out an upgrade"

Transport in London is basically semi-organized chaos anyway, on a good day.

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125,000 Ubuntu PCs to land in Pakistani students' laps

Tom 38
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Re: This could bite them in the arse

If you are interested in this, you should read about the Islamic golden age, roughly 750 AD - 1250 AD, during which Islamic scientists where the greatest in the world in the fields of mathematics, astronomy, chemistry, ophthalmology and physics, discovering things which would only later be 'discovered' by western scientists.

The most important thing that Islam gave us was the scientific method.

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