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* Posts by Tom 38

2317 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

$3500 will get 13.3in Mac tablet in your mitts

Tom 38
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WTF?

@melt

$3499 (£2172), which is $1199 for the 2.5GHz, 4GB MacBook Pro and $973 for parts and assembly

3499 != 1199 + 973

2172 == 1199 + 973

$2172 = £1348

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Googorola mysteriously pulls plug on ITC Apple patent probe

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Manfromarsitis.

EQ is a similar measurement to IQ, which measures emotional rather than intellectual development. You can have a high IQ and a low EQ, meaning that you are smart, but a total twat.

I think this guy meant IQ though.

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Microsoft releases JavaScript alternative

Tom 38
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Re: What...

It's not even close to the same principle:

GCC compiles C++ straight to object code.

Debugging C++ using GDB or similar does not have you examining some generated C code, you step through C++ statements.

Python does not 'generate intermediary C code', it generates python bytecode which runs on a singly specified C python interpreter.

clang++ does translate C++ to C prior to compiling it to object code, but it translates it to only be compiled by clang - it does not generate C which it expects icc, gcc or bcc to compile.

A frontend generating code to be used by it's coupled backend == good, a frontend generating code to be used by unrelated backends that do not strictly conform to any standards == bad. Do you need diagrams, or have you got it yet?

And yes, it is a real fucking pain in the arse when you write valid python code, run it on the python interpreter, and end up having to debug the python interpreter. Fortunately, this almost never happens, since the bytecode compiler and the interpreter are tightly coupled. which they aren't in TypeScript.

So perhaps there is some use for this tool. Some flawed minds can seemingly only cope with "OOP == Java" mindset, and this allows them to master the difficulties that are javascript. Or for those shops that previously would use a nice ActiveX control to ensure lock in, here is another bit of technology that will make your clients either come back to only you for improvements, or re-do the entire project from scratch. I was too harsh! And you can do it in an IDE?! Whatever will these clever guys think of next.

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Tom 38
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Re: What...

Utter tosh. You can develop class based JS applications perfectly fine in JS right now, no external tools required.

Personally, I don't think developing in an IDE is the epitome of sophistication, I don't think compiling one language into another interpreted language* that runs on a variety of interpreters is a particularly effective way of mastering incompatibilities between those interpreters, and I definitely will not want ever to debug javascript issues emanating from auto generated code.

I'll pass on your ad hominem quips; I develop daily in C, C++ and Python, thankfully haven't had to use anything Java related in 12 years.

* However, when the language compiled to is only used as an intermediate, and immediately re-compiled against a single backend, this is an exceptionally good pattern. For instance, clang++ will first translate C++ into C, which is then immediately compiled into object code.

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Tom 38
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Re: What...

It's a library that compiles code to javascript. If you have ever worked seriously with javascript, getting code you've written yourself to work correctly across all major browsers is a pain in the arse.

Getting javascript code that has been written by a machine to work correctly across all major browsers is going to be a pain in the arse that repeats every time you change the original 'TypeScript' and recompile.

Besides which, we all know javascript by now. It's not that hard to write unobtrusive, elegant JS, so why stick an obfuscation layer in between?

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Ubuntu 12.10: More to Um Bongo Linux than Amazon ads

Tom 38
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Trollface

Oxymoron

"Tech savvy Linux users" and "Ubuntu".

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Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: I have gone to Mint KDE

Am I alone in thinking the unity desktop looks aweful with or without Amazon.

Do you mean "appalling; terrible" or "inspiring awe; profoundly impressive"?

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Satellite broadband rollout for all in US: But Europe just doesn't get it

Tom 38
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WTF?

What happened to Low Earth Orbit broadband?

Good question.

Also what happened to WiMax?

Good question.

Let's face it, the UK is corrupt and there will never be competition beyond Virgin and BT Wholesale.

Bat-shit insane non sequitur.

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iPhone 5: the fab slab to grab

Tom 38
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TBH, Colchester has never looked so good.

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WTF is... NFC

Tom 38
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Re: It's not too bad

Well, you would be wrong. It happens to me every day, queuing up in Eat behind people paying for stuff with card - contactless or otherwise. It's miles slower than cash.

Cash: Here's a fiver, here's your change, I'm gone.

Card: Tap it where? Oh, ok. Wait, that one didn't work, try again. Its authorizing... Ok.

Cash is always negotiable, has no barrier to acceptance, and is accepted worldwide.

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Tom 38
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Re: It's not too bad

All of these payment options take longer than giving the guy a fiver. They have machines now you can go up to, stick your card in and get cash instantly, and you can get enough of it in one go that you can give it to other people in return for services for several days.

Works for me. Plus, no-one is analysing what you spend your cash on.

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Euro watchdog to charge Microsoft on web browser choice boob

Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: EU should look into others

No, Apple do not have a monopoly on tablets. A monopoly would mean that you could not easily go out and buy a non Apple tablet, which is clearly nonsense.

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Tom 38
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Re: EU should look into others

Surely that has to be even more anti competitive?

So the fuck what? Apple do not have a monopoly on phones, they don't even have a monopoly on smart phones, and they particularly don't have a monopoly on PCs. Anti-competitive behaviour is only disallowed when you use your monopoly position to provide it.

A company only allowing the OS that it made to be sold with hardware that it also made is not monopolistic, nor is it anti-competitive.

I'm just waiting to see how the EU deals with Windows RT not even allowing other browsers at all. Ha, should be funny.

Well, guess what? They will do nothing about it, due to, y'know, no monopoly in tablets. It's quite straightforward, if you aren't clueless.

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Draft UK libel law forces websites to axe mudslinging comments

Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: Actually, for once...

In theory, in the UK, this could get me sued for libel, as unlike in the US, the truth is not an absolute defence against libel

I'd return your law degree, fair comment has always been a defence in the UK against both libel and slander, along with justification and privilege. What you said about Nick Clegg was both justified and fair comment.

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Apple MacBook Air 13in review

Tom 38
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Re: External storage

I doubt HP get away with a 40%+ mark up these days. Ditto Lenovo, Dell etc.

Dell's prices are public record, go buy a Dell branded hard disk.

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CPS grovels after leaking IDs of hundreds arrested during student riots

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Demonstrations or Riots -- AC 08:51 GMT

What a 'riot' is under the law is irrelevant here, unless you are charging someone with a crime. Here, the word used was 'riot', and here is the context:

a hundred people who were arrested during the tuition-fee riots

We are not being asked to judge whether the people where rioters, only if a riot was taking place. Thus, we are not bound by legal definitions of a riot, and are simply bound by the meaning of the word riot - which does not reference any laws or statutes.

A wiktionary definition, which is all I can be arsed to look up, says Wanton or unrestrained behavior; uproar; tumult.. As an observer of the scenes in question, I would personally qualify what has happened as a riot.

The legal definition of a riot is only pertinent if you intend to take action under the law (reading the riot act, so to speak).

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Guardian's Robin Hood plan: Steal from everyone to give to us

Tom 38
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Re: An ode to down votes

I've up voted your down vote :)

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Tom 38
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Alert

An ode to down votes

Down-votes actually engender more conversation (and hence posts/views) than up-votes. Up-votes avoid boring "+1" or "Me too" posts, but down-votes often come with a vitriolic response explaining precisely how and why you are completely stupid - AND SO IT BEGINS.

Most discussions about the iphone would normally peter out after 2 or 3 posts, but someone is guaranteed to post something like "lol Samsung smokes cock", which magically grants life to the thread. Down-votes are like deep sea black smokers, bringing life into a desolate landscape.

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Tech budgets in schools heading north again

Tom 38
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Facepalm

I hope the former, given track records of Heads not grasping when HP is a rip-off:

Liz Steel, former head of Glemsford Primary School in Suffolk, was one of the victims of mis-selling firms. Her school was left owing more than £500,000 for 125 laptops.

She said: "When the auditor came in, supposedly to count the equipment, he just sat down and told us that it was a colossal scam. And it was like my world had just fallen apart."

Ms Steel had signed the deal after being told the school could lease as many laptops as necessary and, because of corporate sponsorship, would not have to pay for them.

( source )

The key ingredient in every scam is a stupid mark who thinks they can get something for less than it is worth, and believe anything as long as they think it will lead to that fairytale.

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Micro Anvika Stratford goes titsup - 2012 Games 'boom fell flat'

Tom 38
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Re: Where the hell is it?

In the article it says it was a Samsung branded store, which I think was outside on the street, 'ground floor' level (really first floor), next to M&S.

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Tom 38
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Re: Another Olympic leech goes down..

As a resident of Stratford - present throughout the games - I can assure you that the modern Olympics are solely about money, and only corporate money at that. To get to the Olympic Park, you have to walk right through the Temple of Mammon at Westfield and give sacrifices to the great god.

All foot traffic was routed to keep those offered to Mammon within the constraints of Westfield and the Olympic Park, so almost no-one who went to 'Stratford' to see the Olympics even crossed the road into Stratford proper.

The Temple itself is a wonderful creation - all the shops you ever wanted to go to, but with only half the space to have the stuff you actually wanted. There is a Borders, but it is tiny compared to other Borders outside of Westfield. Ditto HMV, PC World, M&S, John Lewis, Waitrose (calling that a Waitrose is a joke). I imagine space in the Temple is at a premium, and comes at a premium cost, which is passed on to us in terms of lack of choice and higher prices.

Having said all that, Micro Anvika is a company preparing to go bust. They were the Kings of Tottenham Court Road, selling last years remaindered kit at next years prices to anyone they could tempt.

They don't sell anything you can't get elsewhere - like the PC World store 100 yards away in Westfield - or online for cheaper, so I'm not surprised they didn't sell much during the Olympics. Plus, the place is ridiculously situated to buy high value large items - most MA employees I saw around Westfield were about a quarter of a mile away, standing by a customer, his kids and his new Samsung TV waiting for his wife to find her way there to pick the damn thing up.

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Microsoft flashes fat mobe wallet, whispers: 'Just rub our hub'

Tom 38
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Stop

I haven't seen an actual paper ticket inside London in over 10 years, except for the occasional tourist.

How bizarre, I've seen thousands of people using paper tickets in London. If you buy a rail travelcard, you currently cannot put this on Oyster. If your travelcard includes tube travel, then this is a paper ticket you have to put in and take out of every ticket gate you pass through,

If your travelcard is an annual purchase (usually on a company loan), this means putting a paper ticket through at least 880 ticket machines (4 a day, 220 work days). The ticket will normally give out after about 100 passes through, and be no longer machine readable, and you have to go to the train station, queue up to talk to the man and get another one.

Masses of people working in the city have tickets like this. I spend as little time as possible on the tube, but get on or off anywhere City and you are guaranteed to see a paper ticket used.

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Tom 38
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Headmaster

'accept' - to receive, especially with a consent, with favour, or with approval.

'except' - to exclude; to specify as being an exception

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LONDON iPHONE 5 MADNESS: 'You must be CRAZY to buy Apple'

Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: I've only once queued up at a shop before opening time to buy an item of limited quantity..

You used your real name on IRC?

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Tom 38
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One wonders why you don't get quite the same level of piss take at similar events for Xbox, PS3, even some games...

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Eric Schmidt: Ha ha, NO Google maps app for iPhone 5

Tom 38
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Re: Just Pissed

I am pissed at Apple for having me upload ios6 to my iPhone 4s and then lose google maps

Apple mind controlled you into installing the update did they?

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Tom 38
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Re: Hmm...

He was on the board then because Apple and Google were best friends back then, with Google not interfering in anything Apple did. Apple launched a phone, then shortly afterwards Google bought a phone OS in development, secretly developed a phone and launched it. At this point, Google and Apple stopped being friends, and became frenemies.

Now, even the veneer of friendship that is the frenemy has gone, they flat out don't like each other now, no hiding it.

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Hitachi claims glass data storage will last millions of years

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: well.. a 100Million years from now..

A porn cache is a subset of porn from your porn stash that you keep on hand for low latency access.

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Scientists: 'Castration is the key to a longer life'

Tom 38
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Balls

This piece is missing the other important detail that whilst this longevity has been documented in a group of castrated Korean monks, there have been many studies on castrati, which document no longevity benefits to losing your scratchings.

Castrati lived fairly normal lives to any other singer - hence there is a comparable control group -whilst Korean monks inhabited a different sector of society to regular workers.

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Man City drags Big Data into Big Football

Tom 38
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Facepalm

Asay is a Gooner

Now everything makes sense.

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Google's Android celebrates fourth birthday

Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: It's impressive

Agreed, but many probably forget (or don't even know) that Apple's iOS is based on BSD.

That is because it's not. It reuses certain components from BSD (specifically FreeBSD), but the OS is not and never has been based on BSD.

As an example, one of the things that is reused is part of the network stack. All versions of Windows also re-use the same parts of the same network stack, is Windows based on BSD?

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Mars rover Curiosity gets ready to blast its first rock

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Language, language!

We give "the Earth" a definite article because 'earth' is a word with many meanings, and so in a sentence the definite article is required to impart the gravitas - there is earth everywhere, but of the Earth, there is only one.

This isn't required with Mars - there is only one Mars (unless you got a Mars Duo) - so it is fine to say "The rover drove across Mars".

You wouldn't say "The rover drove across the London" or "The rover drove across the France". You would say "The rover drove across the UK" because 'UK' is a plural collection, but you wouldn't say "The rover drove across the England".

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Tom 38
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You get better luminosity information per bit with greyscale than you do with colour, which is why all photos from Curiosity are greyscale, apart from the ones from MAHLI, which is intended to only be used in specialised scenarios where colour is important.

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Publishers, Apple bend over for EU eBooks probe

Tom 38
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I'm not sure the "bad for the author" thing holds up though does it, wouldn't an author get paid per book sold, a fixed bit of cash worked out in advance "we'll pay you £1 for the first 100k books then 50p for each book sold up to 250k and then 10p per book after 500k" for instance?

Not if Amazon are setting the prices, in which case they are free to discount the

This quote from a publisher:

When ebooks started, we were pricing ebooks at the same price as the print book, and Amazon was selling them all for $9.99. So they were losing like $3-$4 per book. And they weren’t doing it simply to move Kindles, since they don’t actually make any money on the Kindle unit sales. Now with the “agency model” we get to set the ebook price and Amazon simply takes 30% of that. source

The agency model is the one that Apple et al are getting sued for. Before the agency model came along, Amazon bought ebooks wholesale, and sold them as a loss leader:

So for instance, for a new e-book, let's say the list price was around $24.99. Amazon paid publishers $12.50 per copy, but then turned around and sold the e-book for $9.99. They took a loss on e-book copies to help sell Kindles and to build a huge early lead in the e-book market.

Take that $24.99 list price. Let's say the e-book would have sold for $9.99 at Amazon in the old days but now the publisher charges the consumer $12.99:

Wholesale model e-book:

Publisher: $12.50 (roughly 50 percent of $24.99 hardcover retail price)

Amazon: - $2.50 (selling at $9.99)

Agency model e-book:

Publisher: $9.09 (70 percent of $12.99)

E-bookseller: $3.90 (30 percent of $12.99)

This wasn't a story of money-grubbing publishers trying to stick it to consumers. They actually left money on the table.

The result: The e-book marketplace competition that publishers wanted began to take place. Rather than competing on price, e-book sellers like Apple, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and others have, up until now, mainly been competing on user experience. source

Amazon subsidize all their ebooks sold under the wholesale model by selling related kit, and generally encouraging people to buy stuff from Amazon. Because they, in effect, are not competing means that there is no effective competition in the ebook marketplace. The only way to get an ebook would be from Amazon.

I don't agree with 'favoured nation' status, that seems like anti competition bullshit to me, but allowing Amazon to scoop up all the ebook market by default would be bad, I feel. The agency model, without 'favoured nations', allows all publishers and sellers to behave fairly, where as with that clause, the sellers are protected against price wars against other sellers, with the publishers taking the hit if a non favoured seller lowers their prices below the favoured seller.

If Amazon then wanted to compete on price, they could only do so by reducing their cut, discounting the cost to consumer out of their cut, and publishers have a measure of reliability about what they will receive. They would still be able to undercut other stores by selling as a loss leader, but they wouldn't be able to screw the publisher.

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iPhone 5 sleuth work points to $199 component costs

Tom 38
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Re: "any large-scale product that isn't making about 50% markup…"

I wouldn't expect Apple to sell the iPad or iPhone as a loss leader, but they could definitely sell it for significantly less and still rake in cash hand over fist.

Or they could sell it for what they currently do and make billions and billions. One of these approaches is more appealing to shareholders…

Besides, I thought people didn't buy Apple for ideological reasons, reducing the price wouldn't make those people buy.

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Ten backpacks for tech-heads

Tom 38
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Headmaster

CompuDay Photo 250 is a seriously snazzy backpack and for under £50

Technically, "£50" is not "under £50"

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UK.gov squatting on £1bn IPv4 motherlode

Tom 38
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Re: The US

There is no requirement for you to make allocated addresses routable, you are allowed to use them for non-routable segments. Just like DWP are doing.

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Tom 38
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Re: How do you flog addresses?

I'd imagine they'd ask Nortel's administrator.

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Romanians plead guilty to credit card hack on US Subway shops

Tom 38
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Re: Numerous reason to use credit cards

Paying with cash is instant, so I'm impressed that you can securely exchange credit card details faster than 'instantly'.

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Tom 38
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Unhappy

Subway should be convicted of sandwich fraud

Or maybe I'm just bitter that $5 footlong == £5 footlong.

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Mobile phones still failing to kill people – Nordic scientists

Tom 38
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Re: I want to see an experiment

They would probably feel the Faraday cage is "amplifying other signals" and get physical symptoms in both cases.

Physical symptoms are not necessarily due to any underlying condition, the mind can convince the body to produce all kinds of bizarre symptoms.

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NASA working on faster-than-light drive capable of WARP TEN

Tom 38
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Re: Interesting article

You've never seen the classic sci-fi film 'Primer', where internal consistency disappears about 10 minutes in, and you either come out of the theatre thinking "wow, what an amazing film" or drooling and gurgling while your brain rearranges itself.

Actually there's a 3rd option, where I watched it, lots of people left after half an hour, they just couldn't (or wouldn't) keep up!

There's an obligatory xkcd that explains plot time lines of various movies, "Primer" is the punchline.

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Apple forecast to sell 8m iPhone 5s next weekend

Tom 38
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Re: What irks me...

If Apple could make they twice as quickly I'm certain they would - even then they sold out in the first hour or two - so twice as many may have lasted 3-4 hours...?

Exactly - if they could make them twice as quickly without spending a fortune on being able to make them twice as quickly, they would.

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Tom 38
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Re: More caution...

I know lots of people with iphone 3GS and 4 who did not bother with a 4S (or a 4, in the case of the 3GS), and have been sitting on unsubsidised, month to month contracts waiting for a phone they want to upgrade to to be launched.

I think it would be nuts to change from a 4S to a 5.

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The perfect CRIME? New HTTPS web hijack attack explained

Tom 38
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Joke

Re: Or...

I'm British, so a "nonce" will always be a man that fucks children. Lets keep this discussion civil ;)

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Apple 'hasn't really run out of iPhone 5s AT ALL'

Tom 38
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Re: LOL

They got the cash reserves because they don't do moron things like sit on stock for 3 weeks so you can produce enough shiny for launch date, and instead spread sales over several months.

I'm amazed some of you can tie your shoes, this is simple supply chain 101.

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Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: LOL

Apple contract manufacturing out, and can build a certain number per week - lets say 10 million - which they can then ship out worldwide.

When they launch a new phone, this means the design has gone to the manufacturer, and they are assembling them as fast as they can. Production continues at 10 million a week, shipping new containers full of phones every week.

After 3 weeks, they have enough stock arriving in markets to start selling them, whilst still churning em out at the factory. They have initial orders of 50M, and 20M stock, with 10M new units arriving each week.

This means they immediately sell out, with a backlog of 3 weeks.

Your contention is that they could avoid this "if they wanted to". To avoid this, they would need twice as much manufacturing capacity, which would be very costly, and after the initial rush of orders, they would not need anywhere near as much capacity.

Therefore, they would have to spend an exorbitant amount of money in order to speed delivery to the early users by 2-3 weeks, and then have that expensive manufacturing capacity lie fallow until the next refresh. Plus, as has been pointed out several times, there is the cachet of desirability indicated by stock selling out.

So yes, entirely in their hands, except they aren't morons who would bankrupt the company building unnecessary capacity.

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Apple's first batch of iPhone 5 preorders sold out in an hour

Tom 38
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Re: Gee...

Unless you wanted a blue one, in which case you had to wait for the supply chain to ramp up. Oh snap.

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Tom 38
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Re: Every time

But EVERY TIME they release and iphone it happens and you would have thought they would have learnt by now how many they need to produce.

By your logic, they should delay the launch until they have produced enough inventory to cover all potential sales of the phone, sitting on hundreds of millions of dollars worth of stock whilst it depreciates in value and consumers buy competitors phones.

They announce as soon as they have the supply chain in place to produce a steady stream of phones. Anything else would be stupid.

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Google defends drowning Acer's newborn Alibaba Linux mobe

Tom 38
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Re: Good Thing

Why is it in consumers interest that the only OS available for phones in Asia is that delivered by an ad broker?

People so ingrained to "Apple = EVIL, Google = GOOD" that when something comes up to contradict that, they have to pervert it so that it is a positive.

Google shutting down competition is not good for consumers. You've argued long enough that Apple shutting down competition is not good for consumers, so why when Google do it is it "in consumers interests"?

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