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* Posts by Tom 38

2081 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

First rigid airship since the Hindenburg enters trials

Tom 38
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Re: I wonder how much helium they waste

I actually mentioned it in the original post - alt.suicide.holiday FAQ.

It's not a monthly publication, somehow people only wanted the one issue, and after that all their mail was returned...

And it is quite interesting. Suicide was never 'sinful' until the god botherers got the idea that part of you - the soul - isn't yours, it's part of a cosmic godhood that you are just renting, and don't do anything bad with, or you go to the hot place. Greeks and Romans viewed suicide very differently.

There are lots of different methods documented in the FAQ, some are crazily efficient, some are crazily inefficient, and most suicide attempts use the inefficient ones - either they don't know better, or they don't really want to die.

Eg, hanging, you can hang yourself quite easily - and asphyxiate to death with a crushed windpipe. It's excruciatingly painful, and if discovered before you pop your clogs, unlikely to work. Alternatively, buy the right rope, tie the right knots, fall the right distance for your weight, and your neck will snap instantly, with almost no chance of failure.

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Tom 38
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Re: Hot Helium anyone

BTW you can make helium in a fusion reaction, the only problem is the radioactivity....

And the cost.

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Tom 38
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Re: I wonder how much helium they waste

Death by helium asphyxiation is the top recommended method in the alt.suicide.holiday faq-file. Simply get a canister of helium, rig up some breathing apparatus so that you are breathing almost pure helium. You get none of the 'omg I'm suffocating' gag reflex, since that is actually due to the build up of CO₂ in the blood, and you gradually lose consciousness as you lose oxygen in the blood. After about 20 minutes or so, you've had a comfortable, pain free death,

Downsides are that if discovered 'in time', you've typically suffered brain damage. Lots of it.

The other suicide method that has intrigued me is slashing the wrists and bleeding out in a warm bath, as favoured by the Romans, who saw 'patriotic suicide' as a way of dying with dignity in an impossible situation, eg Cato the Younger, who disembowelled himself - ripping out his own intestines rather than let a doctor tend him - rather than live under the despot Caesar.

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John McAfee the Belize spymaster uncovers 'ricin, terrorist plots'

Tom 38
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This is almost the plot to 'The Tailor of Panama'

His 'operatives' continually find new and interesting things, because McAffee keeps paying them. "Oh, John, my cousin Jesus in immigration knows about these Hezbollah terrorists coming in to Belize, all he needs is some chatting (and $10k USD)".

OTOH, It is a life-long dream of mine to make enough money in technology that I can afford to go bat-shit insane on soft drugs in a tropical paradise with my friendly 19 year old bed warmer. Kudos JM.

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Victory on mobile belongs to Google in 2013

Tom 38
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Google Now

Is there an easy way to sign up for this magical service that allows a computer to predict everything that you interested in and sell that information to anyone interested keep you fully informed about the world.

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Ubisoft probes sudden rash of hijack attacks on gamers' accounts

Tom 38
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Easy solution

Join my boycott of Ubisoft. No more issues with any of their shit.

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'SHUT THE F**K UP!' The moment Linus Torvalds ruined a dev's year

Tom 38
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Re: Err...

Sure, if Mauro was in any way Linus' employee. Which he isn't. He can't take him aside and give him a talking to, or sack him. The only nuclear option he has is to beat on him in public, so that his employers take notice.

OTOH, there is no need for someone like Linus to take that sort of tone on-list. He could have just said something along the lines of "Mauro, please re-check this, as I am convinced you are wrong in this", which would be just as painful for a senior dev to receive.

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Up your wormhole: Star Trek Deep Space 9 turns 20

Tom 38
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Pah, all ST and B5 is bobbins, the best sci fi in last 30 years has to have been the amazing Andromeda. Only kidding.

@Carl Williams: There is a bit of a dearth of "future" sci-fi at the moment, the tendency has been for more dramatic "near now" sci-fi, and for making it with very high production values. Shows have either had to be brilliant (BSG reboot) or long running (Dr Who reboot) to survive. We're missing a current show that has the appeal of an SG-1 though. Here are some current shows to look out for:

Alphas: Sci fi? It's 'Heroes' on the SyFy channel, with a little pseudo science thrown in. Bit too much magic, I wouldn't disagree with anyone who classes this as "fantasy" rather than "sci fi"

Continuum: Canadian time travel, eh? What's that aboot? It's not bad actually, but it's from cable, so only ten episodes a season, but not at the whim of Fox or NBC. I can't quite work out if it is paradoxical that the "good guys" in the future are actually right wing nutters, or if it is designed to appeal to Fox viewers. Hoping the former. Season 2 will be interesting as they delve into some of the paradoxes.

Falling Skies: Americans are loving these end of days kind of shows. This time, aliens invade, and for some reason want our kids to hook up their machines. Crazy.

Fringe: Coming to the end, definitely sci fi, but less believable as the series roll by. JJ Abrams designs shows that grab me for 5 years, I get to the end and the dénouement and think "WTF? What a crock." (see Alias, Lost). He's an evil evil fucker, and I love him for it.

Haven: Another SyFy show that has me asking "is this SF or fantasy?". Precious little science in the show.

Person of Interest: Is this Sci Fi? A computer that can track people around the world and predict if they are going to come to harm, and rings up a team of people to protect them. They don't go into the SF angle much until it's a plot device. JC is a badass.

Revolution: Ridiculous SF that I still watch. In the future, somehow electrons no longer flow, cue fall of civilisation. Some people have amulets that sometimes allow electricity to work. Add to that the dialogue is ropey and the acting (especially the lead character) is awful. I've not heard this getting cancelled yet, but it would not surprise me.

Red dwarf: Hah, still going. Don't like the new episodes though, give me "White Hole" any day.

Walking Dead: SF? Another near now apocalypse show, this time with zombies.

Warehouse 13: zomg, SyFy make some bad shows. I'll watch anything with Saul Rubinek in though.

Having said that, here's the recent sci-fi cancelled list:

Alcatraz - Interesting premise, too slow, cancelled. Could have gone somewhere, but got no viewers.

Dark Angel - I still can't forgive this being cancelled

Defying Gravity - liked it, it had promise, too slow (hence cancelled)

Dollhouse - Whedon lets another one get away

Eleventh Hour (US and UK versions) - both deserved to get canned

Eureka - ran it's course really, tea time SF

Firefly - Cap'n? Shiny.

Flashforward - cool show, but once you've done the flash forward once, what happens next season? Another flash? Please! (hence cancelled).

No Ordinary Family - Modern Family cross X-Men. Huge promise, ratings died on it, so it died.

Terminator: TSC - Good, but bleak. Could have had a third series if they'd tried.

Terra Nova - Can't spend that much per episode for that few viewers, hence cancelled

The Event - Aliens invade! I liked it, I think they were running out of ideas..

V - Hah. The first time I saw one of the lizard men pop out of a human skin, I almost wet myself laughing it was so ridiculous. I'm impressed this got a second series before being cancelled tbh.

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Aw grandad, I asked for an iPad and you got me an iPod

Tom 38
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Hi Obviously!, why you using AC?

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Outlook 2013 spurns your old Word and Excel documents

Tom 38
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Facepalm

Re: Curious...

New shiny! New shiny! Ignore the fact that you can no longer open any archived documents! New shiny! New shiny!

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There’s more to selling email than meets the eye

Tom 38
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Free is still there

MSPs replace internal services with external ones, meaning you no longer need to manage those services, someone else does it for you.

Managing stuff isn't free, so when we moved from Notes to Google Apps, it freed up one Domino developer to do stuff that didn't make him sad all the time, 1 sysadmin whose job was keeping the global databases in sync and making sure the notes-blackberry bridge stayed working suddenly had time to work on some of the infrastructure backlog, and a bunch of rack space suddenly became free.

It's far cheaper to have google supply mail and calendaring tools than it is to do it ourselves.

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Wikipedia doesn't need your money - so why does it keep pestering you?

Tom 38
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Joke

Re: Google

For fucks sake what an idiotic comment. I'm now stuck at work with the irresistible urge to google Heather Brooke :/

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Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: I'm shocked, SHOCKED

As an insider, can you explain why your operating costs are scheduled to triple in 4 years? Seems like you might need less money if you weren't planning to needlessly expand your organization.

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After Sandy Hook, Senator calls for violent video game probe

Tom 38
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Re: Typically American

It's really not simple though is it? There are hundreds of millions of guns and billions of rounds of ammo already in the hands of Americans, you could completely ban the sale of all guns and ammo for a 20 year period without massively affecting gun ownership.

I expect that some assault rifles will get banned for future sale as a result of this, but nothing else.

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ICANN'T believe it's not Apple: Vatican wins domain-handout lottery

Tom 38
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Biggest mistake ever in the history of the internet

I've no problem with IDNs, or TLDs in non roman script, but this is just a daft money grubbing exercise that will confuse and irritate people. www.coke? fuckoff.com.

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Google can't use finger-fumble patent to poke Apple - Trade panel

Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: America's trade commission

Is Illinois no longer in America? Has Canada invaded the Great Lakes and I missed the article?

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Naked Scarlett Johansson pic snatch bloke gets 10 YEARS

Tom 38
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Re: But...

Interesting point ACx, but who the fuck is talking about your mail being opened?

I'm positing "email is secure as a postcard". A postcard does not need to be opened to be viewed. A postcard makes its way through many postal systems. In any of those systems, the operators of the system, could, if they so wanted, view the contents of that postcard. The postcard can then be delivered, and there is no indication that the postcard has or has not been read by anyone else.

You might think that posties would never do that, they have no purpose to look, that it would be a disciplinary action if they did.

Compare this to an email. An email does not need to be marked as "opened" to be read. An email makes its way through many postal systems. In any of those systems, the operators of the system, could, if they so wanted, view the contents of that email. The email can then be delivered, and there is no indication that the email has or has not been read by anyone else.

You might think that SMTP admins would never do that, they have no purpose to look, that it would be a disciplinary action if they did.

You can dislike it, you can down vote me as much as you like, email is demonstrably similar to a postcard in snail mail, whilst people use it as a secure person to person communication tool.

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Tom 38
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Re: But...

You should have a reasonable expectation that a postcard sent through the mail may be read by someone other than you. You should have the same expectation for email - it's as secure as a postcard.

Anything you wouldn't put on a postcard shouldn't be put in an email.

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Dutch operators: Ugh, we really overdid it on the 4G last night...

Tom 38
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Re: People saying prices haven't increased?

If you think prices have increased and you're on an 18 month contract, then you're one of the morons subsidizing me (thx!). I have zero commitment to my phone provider, if they were to raise prices for 3G (they won't) I can just leave for elsewhere.

my £45 contract is now £47.56 a month due to 'inflation'

Play that game then - your £47.56 a month is only worth £45 in 2008.

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Tom 38
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@AC: Which operator do you think will raise their 2G/3G prices to absorb their 4G costs?

Which operators raised their 2G prices at all after spending 6 times as much on the 3G auction as they are anticipated to pay for the 4G auction?

I expect that the monthly cost of my 3G contract will continue to fall, as it has since I first got one in 2008.

I expect that a bunch of twats will pay over and beyond to get 4G now.

I expect that eventually I will get 4G when it is comparable to the cost of 3G and I need a new phone.

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Tom 38
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Re: 3G

£22.4bn not £37bn. In USD it was $35bn.

Licence A: TIW £4.3847bn

Licence B: Vodafone Airtouch £5.964bn

Licence C: BT £4.03bn

Licence D: One2One £4.003bn

Licence E: Orange £4.095bn

The 3G auction in Germany raised £30bn.

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Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: As usual...

Is someone holding your child over a balcony saying "Buy 4G service or the kid gets it"?

If you don't want 4G, don't get it.

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It's official: Mac users are morally superior to Windows users

Tom 38
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Headmaster

zemerick: It's called, maths, it's a new trick people are using. (short answer: browsers can be used on different OS.)

Long answer: Eg, these sets of donations

Chrome - Windows - 10, 10, 10, 10

Chrome - Mac - 50, 50, 50, 50

IE - Windows - 20, 20, 20, 20

Average for Chrome is 30

Average for IE is 20

Average for Windows is 15

The average for windows is therefore less than the average for any one browser. Without looking at the raw data, it would be tricky to say exactly why, but it is probably like my noddy example, IE users give more than the average for windows, !IE users on windows give less than the average for windows, and !IE users on !windows give more than both.

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Iran's Ayatollah Khamenei 'likes' Facebook despite ban

Tom 38
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Re: Assumptions, assumptions...

You might want to look into why the Iranians have the regime that they currently do. They wanted to save themselves from a repressive regime that willingly murdered their own kind, desecrated their religion and acted as a puppet for the west.

Instead they wanted a stable society based upon their Islamic beliefs, completely isolated from western influence. Apart from that choice, they are no more "evil" than any of their near neighbours. There is far more religious freedom in Tehran than in Riyadh for example.

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Football club catches, then punts, Kaspersky name

Tom 38
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Re: The 15- game

I was brought up playing union, but league is definitely faster, more skilful, more physical and demanding. Tackling is better and harder, there is none of the silly playing on the floor that makes union so dull sometimes.

It's a proper tough man's game, if you can play league, you can play union no bother, but only a few union players can play league, it is just too physical and technical.

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Spanish airport cops seize cocaine-packed Bulgarian airbags

Tom 38
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The largest costs in illegal drugs come from three things:

How difficult it is to produce

How far production centres are from the consuming market

How difficult to smuggle the drugs

However, this does not control street price, only the import price. Street price is largely governed by the users - how much they are prepared to pay, and the difference between the street price and the import price is the profit of the dealer supply chain. Being a 'good' dealer is maximising what your clients will pay for the product.

Coca is produced in South America reasonably easily, but requires a lot of processing, is a long way from the target markets and is difficult to smuggle. This makes the import price very high, and the street price.

In order to legalize cocaine, you would first need deals with people to produce 'legal cocaine'. This would be legitimately produced cocaine in Colombia (NB: The US puppetColombian government will not go for this), then legally imported into the UK. The import price of this would be extremely low compared to that of illegal drugs.

The huge difference between the two allows for a lot of taxation. Attempts to undercut the 'legal' price would not work - the legal price could be adjusted lower than it costs to import into the UK, making cocaine import/dealing no longer worth it - unless you cannot get 'legal' cocaine.

You would then have people complaining that legal cocaine is too cheap, and everyone is buying it.

It's a pipe dream. Legal cocaine, I'm not that interested and will never happen, legal pot should happen in the next 15 years. The thing is, all these drugs are easily available to anyone that wants them, they should be regulated for quality and taxed.

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Won't follow Apple Store rules? How 'bout an iTASER TREAT!

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Basic question for Anonymous Puncher.

Punching someone in the face is not necessarily illegal. If you are 'engaging in discourse' with someone, and they use 'fighting words', then it is entirely fine to lay them out. Fighting words are not 'come on then, have a pop', but 'words used specifically to incite hatred from their target'.

In other words, the defence is 'Yes, I punched him, but he forced me to do it by saying XYZ'. Police are expected to not respond violently to fighting words btw.

Similarly, it can be illegal to photograph someone.

So not as clear cut as you put it.

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Tom 38
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Re: grey market/tasers

"Chasing someone" could be lethal to some people, should the police not chase people either?

At some point, the police need to stop thinking about how this will affect the perpetrator, and instead think about how to quickly resolve a situation for the benefit of everyone else.

He clearly felt his options were:

a) Shoot her with a tazer

b) Pepper spray

c) Shoot her

Ideally, he should have called for back up and waited, or been a bit more manly and cuffed a 8 stone woman. Perhaps there was no backup available, perhaps he felt that physically restraining her until backup arrived would be more harmful than the tazer.

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'Metadatagate' fails to bring down Oz pollie

Tom 38
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Tony Abbott and his legal politics

What is it about Tony Abbott and his desire to resort to dubious legal action to get the political result he wants? Before this, he funded legal action against One Nation/Pauline Hanson (aka, 'that daft racist') on electoral fraud grounds, getting them imprisoned before it was all overturned. In that case, he established a secret trust fund and recruited potential litigants, in order to stop a candidate from standing.

It's all so underhand and seamy.

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Punters rate Apple, Samsung more highly than ever

Tom 38
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Re: My favourites

Panasonic (TV's)

Logitech (PC peripherals)

Asus (PC components & Tablets)

Yep, this exactly. Although I was disappointed with my last replacement logitech, which feels like a nasty plasticy piece of shit - the box said it was the successor to the MX 518 :/

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In a mobile data eating contest, Brits would win - Ofcom

Tom 38
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Re: Source?

I pay £15/month for unlimited 3G internet, 6000 minutes, unlimited texts. I use on average between 300MB and 3 GB a month, with a peak usage of 8 GB, mainly subscription music and TV services. Watching TV on my phone for around 6 hours a day - I like to have the cricket on at work - uses about a GB of data.

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Google maps app is BACK on iPhones, fanbois spared death

Tom 38
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Thumb Down

Re: Maps worth more to Google than Apple?

Put up and shut up? No thanks.

Don't use a clubcard, don't tie your Oyster to your identity, pay for things with cash.

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John McAfee on a plane to America

Tom 38
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Re: There's still something missing.

If he's flying American Airlines, then the zombie aspect is covered, they are just fetching him his in flight meal.

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Deputy PM: Rip up Snoop Charter, 'go back to the drawing board'

Tom 38
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Re: @Tom 38 @BenR

No-one is reading what I am posting, clearly.

Well, in that case, and even looking at your latterly posted "Noddy example", how about we let the police go to the courts and ask for permission, based on suspicion and/or evidence, to monitor the communications of these people to see if there is any link between them?

Bomb goes off, we know who set it off, we want to know who they have been communicating with. Lets start that monitoring! Oh wait…

We could even have a special name for it... what might one call an 'order' from the 'court' I wonder...

No shit Sherlock. I fully agree that access to this information should require a court order. However, if you aren't collecting that data, you can't access it.

We currently collect communication logs from phones, store it, and can access it with a court order. We currently don't store communication logs from internet devices, and so can't access it at all. I don't want the police randomly searching my internet history, but if they need to randomly search my internet history, as decided by a judge, then they should be able to.

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Tom 38
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Re: @Tom38

So you feel that it is proportionate to have every website site you've ever visited, including the millions that you've never heard of but your PC has probably wondered off too, recorded in a form which can easily be searched by large numbers of people.(Dazed and Confused)

How would me wanting the police to have that information logically expand into wanting you to have the information?

Logic, it's a priceless tool.

Also:

I agree fully on limiting dissemination of the information, and would limit access to this new information to the same people who can currently peruse phone records. (Tom38)

Reading comprehension, also a priceless tool.

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Tom 38
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Re: @Tom 38 "I recently did jury service..."

There is no published case where having these "new laws" would make a difference to the outcome of the case or the evidence presented.

Do you want to revise that? How precisely do you enumerate the number of cases that could be proven by collecting new evidence, without collecting the evidence. Not many people leave court and then say "Hah! Suckers! If you'd had my IM logs, I'd be doing porridge right now".

Eg, (noddy example) currently if plod think A. Burglar sold a stolen phone to A.Fence - but there is no phone records linking the two - they can't proceed due to lack of evidence. The two communicate frequently on MSN, but there is no evidence of that - there is no way for the police to see that.

With the new system, plod can see that the two talk about this stuff on IM, and could charge them - but without knowing what the data is, how can you possibly say that?

I agree fully on limiting dissemination of the information, and would limit access to this new information to the same people who can currently peruse phone records.

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Tom 38
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@BenR

So what you're saying is that the existing laws enabled the authorities to connect these people to each other and the crime through their communications?

Yes, they could in this case. The point is that in this case, the existence of communication records between the defendants was what caused the conviction. It was dumb luck that the defendants chose to use phones to communicate, if they had chosen email or IMs, there would be no record of the communication, and they would have walked.

In that case, you've just undermined the need for the new law straight away haven't you?

This loophole is what the police and CPS currently have to deal with. The purpose of the new law is to allow police to investigate any communication method - email, IM, phone, VOIP - as they can currently investigate phone communications, and to close this loophole, so no, rather than undermine it, I think I've stated the case quite clearly.

PS: I don't agree with the law in it's current form either, I don't think I made that clear.

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Tom 38
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Because you've not needed it for the last 2000 years and there's no reason to suggest it would have helped in any recent incident, conviction or operation

Steady on there. Until very recently, very few conversations took place on the internet, the intent of this law is to give police the ability to do the same thing they can currently do if the conversation took place by phone.

I recently did jury service, and the key thing that connected (and convicted) the defendants was their copious phone communications and locations as reported by their phones (combined with their insistence that they didn't know each other). It is clear to me that this information is genuinely useful to convict criminals of their acts.

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Earthworm Jim

Tom 38
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Re: An enjoyable game

Witness the player's frustration at Nataliya's tendancy to get shot or walk in front of his gun, whist endlessly chirping "We need to go to the control room!" before she gets stuck walking into a door frame.

I loved that game, but babysitting that daft bint as she continually fails to walk to the computer almost made me break my N64 controller in rage. She'd stand outside the control room, you inside, doors open, all the windows blown off, repeating "We need to get to the control room". NYARRGHH.

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Microsoft notices Xbox gamers actually slack-jawed TV fans, adds 43 new apps

Tom 38
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Re: Holier-than-Thou Non-Believers

I play my games on Steam, costs me £0.00/day. I've tried shopping around, but I can't find it any cheaper.

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Sheryl Sandberg offloads $41.5m in Facebook shares in just 6 weeks

Tom 38
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Sounds bad - what COO sells their own stock, not exactly a vote of confidence, but then you get to the crux of it - she still owns (at current prices) ~$500m worth of shares.

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Apple's iOS 6 maps STILL muddle Mildura

Tom 38
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Re: It shouldn't be too hard

Perhaps they could have referred to some sort of officail Australian reference source?

Did you miss that the location they are reporting for 'Mildura' is the co-ordinates that the State of Victoria supplied as the location of 'Mildura Rural City' - it's literally the central point of a massive area of nothing. IE, this comes from official government sources.

It's a universal truth, data is shit until you've spent too long sanitizing and verifying it.

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Iran draws veil over lolcats, launches local YouTube knock-off

Tom 38
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Mushroom

Re: @AC 07:35 GMT

Suggesting that defense against Israel is a good reason for Iran to have nukes is absolutely absurd.

Israel refuses to admit it even has nukes, and if it did admit it had them, it would not give them up as it sees them as a last defence against Iran. See how that argument works?

Israel has very little motivation - read "none whatsoever" - to out-of-the-blue attack Iran just for the hell of it.

Really? It didn't take much motivation for Israel to out of the blue attack Syria over perceived nuclear ambitions.

PM Netanyahu stated just 3 months ago that he has "red lines" over Iranian nuclear development, at which point risk for Israel is "intolerable". Netanyahu and Barak have been reported by the former heads of Shin Bet and Mossad as having "belligerent" and "messianic" impulses over Iran.

When the the whole football team is threatening constantly to kill the tiny class nerd and he gets a baseball bat, do you advocate that the 300lb lineman get a bat also to 'protect himself' from an unprovoked attack? Seriously?

To clarify, Israel and the US are the tiny class nerd, and Iran is the 300lb lineman? Some mistake surely? Military spending (2009): US: $663bn Saudi Arabia: $33bn Israel: $13bn Iran: 9bn (note some of US military spending is aid to Israel).

do you really subscribe to moral equivalence between Israel, the US, and Iran

Yes, pretty much actually.

I think the State of Israel is the 21st Century's Third Reich. Its degrading treatment of it's citizens, whose only crime is to be Muslim, is shocking. The conditions in Gaza are truly repugnant. The only similar situation to Gaza in the last century was the Warsaw Ghetto. That a people on which so much horror was foisted can so quickly be doing the foisting themselves is an irony of the human condition.

Iran is a rabid theocracy, with very few freedoms for it's people, I wouldn't like to live there.

The US is morally bankrupt. The poor starve whilst the rich live out their gilded lives. I've been all over the world, and I've never seen so many people eating out of bins as I saw in three weeks in Chicago.

Half the nation thinks that paying for healthcare for the less fortunate is somehow "wrong", whilst they spend more on military spending than anyone else in the world, so that they can promote their democracy and value system around the world by projecting military force.

Two of these countries have nukes, and you're a liar if you've never heard the expression "turn Tehran into a parking lot". In the current scenario, at some point - any point - Netanyahu may decide he's had enough, and nuke Tehran. Israel would be condemned, but Iran would not be able to respond back in any meaningful way. With both sides having nukes, that equation changes such that neither side has a reason to use them.

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Tom 38
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Re: @AC 07:35 GMT

This is how Iran sees the west involving itself in this:

US: Here, look Iran, you can't just go enriching uranium.

Iran: What? This is our Uranium, we dug it up here, what do you mean we can't use it?

US: Naah, don't be mental, it's far too dangerous to let your lot have any of it. Here's some the French have made

Iran: French uranium? Why would we buy french uranium, we've got our own! What if we do something you don't like and the French cut us off?

US: Hah! Don't be silly, we'll never hold the supply of fuel over you.

Iran: OK, there's just the small Israel problem.

US: Israel problem?

Iran: Yeah, you gave them a bunch of nukes, and they keep threatening to level Tehran. Not cool bro.

US: Pfft, they'd never do that, trust us.

Iran: So we can build some nukes too? MAD is required for equilibrium.

US: Crikey no, you can't have nukes because you signed the NPT, Israel never signed it, so it's fine for that right wing theocracy to have nukes - what could possibly go wrong?

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Tor node admin raided by cops appeals for help with legal bills

Tom 38
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Re: Reminds me of a few years back..

A subscription warez service? I doubt it. One of the points of warez is that it is software that you are not prepared to pay money for, and so I doubt how successful such an enterprise would be.

Plus, if this was the golden age as you describe it, warez was everywhere - kickme.to/fosi - no-one was paying for it, let alone a subscription.

You sure this guy didn't just have a personal FTP server hooked up to his shiny network connection? 'Back in the day' the number of dodgy FTP sites covertly run by sysadmins on commercial networks was obscene.

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Tom 38
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Re: Blimee...

100 TB is a lot more than your average guy, but it's not that much really. It's also probably not 100TB of actual storage, but 100 TB of storage with no redundancy.

I have a simple setup here with two 16 disk JBOD arrays with SAS expanders plugged into one server. Currently I have 18 disks in there, for a total of 36 TB 'headline' storage, which comes down to about 30 TB of redundant storage. If I filled the remaining bays with 4 TB drives, that would be another 80TB, easily bringing me over 100 TB - although there is no way I'm paying £50+/TB.

The JBOD arrays were second hand, only cost me around £70 each plus postage from the US.

Without going for an external chassis, you can get quite a lot of disks just by cramming them into a decent full tower case. Before I had the JBODs, this is what I had, a tower case filled with 12 disks.

You can easily find motherboards with 7 or 8 onboard SATA ports and multiple PCI-E x8 slots, and you can buy cheap 8 port SATA LSI cards from ebay for around £100, or cheap 2 port cards for around £15.

The worst downsides to doing this is that a case crammed with disks needs proper airflow, or your disks die real quick, and when a disk does die, you have to dig around in a powered off case to find the broken one.

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Stallman: Ubuntu spyware makes it JUST AS BAD as Windows

Tom 38
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Re: Very weird post respones here....

He wrote the original versions of gcc, gdb and gmake, long since replaced (even their replacements have been replaced, eg gcc -> egcs -> gcc 4 are all major rewrites).

He is responsible for emacs, and for that he can never be forgiven.

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Tom 38
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Re: All as bad as each other

If the GPL forbids only one thing, why does it take 5644 words to do it?

If you were going to answer that one, you could also follow up with why the GPL forbids the inclusion of CDDL licensed works, when the CDDL license is so open that it can be included along with BSD licensed works?

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Tom 38
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You can be stauch pro-FOSS, and still disagree with the statement "RMS is right as usual".

In this case, I agree that he is right, but on a lot of things I disagree vehemently with him, particularly over GPL.

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I've got the 'fastest growing THINGY ever', boasts Google+ chief

Tom 38
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Re: Google worries me - About GeoLocation

Please, if GeoIP even gets the right country I'm impressed. Doing Geo IP on my phone will return the same location each time, and never anywhere near where I actually am. Doing it on my home connection shows says that I'm in the Netherlands, and from work it says I'm in Germany.

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