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* Posts by Tom 38

2360 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

Tim Cook: I'm NOT worried about CRAP iPad sales. It's just a 'speedbump'

Tom 38
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I thought the same as you, slightly annoyed new apps won't install, old apps might misbehave, but I did "fork out" for an upgrade; when I changed my phone contract from a iphone subsidy one to a cheapo contract (£42pcm -> £15pcm). Three offered me an ipad air for £30 upfront, £25 pcm, with 15GB/month data contract, so basically what I was paying beforehand.

Perhaps it would be cheaper over the long run to get a wifi ipad air directly from Apple, but that plays down the value of the mobile contract - 4G, GPS, plentiful data, free data roaming..

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Six of the best gaming keyboard and mouse combos

Tom 38
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Re: I call shenanigans

I had a Logitech G7 that lasted me 3 years before the batteries started failing, followed by a G5 that lasted 4 years, but when I came to replace that I found they no longer make an equivalent mouse - they all have ridiculous grips, where is the classic "large logitech" shape of the mx518, G5/7?

Instead I went with the G400, which seems the current closest. It's cheap and nasty and breaks with any moderate amount of abuse. I've been through three of them in a year and a half (two warranty replacements). At least it is cheap, £25 or so.

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Tom 38
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The best gaming keyboard I've ever used

The best gaming keyboard I've ever used is a 1985 IBM model M with a UK key layout. It has indestructible keys that consistently respond to the same amount of pressure, it has no windows key that you can accidentally click.

I'm thinking of giving it this upgrade to make it officially a gaming keyboard...

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Déjà vu: Virgin Media jacks up broadband prices

Tom 38
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Re: I'm not surprised they are increasing their prices

They constantly delivered them to me also, when I lived in places that they did not even serve.

Presumably, they must know what locations they serve, so why they felt the need to send me weekly invitations to sign up for the worst sort of broadband available to me at that location, a poorly managed rebranded WBC from BT Wholesale, I have no idea.

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Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?

Tom 38
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Re: Take a note from the US

Also resulted in the total collapse of the CDC's public network due to a sudden 10,000ish fold increase in incoming web traffic when it went viral, so it's perhaps not the best idea to emulate.

Call me crazy, but shouldn't the public website of a body that prepares for disasters be somewhat capable of sustaining a sudden peak in traffic, such as might occur after a disaster?

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Tom 38
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Haha, amusing yes..

The purpose behind PR like this is to push the story "OMG we are wasting so much money on FOI requests, look at this nonsense we have to put up with", with the aim of limiting or reducing FOI.

What it doesn't show is whether we are getting value for money by allowing requests like this, because it also allows proper investigative journalism - the kind Private Eye does, not the "Fake Sheikh" red top investigative journalism.

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Look, no client! Not quite: the long road to a webbified Vim

Tom 38
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vim doesn't need to be re-written in a different language, it works perfectly as is.

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Tom 38
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Stop

Just because you can code an editor using javascript and run it in your web browser, doesn't mean that you should.

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Heartbleed implicated in US hospital megahack

Tom 38
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Holmes

When were the credentials stolen though?

Did the credentials get taken via Heartbleed before or after the 7th of April, 2014? IE, was this an unfortunate case of being attacked with an unknown vulnerability, or did CHS expose insecure systems after the vulnerability was disclosed?

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AMD slaps 'Radeon' label on Tosh flash: >Beard stroke< Hmm, cunning ...

Tom 38
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Re: OCZ!!!!!!

Their new stuff is very nice - I bought some of their old stuff (Vertex 3 and Vertex 4) when it looked like they were going bust, factory refurbs with a 3 month warranty, scan were practically giving them away. I mainly use them as optional read caches, so it only degrades performance if they die.

Inevitably one bricked, inevitably right after 3 months. By this point Toshiba had bought OCZ, and they replaced it no questions asked with one of their modern Vertex 460, which has worked perfectly ever since.

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Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: No problem at all.

What if neither me nor none of my family own hotels in the US?

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e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

Tom 38
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Re: Erm...

Did you even read what you quoted? Fixing it would cost £97m more than it cost them to settle, ie £327 million. The clue is in the words that say that...

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Something's phishy: More holiday scam spam flung at real hotel customers

Tom 38
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FAIL

Booking.OhHangOnShitThatsAScam not as catchy

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Twitter displays our 'Favorites'. That is, like, PRIVATE, huff naive users

Tom 38
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The companies that are paying for them don't go bust?

Don't worry, marketing is 50% about making up bullshit to sell your sizzle, and 50% measuring the effect of that bullshit so that you can spend at least the same again next year on more bullshit, so ad campaigns are well tracked for value for money.

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Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests

Tom 38
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Re: Not surprising

People are flocking to "containers" as though they are some magical new feature that has only recently become available, but they are no different than BSD jails, Solaris Zones - which themselves are not much more different than a chroot.

With Docker, although you get native performance, you still miss things like memory overcommit and IO management that you get with a VM and so you can get less performance from a single box.

Docker allows you to split up and isolate applications, but if you couldn't run all those applications on a single host without Docker, then you still cannot with Docker. With a VM you have more control over how IO resources are allocated so that all applications can be run with their desired performance profile.

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Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors

Tom 38
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Unhappy

Re: Your dog is more popular than your daughter

I think that depends on families, my mum's passwords are all about the dogs not me.

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XBOX One will learn to play media from USB and DLNA sources

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: So they are

A file format is exactly what mkv is, a container file format to be precise.

Matroska is a generic container for codecs, mkv is a specific Matroska profile that defines a container file format.

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Tim Cook on pale, male Apple: 'As CEO, I'm NOT satisfied'

Tom 38
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Re: Maybe I'm reading that last set of graphs wrong...

It is global gender at Apple. So globally, 70% of people who work for Apple are male. This figure is then classified further, eg in tech positions.

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The internet just BROKE under its own weight – we explain how

Tom 38
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Re: Please refrain from NAT66

The counter is specious - you do not need X because we have provided Y which is ideologically better but requires updating all your hardware and software and relying on a daemon on one box correctly informing everything else it needs to be updated.

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Stephen Hawking biopic: Big on romance, not so much with the science?

Tom 38
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Re: Mr Hawking – Over-rated - Big Bang Mythology

Don't fall for it, don't fall for it, don't fall for it, don't fall for it....

I remember the huge fuss, when some eminent Italian scientists said Einstein was wrong, a few years ago, I instinctively knew they were mistaken, turned out they had got their sums a bit wrong.

You cretin. They 100% did not say that "Einstein was wrong". What they said was "We've done this experiment, it was supposed to show us X, but instead we're noticing that it suggests Y. We've re-checked all our sums and measurements, and we can't figure it out - here is our data".

You've para-phrased that as "cocky scientists are always wrong and I can use my gut to say whether they are full of shit or not". Cretinous cretin.

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Digital dongle transforms European XBOXen into tellies

Tom 38
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I wonder whether Xbox Live subscription will be required to use this.</cynic>

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Clock ticking for Surface 3 as Microsoft preps for globo-launch

Tom 38
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WTF?

Re: I'd love one, but

I disagree 12" is too small for the ultrabook market. My mum bought a 11" (I think) 2-in-1 tablet/laptop

So, not an ultrabook then?

I disagree 12" is too small for the ultrabook market. My mum bought a shiatsu dog recently and I was quite impressed how useful it was. I wouldn't choose to work on it 8 hours a day but that's not really the intention.

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London cops cuff 20-year-old man for unblocking blocked websites

Tom 38
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Re: Don't talk to the police

OTOH:

You do not have to say anything. However, it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence.

Wikipedia says that the "harm" may be thus:

Adverse inferences may be drawn in certain circumstances where before or on being charged, the accused:

fails to mention any fact which he later relies upon and which in the circumstances at the time the accused could reasonably be expected to mention;

fails to give evidence at trial or answer any question;

fails to account on arrest for objects, substances or marks on his person, clothing or footwear, in his possession, or in the place where he is arrested; or

fails to account on arrest for his presence at a place.

Keeping quiet is not always the best policy as they have you coming and going.

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Facebook goes down, people dial 911

Tom 38
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Re: Wait... what?

the police can/should do something about *Facebook*

Oh, I wish they could....

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Sneaker-maker Reebok cooks up performance-enhancing BACON

Tom 38
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Seriously, running is optional - just eat less and move ever so slightly more and the weight falls off.

Running is not a necessary part of losing weight, but once you've lost the weight it is then good for getting fit.

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4K video on terrestrial TV? Not if the WRC shares frequencies to mobiles

Tom 38
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Re: Gigabit fibre optic broadband

I think you have misunderstood what I was saying. For the cost of building a publicly subsidised high speed railway to Birmingham, we could easily pay for running lovely fibre to everyone in the UK. So:

But what about people stuck out in the countryside? Who's going to lay fibre to them?

Us, the taxpayer. We can make the operational costs by charging ISPs to access subscribers.

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Tom 38
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Re: Gigabit fibre optic broadband

As someone who actually has gigabit fibre optic broadband, I 100% agree. Apparently we could all have this for less than building a choochoo to Birmingham...

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British Lords: Euro 'right to be forgotten' ruling 'unreasonable and unworkable'

Tom 38
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Re: I'm shocked

I'm shocked that you think they are doing something right, and not just parroting what their favourite Google lobbyist told them.

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Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5

Tom 38
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Its not just Sonos

They are all at it.

Spotify doesn't work on my original ipad - well, I can install the app, but it stops playing music after about 30 seconds. Every few months they release a newer version of their app, each new version makes it run even slower on my iphone 4.

I don't know what on earth they are doing that makes it think for 1 minute+ before even showing my playlists.

If I click a button, the whole thing whirs to a stop for multi second pauses before doing anything.

The app has a filter function for filtering a playlist, it doesn't do anything on my phone - apparently, it is too difficult to filter a list of 1000 items on such limited hardware.

If I go to search for a song, going to the search page, typing in ten characters or so, pressing search, and then queueing the track takes literally minutes.

I know from using it on super recent hardware that the app works perfectly on them - but this is a fucking music app. My first MP3 player was an Archos (FM Recorder), which had an 11 MHz CPU and miniscule memory, it is shocking that this insanely powerful computer cannot play some bloody tunes and put a picture on the screen without using every last resource on the damn thing.

And for this I pay £120 a year..

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Dusty pre-Facebook, pre-Twitter laws will do for social media crimes

Tom 38
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Re: What, not how

It's good that things like this still do come out of the House of Lords. When it was hereditary and appointed lords sitting (which I do not approve of), the ones that attended did so because they were interested in the topics and did (usually) give short shrift to political crap that comes up from the lower house, because although they were notionally arranged in to parties, they often did not toe the party line.

The new system gives us mainly politicians in the upper house, and mainly appointed Lords (which I definitely do not approve of). Because they are political, they owe their allegiance to the party, and you end up with them rubber stamping things if they think it will make their party more electable.

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Just TWO climate committee MPs contradict IPCC: The two with SCIENCE degrees

Tom 38
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Re: Selectivity

Hypothesis

Test

Conclusions

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Tom 38
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Maths is not science?

Some consider mathematics to be the only pure science.

Some do not (mainly physicists).

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Microsoft bakes a bigger Pi to cook Windows slabs

Tom 38
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The problem is that they are incapable of actually losing the plot - they make so much money from other parts of their business that they can continue to spaff it up the wall on projects that lose money, or at least use it inefficiently.

If I was an MS shareholder, I'd want the company broken up in to smaller chunks, and I'd sell everything that wasn't part of the enterprise cash cow. Bing, Xbox, IE, winphone, surface all are poor performing business, and they are allowed to under-perform because enterprise props everything up.

If Bing is/can be so good, spin it out so that it can grow without constantly propping it up. Time for the kids to move out.

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Verizon to limit unlimited 4G plans

Tom 38
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Telco: Upgrade to 4G, its sooo fast you can watch a gazillion movies at once

Punter: OK, sounds cool

Telco: Stop watching a gazillion movies at once on 4G you utter drain on soceity

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Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source

Tom 38
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Re: CPU

Why assume anything? If they had proved all their hardware was secure, would you have lead with "I assume they've proved their kernel is secure too"?

Even if they haven't, it is one tick box off on the way to proving every component is secure, which is note- and praiseworthy surely?

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Asteroid's DINO KILLING SPREE just bad luck – boffins

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: If only they'd let Jesus into their hearts

JC still existed before he was born though, it's an important aspect of the orthodox trinity.

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Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins

Tom 38
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PAR2 sets for the wire? Cool beans.

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Tom 38
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The litmus test of any video technology is whether pornographers are all over it like a rash (err). They went for HD immediately, they even embraced 3D, but they don't seem too keen on Ultra HD or whatever it is being called.

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Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold

Tom 38
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Re: [no payment was supplied]’

He's in the USA, and so he hasn't "paid for Sherlock". I'm pointing out he can watch them all, for a few cents per episode - and he says that's too much to pay. Do try and keep up.

Well done for ignoring the argument. He may be in the US; I'm not, and me downloading Sherlock to watch is just as criminal as him downloading it - it is an example to demonstrate the idiocy of the law.

If you take away freedoms we've enjoyed because technology has enhanced the utility of those freedoms, don't be surprised when we do not respect those laws.

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Tom 38
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Re: [no payment was supplied]’

Sherlock is a wonderful example to choose. We've all paid for Sherlock. We paid for it to be produced, edited and broadcast. If I had set things up correctly, I could have recorded a pristine broadcast copy on to my hard disk to watch whenever I want.

I can feel fine about that, as I've paid for it. The people producing the content have got from me what they were expecting to get from me.

If I hadn't recorded it, you are saying the only reasonable thing for me to do is to pay Netflix for it. If I get a copy from a friend, or download it from iplayer and keep it for more than 21 days, then I'm now an tragic overcoat wearing freetard who is destroying the fabric of light entertainment?

Now, you can say I don't have a *license* to record and keep this content indefinitely, and you are probably right - I don't really care what the law actually says about this, if you broadcast TV to me, I feel morally permitted to record it to watch whenever I choose, or to acquire a copy through any other means to watch whenever I choose.

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Microsoft: We're making ONE TRUE WINDOWS to rule us all

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: One Windows doesn't work!

Is it because it is grammatically awkward? "One Window", surely.

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Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax

Tom 38
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This is true, if only somewhere in the EU made things.

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Tom 38
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Re: I think...

businesses collect sales tax on anything purchased in your state, or from a business with a location in your state. The percentage varies by state.

Even then... You are compelled to pay that tax at the end of the year, via a box on your state tax forms.

it would be a mistake to think your govt is more adamant about collecting taxes.

On out of state purchases, the consumer is supposed to pay a "use" tax and pay it at the end of the year. Would you think it is accurate to say that 100% of this revenue is reported by each consumer and remitted in full to the IRS each year?

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Tom 38
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Re: I think...

US sales taxes can be avoided or minimized by choosing where you purchase something from though.

I think the interesting point is that we would know precisely how much we were getting ripped off if the grey channel was not considered illegal. As it is, we just have to take whatever price the company sets us, or sets its disties.

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Watching smut at work is bad but emailing it is just fine, says Oz court

Tom 38
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Re: Common sense failure

Why stop there? Don't just fire everyone, also kill them, and burn and salt the bodies..

If you don't like the "work from home" example, say every Friday everyone knocks off 30 minutes early. This goes on for months, everyone takes part, suddenly 4 of them are sacked for skivving off work early.

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Yahoo! Japan! launches! service! for! the! dead!

Tom 38
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Re: Seriously folks

I don't know about ebay, but paypal require the executor to provide proof of death, proof of executorship and identification, at which point they will issue a cheque in the deceased's name to form part of the estate.

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THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy

Tom 38
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Re: Are you implying...

I'm thinking of just saying "fuck it" and upgrading to 10 GigE at home. Pushing data around at gigabit speed when the source and sink will both read/write at least 4 times quicker is tedious.

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Home Office threw £347m in the bin on failed asylum processing IT project

Tom 38
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Re: WTF

It wasn't a paper system, it was replacing an electronic system (which might also have used paper records I suppose, but it was an electronic system at heart).

The problem with government IT is there are hundreds of chiefs to keep changing what the thing is supposed to do.

Finally, something is produced, and it is put in front of the people who are expected to use it, and they find that they cannot use it efficiently because it has been poorly specified and somehow mutated to do something that was never originally in spec, and so they continue to use the old software, at least for some tasks.

This means that you cannot then remove the old software, and so instead of delivering cost savings, the project has delivered extra costs.

It all comes down to poor management and design processes, which still happen a bit in the private sector, but not as much - if you screw up, you probably no longer have a job - so in the private sector we spend a lot of money making sure that our processes are good and deliver continuous improvement.

In the public sector, train-wrecks like this happen constantly, and so it seems it is not such a judgement on someone who led/designed these failed projects, they seem to land another one immediately after presiding over hundreds of millions of pounds in losses.

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Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them

Tom 38
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Flame

"hacking" seems to be in the list of categories that are filtered. What the fuck? How is information about hardware and software considered so harmful that it cannot touch the minds of our precious little children?

Where will the next generation of hackers come from? In 15 years, will we find that 99% of CS graduates only know how to prod .NET or Java?

Filter hardcore porn? Sure. Filter gambling? Sure. Filter drugs? Sure.

Why filter hacking?

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WTF is ... Virtual Customer Premises Equipment?

Tom 38
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FAIL

Re: My data went to 65,536 ports and all I got was this lousy browser

No, he described Web (HTTP) as "the open Internet's interface" - it's right there in the quote you've included.

Seems pretty uncontroversial.

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